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St. Paul daily globe. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1884-1896, February 27, 1884, Image 8

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FINANCIAL
MORNING REPORT.
New York. Feb. 26.—11 a. m.—Stocks
•ctive and higher and advanced 4*14 p#r cent.
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western, Pacific Mail,
Union Pacific and Oregon Transcontinental were
the features.
AFTERNOON REPORT.
Money easy at 14*2 per cent. Prime mer
cantile paper 46J.5 4 per cent. Bar silver,
$1,124. Sterling exchange steady at $4.86
long, $4,894 short.
Governments—Steady.
State Securities—Quiet.
Bonds—Railroad bonds firm.
Stocks—A fraction off after 11. Near midday
there wa<* a recovery, since which the market
has been less active. At the Delaware, Lacka
wanna & Western meeting to-day Sloan was re
elected president and the old board of directors
re-elected excepting A. R. Van Wert and G. R.
Colby, elected new members. E. W. Holbrook
retires. Subscriptions to the $3,000,000 of
Pennsylvania 44 percent, bonds have been
closed, as twice that amount has been sub
scribed. New York Central lent at 1-64, North
ern Pacific preferred flatrgl-04, Philadelphia &
Reading flat*l, Chicago & Northwestern and
Oregon Transcontinental 1, and other stocks flat.
Stocks lower. Central Pacific led the downward
movement, selling off 1% percent, to 60, and
the whole list became weaker in sympathy.
Chicago & Northwestern 119?6, Delaware, Lack
awanna & Western 129&, Pacific Mail 50?i,
Philadelphia & Reading 594, Oregon Improve
ment 42%, Oregon Navigation 92%. The market
closed lower.
Morning Board Quotation*.
GOVERNMENTS.
Threes 101 Fours coupons. ..123 1'
44sdo 114% Pacific 6s of '95..129
STOCKS.
Adams Express.. 129 Mobile & Ohio 9
Allegheny Cent.. 12 Morris* Essex..123%
Alton & T. H.... 44 N., C. & St. L.... 52
do preferred... 94 N.J. Central 884
American 9G4 North'nPacific... 22
B..C.R.&N 75 do preferred... 474
Canada Southern. 554 Northwestern... .120%
Central Pacific... 62 do preferred.. .145 %
Chesapeake* O. 14 N. Y. Central 110%
do lst pref'd... 264 N. Y., C. & St. L. 8%
do 2d pref'd... 16 do preferred... 19%
Chicago & Alt 135 Ohio Central 2 Ji
do preferred. ..145 Ohio & Miss 224
C, B. & Q 126% do preferred... 90
C.,St. L. &N. O.. 84 Ontario* West.. 11
C, 8. * Cleve... 35 Pacific Mail 51%
Cleveland* Col.. 65 Panama 98
Delaware & H...1114 Peoria, D. & E... 144
Del.* Lack 130% Pittsburg 138%
Denver & R. G... 20 Reading 59%
Erie 26% Rock Island 1234
do preferred... 694 St. L. & S. F 19 Ji
Fort Wayne 134 do preferred... 404
Han. & St. Joe... 384 do lst pref'd... 87
do preferreed.. 884 Mil. & St. Paul... 91%
Harlem 193 do preferred.. .117
Houston* Tex.. 40 St. Paul & Man.. 95
Illinois Central...1324 St. Paul & O'ha.. 32
Ind., B & West.. 17 do preferred... 944
Kansas* Texas.. 20% Texas Pacific 21%
Lake Erie* W.. 164 Union Pacific 814
Lake Shore 1034 United States 58
L'ville & Nash... 48% Wab., St. L. & P. 17%
L., N. A. & C 20 do preferred... 28%
M. &. C. lst pfd. 10 Wells & Fargo...Ill
do 2d pref'd... 5 West. Union T... 76%
Memphis & C... 35 Quicksilver 6
Mich. Central 994 do preferred... 24
Minn's* St. L... 17 Pullman Pal. Car. 108^
do preferred... 34 C, St. L. & Pitts. 10
Mo. Pacific 934 do preferred... 28
♦Asked. tBid. JOffered. i;Ex. int. §Ex.
div.
EVENING REPORT.
Money easy at. 14*2 per cent.
Prime mercantile paper 4*54 percent. Ster
ling exchange, bankers' bills steady at $4,804 ;
do. ex. demand, $4,894.
Produce exports for the week, $5,264,000.
Governments—Steady.
Bonds—Railroad bonds firm ; New York, West
Shore & Buffalo fives, however, weaker at 534 ;
Missouri, Kansas & Texas general sixes in good
demand up to 824.
State Securities—Quiet.
Stocks—The stock market opened strong and
higher, yet the result of the day's trading was
an almost general decline. Compared with the
closing prices last evening, twenty-two out of
thirty of the most active stocks were lower,
though only four of them showed declines of
over 1 per cent., viz: Central Pacific 1 4 per
cent., Chicago & Northwestern 1%, Wabash, St.
Louis & Pacific preferred 14 and Chicago, St.
Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha preferred 14. All
other declines were fractional. Only five stocks
were higher than last night and these fractional.
The bears and room traders are responsible for
the decline to-day. Two hundred thousand dol
lars in gold goes out in to-morrow's steamer. An'
application ha9 been made to the Stock Exchange
to have the non-voting certificates of the New
York, Lake Erie & Western declared not good
for delivery, in accordance with an agreement
that the stock should have voting power after the
payment of three consecutive dividends on pre
ferred stock. The Missouri, Kansas & Texas
railroad earned, in 1883, over all expenses,
§448,125.
The transactions aggregated 315,000 shares:
Central Pacific 18,000; Delaware, Lackawanna &
Western 09,000; New York, Lake Erie & West
ern 6,000: Lake Shore 9,000; Chicago & North
western 13,000; Pacific Mail 26,000; Philadelphia
& Reading 45,000: Chicago, Milwaukee & St.
Paul 41,000; Texas Pacific 6,000; Union Pacific
29,000; Northern Pacific 5,000; Oregon Trans
continental 18,000.
MINING STOCKS.
The mining market was dull and steady. In
the afternoon the market was dull and Sonora
Consolidated weak at 06. Decatur sold at 02,
Harlem 07, Climax 05, Bonanza King 1,000, La-
Crosse 11 and Father De Smet 275.
BOSTON RAILROAD AND MINING.
Old Colony 138 Boj.,H*E. 7s
Allouez Mine Co. 1 o.o44s Ill
Calumet* H 2394 K.C.St.J.*C.B.7's
Catalpa 30 N. Y. & N. E. 7's.100
Copper Falls Atch.& Top. R.R. 1787s
Franklin 114 Bost.* Albany..178%
Pewabic 14 Bost. & Maine... 161
Quincy 44 C, B. & Q 124 Ji
Ridge 30 Cin., S. & Cleve.. 13
Wis. Central Eastern R. R
Osceola 16 Flint & P. M 274
Huron 14 do preferred. ..101
Water Power 24 L. R. & Ft. S 174
Boston Land 04 N. Y. & N. E 13%
Atch.*Top.lst7sl22
do land grant 7s 117
SAN FRANCISCO MINING.
Alta 1624 Grand Prize 15
Belcher 100 Hale* Norcross.250
Belle Isle 40 Martin White.... 73
Best & Belcher. .275 Mexican * 250
Bodie Consol....925 Mount Diablo 250-
California 25 Navajo 225
(hollar 250 Ophir 1624
Consol. Cala 45 Potosi 125
Consolidated Va.. 30 Savage 85
Crown Point 125 Sierr^ Nevada... .3624
Day 2374 Union Consol... .3124
Eureka Con 375 Utah 200
Gould* Curry... 1874 Yellow Jacket...2624
Afternoon Board Quotations.
Stocks and bonds closed at the following
prices bid:
GOVERNMENTS.
Three per cents.. 101 Fours coupons... 123 7s
44s coupons 114% Pacific 6s of '95. .129
STATE BONDS.
La. consols 774 Tenn. 6s, new.... 39
Missouri 6s 105 Virginia 6s 40
St. Joe 110 Consols'? 40
Tenn. 69, old.... 39% Deferred 74
RAILROAD BONDS.
C. P. Bonds, lst.112% U. p. land grant. .1104
Erie seconds 94 Sinking fund 119
Lehigh & WJ 107% Tex. P. grant B.. 494
St. P.* S. Cist.118 do Rio G. div.. 724
U. P. Bonds, lst. 115
STOCKS.
Adams Express.. 129 Mobile & Ohio... 94
Allegheny Cent.. 12 Morris* Essex*.1234
Alton & T. H.... 474 N., C. & St. L.... 50
do preferred... 95 N.J. Central 884
American 96 Norfolk* W.pf. 40
B., C. R. & N 75 Northern Pacific. 21%
Canadian Pacific. 55 do preferred... 46%
Canada South'n.. 544 Northwestern 1197 8
Central Pacific... 60% do preferred... 145
Chesapeake* O. 14 N. Y. Central H64
do lst pref'd... 25 Ohio Central 2%
do 2d pref'd... 15% Ohio* Miss 23
Chicago* Alt...134 do preferred... 90
do preferred... 145 Ontario & West.. 10%
C, B. & Q 1244 Oregon Nav 92
C.,St. L. & N. O. 844 Oregon Trans 204
C, St. L.& Pitts.. 10 Oregon Imp 43
do preferred... 30 Pacific Mail 50%
C., S. & Cleve 35 Panama 98
Cleveland & Col.. 64 Peoria, D. & E... 14
Delaware&H 110% Pittsburg 138%
Del.* Lack 129% Pullman Pal. Car. 108
Denver & R. G... 19% Reading 59%
Erie 26% Rock Island 122
do preferred... 694 St. L. & S. F 20
East T., V. & G.. 74 do preferred... 42
do preferred... 124 do lst pref'd... 87
Fort Wayne 134 Mil. & St. Paul... 914
Han. &St. Joe... 384 do preferred... 1104
do preferred... 884 St. Paul* Man... 944
Harlem 193 St. Paul & Om'a.. 31
Houston* Tex.. 40 do preferred... 98
Illinois Central...1314 Texas Pacific 21%
Ind., B.& West.. 17 Union Pacific 80%
Kansas & Texas.. 214 United States 58
Lake Erie* W.. 16 W.,St. L. & P.... 164
Lake Shore 102% do preferred... 27%
Louisville AN... 47% Wells & Fargo. ..110
L., N. A. & C... 25 Western U. T 70%
li. & G. let pfd.. 10 Homestake 84
do 2d pref'd... 5 Iron Silver 185
Memphis & C... 34 Ontario* 284
Mich. Central 924 Quicksilver 6
Minn's & St. L... 104 do preferred... 26
do preferred... 334 South. Pacific
Missouri Pacific. 924 Sutro 16
*Aeked No sales. -"-Offered. 1 Ex. mat.
coup. $Ex. div. \ Ex. int.
COMMERCIAL.
St. Paul, February 27. —The past week has
not been favorable for mercantile activity or the
expansion of trade. Two things have conspired
to spoil what otherwise would have been a good
week's business—the weather and cthe holiday.
The birthday of the "father of the couutry," 1
coming on Friday, and Saturday, an off day, fol
lowed with Sunday upon its heels left but four
business days, and these were days
of wind and snow and storm, block
ing railroads and making travel difficult
and even dangerous. On the St. Peter &
Winona road a train has not run for a week and
reports from the northwest say that business is
almost lifeless, fanners and others not being
able to get to market, and yet notwithstanding
these facts the week has not been by any means
a dull one to the leading wholesale houses.
Grocery house? report a good week's trade with
orders somewhat delayed; dry goods jobbers
say that business has been better than the cor
responding week of last year; hardware men
state an improvement on the former week, the
road sending in better orders for shelf goods, and
judging from the cars of merchandise shipped
out from St. Paul it would appear that the four
days have been better than the six of the former
week, there having been shipped 89 cars more
goods the week ending yesterday the
figures being for week ending Feb. 26, 442 car s
against 353 for the week ending Feb. 19. The
receipts of merchandise were ninety-seven cars
less, being 408 against 505 for the previous week.
The total number of cars, including produce, ma
chinery, live stock, etc., was also less, being
1.371 against 1,542. The falling off of receipts
js owing to the fact that eastern purchaser of
dry goods for spring trade were
mostly shipped the previous week.
It should be borne in mind that these figures, af
ter all, are only relative owing to the fact stated
in these columns before that cars shipped into
and from the transfer are not included, and many
of our largest houses ship to their correspond
ents from there. By the term merchandise as
here used, is not meant agricultural implements,
oils, lumber, produce, dressed meats, machinery,
pig-iron,but manufactured fabrics,groceries,drugs
and domestic goods. In reference to pig iron
there has been an unusually large amount ship
ped in during the past week, in all some thirty
one cars.
Groceries are quiet and generally firm and
steady, sugar being the only staple which has
declined and that but a shade. Teas are firm and
higher and raw coffees steady. The hardware
business during the week has been as one mer
chant expressed it "statu quo,"' the stormy
weather checking trade considerably and yet there
was a perceptible improvement on the former
week. The same authority said: There has been
no change in screws and they continue to be
quoted 80 per cent off price lists—not much left
for the manufacturers who are still butting
against each other. Nails are scarce and higher,
owing to the appalling and fearful water scourge
which has flooded the mills of Pittsburg, the
qnly nails produced at the present time being
made in south Illinois. Although a little ini
proved the hardware trade is not where the
houses engaged want it. Manufactured iron and
steel, which was picking up, have had a complete
set back by the weather. Iron, which has for
some time been weak and fluctuating, is gaining
in strength and a better tone is perceptable. A
striking and powerful argument in favor of free
trad»ls supplied by the present position of Bes -
semer steel rails, which are manufactured
in this country. When the home
manufacture was "protected" by a high duty
Bessemer rails were held by American manufac
turers at $90 and $100 per ton, and they declared
they could not.be produced for less, but as soon
as the duty was taken off the home manufac
turer produced the article at $35 per ton and
thrived on the profit, and to-day the rail can be
produced of as good quality and at a less* price
than in England, and shipments are
made to that country. The boot and shoe trade
has been quiet, the weather having been very
unfavorable for a large business in spring goods.
Leather also is very quiet, with prices steady and
unchanged. Drugs have not been so active as
hitherto reported. Country houses report busi
ness as very dull. There are no changes In quo
tations, but prices are firm and-steady.
The lumber trade has been looking up a little
during the past week but the south western trade
is still locked out from this market. A good
time is coming, however, for the railroad magnates
have come to their senses and have agreed to
place St. Paul and Minneapolis on an equal foot
ing with Chicago, the new arrangement to come
into effect on 10th proximo. In the new tariff
Eau Claire will be charged
5c additional. Meanwhile Chicago is
making hay while the sun shines by exerting
every effort to ship its goods to Missouri points
while it has the advantage in freight. Large
dealers here are receiving such enquiries as
promise large business in the near future. The
number of cars reported shipped from
this point was eighty-three. A great improve
ment is looked for when the Missouri field is
opened up for this market.
The dry goods houses report business variously
from good to steady and fair, but there is no
doubt that the weather and the Tiational holiday
have worked against a very busy week. In going
the rounds of the larger dry goods jobbing houses
the immense piles of domestics, cotton prints,
velveteens and velvets were noticed, but a heavy
stock of comparatively new material was special
ly conspicuous. It was, formerly the custom and
is still to a certain extent to line
the bodice of dresses with a kind of
twilled Silecia called corset jean, but this is be
coming rapidly superseded by a new twilled
fabric very finely woven combining great strength
with the requisite elasticity to accommodate the
movements of a supple and lithe form. This
fabric is made in an endless variety of shades—
some fifty-two of the most brilliant and exquisite
tints, scarlets, pinks, yellows, primroses, grays,
etc., etc, the dyeing being the finest
we ever remember seeing in cotton goods.
This fabric under the brands of "Crescent,"
"Rsyal"' and "Merveilleux" twills is sold at 104
@18c, and its fine, glossy surface makes it equal
ly good for tailors as dressmakers. The mater
ial is double corded and double rove in warp and
weft, giving it unusual strength. Collections are
reported variously as fair and ipdifferent, but a
large dry goods house states that Its collections
for the past month exceeded its sales by $100,
000. The following tables of quotable prices
have been carefully corrected up to date:
ST. PAUL WHOLESALE MARKETS.
Dry Goods.
HBAVT BBOWH SHEETINGS.
Hyde Park AAA 84 Badger State LL.... 5%
" XXX Btd 7% Greylock LL 5%
" XX 74 Lawrence LL 5%
Illinois A 6
IndlanHead 7% Agawam F 5%
Wachusetts 74 Cheesecloth [email protected]
Washington 7 Centennial 6
Indian A 7 Indian H 7%
IndianD 7
bhibting stripes.
Dexter A 114 American 94
" B U Eagle 9
Amoskeag 104 Moravian. 18
PBINTS.
American.. 6 Pacific 6
Allen's 54 Manchester. 6
" shirting 44 Bristol 6
Oocheco 6 Robes 64
Gloucester 64 Spraguepink 64
Simpson's ..6 'r fancy 6
Hamilton 6 Oriental 6
Merrimack D 6 Freeman 5
Harmony 5 Lodi 6
Chester 5 Ballon solid 64
Ballou black 54 Simpson's, black 6
Gloucester, mourning 54
cHKvorrs.
East Lake 15 Grown, 8
Angora 11 Bates'Plaids 94
Black Diamond 10 Castlebar WIncy 124
Winneconnet 94 Amoskeag 10
Machester A plaid...10
Edenbury 104
cambric.
Washington,flat fold. 5 King Phillip rolleds. 6
Glove flnishd " . 6 Lonsdale " . 6
- GINGHAMS*.
Renfrew 9 Lancaster 8
White 9 " dressstyles.. 9
Plunkett 8 Bates 74 j
Randolph 7 Amoskeg 9
Glasgow 8 Atlantic DD 104 '
COTTONS bleached.
4-4 N.Y. Mills 104 Naumkeag 84 !
Wamsuttas 104 Androscoggin 84
4-4 Mt. Clair A 8 4-4 Hill S. 1 8ft :
4-4 " X 8 7-8 " 8
10-4 Fruit of Loom.. 9 4-4 Blackstone 7 % i
4-4 Lonsdale 8% 4-4 Dexter AAA 74
Lonsdale Cambric...114 4-4 Gladiator 84
4-4 United States.... 8 3-4 Centennial 6
4-4 Bismarck A 84 S-4Holmesville 6
Fairmonnt 6 Caster 6
Ballou <% Rockport 44 !
Amoskeag 94
APRON CHECKS.
Jas Long, No. 50 14 Farmers', Miners... 14 I
Otis 10
TICKING.
83-in. Shrewsbury... Otter Creek D. W... 15
" fancy 16 6-in. Otter Creek....14
82-ln. Conestoga 15 " XXX 14
32-ln. York 14 Otter Creek XX 13 •
81-in. " XX 124 OordisNo.l 154
29-in. "X 10 " No.2 144
THE ST. PAUL DAILY GLOBE. "WEDNESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 27, 1884."
Amoskeag ACA 134 " No. 3. 134
44 A 12 " No.4. 12
44 B 11 *» No. 5 10
■ 0 10 ■ No. 6 9
" D 9 " No. 7 8
BATTING.
King ....14 Rock Island 12
Badger ....124 Di». P. SOtw 10
Standard 9
(Above war, full wgt.)
FINE "8BOWH BHIBITNIM.
PepperlllB 6% 36-ii*. Connestoga.... 74
" 0 6 3G-in Terrace City R. 7
" N 64 Echo Late 74
4-in Hyde Park F... 8 Dwight, Z ..7
GRAIN BAGS.
Chatham 23 American A 19
Lowed 22 Lewiston So
StarkA 224
DENIMS.
Amoskeag 1*4 81. Lawrence AA....15
Columbian XXX.... 15 * CC 13
CordisD* T 15 Uncaaville 13
Otis AXA 13 Montrell 104
OtisBB 12 Pacific »J4
Warren AXA 13 Oakland A 104
BB 12 '" 184
Old York Eagle 15 St. Lawrence BA... .14
BBOWH DUOX.
Boston X 10 Terrace 9 oz 18
14 XX 104 " AA ia4
Plymouth 7 oz 11 " A 124
Boots and Shoes.
Jg en's Cus. Fr. e* < b. boots, per case......f52 CO
Men's Cus. ifrench calf D. S. opera boots
per caee 68 00
Men's Cus. veal calf D. S. boots, per case.... 45 00
Men's Cus. veai calf D. S. boots, per case... 42 00
Men's Cu*. veal calf split back D. S 40 00
Men's Cus. Fr. grain. IS in. D. S 34 0!)
Men'* Cus. grain Cavalry D. 8. boots 48 00
Men's Cus. grain D. S. plow boots 23 00
Men's Cus. Fr. t-rfiin. 1 buckle, per pair 1 80
Men's Cus Fr. Gnsselt plow, per pair 1 40
Women's Cus. calf split back D. S. pol 1 75
Misses Cue. calf split back D. S. pol 1 35
Cnildren's Cus. calf split back D. S. poi 1 00
Rubber boots and shoes 25 per cent, from price
list.
Leather etc.
Buffalo siau sole ex. beat 82ffi S3
Buffalo slan sole be6t [email protected] 31
Buffalo Spanish sole 56 @30
Best oak sole 38 @-iu
French calf, 24 to 30 Ibe 1 20®1 90
French calf, 30 to 36 lbs 1 20gl 75
French kip. fiOtolOOlbs [email protected] 20
Hemlock calf 1 OOjgl 15
Hemlock kip veal 752J 95
Hemlock upper, per foot [email protected] 25
Hemlook collar, per foot [email protected] 19
Hemlock Harness 30ec 33
Oak harness [email protected] 38
Roans, or doz 8 [email protected]*2 00
P'nks, p«r doz 19 [email protected] 00
Oru-rs. Paints. Oil*. &c.
AcidAeetlo 10 Gum Opium.. 4 IS
Acid Cit *. 65 Gum Shellac.. 82
Acid Sulph 5 Hemp Seed... 6
AcidTart 48 IodideP 140
Alcohol Ipecac,powder 110
iAlum... 4 Jalap,powd'ed 35
> Aloes, Cap 20 Licorice ext'ct 88
Am. Aqua 8 Morphine^oz 8 10
Am. Carb 20 Nit Silver.... 8*2
Ammatto 85 Oil Aiiae 2 00
Am.Isinglass..l 25alt>0 OU Cedar 40
Balsam Cop.... 55 OL O*oves 120
Balsam Tola... 65 Oil Lemon.... 2 00
Barks, Peru red 40 Oil Origanum.. 40
" yellow 25 Oil Olive, pure 1 50
Bay Rum%» gal 2 60g325 Oil Pep.... 3 [email protected] 25
Bi Carb Soda.. [email protected] 8 Oil Sassfrass.. 70
Borax 134 Potash, Chi... 20
Brimstone roll. 4 Prus. Potash.. 28
Calomel, Am... 70 Quicksilver... 46
Calomel, Eng... 1 10 Quinine 1 45
Cayenne, pure.. 25 Red Precipitate 82
Oamunor "5 Rhub'b.root..V-«??l OR
r-nrdamoo* Mai 2 35 •'o-*wd'*3t..,«t8100
(Jaetre ji 1 4J oagotsan.fc*2> 8
Chloroform.... 100 Sal Soda 4
Cochineal 40 Sal Nitre.pure 9
Cream Tartar.. 25 Seeds, Canary 6
" pure.... 40 " flax,gr'd 4
Emery 10 Senna 30
Epsom Salts.... 4 Sulphur 6
Ex. Logwood... 12 Sugar Lead... 18
Gum Arabic... 60 8p. turpentine 45
" sorts 30 Spirits Nitre.. 40
" powdered.. 45 Vitrol, Blue... 10
OILS, 40.
Linseed, raw 66 Whale, extra [email protected]
" boiled 69 Whale, No. 1 [email protected]£
Bleached sperm.... 1 50 0arbon.inspc'[email protected]>-, 4
Lard oil.ex 80®82 Gasoline, 85 deg 23
" No. 1.... [email protected] Benzine, 74 deg 15
Benzine, 62 deg 13
winnow GLASS.
8x10 first quality..8 00 10x16. first quality.. 8 00
9x12 first quality ..8 00 10x18, first quality.. 8 60
9x16 first quality..8 00 12x14, first quality.. 8 60
10x12 first quality..8 00 12x16, first quality.. 8 50
10x14 first quality.. 8 00 12x18, flr»t quality.. 8 50
60 per cent discount.
WHITE LEAD.
Strictly pure N. B. 4 0.
Iotsof600pounds6 25 " " tin* 6 75
Strictly pure, less
quantity 6 40
Hardware.
Angers—Best 0. S. cut, less dia. per cent.. 10
Jennings 60
Auger bits—Best 0. S. cut, less dis. per cent 60
Butts —Wrought narrow, discount 60
Wrought loose pin, discount *. 60
Cast acorn, discount 60
Chisels—Socket framing, discount 60
Sockets firmer, discount 60
Drawing knives—Best C. S., discount 40
Files—Nicholson, discount 10
Hinges, Strap and T, discount [email protected]
Wrenches, Coe's genuine, discount 60
Coe's imitation, discount 00
Axes—Hunt's I 8 00
Peerless 8 00
Peerless double bit 16 50
Mattocks, long cutter 9 50
Chains—Cable, 5-16 inch, lb 7 00
Cable, 4 Inch & 2> 6 50
Trace, long, W pair 40
Trace, short, $ pair.... 20
Well, « pair 05
Coffee mills, Wilson's, dozen .' 8 00
Wood back, No. 2 4 50
No. 301 8 60
Hammers—Maydole's No. 14, adz eye 6 60
Russell's 4 00
Handles No. 2 1 50
No. 1 2 00
Shaved, extra 2 65
Hatchets—Shingling No. 2 %f dozen 6 00
Shingling No J, ~$ dozen 6 00
Claw, 50c % dozen adAance 6 40
Stove Polish—Dixon's V grosa 6
Scoops—Steel. No. 4
" No.5 9 60
" N0.6 990
Scoops, Iron,No. 4, 7 80
" 6 8 10
« 6 840
Screws, patent gimlet point, dis., per cent..a 70(510
Carriage bolts, dis. pel -tent, new list 60gl0
Locks and knobs, new list..- 60
Nails, 10to68 2 85
Casing nails, above common 75
Finishing nails, above common 1 25
Clinch nails, above common 1 75
Tin plates, 10x14, lc 7 00
Pig tin, per lb 25
Sheet iron, common No. 27, per lb 3 80
Juniata, 2c advance
Charcoal, 14c advance
Wood's planished iron No. A 104
44 " No. B 94
Less than bundle, lc advance
Copper bottoms 24
Copper planished 88
Tinned copper, per lb 28
Sheet zinc, perm 7
Finished Iron and Steel
Common iron % 24
Horseshoe iron 84
Swedish iron 7
Best tool steel 16
Ca6t plow steel 7
German plow steel 6
Spring steel 7
Machinery steel 7
Groceries an Grocers' Sundries
Foreign Dried Fruit. Fish.
Layer raisins, new2 15 Geo's cod c'd 54
London layers, nw 2 75 Boneless rolls 64
Loose muscatels..2 25 " strips, XX... 7
Valencias, new.... 73* " " 51b box 9
Sultana 134 ' Calif'asalmon, 4 b9 75
Seedless, mats nw.6 75 Family mackerel..7 50
Prunes.Turkishnw 64 No. 2 " 8 i&
Currants, new 64 No. 1 bay " 9 75
Citron 19 No. 1 shore " 10 75
Domestic Dried Fruits, Extra mess,4 bbl 12 60
N.Y.sl'ddv'd ap's 84 No. 1 trout, 4" 4 75
N. Y. qt's dr'd ap's 7^ No.l white fish,4 b6 75
Michqrs " " .. 74 Herring, bbls 7 75
Ohio qrs " " .. 74 " 4 bbl 4 37
Ind'aqrs " " .. " 4 bbl 2 30
Alden dr'd ap's bbl 124 " kits 80
Alden " u bx 134 » Holland....l 20
Halfpeaches 7 mess 63
Mixed peacl#s... 65£ dried^box 36
Peeled peeches... 164
California peaches .... Coffee.
California plums.. 184 Fancy Rio 17
Pitted cherries 20 Prime 164
Raspberries , 32 Roasting [email protected]
Blackberries....... 12 Mocha 30
Fair 144
Canned Goods. Java [email protected]
Dozen
lb stand peaches2 25 Syrup.
3 lb 2da " 1 75 Common molasses 23
2 lb stand " 176 N. O. do, fair 50
21b2ds " 140 N. O. do, choice.. 70
61bpie " 2 25 Syrup, fair 33
3 1bpie " 126 Syrup, sugar 40
Gallon apples,E?le3 26 Syrup, choice 60
3 lb tomatoes 1 124 3c additional in4 bbls.
2 lb tomatoes 75 6c additional in [email protected] gal
2 ibe'e oysters sn'dl 85 kegs.
1 lb " " 1 10 Cordage
1 lb " slack 90 Sisal—
21b " - 160 [email protected] 94
1 lb salmon 1 50 12 thread or % inch 10
21b " 2 50 [email protected] 11
241b " 3 00 . Manilla—
21blobsters 2 80 [email protected] 164
lib ' 180 12threador^ inch
1 lb little neckclaml 26 [email protected] or 4 inch.... 174
2 lb " " 2 00 Lath yarn, tarred. 17
2 lb chicken 2 75 Bed cords— U
21btnrkey 2 90 Jute 1 20
Eagle milk..: ....2 00 2threadSisal 160
i Anglo Swiss milk..1 50 6 thread Sisal 2 00
Half sardines $»can 21 6 thread Manilla.. 3 25
Quarters " 13 Cotton 176
j 2 lb raspberries.. .1 60 Sugars.
2 1b blackberries.. 1 10 A coffee, standard. 7%
2lb red cherries.. 1 45 Bdo 74
21b white " ..3 25 ExtraO 74
21bquinces 165 YellowO 65£
i 2 1b eggplums....l 75 Granulated 84
: 2 lb greengages.. 1 75 Powdered SJi
21b pears 175 Crushed 8's
1 2 lb pineapples, Ba- Cut loaf 87$
bama bragd—2 75 Soap, &c.
1 2 lb string beans.. 1 00 Minnesota Soap Co- -
2 lb lima f .. 95 White Lily «4
! 2 lb common neas. 75 Rose Queen 64
I 21bmarrowfat" 130 Imperial.,... 64
2 1asmall "150 Minnesota 64
j 21bdamsons 150 Star..
21bBUccotash 165 German
2 lb Tarmouthcornl 35 Blue 6J£
Marshall corn 1 35 Moin'g glory. 120b. 8
Cali. fruit Lusk...3 00 Outcast, e, doz.. 55
Boston bak'dbeansl 80 Cocanut oil, 24 dzl. 90
2 lb jellies 2 10 Star Candles,f 1 104
llbdo 150 Tallow candles.. 5i£
Tumbler jellies... 95 Kirk's Imp savon 6
4 gal apple butt. .3 60 " Blue India. 10
4 gal peach do...6 00 " WbiteRussian S%
4 gal plum do....6 00 " Satinet
*£ gal quince do.. .6 60 Sundries.
4 gai pear do 5 50 Nutmegs. 75
4 gal mince MtU 60 Cassia M 11
21bcornbeef 3 00 Clove* 30
41b do 4 90 Allspice M 9
3 lb tig's feet....3 60 Pepper m 17
Sago 6
Nuts. Pounds. Tapioca C
8. 8. Almonds 9i) T'g Am'i cheese..
Filberts 14 Full crm cheeee... 144
Brazfls 14 Skim Cheese 12
Walnuts 13 Maccaroni 10
Peanuts 13 Vermicelli 10
Pecans 13 OatmealNorthStarQ 50
Med. H. P. beans..3 So
Pickles. Navy beans 3 06
Medium, bbls 6 50 Hominy ,4 69
" 4 bbls...8 50 Hops
Small, bbls 7 Ou Gun caatile soap 10 40
do 4 bbls 4 00 Wooden war e.
Gherkins, bbls... 14 50 3 hoop polls 1 50
Mixed English... 12 00 3 hoop palls 1 67
Keg4,5 gal small.3 25 Paper palls 8 75
Pints, in glass 150 No. 1 tubs 8 25
Quarts " 3 40 No. 3 tubs 7 25
4 gal, " 8 80 No. Stubs 6 25
Gallon " 5 00 No.lchurns 9 75
Cat=up, pints 1 00 No. 3 churns 8 75
" quarts 160 No. 3 churns 7 76
Starch—Kingford's. No. 4 churns s 00
Silver Gloss, 1 lb.. 84 Wilson singlew'sh'l 76
" " asat'd 9 Wilson doub wash'2 75
"crates 61b bx 9 Star single wash'dl 75
Corn, 1 lb paper .. 84 Peerless, 4 lbs,wash' 275
Pearl 6 Protector singlewd3 76
Among the Commission Men.
There has been nothing exciting or of any great
interest in connection with the grain market at
this point during the past week. The outside
markets have not materially affected values here
which have remained steady at about [email protected] for
No. 1 regular, and 83(g87c for No. 2 regular,
which includes well Digh all that is received.
There were 100 cars received, making some 47,
000 bushels, against 79 cars for the previous
week. The delivery by wagon has been larger
during the week than at any previous
week, farmers coming in from wide and
distant points—even from the extreme of Goodhue
county. The reason is that sleighing has been
good, and having nothing to do for their teams,
they have thought by getting 10c per bushel bet
ter price it would pay them to haul it to St. Paul
rather than the elevator, and at the same time
see the mc-tropolis.*Yne average quantity of wheat
delivered at the mills here by wagon has been
over 1,800 bushels per day. There are at the
present time some 1,800,000 bushels of wheat in
the elevators here. The receipts of corn have
been less the past week than the former week,
being only 6 cars against 10 as reported last
week. There seems no improvement in the new
corn shipped here: it is all more or less damp
and showing indications of being housed before
it was fully ripe. Prices have varied according
to quality and condition. Old corn has
been qnoted at [email protected], but the quotation has
been nominal, for little or none has been offered.
Oats have been steady and firm and rather scarce,
the total receipts by rail being but nine cars:
road deliveries have gone direct to consumers.
Barley is quiet but firm; stocks are ample but
receipts are light: the only trade has been for
local use, and the receipts have gone direct to
tha maltster.
There has been a slight improvement in flour,
but only slight, the shipments amounting to 27
cars, against 19 of the previous week. Buck
wheat is very slow and almost without move
ment, and prices are low. There has been a
little improvement in hay, the demand being a
little quicker and the receipts
higher. 17 cars is the total of
receipts here. Shippers are holding their hay
and only sell "to arrive." This has worked so
well that wild hay now sells at $7.00, when the
previous week it was difficult to get even $6.00.
In again reverting to wheat which
has been in the great markets of
this country fluctuating and changing as rapidly
as a barometer in squally and thundry weather it
might be mentioned for what it is worth, that
wheat in England Is selling for 36s, lid. per
quarter or $1.02 perbushel, being 4s. lOd. per quar
ter or 14c per bushel less thanit was selling for the
same time last year. Add to this the fact that
stocks in England are larger and the prospects
are thns far good for a large crop next season.
The provision market has been slightly more ac
tive during the week, with a better prevailing
tone. Butter has had a brisker movement in the
finer grades, and good fresh country roll
has been in demand as well as creameries.
Shipping stock has also been sought after at 7(3
8c, but mediums" are wholly neglected and will
remain on hand till they become mere grease.
These low grade butters are bought up it is
thought by butterine makers, who also pnrchase
to a small extent creamery and sfteet eall for
what purpose can easily be inferred. The butter
question is one that nearly touches
the interest of the farmer, and is destined to be
of as great importance as wheat raising, hence
the necessity of care and skill in the dairy,which
pays a hundred fold for the trouble taken. As
showing the importance of the dairy and Its In
creasing value, we publish the following table
from the annual report of the secretary of the
Elgin board of trade:
Comparative table of transactions for the past
three years, showing the growth of business on
the Elgin board:
* Pounds Pounds Total
Cheese. Butter. Value.
1881 11,327,525 3,808,029 $2,219,600 04
1882 10,960,207 5,650,915 2,752,231 56
1883 13,174,092 7,274,071 3,282,527 19
Beans are a little stiffer, owing to the fact that
stocks have considerably diminished; there is,
however, no great demand. The demand for
cheese is increasing, as stocks are decreasing.
Dealers laid in large stocks in the fall, but these
are greatly reduced and prices have in
consequence advanced a shade. In the early
part of the week eggs declined rapidly on ac
count of the liberal receipts, but the cold and
stormy weather has greatly checked the supply
and prices are a little firmer. No advance how
ever, can be expected so far along toward spring.
Dressed meats have been scarce from the
country and the abattoirs have had all they could
do to fill orders. Prices have accordingly ad
vanced 4c, and the market has an upward ten
dency. In connection with the snbject of dressed
meats, we clip the following from the Daily
Drovers'" Journal, prefacing the extract with
the assertion that the western meats spoken
of are not shipped from this point but from Kan
sas City probably arid other southwestern points.
The dressed meats here and those shipped from
here are in the primest condition.
"Western-dressed refrigerator beef is under a
cloud just at present. The sickening display of
the hooks in Washington market for a number of
days past and the more serious complaints of
consumers who have been made wretched by the
eating of it, have turned the hands of shop
butchers and the stomachs of consumers against
it. Even the selling owners of the beef, al
though heavy losers by its depreciated value,
and by the seizure and confiscation of a large
amount by the Sanitary Inspector yesterday,
join in the almost universal cry of "No more of
it for New York !"
Poultry has been very scarce and is daily grow
ing more so. The receipts have not been suffi
cient to fill orders and prices have been corres
pondingly high. There have been some poor
birds sent in bnt the principal of the small
lots have come to market in
good shape and have sold at
outside prices. The week has not been favora
ble to the fruit trade, but the business notwith
standing has been fairly good. Oranges and
lemons, which have almost been a drug in the
market, so completely has It been glutted, are
now assuming a better tone. The
crop is large, and consequently prices
are low; the fruit, too, is not only plentiful but
unusually good. Hops and brewers' materials
are steady and firm with no change in prices.
Hax seed is quoted at $1.40 —a good paying price,
ana the wonder is that more is not cultivated in
districts where the wheat crop is hardly remu
nerative.
There is nothing of interest to report respect
ing furs and hides. Other produce is steady and
unchanged. Following are prices current to
day:
Buttek—Receipts liberal; grease, 5c; packing
stock off flavor, [email protected]; dairy, common to fair, 10
@15c; choice [email protected]; creamery, [email protected]@37c.
Beans—Common, [email protected]; medium, $2®
$2.25; navy [email protected]
Bacon and Hams—Long clear bacon, 104c;
short clear, lie; shoulders, 94c; hams, 134
(o 14c: dry salt sides, [email protected]
Cheese—Skim, [email protected]; part cream,'[email protected]
94c; full cream old,;[email protected]^c; full cream.fall
made, 13%£@14c4.
Dressed Meats—Beef, country dressed, 64®
7c; city dressed, [email protected]; mutton, country
dressed, 6®7c; city dressed, 74®94c; veal, 10
®11.
Eggs—Ice house and pickled, 24®25c; strictly
fresh, 26® 28c and nominal.
Flour—Patents $5.75®6.25; straight $5.00®
5.25; Bakers' XXXX, [email protected]; low grades
[email protected]; Rye flour [email protected] per barrel;
graham $4.25®4.50 per barrel; buckwheat flour,
$6.75®7.00.
Hides—Green, salted, 7c; green, 6c; dry flint,
12c; calf, dry, 124c; green lie: deer, dry,
[email protected]; antelope, 20®25c; elk, [email protected]; buf
alo, 8®10c, damaged 4 off.
Wool—Unwashed, [email protected]; washed, [email protected]
Honet—White clover, [email protected] lb; buckwheat,
[email protected]
Hops—Washington Territory, 28c; New York
30c.
Linseed Oil—Raw, 53®54c; boiled [email protected]
Linseed meal [email protected]
Poultry—Chickens, dressed, 12®15c per lb:
turkeys, dressed, 16®18c; ducks and geese, 13
®15c. These prices are for choice birds dry
picked; scalliwags sell for what they are worth-
Roots—(Medicina) ginseng, $1.75®1.85; sen*
eca snake root, [email protected] per lb.
Fruits—Apples, [email protected]; peddler's stock
[email protected]; pears, Easter Burre, 2.75®3.25 per
box; Winter Nells, [email protected]; oranges, Valen
cia, [email protected] per case; Messinas $3.50; Messi
na and Palermo lemons, [email protected]; Cranber
ries, [email protected]; Malaga grapes, 50 >b., 8®8.
50; Figs, new,«16c, 18c, 20c per lb.; dates,
black in frails '^■©Sc, fard in boxes, 12c per
ib.
Nuts—Hickory, large, $1.25; small, $1.50
walnuts, 15c; almonds, 19®20c; Barcelona ha;
zel (filberts) 14c; pecans, 18®13c; Brazil, 14c;
peanuts, 8®l3c.
Fues—Mink, 50c® 1.00; coon, 60®20c; lynx,
1.50*3.00: musk rat, winter 10c, spring 12c,
kitts3®4c; red fox, 1.25*1.50: kitts. 3<k.',40c;
silver fox, 20.00*40.00, cros3 UOQ&OO; otter,
[email protected],6.OO: fisher, 6.00*7.00; ski*:-!;. 30®75c:
badger, 50* 75c; wild cat, [email protected]: hou se cat, 10
*25c; marten, 1.25*3.00: wolverine, 4.00*5.00;
wolf, 1.50*3.50; prairie wolf, 75c® 1.00: bear,
[email protected]; cubs, 4.00*6.00: beaver. Lake Su
perior, 2.00®2.25 per lb.; Hudson bay, 2.00*
2.25 per lb., Dakota, 1.50*1.75 per lb.
On 'Change.
St. Pact,, Feb. 27.—There was no 'change in
the condition of the wheat market yesterday,
prices remaining the same as on Monday, with
but.little interest *hown in spot or speculations
Corn was quiet but held at lc higher by sel
lers. Oats were steady and unchanged. Feed
was dull and steady; 1 car sold at $19.50 out
going, lepresents the market. Hay was a little
firmer: 3 cars sold at $7. Eggs were again low
er and on the bid of 25c half a dozen holders of
stock cried for a deal; the bidder, however, only
wanted 10 cases at the price. Hogs were in de
mand at higher figures. Following is the call:
Wheat—No. 1 hard 99c bid*. March, 99c
bid; April $1.02 bid: May $1.04 bid: $1.08 asked:
No. 1 regular, [email protected] bid; No. 2 hard, [email protected]
bid; No. 2 regular, 83*87cbid.
Corn—No. 2, 51c bip, 55c asked: May, 54 bid.
58 asked; No. 3 45*48c asked; new mixed. 47c
asked: rejected, 43*44c asked.
Oats—No. 2 mixed, 32c bid, 33c asked;
March 32c bid, 34c asked; April 35c asked; May,
34c bid; 36c asked: No. 3, 31c bid; No. 2 white
33c bid; No. 3 white, 32c bid.
Barley—No. 2, 60c bid; No. 3 extra, 48*
52c: No, 3, 38<g 4*ic.
Rte—No. 2, 54c bid.
Ground Feed—$18.25 asked.
Bran—$13.00 asked.
Baled Hat—$7.00 asked.
Timothy Hay—$9..50
Live Hogs—$5.50 bid.
Dressed Hog3—$8.25 bid 9.00 asked.
Flax Seed—$1.40 bid.
Timothy Seed—$1.10 bid.
Clover Seed—$5.50 bid :$6.50 asked.
Potatoes—40c asked: March 35c asked.
Eggs—25c bid, 25c asked.
Pork—Si7.50 bid; 18.00. asked.
Lard—$9.25 bid.
The following comparative table gives the
principal quotations at the call February 20,
1883, and to-day:
1883. 1884.
Bid. Asked. Bid. Asked.
Wheat No. 1 hard $1 12 1 14 99
" " March 99
" " April 1 02
" " May 1 04 1 08
"No. 1 regnlar. 1 05 1 08 93
'• " No 8 hard 1 06 1 09 94
" No. 2 regular. 101 104 87
Corn, No. 2 old.... 48 52 51 55
" new mixed.. 47 50 .... 47
Oats, No. 2 mixed 38 39 SS 33
Oats No, 3 mixed. 37 31
" 2 white 394 404 33
"3 " 38 40 8S
Barley, No. 2 70 .... 00
" 3 extra 55 .... 52 ....
" 3 48 42
Rye No. 2 54 54
Ground Feed 19 00 18 25
Corn meal 19 00 17 50
Bran sacked 1100 13 00
Baled hay 7 00 7 75 7 00
Dressedhogs 7 40 8 25 9 00
Potatoes 56 40
Receipts and shipments of grain, live stock,
produce, merchandise, etc., for the twenty-four
hour* ending Feb. 20, 1884:
Articles. Rec'd Sh'd Article*. Rec'd Sh'd
Wheat 01 3 Lumber...; 29 18
Corn 3 Wood 39..
Oats 1 1 Oil 7 1
Flour 1 10 Coal C7 15
Feed 5 1 Paint I
Bran 1 .. Merchandise 119 89
Linseed Meal & Barrel stock.... 2 1
Oil Cake 1 Brick 0 ..
Hay 2 1 Pig iron 2 1
Sheep 2:.. Railroad iron and
Cattle 5.. rails 6 16
Horses & Mules. 1 1 Sundries 10 22
Pork 1 ..
Total rec'pts, 375 cars. Shipments, 182 cars
Family Retail Marke
Bread and Flour—Wheat bread 5c per lb,
rye bread, r>c per lb; Vienna bread, lOe per loaf;
flour 4c per lb.
Butter—Farmhouse, 30*35c per lb ; cooking,
124*20c.
Cheese—124(^15c(^20; Swiss, 20*25c.
Coffee—Green Rio, [email protected] lbs for $1: Java
Cgreen) 2(gl4 lbs for $1 ;.Rio roast, 4<3.6<g-7 lbs
for $1; .Java roast, 35c per lb, 3 lbs for$l; Mocha
same as Java.
Egos—Case eggs, [email protected]
Fruits—Apples, 40c peck; crabs, 50c peck:
baskets, 90c: grapes, 30^ 35c lb: Catawba, 60c
basket: Valencia oranges, [email protected] doz: Messina
lemons, 25*85c doz; 'cranberries, 12%c
quart.
Meats Sirloin steak, 15c; porter house, 18c;
roasts,15c: corned, [email protected]; muttonaud veal 15c ;
for chops and roasts, pork 10c; pork sausages,
10c; belognas 124.
Poultry and Game—Turkeys [email protected] per lb;
chickena [email protected]; geese 14(5.15c; ducks 14*
15c; pheasants and grouse 75c per pair; wild
duck 60c pair; squirrels 25c pair.
Sugars—Granulated 11 lbs for 1.00; Standard
A 114 lbs for 1.00; extra C 14 lbs for 1.00; yel
low C 12 lbs for 1.00.
Tea—Gunpowder 50(^90c; Japan from 25 to
70c; Oolong 40 to 90c; Young Hyson 50, 80, 90c.
Vegetables—Beans, dry 15c quart; beets 75c
bushel; cabbage 10, 15, 25c each: celery 90c
dozen; horse radish 15c lb: leeks 50c dozen; on
ions 75c bushel; parsely 15c bunch; peas, dry
15c quart; parsnips 1.00 bushel; rutabagas 60c
bushel; saurkraut 15c quart; potrtoes [email protected]
bushel; turnips 60c bushel; lettuce 3 for 25c;
radishes 3 bunches for 10c.
Milk—7c quart; cream 60 quart.
Lumber.
PKICES TO DEALEBS ONLT.
Common Boards $13 50
2nd " " 1000
Cull » 7 50
Common Stock Boards 8,10 and 12 inch 14 00
2nd " " " <* - " 1100
lst Fencing selected 15 50
2nd " 1100
Cull " 7 00
Scanting 2x4, 4x4, 10x12 and 18 ft 13 00
" " " 14 " 16 " 12 50
" " 20 " 14 00
Timbers 4x6 to 8x10 inclusive same as scant
lug.
Joists2x6 to 2x12 inclusive.
" 12,14andl6ft 12 00
" 18" 12 50
" 20" 13 50
lst and 2nd Clear, 1 in, 14, 14 and 2 inch
Rough 45 00
3rd Clear, 1 in, 14,14 inch, Rough 40 00
Aselectl in, 14,14 inch. Rough 36 00
B " 1 " 25 00
B " 14, 14 and 2 inch 30 00
B Stock Boards 36 00
O " " 8000
D " " 17 00
AFlooring 88 00.
B " 35 00
C " 26 00
Fencing Flooring selected 17 00
No. 18hipLap3 16 00
No.2 " " 1300
Drop Siding same as Flooring.
lst and 2nd Clear Siding 22 50
ASiding 21 00
B *' 19 00
C " 15 00
D " from selected Fencing 1100
?a Beaded Ceiling 50c more than Siding.
No. 1 Shingles per M 1 00
X lY '.' " 2 00
XX " " " 3 00
Lath " " 2 00
Dressing 1 side, ?1 per M.
Dressing 2 " $1.50 per M.
Dressing and Matching, $2.00 per M.
DAILY MABEET REVIEW
OP THE
CHICAGO AMI MILWAUKEE MARKETS!
FURNISHED BY WALL <fc BIGELOW,
COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
Room 4 Mannheimer Building, Southeast corner
Third and Minnesota street. Direct wires to
Chicago and Milwaukee Board of Trade.
(Operator in our office.)
F. T. OLDS & CO.,
Mew Tacoma, - - W. T.
Investments made in city and farm property,
timber and coal lands. Buildings erected. Loans
negotiated. Rents collected. Taxes paid, etc*
The building department will be in charge of a
competent and reliable architect.
Refferences: Banks of New Tacoma and Roch
ester, Minn. Correspondence solicited.
St. Paul Live Stock.
The receipts of cattle the last week have been
very light, only amounting to some nine cars,
besides those received at the transfer stock
yards. These nine cars were sold immediately
to the abattoirs at remunerative prices. Cattle
have sold all the way from 4=£c up to 6c, accord
ing to quality, and if the quotations at this mar
ket be compared with those of Chicago it will be
at once evident that this at the present time is
the better market of the two. In comparing
prices it should be borne in mind that the grades
here should be compared to
the one below at Chicago, for instance
prime steers at St. Paul grade "good"' at Chi
cago. Ready sale now is insured because of the
number of abattoirs now existing. In former
times cattle stood for days awaiting butchers to
come and purchase, but now all is changed; the
large slaughter houses buying all they
can get at full value and the sur
plus carcasses are shipped to Minneapolis
Stillwater and other outlying cities and those
still remaining over are either packed or shipped
east. Cattle of all kinds fit for beef are in active
demand at the prices quoted, and even a shade
higher. The receipts of sheep were 3 cars, and
those of inferior quality they sold, however,
immediately at good figures. For example, a car
averaging 90 lbs., sold at 44c. Compare this to
Chicago quotations, which give fair sheep $3.25
®4.25, and the conclusion it is favor of St. Paul.
Hogs have been very scarce, and the only re
ceipts reported were sold at high flgnres, viz: A
lot weighing an average of 180 lbs. at 84c
Again comparison with Chicago will be favorable
to this market. The following prices are readily
realized for good stock :
Rough mixed cattle 34c®4; good mixed 44®
44c; fair steers and heifers44®5c: good steers
5}*<&-55S£c; prime steers 6®64c: fat cows 44
<8i41ic: bull 34®4c. Sheep 44®5*c. Light
hoga [email protected]; medium 5>£@6c; heavy 64®
64c.
St. Paul, Tuesday, Feb. 26, 1884.
Following is to-day's range of prices on the
Milwaukee and Chicago board*:
5 < s = r a o
I * I:;; ■ f | * *
a Q ?» f : c? £
f ? : : : » I :
Milwaukee,
Wheat—
90% 90% 92 90% 91% 106%
April
May 96% 96% 98 »6% 97% 113%
Chicago,
Wheat-
March 91% 91% 92% 91% 92%;107%
APril 92% 92% 98% 92% 93%!l08%
May 97% 97 984 97 I 98% 113%
June 99 98% 1004 98%100 1134
Chicago,
Corn—
April 534 53 584 52% 534 57
May 58 57% 5$4 57% 58 61
Jane 584 584 58% 58 58% 614
Chicago,
> "Oats—
APril 324 32% 32% 82% 32% 40%
May 36% 36% 364 86 364 424
Chicago,
Pork—j
April 18 10 17 75!l8 17 17 85 18 17 18 25
May 18 25 18 00il8 27 17 97,18 27 18 47
Chicago,
Lard—
April 1 9 72' 9 65J 9 75 9 65 9 72 11 55
May I 9 82! 9 75 9 85 9 75 9 82 11 70
Grain Movement—Following is the movement
of grain at the points below for the twenty-four
hours ending at 7 o'clock this morning:
Receipts. Shipm'ts.
Chicago—Flour bbls 17,881 20,117
h Wheat, bu 19,647 24,827
" Corn 202,185 146,000
Oat* 128,854 98,028
" Hog9, head..... 12,000
M. Doran's Keports.
St. Paul, Feb. 25.
The following quotations, giving the range of
the markets daring the day, were received by M.
Doran, Commission Merchant:
WHEAT.
MILWAUKEE. CHICAGO.
Mch. May. Mch. May.
9:30 a. M. 90% 96 % 91 97
9:40 '■ 90% 96 Ji 91% 974
9:50 " 91 97 91% 97%
10:00 " 91 974 91% 97%
10:10 " 91% 974 91% 97%
10:20 " 914 97 4 914 974
10:30 '- 914 97% 91% 97%
10:40 -• 91% 974 91% .97%
10:50 »« 914 97% 91% 97%
11:00 " 914 97% 92 97%
11:10 •' 914 974 91% 97%
11:20 " 914 974 91% 97%
11:30 '• 91% 974 91% 97%
11:40 '■ 914 974 91% 97%
11:50 " 91% 974 91% - 97%
12:00 m. 91% 974 91% 97%
12:10 P. M. 91% 97% 924 9S4
12:20 " 91% 97% 92% 984
12:30 " 91% 97% 92% 984
12:40 " 91% 97% 92% 98%
12:50 '• 91% 97% 924 98%
1:00 " 91% 97% 92% 98%
2:00 »| 92 98 9*-"i 984
2:15 " 92 98 92% 984
2:30 •« 91% 97% 92% 984
2:45 " 91% 97% 92% 98%
CORN, OATS AND PORK—CHICAGO.
I Corn. I Oat*. I Pork.
Time. ; .
!Mch; May Mch May Mch May
9:30 a.m. .524 57%!324:864'l7 80 18 00
9:40 " '52%:574 32 364 17 75 17 974
9:50 " '52% 574 32 364 17 80 18 00
10:00 " 524 574132 364 17 80 18 00
10:10 " 53%.57%|32 36% 17 85 18 05
10:20 " 52%57%j324 36% 17 80 18 024
10:30 " 534 57%!32 36% 17 80 18 05
10:40 " 524'57% 31% 30% 17 95 18 10
10:50 « 524 57%!31% l36% 17 90 18 124
11:00 " 52% 58 |31%364 17 95 18 174
11:10 •• 524 57% l31% i 364 17 95 18 174
11:20 «« 52%57%i32 364 17 974 18 20
11:30 " 524:57%!32 364 17 974 18 20
11:40 » 524 57%|32 36% 17 95 18 174
11:50 " 52% 57% 32 36% 17 95 18 174
12:00 M. 524 58 31%|36%18 80 18 20
12:10 P. M. 524 58 31% 36% 18 05 18 224
12:20 '* 52%,58%32 36% 18 024 18 25
12:30 '• 52% 584 32 364 18 05 [18 224
12:40 " 52%;58%i32 864 18 074ll8 25
12:50 •• 53 58%i32 364 18 074:18 274
1:00 " 53 !584!324 364 18 074 18 274
2:00 " 52% 58% 324 36% 18 074;18 274
2:15 " 52% 58% 324 36%'18 05 18 25
2:30 »« 52% 584 32% 36%;18 074!18 274
2:45 m 52^ 53 32^ 36 % 18 07^ 18 27 i^
CHICAOO CLOSING.
Feb. wheat Feb. corn 52?£
April wheat 934 April corn 53%
June wheat 100 June corn 584
July wheat 1004 July corn 6O4
Feb. oats July pork 17 45
Apriloats 32% April pork 18 174
Juneoats 36% June pork 18 35
Yearoats 304 pork 16 124
ASSOCIATED PRESS MARKETS.
Milwaukee Produce.
Milwaukee, Feb. 26.—Flour quiet and un
changed. Wheat dull and easy; No. 2 92%c;
February 91 %c; March 91 %c; April 92%c;
May 97?ic Corn quiet; No. 2 53c; rejected 46
@4Sc. Oats inactive, but scarce; No. 2 324c.
Rye lower; No. 1 584c; No. 2 564c Barley
stronger and higher; No. 2 59%c; extra No. 3
54c. Provisions lower; mess pork $18.00 cash
and February; $18.20 May; lard, prime steam
$9.60 cash and February; $9.80 May. Sweet
pickled hams firm at [email protected] Butter higher.
Cheese quiet and nnchanged. Eggs firmer. Re
ceipts, 19,526 barrels of flour: 27,967 bushels of
wheat; 20,594 bushels of barley. Shipments,
17,412 barrels of flour; 1,700 bushels of wheat;
15,283 bushels of barley.
Chicago Produce.
Chicago, Feb. 26.—Flour firmer and not
quotable higher. Wheat in fair demand and
stronger, opened easier and became firmer and
advanced 4*14c above inside figures, closed
about % c higher than yesterday; sales ranged:
February [email protected]%c, cloaed at 924c;
March [email protected], closed at 924 April
92%*934c, closed at 934c; May [email protected]' /i «.
closed at 98,%c bid; June 98%@100%c,
closed at 1004c; July quotahleat about
[email protected] over June; No. 2 Chicago spring
92*92%, closed at [email protected]%c; No. 3 Chicago
spring 80*32c; No. 2 red winter 98%[email protected]$1.01%.
Corn in fair demand, unsettled, demand chiefly
for specualtion opened 4c lower, declined %c
additional, gradually advanced Jic, and olosed
about 4c better than yesterday; cash 52%@
534c, closed at 52%@53c4; February 52%*
52%c,closed at 52%c; March 524©Mci closed
at 52%@53c; April 52%@534c, closetrat 53%*
@534c; May [email protected]%c, closed at 58%c; June
[email protected]%c, closed at 58%c; July 59%@60%c,
closed at 604c Oats dull and nominal, weaker
at opening, afterwards strong; cash, February
and March 32c; April [email protected]%c, May 364
®364.c, closed at 36%@364c; June 36%®
36%c,"closed 36%c; [email protected], closed 30%c.
Rye quiet and unchanged at 58c. Barley quiet at
63c. Flax seed quiet at $1.53 on track. Pork
demand active, opened [email protected] lower, rallied 25
@30c, and closed steady; cash $17.75 for old
$18.00 for new; February $17.75*18.10, closedjat
$18.05*18.10; March [email protected], closed
at [email protected]: April $18.00*18.20, closed
at $18,174*18.20; May $17.95*18.274, closed
at $18.25(&18.274; June $18.05*18.35, closed at
$18,324*18.50; year$15.95*16.024. Lard in
fair demand and shade lower; cash $9.50*9.574 ;
February $9,574; March $9.50*9.60, closed
$9,574*9-60; May $9.70*9.85, closed at
$9,824*9-85; June $9,774*9.90, closed at
$9,874*9.90. Bulk meats in fair demand;
shoulders $7.40; short rib* $9.75; short clear
$9.80. Butter quiet and unchanged; cream
ery [email protected]; dairy [email protected] Eggs 21c. Whisky
steady and unchanged.
Receipts, 17,000 barrels of flour; 20,000 bush
els of wheat; 202,000 bnshels of corn; 121,000
bushels of oat9; 3,000 bushels of rye; 20,000
bushels of barley. Shipments, 20,000 barrels
of flour; 25,000 bushels of wheat; 146,000 bush
els of corn; 96,000 bushels of oat9; 4,800 bush
els of rye: 13,000 bushels of barley.
The Call—Wheat, sales 1,200,000 bushels;
Marchadvanced '4c; May declined%c: June
declined 4c. Corn, gales 745,000 bnshels;
March and May declined 4c; June declined 4c.
Oats, sales 15,000 bushels; May advanced %c.
Pork, sales 4,300 barrels; June declined 24c.
Lard, sales 4,000 tierce*; unchanged.
The visible supply of grain on Feb. 23 was:
34,297,000 bushels of wheat; 13,640,000 bu3hel*
of corn; 2,057,000 bushels of oat*; 2,321,000
busheU of rye; 2,079,000 bushels of barley.
The following grain was In store at ChiQago
Feb. 25: 12,811,000 bnshels of wheat; 5,817,000
bushels of corn; 1,604,000 bushels of. eat*;
2,764,000 bushels of rye; 347.000 bushel* of bar
ley ; total of all kinds. 22.242.000 bushel* ; tame
time last year, 18*241,000 bushels.
In addition to the above there is afloat in the
baibor 91,000 bushel* of wheat; 792.000 busbela
of born; 102.000 bushels of oats; against 313,000
bushels of wheat; 173,000 bushels of corn afloat
last year.
Chicago Live Stock.
Chicago. Feb. 26.— The Drovers' Journal re
ports: Hogs, receipts 11,000 head; ahlpmenta
5,000 head; best steady others weaker;
rough packing $6.30®6.90: packing and ahip
ping $7.00® 7.60; 8 ki p3 $4.75(26.25. Cattle,
receipts 6,300 head; ahlpments, 3,000 head;
slow but steady -.exports $0.50(87.00; good to
choice shipping steers $5.80®6.25; common to
medium $5.20®5.70; Texana $5.80^6.00;
sheep; receipts 9.000 head; shipments 2,400
head: {active 15®25c lower: Inferior to fair
$3.00®4.25 per cwt. ■ medium to good $4.50*
5.50; choice to extra $5.40®6.00.
New York Produce.
New York, Feb. 26.—Flour quiet; receipt*,
20,000 barrels; exports, 2,100 "barrels; «up«rllne
state and western $2.30®3.35; common to good
extra $3.35®3.65; good to choice $3.70®6.50;
Minnesota patent process 5.75®6.90. Wheat, a pot
lota a trifle better; options declined 34c at the
opening, afterwards recovered from the decline
and advanced ?,® 4 e, closing strong; receipt*
7,000 buahels; exporta 38,000 bushels; ungraded
red92«@$1.22'i;>[email protected]; j,- 0 . 9
red $1.07 7'®1.134; ungraded white $1.03*
1.10-fc; No. 2 red February quoted at $1094;
March sale* 384,000 bushels at $1.07^®1 03 H.
closing at $1,034 ; April sale* 280,000 bushel!
at [email protected] 7 3 , closing at $1 10*;
May sales 1,584,000 bushels at $1,124®
1.1314. closing at $1.13*4; June sale* 224.000
bushels at $1.134®1.144, closing at $1,144.
Corn opened weak, 4® *ic lower, aubsequently
reacted %(&%c, closing strong; receipt* 21,000
bushels: exporta 6,500 bushels; ungraded 56*
63c; No. 3 [email protected]; ateamer «lc; No.
2 634®634c; ungraded white 58®68c: No. 2
February 62®634c, closing 62 *c; April
[email protected]\e. closing at 63fcc; May 644®654c,
closing at 654c; June [email protected], closing
at 654c. Oats a ahade higher; receipt* 40,000
bushels; exporta 135 bushels; mixed western
[email protected]; white western [email protected] Hay gteady.
Coffee, spot fair: Bio higher at $12.75; option*
10 points higher and In fair demand; aalt*:
7,000bags Rio No. 7 March at $10.85*1100;
4.500 bags April at $11.00*11.05; 6,500 bag*
May at [email protected]; 6,500 bags June at
[email protected]; 250 bagsAugust at $11.25; 1,000
bags October at $11.25. Sugar ateady; fair to
good refining quoted at [email protected]; off A 6?»c;
mould 7 %c: standard A [email protected]; powdered 7J4
@7 ';' c; granulated 74c; cubea 7®7c \. Molas*e*
quiet; 50-test refining 25c; Porto Rico 35*
45c; New Orleans 30®35c. Rice ateady. Pe
troleum steady: united 99 5,c. Roain quiet but
steady. Turpentine dull at 36c. Eggs, west
ern, dull and weak.f Pork weak. Lard *teadv;
prime steam $9.90; Februarv$9.94®9.90; March
$9.85(39.90; [email protected]*7;May $9.97*10.06;
June $10.10; July 810.15. Butter quiet but
steady. Cheese, demand fair and market firm.
Other articles unchanged.
New York Dry Goods.
New York, Feb. 26.—The exports domestic
cottons for the past week were 2,753 packages;
since first of January 22,389, against 22,654 for
the same time last year, 22,481 same time In 1892,
and 20,727 in 1881. Movement from agent* con
tinues of good proportions. The tone of the
cotton market is Aery ateady.
LDninth "Wheat.
fSpecial Telegram to the Globe.]
Dctxth, Feb. 25.—Wheat—The market* ou
'change to-day were a shade lower, but con
siderable May wheat was sold. Closing prices:
No. 1 hard cash 98c; May $1,044; No. 2 hard
cash 924c; No. 1 cash 91c. Receipts, 6,882
bnshels. Shipments, 2,706 bushele. In
store, 2,412,389 bushels; afloat In harbor 262,^
403 bushels.
Minneapolis Markets.
The sales reported on 'change yesterday were
as follows:
One car No. 2 hard, by sample, f. 0. b. 98; 1
car sample, to arrive, 92 4 ; 5 cars No. 1 hard, la
store, 1.00; 5,000 No. 2 hard. May delivery,
1.014 ; 1 car No. 2 hard, by sample, on track,
1.00; 2 cars No. 1 hard, on track, 1.004; 1 car
No. 1 Northern, on track, 93; 1 car No. 1 North*
ern, by sample, 94; 1 car sample, f. o. b., 80.
The following were the quotations on 'change:
Flour—Patents, $5.75*0.00; straight*, $5.25
@5.75; clears, $4.75*5.25; low grades, $2.00*
3.25.
Wheat—No. 1 hard, I1.00J4; No. 2 hard,
954c; No. 2 northern, 86c.
Corn—None in market.
Oats—No. 2 mixed, 32c; No. 2 white, 34c.
Bran—Bulk, $12.00*12.25. In sack*, $2.00
more.
Shorts—$12.00*12.25.
Mixed Feed—$17.00*17.50.
Hay—Good upland wild, $6.00*7.00.
SAWING HICKOBF,
How Mr. Steveall Spent the Night With a
Red-WJiiskered Man.
Arkansaw Traveler.
The hotels of Interior Arkansaw are not
what advanced enlightenment demands, In
that several guests have to sleep in the same
room. The other day Mr. John Steveall, a
well-known gentleman, stopped at the Bar
dell house. When informed that he must
occupy a room with a red-whiskered fellow
with whisky-streaked eyes, he demurred, but
seeing no chance of bettering his condition,
he finally consented. Mr. Steveall has the
annoying misfortune of snoring. Other men
have been known to snore pretty well, but
no person who has ever heard Mr. Steveall,
will attempt to turn over his memory In
search of any one who can score a higher or
deeper triumph. Mr. Steveall and the
red-whiskered man with the whisky
streaked eyes went to bed about the same
time, fortunately, "r unfortunately as the
case may be, occupying different couches.
We may say coaches, in mockery.
Mr. Steveall soon dropped off to sleep and
at once began to saw hickory timber.
"Sav," called tbe red-whiskered man.
"Well?"
"You are snoring."
"That so?" replied Mr. Steveall, sarcastic
ally. "I am forty-five years old and you are
the first man that ever accused me of snor-
ing."
He soon dropped to sleep .'.in, for it
seerns that snoring men nevi 1 .'.wake.
'•Sav."
"Well."
"You are snoring again."
"You must excuse me, sir. I am forty
five years old, and I don't think that any
one ever accused me before of snoring."
Again he slept, and again he put on a
large hickory log. He had slabbed off one
side and had struck a knot when the red
whiskered man calied:
"Sav, over jherel!"
"Well."
"Snoring again."
"This Is indeed singular. I am 45 year*
old, and you are the first person to discover
that I snore."
He dozed again and fonnd a black-jacket
log that needed sawing, so he rolled It up on
the trucks and began work. He ripped off
one slab and started to split the middle when
the saw struck a shattered place.
"Sav?"
"Well."
"You are again snoring."
"Well, I declare, this 13 singular. I am
45 years old, and you are the first person to
make such an accusation."
"Lookhere, my friend, that 19 getting to
be a trifle too attenuated."
"What't that f'
"Why that forty-five year old ptory."
"Then you don't believe I have told you
the truth."
"I know you have not. Bet anything you
have been a snorer all your life. Bet you
kept your mother awake when you were a
bov. Will you do me a favor?"
"Yes."
"Well, if I drop to sleep and you stop
snoring will you wake me up and tell me?"
"Yes."
"All right. I will remember you as the
crowning favor of a lifetime."
After awhile the red-whiskered man sank
to sleep. Mr. Steveall arose, took a slat
from his bed, approached the sleeping man,
gently turned down the covers, "hauled off"
with the slat and struck him a blow that he
will never forget.
"Great Lord! What are you doing?"
"I am not snoring," replied Mr. Stevehall,
striking his victim again. "You wanted me
to inform yon when I stopped," and
"whack" he took him again. "I am not
snoring now, you annoying rascal. Lay
down there and if I hear another word out
of you to-night I'll wear you out," and Mr.
Steveall lay down and soon began to saw an
elm log.
When we consider the little attention which 1*
paid to the laws of health, we cannot be surprised
at the indifference manifested in relation to the
purity of the articles that are nsed in daily food.
If all articles put upon the market were as per
fect as Dr. Price's Cream Baking Powder, this in
difference might answer.
7

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