OCR Interpretation


St. Paul daily globe. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1884-1896, May 03, 1888, Image 2

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059522/1888-05-03/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

_
counting was intolerably slow in this
ward. It was about noon when the
judges of the First precinct completed
their work, and it was nearly 10 o'clock
last night twenty-seven hours after
the beginning, that the result in the
Second precinct was made known.
James Melady, the Democratic candi
date in the Sixth ward, had a good-sized
plurality over Bryant and Berlandi,
and Mr. Bryant, who, it has been
claimed, was the "syndicate" candidate,
was laid carefully away on the top
shelf, where he will make no more trou
ble for aldermanic candidates at least
for a couple of years.
Of course Aid. Sanborn caught all the
silk stockings of the hill in tho Seventh
ward, as he bad no opposition exception
the cold water ticket. Henry Weber, of
the Eighth ward, was another Repub
lican who had it easy, for he lives in a
ward where Republicans are thick and
the Democrats few. In the Ninth an
other Democrat, John Gehan,
was elected by a full-grown
plurality. In the Tenth K.V.Pratt,
the Republican candidate came under
the wire ahead of the four or live others
who were in the race, and in the Elev
enth D. M. Sullivan, the Republican
candidate, of course had an easy and
safe time of it.
So there are eleven men to six on the
Republican side of the council chamber.
The German societies voted pretty
solidly for the ticket indorsed by their
representatives. Eight of the aldermen
are Germans, or of German descent.
A LIGHT VOTE.
The vole was light. The registration
had been a trifle more than 26,066 and
about 8,000 votes less than that were
the highest number for any candidate,
being 18,541 polled for the associate
judgship. Whether this indicates that
party leaders were more active on the
registration days than on election day,
or whether the voter thought he had
done his whole duty when he had put
his name on the list, does not appear on
the face of the returns. It is general
talk that that feature of the new law
which makes the hour of opening of the
polls, 9 o'clock, had something to do
with the light vote. Many, especially
ot the workfngmen, had to beat work
before the opening of the polls, and
from the rush at the closing hours were
shut out iron* vol in - - then.
The voters of the city are on record as
favoring the issue of $2-0,000 bonds
for the construction of the
bridge from Broadway to State street
The Sixth ward went solid for the
bonds, and so did the third. The
Eighth ward went heavily against
them. By a mistaken idea on the part
of voters, many of those who favored
the bridge and intended to vote so,
were practically disfranchised on this
point. A separate ballot box was kept
for the vote on this question. It was
found on counting up some of the pre
cincts that there were numerous votes
on the bond question in the principal
box, the voter having apparently folded
the slip inside the city ticket and the
judges did not notice them.
On the count all these ballots had to be
thrown out. It is estimated that the
majority in favor of bonds would have
been several hundred larger if these
mistakes had not occurred.
Burg* and Nelson were elected jus
tices and Olson and Reichow constables.
James Schoohuiaker for associate judge
of the municipal court had the largest
vote of any man whose name was used
in the election, ids vote being 18,143.
Here are the figures as the judges found
them:
Mayor, Comptroller and Treasurer
For j For Com For Treas-
Mayor. | troller. I urer.
2- lOl' C~x H a "h"
1 3" 2. p. o ft c?
r" i.* • ? V § .
: : '. '. : £
Wd 1- " !
1 pre 734! 34! 238 515 402 341
2 jue 203; *"_ 57 184 1 188 106
. 3 pre 515 96' 243 326 345 234
Wd 2
-1 pre 470 24 *._:. 268 413 74
2 pre 734 #2 297 445 490 244
3 pre .-:. 43: 186 319 313 193
Wd 3— I
1 pre 587 7 231 401 j 320 299
2 pre 530 4! 368 It',:;
3 pre! 570 10 237 302 362 230
Wd 4-j |
1 pre 665: 10, 4211 250 500 172
2 pre; 521 9 214 322 370 108
3 pre 788 £0; 290 510 538 257
4 pre 552 11 318 *_.* 880 222
Wd s—;
1 pre] cos! ' 7 801 j 315 340 271
2 pre 808 5 574 3681 253 533
„ 3 pre 070 1 327 349 292 3.5
Wd 6
-1 pre 549 9 288 203 350 196
2 pre 540 0 435 116 422 132
3 pre 328 16 114 223 190 144
4 pre -291 5 99 198 158 138
5 pre 280 8 93 189 113 103
0 pre 184 12 91 100 99 92
Wd 7-;
1 pre, 235 -i 23 230 144 100
2 pre 543; .32 71 513 334 244
3 pre 178 22 20 185 114 S8
W d s
-1 pre 598 83 194 431; 397 223
2 pre 741 121 178 573 87 305 .
3 pre 027! 30 297 338 420 199
4 pre 495 1 167 328! 207 220
Wd 9
-1 pre 593 43 225] 407 440 192
2 pre 658 67 250! 432 450 242
3 pre 054 30 431 240 402 109
Wd 10- i
1 pre 210! 64 92 137 99 126
2 pre 193 16 SO 116 119 78
Wd 11
--1 pre 417 21 179 253 222 209
2 pre 42 16 20 30 37 13
3 pre 66 34-32 44 22
Total.. 17038 899 791210-7910726 6796
riur'ty,loi:_) | ..'... I 2707! 3930!
Woodward, Prohibition candidate for
comptroller, received 408 votes, and
Wurts, Prohibition candidate for treas
urer, received 418 votes.
Democratic Aldermen at Large.
p o 1 » *< a 2 '
5 *. • = 2 5- 2
5 3" ? r 2- I
Wd 1- "
1 pre 383 299 283 243 209 271
2 pre 87 07 1 75 65 32 SO
3 pre 249 202 220 220 177 203
Wd 2—
. 1 pre 320' 188 220 247 194 202
2 pre 435 246 384 307 259 204
3 pre 341 j 152 312 173 200 100
Wd 3—
1 pre 289! 217 286] 230 202! 243
2 pre 413 352! 363 393 358] 390
3 pre 290; 2351 279 251 203 255
Wd 4—
1 pre 413 420! 329 463 363 445
2 pre 344 211 284 253 258 228
3 pre 492 290 405 329 286 304
4 pre 190 225] 200 255 183 221
Wd 5—
1 pre 3G2 200 379 321 237 258
2 pre 585 287 520 448 231 886
3 pre 462 284 442 262 253 285
Wd 6—
1 pre 369; 257; 431 2661 143 341
2 pre 417 378! 459 410 218 445
3 pre 204] 123 241! 130 123 164
4 pre 202 138 120 1:50 113 152
5 pre 169 98 190 74 .78 105
6 pre 109 88 163 91 60 93
Wd 7
-1 pre 37 67 64 39 24 60
2 pre 115 152 129 95 70 161
3 pre 39 53 49 30 23 100
Wd 8—
1 pre 409 303 399 195 112 SOS
_ pre ' 531 420 471 194 179 214
3 pre 425 312 428 283 197 299
4 pre 435 291 425 174 180 190
Wd9—
1 pre 351 217 350 218 152 270
2 pre 321 272 313 289 105 391
3 pre 397 329 328 402 237 431
Wd 10- ,
1 pre 66 81 SO 83 5S 58
2 pre 70 77 70 77 84 -73
Wd 11
--1 pre 216 209 IS7 190 167 188
2 pie 21 23 24 22 21 25
3 pre 58 50 57 53 32 44
Total.. 10578 7874 10039 7923 5903 8204
Plur'lyj 2374..... 1 1835.. |
Republican Aldermen at I_arj»e.
Ea . _ 5 .*; a"
2. _- <*. = 2 «<
•** ~ — r> *"! _!•
_. 2 "" - <** .
: :' - •■'■ •-;: Q.
Wd 1
-1 pre 531 420 475 487 429 2SI
2 pre 186 105 175 211 150 135
3 pre 359 309 315 381 351 271
Wd 2
-1 pre 253 . 189 290 . 320 213 125
2 pre 423 320 462 . 445 399 220
3 pre 336 285 275 231 257 127
Wd3
--1 pre 412 329 382 370 372 272
2 pie 197 125 125 101 93
3 pre 375 319 333 3551 319 277
Wd 4
-1 pre 280 227 199 326 212 200
2 pre 341 204 211 377 89 152
8 pre 609 397 309 554 -5 ( ; 228
4 pre 261 246 216 30s 23s 189
Wd 5
-1 pre 378 279 241 340 28s 174
2 pre 574 437 319 516 -87 221
3 pre 454 289 297 388 370 ISO
WdO
' 1 pre' 326 242 100 288 310 84
2 pre 177 110. 100 172 125 08
3 pre! 208 139 125 225 184 00
4 pre 173 96 100 20S 159 46
5 pre 211 141 11 5 197 206 70
0 pre 97 So 711 122 1 115 10
Wd 7- j j
1 pre 216 159 200 227 19l 157
2 pre 433 358 475 507 41 8 379
3 pre 174 139 101 179 113 129
Wd 8—
1 pre 455 321 197 406 405 163
2 pre 577 378 140 507 520 92
3 pre 392 355 164 407 327 100
4 pre 328 176 40 320 314 27
Wd 9
-1 pre 406 310 267 427 343 221
2 pre 435 447 362 429 298 323
3 pre 259 351 150 285 249 139
Wd 10
--1 pre 145 148 101 170 60 159
2 pre 117 120 117 116 100 115
Wd 11
--1 pre 258 230 255 203 221 193
2 pre 31 25 28 25 19 23
3 pre 20 9 9 33 10 9
Total. 11453 8865 8039 11350 9453 5745
Pliil'lv - 249 601 . ... 3146 1249
Prohibition Aldermen at .Large.
~9 S_; CO C3■< I t-j
_ ° 2 — o cr
*» © 5. ss a 2
<_ " .■ja ■- , •. >—. 0 - *-- f*T 2
■"■* *-• CD jjq : —
: 3* ■ ■-• *_. .--*& .. : :
re • ;
Wa.—
1 pre !
2 pre 14 13 13 13 14 13
8 pre _4 32 33! 33 34 34
Wd2—
1 pre 11 17 1
2 pre 4S 42 50 49 ! 52 52
3 pre 22 22 25 ! 28 22 21
Wd 3— a
1 pre
2 pre ! j ••
3 pre Di 11 9, 8 9 8
Wd 4
-1 pre 4! 4 4 4 4 3
2 pre 3 3 3 3 3 4
3 pre 10 10 10 10 10 13
4 pre 7 7 7 7 7*7
Wd 5
-1 pre 4 2 4 4 4 4
2 pre
3 pre 11111 l
Wd6
--1 pre 4 0 6 0 6 5
2 pre
3 pre 11 10 11 11 ill 11
4 pre I I
5 pre 3 4 4 3 4 4
6 pre 7 8 7 6 6 0
Wd 7—
1 pre 5 ■;'• 5 5 5 5 5
2 pre 16 16 15 17 17 11
3 pre 9 10 9 9 10 11
Wd 8
-1 pre 13 12 13 13 13 16
2 pre 3 3 3 3 3 3
8 pre 20 27 ' 26 25 20 ' 20
4 pre 11111 l
Wd 9
-1 pre 12 12 12 12 12 14
2 pre 29 29 30 31 29 26
3 pre! 20 21 21 21 25 21
Wd 10-1 I I
1 pre 60 59 143 58 .60 58
2 pre 14 14 20 14 14 14
Wdll
-1 pre 11 11 11 11 11 11
2 pre 12 12 12 12 12 15
3 pre -.
Total.. 423 407 525 418 425 419
For Justices of the Peace.
~ -. EH £• k~
2. * £ ° ~^
co -5 Ci ~*
2 re 2 re
*— Ol yi (—
: " 2 :
Wd 1- "
1 pre 737 173 267 12
2 pre 242 42 100 12
3 pre 570 34
Wd2
lpre 480 164 39 10
2 pre 778 234 205 30
3 pre 505 142 122 23
Wd3
lpre 525 243 274
2 pre : 53 -.
3 pre 570 220 239 7
wa_—
lpre 624 73 199 4
2 pre 480 365 107
3 pre OS7 500 269 .
4 pre 55i 287 263 11
Wd._
--1 pre 42s 421 180 ' 4
2 pre 483 473 380
3 pre 44- 464 203
WdO—
lpre 32i 382 108
2 pre 331 394 148
3 pre in 71
4 pre 131 100 138
Sure 98 108 121
. 6 pre 112 80
Ay d7 —
lpre 146 96 155
2 pre -.. 373 250 322
3 l>re 119 70 132 ....'.
WdS
-1 pre 321 303 309
2 pre 280 011 136
3 pre 331 466 174 283
4 pre 194 4:35 63 1
Wd9—
lpre 401 839 200 : 13
2 pre 650 302 226 31
3 pre 644 420 115 21
Wd 10—
lpre 215 68 73
2 pre 160 77 117
Wd 11—
lpre 352 188 234....
2 pre 40 291 20 ...
3 pre 02 57 1 13
1 1
Total 112852 88511 5933 496
Plurality I 6919 j.... . j
For Constables and Judge.
_ 5: c tc 0_
** .? ST _> ra
3 » g ft f-.
3 I***; 2 <■■' 5
s r. r 2 •=
a •■..-.-*. ■■■-.. 5
:'.'.'. »
'.'.'.'. a
Wd 1— ~
1 pre 184 275 568 455 753
2 pre. 75 89 173 147 245
3 pre 106 232 4161 310 564
Wd 2
lpre 187 248 302 240 489
2 pre 269 340 480 415 748
3 pre...... . 141 176 303 328 505
Wd3—
1 pre 230 255 374 320 599
2 pre 534
3 pre 246 243 334 320 577
Wd4— .
1 Pie 281 - 814 . 136 146 .661
2 pre 211 260 . 274 325 535
3 pre 252 367 428 568 791
Pre 250 227 257 321 551
v d 5—
1 pre 263 359 253 308 583
2 pre 355 503 300 386 739
3 pre 261 394 294 379 671
Wd 6
-1 pre...... 1 268 285 245 258 551
2 pre 1 308 321 127 149 544
THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE: THURSDAY MORNING MAY 3, 1838.
3 pre 113 136 187 205 334
- 4 pre 91 134 154 ISO 300
5 pre 69 5. 197 51 283
0 pre...... 89 91 96 ' 101 192
Wd 7—
1 pre 52 50 193 200 179
2 pre 156 143 426 451 578
3 Pre. 51 42 152 163 196
WdS—
1 pre 179 219 390 450 617
2 pre 206 203 521 509 738
3 pre 248 262 381 870 637
„. pre 168 175 314 307 493
Wd 9—
1pre...... 247 279 35. 352 023
2 pre...'... 272*310-413 387 693
3 Pre 399.426 257 250 006
d 10—
1 Pre S3 92 143 134 227
3 pre 70 77 120 '119 194
Wdll—
1 pre 203 191 220 245 420
2 pre 21 21 27 29 48
3 pre 58 56 8 10 60
Total... 678817852 9947 997818123
Plur'ity 1 20. . 2120 ; 17705
Doty, Prohibition candidate for asso
ciate judge of the municipal court, re
ceived 418 votes. Wolf and Huff, pro
hibition candidates for constables, re
ceived a total vote of 219 and 325 re
spectively. There were 307 scattering
votes, most of which were cast -for
Johnson. Prohibition candidate for jus
tice of the peace.
The pluralities of Reis, s_>erg, Bur
gess, Olson and Reichow and the total
received by Thauwald, Cassel, McGuire,
Bentiey. • Billingsley. Voak, Thorn,
McCarron. Shines, Brennan, Ward,
Wolf and Huff will be slightly increased
by the official count, although the re
sult of the election will not be changed
by the vote cast for them in the Third
precinct of the Third ward, the tally
sheet of which was sealed up before a
transcript of the whole of it could be
made.
Ward Aldermen.
FIRST WARD.
123 T P
For Alderman
Johnson, D 17 24 6 47
BIom,R 690 540 233 1403 1412
Sundgaard, P.... 11 28 12 51 ..
Bridge Bonds—
For 146 131 277 248
Against 147 82 229 ..
SECOXD WARD.
12 3 T P
For Alderman —
Flaherty. D. 190 291 169 650 ....
Leithauser, 1t... 223 424 311 958 308
Magraw, F 7 42 20 69 «
Dawson, I. I. 69 44 33 146....
Bridge Bonds—
For 288 449 437 100
Against 202 135 337 ....
THIRD WARD.
12 » T P
For Alderman—
Conley, D 255 398 293 940 IS6
Johnson, R 352 127 281 760 ...
Water house, P 8 8 ...
Bridge Bonds—
For ...55S 438 494 1490 1397
Against 31 10 52 93 ...
FOURTH WARD.
la 3 4 T p
For Alderman—
Kavanagh, D....423 329 462 299 1513 515
Sweeny, X 212 197 332 257 998 ....
Virtue, P : 4 3 7 ....
Doyle, I. D 37 5 .... 6 48 ...
Bridge Bonds —
For 527 291 407 423 16-18 1299
Against 21 59 19S 71 349
FIFTH WARD.
123 T P
For Alderman —
Banholzer, D 299 257 299 855 ...
Bock, R 306 598 350 1254 359
Fiske, P 4 ... 2 5 ...
Bridge Bonds—
For 259 215 110 584 ...
Against 140 503 351 994 410
SIXTH WARD.
12 3 1 5 O T P
For Alderman—
Melady, D. .261 290 121 131 90 89 972 367
Bryant, R... 208 85 127 102 83 77 005...
Lind. P 1 ... 7 ... 3 6 17 ...
Berlandi. I. 23 158 62 46 24 6 319...
Gaefke, I.E. 71 28 29 37 85 20 270...
Bridge Bonds
For 328 549 321 290 IS4 13S 1072 1030
Against... 12 6 2 4 18 24 42
SEVENTH WARD.
123 T P
For Alderman —
Hager, D 2 8 .. 10 ..
Sanborn, It .....233 551 202 991 950
Hammond, P .5 24 12 41 ...
Bridge Bonds— •;• vY*.
For ... 83 310 81489 68
Against 131201 89 421 ...
EIGHTH WARD.
12 3 _ T P
For Alderman
Mat*/.. D 142 153 290 162 750....
Weber. 1 v.... 472 586 351 330 1739 989
Anderson, P. 10 1 18 1 30 ....
Bridge Bonds— *
For 191 69 94 37 381 ....
Against 816 498 303 181 129S 917
NINTH WARD.
123 T P
For Alderman —
Gehan, D .280 365 455 1100 454
Schneider, R 306 195 145 046....
McManigal. P.... 39 28 12 79....
Nelson,!. R 12 .140 81 233 ....
Bridge Bonds—
For 402 311 773 051
Against 39 S3 122....
TENTH WARD.
12 T I*
For Alderman —
Adams. D 55 46 101 —
Pratt, it 30 151 187 37
Wallace. P 142 8 150 —
lla/zaid. I. It 39 - 2 41 —
Partridge. L 14 3 17 —
Bridge Bonds —
For 35 35 70 —
Against 80 OS 148 78
ELEVENTH WARD.
123 T P
For Alderman-
Baker, D 186 25 48 259 —
Sullivan, It 257 36 18 311 52
Bridge Bonds—
For 37 22 5 64 —
Against 99 25 36 157 93
TOTAL VOTE ON BONDS.
For. Against. Total.
First ... 277 229 506
Second 437 337 774
Third 1,490 93 1,583
Fourth 1,048 349 1,997
Fifth 554 994 1,578
Sixth. 1,672 42 1.714
Seventh 489 421 910
Eighth 381 1,298 1.079
Ninth 402 311 773
Tenth 70 148 218
Eleventh 64 157 221
Total 7,574 4,379 11,953
Majority f0r.... 3,195
A Correction.
To the Editor of the Globe.
Will you kindly correct the statement
published in the Pioneer Press of this
morning, charging me with having dis
tributed citizens' tickets at the polls on
election day. I wish it plainly and em
phatically understood that I did not dis
tribute a single ticket of any description
at any of the polls. 1 did not spend a
moment at the polls working in the in
terests of any party or person, but, on
account of my connection with the
GLOBS and while sitting In my buggy
opposite my residence on Central ave
nue, was brutally assailed by one Mc-
Ellistrem, a creature of the Republican
register of deeds. W. E. Magraw,
Circulator The Globe.
St. Paul, May 2.
_s_
Its New Directors.
At the annual meeting of the stock
holders of the St. Paul Trust company
held yesterday afternoon in the First
National bank the following directors,
to serve during the ensuing term of
three years, were chosen: William
Dawson, 11. 11. Sibley, P. 11. Kelly, A.
H. Wilder, E. F. Drake and D. R.
Noyes. One-third of the board retires
each year, and the gentlemen named
above were elected to fill vacancies
created by those retiring this year.
Officers will be chosen at the meeting of
the directors this morning.
Supreme Court. '
The following cases were argued and
submitted to the supreme court yester
day: ___Btl
Charles P. Holcombe, as sheriff,
respondent, vs. The C. N. Nelson Lum
ber Company, appellant; continued
till next term of -court.
" W. S. Liggett, respondent, vs. E. - C.
"Himle, appellant; argued and sub
bitted.
Tennis Slingerland, appellant, vs.
Tennis S. Slingerland, respondent;
argued and submitted.
' "***■".
Sei-C-berg- & Co.'s
Figaro will delight you. On sale every
where for 5 cents. Y_f_-f--_____t__. V
SAINTLY CITY DOINGS.
Maggie, the Midget, Who Was
Not Abducted, Appears in j
Court.
: : ;«• ' i
The Loyal Legion Elects Of- *
fleers and Banquets aS yy]
the Ryan. |£| .
. r i
Evangelist Munhall Gives a *
Characteristic Talk to j *';
Railroad Men. ■■"■■__• V*
- — 4** -
Regents Discuss University -
Matters—April Weather— } ' *
A. 0. U. W. Annual. W I
•/'.* ;
— — — ~ — * i :'■.*«_. 1
THE MIDGET IN COURT.
Maggie Says She Loves Her Al
leged Abductor as a Brother. ;
Alfred Beadle was arraigned in the
municipal court yesterday morning on a
charge of abducting Maggie Hopkins,
the West St. Paul midget. The little
girl was in court with her mother, and it
was plain to see that she cared more for
Beadle than anyone in sight. Prosecut
ing Attorney Egan introduced a sworn
statement made by Maggie, in which
she set forth that she had left home of
her own free will and that no criminal
intimacy had existed between herself
and Beadle. She said she loved Beadle
as a brother, and that he had always
treated her kindly as a brother could.
On motion of Judge Egan the case was.
dismissed after Beadle had been
soundly "roasted" and had promised to
keep away from Maggie in future.
THE NEW OFFICERS.
Annual Election of the State Com-
mandery of the Loyal Legion. .
There was not a vacant chair at the
meeting of the Minnesota Commandery
of the Loyal Legion, held at the Ryan
last evening, for in addition to the
regular programme an election of
oflicers for the ensuing year was on the
tapis and a great deal of interest was
manifested in the result. After the
usual routine business had been trans
acted the committee on nominations re
ported the following ticket which was
unanimously elected:
Commander— Gen. Henry 11. Sibley.
Senior Vice-Commander— Col. James Gil
fillan.
Junior Vice-Commander— Reuben C.
Benton.
Recorder— Geo. Q. White.
Registrar— Capt. William Loci-ten.
Treasurer Seheffer.
Chancellor*-— Robt. P. Bates.
Chaplain— Chaplain Edward D. NellL
Council— Capt. Henry A. Castle, Capt.
Loreu W. Collins, Bvt. Brig. Gen. Edwin C.
Mason, Bvt. Lieut. Col. Thomas C. Sullivan
and Capt. Samuel P. Snider. ;,
These officers will be installed at the
June meeting of the commandery, when
a banquet will be given to which wives „
and daughters of members of the com-.
mandery will be invited, and short
speeches will be insisted upon from
those selected to respond to the toasts.
Few members were elected last evening
as follows: Loyd Wheaton, Mons
Grinager, Adoniram J. Merritt, William
Richeson, James W. Lusk and Robert
Pratt.
"From Williamsburg to Yorktown"
was the title of a paper read by Col.
Reuben C. Benton, the* essayist of the
evening, and he detailed in a graphic
manner many of the most interesting
events of that memorable Peninsular
campaign. .-.•::_ Y *•'■•'
TO RAILROAD MEN. \
Evangelist Munhall Looks Down,
the Track With Them. V V
Despite the disagreeable weather a
good audience assembled at Market hall
last evening, to hear Dr. Munhall. The
front seats, which were reserved for
railroad men, were occupied by
members of that fraternity, for whom
Dr. Munhall has a special admiration.
The text was Mathew 7, 18 and 14.
'Enter ye in at the straight gate; for
wide is the gate, and broad is the way
that leadeth to distraction, and many
there be which go in thereat; because
straight is the gate and narrow is. .the',
way which leadeth unto life, and few
there be who find it." Said Dr. Munn
hall:
. There are two roads in this life; one,
the broad road that leads to destruc
tion, and the other, the narrow
road that leads to eternal life.
Which do you want? I am sure no train
master would think of sending out a
train without a headlight; not that the
headlight is an absolute preservative
against danger from accidents, for it
does not throw a light very far along
the road. I'm sure if some man could
invent a headlight that could show the
full length of the road he could make a
fortune. I want to say to you there
is a headlight that will show you
your way clearly through life, and that
headlight is God's word. This light
will show you what's before you and
what you have to expect. Let us allow
it to flash along the broad road. The
first prominent thing 1 see is that
the way of the transgressor is hard.
Now tor a suggestion or two. That
man violates the law who fills up
on whisky and brings pov
erty and misery and becgary
to his home and family. He's on. the
broad road and he'll find it out soon.
Who foots the bill for the building of
these political saloons, but jour dollars
and dimes? I know that railroad men
are
........ LESS DISPOSED TO DRINK .;".*
than other classes. One reason for this
is that many of the trunk lines will
not , employ tinplers. Drunken
men. are apt to wreck trains,.
Railroad men nowadays, as a rule, are
the most sober men yon can find, but
now and then you find a few who take
a drink on the sly. There's the man
that swears. I know the provocations
that railroad , men have to .in
dulge in profanity, when .the
weather is rainy ' and fold * *
and the engine backs and doesn't
make the coupling. I can understand 5 '
how a railroad man finds it difficult to . ,
refrain from swearing. I heard of a
man once who rushed into a depot, i
only to see. the train he wanted to
catch dashing away from hjm.
An instant later . another man.' 4
who wanted to catch the . same ,
train, came up to where the first __an '
stood. Number one was cursing away . •
at a terrible rate and when he had - fin
ished number two turned and said: to
him: "I'm much obliged to you." '
Swearing is the most seeseless thins:
imaginable. Now a word about gam
bling. Many of you won't go. into a• *
saloon to pursue your gam
bling propensities because you know : '
if you - are causht at -lit,,
you'll get the bounce. But you gamble
just the same. You get into* a caboose
and play "craps," and fritter your hard
earned money away. The way of the
transgressor is hard. Let the light
flash along the broad road again,
and I see there a way that
seems right. On this road you'll
find the man who leads a good life
who doesn't swear, or drink,or do wrong.
Let us flash the light along the narrow
way. The first thing that is revealed, is
that the narrow way is a way of pleas
antness. So when you put your trust
in God, your path is a path of peace. I
know as much of the world as the or
dinary man, and I've traveled it over
pretty thoroughly during the forty odd
years of my life, and I've kept my eyes
OPE- AT ALL TIMES,
and I desire to say to you, my friends,
that it is a hundred times easier to go to
heaven than to hell. The sinner has no
peace on earth. When he's out on his
run and hears of some poor -fellow. :
getting mangled* under the wheels'; he
grows restless ; but if he's on the narrow
road . he can * think of these things in
perfect calmness. He can go out to the
greatest perils, knowing that the Lord
will take care of him.
The following announcements were
made:
Ladies' prayer meeting to-day at 2:30
p. m. at the First Baptist church; Bible
reading at 3 p. m.
Sunday afternoon, meeting for women
only at Market hall. Subject of lecture,
"The Model Woman/ Sunday even
ing, meeting for men only. The same
evening the women will have a meeting
; at House of Hope church.
\ THE REGENTS.
A Day Devoted to the Discussion
*.' of the Medical Department.
. Members of the special committee ap
pointed by the regents of the state uni
versity to select a faculty for that insti
tution, held an executive session at the
(Merchants yesterday to make up a slate.
(None of the committee would divulge
»the result of the session, statins that
they were pledged to secrecy until the
.natter was turned over to the regents
[for rattilication or disapproval. This
action will be taken to-day, and until
the regents take action, the names of
the lucky ones will not be given out for
publication. It was an all-day session
of the committee, whose labors were not
completed until nearly, midnight. .\.
PACTS ABOUT WEATHER.^
Wind, Rain, Flood and Other Data
Collated by the Signal Service.
A review of the weather experienced
by the population of St. Paul last month
shows that the precipitation was in ex
cess of that for any corresponding
month since 1870, and that the tem
perature was considerably below the
normal. In other respects there were
no decided departures from the nor
. mals. The mean temperature for last
month was 40.5 dee.; the April normal
is 45 deg. The highest was TO, and the
lowest 22.6 deg. The month was colder
than every corresponding one, except
two, since 1870, and they were in 1874
and 1875. That of 1874 had a mean of
,37 deg., and is the coldest on record;
that of 1878 had a mean of 51 deg., and
is the warmest on record. The normal
April precipitation is 2.25 inches.
There was more than twice that last
month. It was very evenly distributed,
and slightly less than normal up
to the 20th, but from then to the close
of the month the fall was so exces
sive that it brought the total up to 5.14
inches, or a margin of 2.89 inches over
normal and 22-100 of an inch over the
greatest previously on record for that
month. The dry est April since 1870
was in 1881, with a precipitation of .47
inch. There were G clear, 15 fair
and 9 cloudy days, and 11 days on which
.01 inch or more of rain or melted
snow fell. The mean height of the
barometer reduced to sea level was
30.120 inches. The prevailing wind
came from the northwest and east. The
total number of miles registered by the
wind was 5,710.Ga1es of twenty-live miles
an hour and upward occurred as follows:
Fourth, £„ 40 miles an hour; 10th, E.,
27; 17th, NE., 28; 25th, SE., 28. There
were thunder storms on the 4th, 16th,
17th and 26th. Aurora or polar lights
were visible on the 3d, 11th and 12th,
and killing frosts on sixteen days.
The ice dam in the Mississippi river
moved out on the tth. There was a
minimum stage of three feet of water in
that stream on the 6th and a minimum
of 14.4 on the 14th. The true recoras
of the signal office date from April, 1872,
c and show that higher stages of water
* occurred in 1873, 1875, 1880 and ISSI, but
they do not show anything to compare
• with the sudden rise of last month.
' WILL CLOSE TO-DAY.
The Annual Meeting of the Grand
Lodge, A. O. IT. W.. Nearing the
t End.
' The Grand Lodge of Minnesota and
Dakota, A. O. U. W., is still in session
at Knights of Pythias hall. Yesterday
' was the second day. The morning was
.devoted exclusively to making changes
in the constitution for the good of the
order, and other routine matters. The
'work of the'- order was exemplified.
The' grand lodge received ' invitation
,to attend ah entertainment in Minne
apolis given by the Select Knights, A.
O. U. W. -The election of officers for
the ensuing year will occur some time
to-day and the installation will follow in
the evening - . There are two candidates
already in the field for the office of
grand master workman, L. K. Merrick,
of Minneapolis, and C. C. Huff, of
Huron, Dak. Both have many friends
and the contest will probably be rather
close. These will, in all probability, be
the only candidates for that office. The
session will conclude to-night and the
-members leave for home by the earliest
trains.
Fatally Crushed.
James Burns, fifty years old, was
struck by a switch engine while cross
in the tracks of the Chicago, St. Paul,
Minneapolis _ Omaha railway in East
St. Paul yesterday afternoon. His
right leg was crushed and his left leg
broken. He was removed to St. Jos
eph's hospital by the Margaret street
patrol, and died at 6 o'clock in the even
ing. Burns was a stranger. He was
blind in one eye, and wore clothes
which indicated that he was a laboring
man.
Mated and Will Marry.
The following marriage licenses were
issued yesterday: dames J.Young and
Ingar Monson, Isaac McCoy and Clare
Alexander. William C. Snow and Etta
L. O shorn, John Anderson and Augusta
Carlson, Male 1 or Walder and liosa
Schuch, John And wood and Sophia An
derson.
GLOBULES.
Scarlet fever on Arcade street is bulletined
at the health office. ■; ..* v
nineteen births and four deaths were re
ported at the health officii yesterday.
Dr. C. William-, who has been East for the
. last three weeks, returned yesterday from
Sew York.
The Quartette Ilarmonier gave a very
pleasant concert in this city last evening at
Turner hall. A large audience was present.
The Capital City Dancing club will give a
May part} in Society hall. Drake block, to
night. It will be tlie wind-up of the season.
The Central W. C. T. _. will meet this af
ternoon at 3:15 o'clock, in the rooms of the
Woman's Protective agency, 21 West Fifth
, street. - •■>
• The congregation of Westminster Presby-
r terian church, West side, hold its annual
■-meeting last night and elected trustees for
the ensuing year.
, The contract for paving Kent street with
asphalt was awarded by the board of public
Works yesterday to the Warren-Sc barf com
pany for 511,055.
The Capital City club will give a May party
and hop, the last this season, under its aus-
I pices, at Society hall, in the Drake block,
next Thursday evening.
' City Treasurer Reis yesterday paid the
monthly salaries of the "police and tire de
partments and other city officials, amounting
iv all t0535,000. The "street force will be
paid to-day.
C W. 11. Seldon. a tramp who was found by
.an officer trying to effect an entrance into a
residence at Seventh and Locust streets, was
sentenced to thirty days in tbe work house
'by Judge Cory.
A meeting of the western Oberlin
Alumni association will be held in Minneap
olis May 20. H. H. Hart, of the slate board
of corrections and charities, is presideut of
the association.
John _offman and Louis Ken-man, held
for shooting and robbing Louis Leglace on
the Lake Phalen road, were brought before
Judge Cory yesterday and discharged at the
request of Leglace.
Abe Graves and John Ryan were arrested
by Captain Bresette, last night, for stealing
two pieces of rubber hose. Edward Gleason
was locked up by Officer Davies for stealing
a bundle of dry goods.
Officer Rose arrested Charles Flesher In the
act of breaking into Rheinha_dfs saloon on
East Third street, near Wabasha, Tuesday
night. Flesher was sent to the work house
for ninety days by Judge Cory.
Officer Meyer ding found a barrel filled with
hay and soaked with oil in a barn attached
to Bnudy's nursery, 408 Seventh street.
Tuesday night. The -tuff had been ignited,
nut was extinguished before any damage was
done.
A concert and lecture for the benefit of the
First Swedish M. E. church building will be
given this evening at Central Park M. E.
church, commencing at 8 o'clock. The pro
gramme will consist of musical selections
and a lecture. • _ ■-..*'• /-.-_ .....
James McDonald, a waiter in a saloon on
East Seventh street, was arrested by Officer
Gruber yesterday ; for assaulting A. - Gotts
■rum. He struck ■ ttoitsirutu . ox* , the head
with an empty beer bottle, Inflicting an ugly
gash iv his scalp.
The board of regents of the State univer
sity will meet in the governor's office, cap
110 l building, this morning to* receive the re
port of the committee appointed to nomi
nate the professors to comprise the faculty of
the proposed new medical department of 'the
• university.
Articles of incorporation weie filed vestcr
' day with the secretary of state by the I) uluih
& Dakota Railway company. Capital stock,
88,000,000; limited indebtuess. $8,000.0-0.
Incorporators: L. L. C. Brooks, William
Rhodes, l.yle M. Fisher, Howard 11. Cleve
land, of St. Paul, and John P. Crowley, South
St. Paul. •...•-;
He healed the sick. It will be learned with
much regret that Dr. J. Cresap McCoy, the.
famous physical] whoso great skill has been
heralded to the world through the medium
of the Glob, for two years past, and whose
patients have in many cases had their por
traits published in these columns, has moved
his office to Chicago. The doctor and his
able assistants made hundreds of friends in
St. Paul.
The Independent German and Scandina
vian Political club held a meeting last even
ing at '_-_ East Seventh street. _A. Rose
called the meeting to order. 11. Gullicfe was
elected president; C. A. Rose vice president
and 11. A. .tone secretary and treasurer for
one year. A committee on a hall was ap
pointed, consisting of A. Petren, 11. Gallick -
and 11. A. Stone.
Additional SI. Paul News on
the Fourth I* age.
PERSONALS.
Hon. H. B. Cory, of Austin, is at the Mer
chants.
' L. R. Arne and wife, of "Winnipeg, are
stopping at the Merchants.
Senators. D. Peterson, of New I'lm. was
among yesterday's arrivals at the Merchants.
J. W. Ham. who has been South for sev
eral mouths in search of health, is home
again.
J. M. Spicer, the Willmar banker, arrived in
the city yesterday and is domiciled at the
Merchants.
Rev. H. B. Whipple, a brother of Bishop
Whipple, and who is in charge of the Episco
pal church at Faribault, is stopping at the
Merchants.
Railroad Commissioner John L. Glbbs,
who has been on a tour of inspection
throughout the state, registered at the Mer
chants yesterday.
E. W. Rayworth. a leading merchant of
Fargo, was among the guests at the Mer
chants yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Dcnnison, of New York,
where the former is a leading business man,
have parlors at the Ryan.
Capt. A, 11. Reed, of Glencoe, who came
up to attend the meeting of the Loyal Legion,
has apartments at the Merchants.
Dennis Ryan, who has been, spending the
winter with his family at Thomasville, Ga.,
returned to the city yesterday, and Is stop
ping at the Ryan.
Capt. 11. H. Humphreys,, infantry,
who has been East on "a leave of absence,
registered at the Ryan yesterday, en route to
join his command.'
■ m
Delightful Office for Rent.
A splendid office on ground floor of
Globe building is for rent from May 1.
An excellent location for any important
financial institution, it having a large
fire and burglar-proof vault in it. In
quire at Globe counting room.
-»•
The St. Paul Real Estate Board
Will visit Inver Grove Park aud Inver
Grove Factory addition next Friday,
May 4. The activity in this section is
increasing every day. houses and homes
being secured by many. The buildings
contracted for are being pushed and
many more will follow. Bushnell &
Bushnell are sole agents for this addi
tion, and are securing many good peo
ple for Inver Grove.
A very large brickyard is going in at
Inver Grove, ancl it is proposed to erect
a good many nice brick houses and on
terms any one can own the house they
live in. The opportunities offered for
securing a home at Inver Gtove are
open to all, and the payments are so
small any one paying rent can meet
them.
GEMiL JEWELER,
CI OT 85 E. THIRD,
LIU I I ST. PAIL,
', Yy -
NEW CARPETS.
Order before ihe Spring
Rush at
I OLIVER BAKER'S
3 Carpet, Drapery and Wail
Paper House,
417 and 419 Wabasha St.
PATENTS!
Caveats, Designs, Trade Marks, Labels,
etc. Write or call.
F.W.LANE,
Room 52, German-American Bank Bldg.
ST. PAUL, MINN.
151 FOOT BOAT, $25 !
JOSEPH DI_GLE,~- BOAT BUILDER,
Cor. Isabel and Clinton. West St. Paul,
One block from street cars. .
REMOVAL!
The Wheeler A Wilson ___uu_
fac. tiring Company Hare ISe
inorcd to
32 West Third Street.
HOLLAND & [THOMPSON MPS. CO. ; =
o_.ce*-_l7 Minnesota Street. i
Factory— Park, St. Paul, Minn. j
Steam Heating, Brass and Iron Fittings,
FOR STEAM, WATER AND GAS.
BRASS FOUNDRY.
_M_i \ tr^^tr a. JLc? ___f I\g i
r^-b-CNTISI Yf J
J^y CROWNS, BRIDGES, JftjU?
B||P) & API IS TIC 6QLO fILUNGS. f|||||
120 MANNHEIMER BLOCK, St. Paul
Telephone 117-3. .
FLORAL DESIGNS. CUT FLOWERS
E. V. BEALES,
FLORIST AND SEEDSMAN, \
Cor. 2d anil Cedar Sts,, St.Paul, Minn
SEEDS AND BULBS.
FLORAL DECORATIONS.
MONEY. i
We have some small amounts on hand
to loan quickly on Improved property
at regular rates.
CLARK ..&' .THORNE,
_1_ _•.>.-<-_■ _*____
. • A F"__N"__3 *
LOT ON SELBY AVENUE,
FOR SALE CHEAP.
WM. N, YIGUERS & CO.,
1 41 :£&§s F© uitfc : Street
_S_*A St. Paul Clothing House that is Exclusively
Owned and Controlled by St. Paul Men.
s *^____i^ :
LOT 6327.
Genuine Imported Blarney Tweed (Irish) Suits,
four-button Cutaways or Sacks, neat black and
white mixture; best possible Business Suit. Price,
$20. '
LOT 6393.
Harris Cassimere Sack Suit, black and white
small check pattern, a very genteel suit. Price,
$15.
LOT 6395.
Scotch Tweed Sack Suit, narrow black and
white stripe; a good Business Suit. Price, $14.
LOT 6600.
English Suiting Sack Suit, rather loud plaid
with light cardinal mixture; a nobby Business Suit;
for $25. "
LOT 6378.
The old-fashioned Canadian homespun Sack
Suit. Everybody knows the wearing quality o£
homespun. Price, $10.
Our lines of Black and Blue Serge and Cheviot.
Frock and Sack Suits are specially attractive:'
Prices from • -j
$14 to $28 a Suit
In all cases our prices guaranteed as Low op
Lower than the same quality and make of goods;
can be bought for elsewhere.
Our Price List and Rules for Self-Measurement
sent postpaid to any address.
B** Open Every Evening, -+&
BOSTON
03_T___ - PRICE O__,OT__CIInTO HOUSE
THIRD STREET, CORNER OF ROBERT,
ST. PA TJL.
JOSEPH M'KEY & CO. ST. PAUL'S RELIABLE OUTFITTERS,
We have no branch houses, and are not a branch of any house.
SOME BARGAINS YET
We advertised last week a list of Special Bargains. Most of
those have been sold, but we add a few equally attractive!
These Pianos are all good, honest instruments, fine tone and
action, and worth much more than we ask for them. We do'
not have such every day.
1.1*. 3 1T5: & ERSST- Grand, four round corners, handsome
ease, 7% octaves, ivory keys 1317 SQ
J. I». llAl.__— Square Grand, all latest iniproveinents.nearly new, a _reat I ■
bargain tor./ " \ ° . 175 00
G-JSLEK- Upright; another of this favorite make, in fine condition
very cheap at ' 18( - q0
_.__Cl_l.l. 1£ OS.- Square, latest style, very little used' an in perfect . :
order; cost $475; only *** °v) 00
IFM. SCIIAEITKR— Square, carved legs and lyre,* serpentine *.
111 sr, i'A octaves, fine torn* 150 00
STEI-¥_VAY— Square, handsome rosewood case, can "cd legs __„lVrc"
excellent tone and action ; a rare bargain at ....-' o.>- 50
Above will be sold on easy payments if desired, good stool
and cover included. __^
W J DYER & BRO 4JB and Jso East Third St.-ST. PAUL;
ww. v. EJicn QL 509 an_ 5H Nicollet Ay.-MINNEAPQUS
" ' " "a
100 PIANOS!
200 ORGANS!
FOR SALE OR FOR RENT.
$3 TO $6 PER MONTH.
Every one fully warranted. No occasion fori
any family to be without a good instrument.
WHITNEYOnSIC store,
97 EAST THIRD STREET.
Si
92 and 94 E. Third St, "'"rq^ **"■
EXC H AN G E
.our Old PIANOS AND ORGANS for New Ones!'
Easy Terms on Difference.
BUY NOW, and get the benefit of CASH PRICES ON TIME, a Choice from,
DECKER BROS., II IIMPFR fr 0 "
HAINES, BRIGGS, fj UP b .__. I I
EVERETT AND SMITH iaiARWELL
_Y-_I-A._n.OS. lOT.East ___ Street.
HIGH ART JEWELRY!^
DIAMONDS, WATCHES AND SILVERWARE.
A. BROWN,
111. East Third Street, *■*, St. Paul, Minn.
•"* *«*'.'*-i *,

xml | txt