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St. Paul daily globe. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1884-1896, May 10, 1888, Image 6

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-ARNES'BUjNDERERS
Present the St. Louis Team
With a Game With Their
Compliments.
The Report Sent Out That
They Couldn't Even Hit
Beer Kegs.
Minneapolis Defeated at Kan
sas City— A Pretty Game
at Omaha.
Chicago, New York, Boston
and Philadelphia National
League Winners.
Special to the Glob?.
St. LOUIS, May The St. Pauls
played here to-day, and their display
was fully what the word "play" is de
fined in the dictionary. Had Staley
pitched beer kegs over the plate at
Sportsman park to-day it is doubtful
whether the St. Paul team would have
made enough hits to win the game.
Three was the sum total in nine
Innings with an eveiy-day ball,
and Shafer scored two of these.
There were some queer motions made
during the game by the visitors, which
their opponents and the speculators
were inclined to be believe were at
tempts to cripple Beckley at first base,
and whether it was their intention or
not, the} were nearly successful. Beck
ley is one of the most inoffensive men
in the team, and has never had any
trouble in bis position until to-day. In
the seventh inning Morrissy, who is big
enough, to knock the cover off the ball,
it lie could find it, ran into Beckley and
injured his arm. Jake hung on to the
ball, however, and retired the man. In
the eighth Murphy tried the same thing,
and landed on his back about ten feet
from the base. He succeeded, however,
in knocking the ball out of Beckley's
bauds, but be was declared out. This
may have been earnestness or deter
mination to win the game, but it was
Dot a very friend-making piece of work.
Anderson did very well for St. Paul,
and the team would have made a much
belter showing if it had played
anywhere near as well, but his support
all around was bad. lie struck Staley
in the shoulder, but did not cripple him.
Morrissy made two of the prettiest stops
and pick-ups during the game ever seen
On this or any other ball field. He
started into play first, but changed with
Vouch to third base after the third in
ning. It was while at third that he made
the two great plays. Staley pitched one
of Ills best games, and was
ADMIRABLY SUPPORTED
all around, but his playing was not su
perior to that of Anderson, as four
bases on balls were taken off him and
only two off Anderson, and Staley also
pitched a wild hall. Murphy and Veach
both muffed liy balls, and Kemmler
made a wild throw. Murphy's muff in
center field in the tirst inning let in a
man. Carroll had very little to do, and
no opportunity to show what was in
in. Veach unified a lly in the eighth
inning without serious results.
Kemmler passed one ball and
ranked next to Anderson in his
able playing. Pickett made a muff at
short stop, but was a lively player and
covered his territory well. Nicholson
opened the game with a single, reached
second on a wild throw by Shafer, but
was nut out at the plate while trying to
run in on Crooks' grounder to Ander
son. Crooks went to second on the play
and scored on Murphy's muff of Burch's
lly. After two outs in the third, Staley
was hit by a pitched ball, and hits
by Beckley, Crooks and Burch,
aiid an error by Pickett, netted
two runs. Anderson made a run for
the visitors in the same inning on a hit
to left, a steal and two wild pitches. In
the fourth Keiiyon made a hit and
Cattte a double along the left foul line,
on which Kenyon scored. Kenyon
Scored in the sixth on his hit to center,
ft single by Dolan and Staley's double.
In the eighth St. Paul got in another
run. Crooks tailed to handle Ander
son's hit. and Shafer's double advanced
him to third and he scored on Murphy's
sacrifice. Score:
ST. LOUIS. A B| ll Illt H R TO A , E
Nicholson, 2b. 5 0 10 2 2 0
Beckley, lb. . _ 1 1 0 11 . Oj 0
Crooks. 3b.... 3 2 10 2 11
Burch. If 4 0 10 10 0
Herr, ss 3* 0 0 0 0 5 1
Keuyou. cf.... 41 2 3 0 1 0 0
Canlz.rf II C)| 1 0 2 0 0
Dolan, c 4 01 10 8 2 0
Staley, p 3 0 10 0 7 4
— __
Totals 35] 5 10 0 27 17 ii
ST. I* A VI.. A B 11 ill SBIFO a I E
Bhafer, 2b 4 0 "2 o 2 5 1
Murphy, cf.... 10 0 0 0 0 1
Carroll, if 3 0 <» 0 i 0 O
Karle, If 2 0 0 1 l o 0
Veach,3b<& 11) 3 0 0 0 7 11
Mor'sy.lb&Sb 10 0 0 7 3 0
Pickett, ss... 1 o 0 0 4 4 1
Anderson, p.. 3 ■_' 1 1 0 4 2
Kenunler, c... ;: 0 0 0 5 3 1
Totals :;t;, •_• 3 2 27 20 7
M. Louis I O 2 1 Ti 100 o—s
Bt. I'm 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 o—2
Earned runs, st. bonis l: two-base hits.
Cant**, Stale> und Shafer; double play,
Bhafer, Pickett and Morrissy; bases ou balls,
nil' Anderson 2. oil Staley 4* hit pitcher,
Staley; struck out. by Anderson 3, "by Slalev
5; left on bases, St. Paul 5. St. Louis 0; wild
pitches, staley 3: passed ball, Kemmler i;
time, 1:50; umpire, Hawaii.
Minneapolis Beaten.
Kansas City. May 9.—
Kansas Citv.... o 2 201101 I— S
Minneapolis.... 0 0001 100 o—2
Base hits, Kansas City 10, Minneapolis 9;
errors, Kansas City 3, Minneapolis 3.
CHICAGO SHUT OUT.
liOvettDoes Some Fine Work in
the Box.
Special to the Globe.
Omaha, Neb., May o.— The first game
of ball since the recent flood was played
on the home grounds to-day between
the local team and the Chicago Maroons,
and resulted in a shut-out for the vis
itors. OLovett was a Samson in the box.
He gave but one man a base on balls,
struck out eight and allowed but two
hits to be made off him. Omaha had
great difficulty in handling Dunn's
curves, and only succeeded in scoring
two runs. The fielding of the visitors
was excellent, but the victory was won
for Omaha by Lovett'** pitching. Dunn
did his best work during the first few
innings, but perceptibly weakened be
fore th;- game was over. Score:
OMAHA. I ABl It I 1 B'S 15 Pul A j X
Bums, If i 4: 0 1 10 0 0
Flyuiurf i 3 0 0 0 0 0 1
Aunts, cf 1 4 0 l| 1 2 O 0
O'Conncll, lb.; 1110 8 0 1
Miller, ss | 3| 01 2 0 13 0
Shannon, 2b.. 1 1| 0 0 1 -1 o 0
Doran. 3b 4! 0 10 12 1
Lovettp 4; 0 1 1 2 10 2
Wilson,., c... 3 1 0 0] 9 2 0
Totals ' 33 1 2j 7j 4 1 27J~37i 5
CHICAGO. A b| 11 1 IB I SB IP ol a I E
Long, cf ! 41 0 110 0 1
Crogan, 1b..:. 3j 0! 0 0 14 0 0
Lunge, :'b. ...4 0 0 0 0 2 0
Rooks, if 4, 0 0 0 2 10
Moriarity, rf..l 3 0 1 0 0 0 0
I.e.Mgle, 2b... 3! 0 o 0 2 3 0
DiU-.iFilc, C.... 3| 0 O 0 7 1 0
Hauraluin, ss.l 3 0 0 0 l 8| 0
Dunn, p I 3 0 0 0 16 2
Totals 130 0 21 1; 27 21l 3
Omaha ~To "o 1 0 O 1 o o o—2
Chicago 0 0000000 0—
Earned run.Onmhal 'three-base bit.Miller;
two-base bit, Annis; bases on balls, oft' Lov
ett 1, oft* Dunn 2; struck out, by Lovett 8, by
Dunn 4 ; left on bases, Omaha 5, Chicago 4:
nasscc balls, Dugdale 2; time, 1:20; umpire,
rower.
No Game at Dcs Moines.
The game at Dcs Moines between Dcs
"Moines and Milwaukee was prevented
by rain.
Ynti wo *-'- - 0l what you want unless you
* vu advertise in the Globe. . "
NATIONAL, LEAGUE.
Philadelphia, New York, Boston
and Chicago Win.
PiTTSBui-G, May 9.— The rain yester
day left the Pittsburg grounds in fair
condition. Attendance 3,000. Score:
Pittsburg 0 0 0 0 0 1 o—l
Philadelphia 10 0 0 0 1 o—2
Hits, Pittsburg 4. Philadelphia 6; errors,
Pittsburg 2, Philadelphia 3; earned runs,
Pittsburg 1, Philadelphia 2; two-base hits,
Fogarty 2, Farrar 3: double plays, Fields and
. Smith. Bastain and Farrar : first base on balls,
Carroll, Fogarty, Bastian: first baseou errors.
Dalrymple; struck out, by Henderson 1, by
Gleasou 3; time, 1:25; umpire, Dauiels.
INDIANAPOLIS 4, SEW VOBK 18.
Indianapolis, May 9.— Healy's arm
was sore to-day and the visitors hatted
the ball all over the ball ground and
adjacent lots. In the fifth inning Keefe
complained of sickness, and Ewin*f
lieved him, and McGeaehy also took
die box in Healy's stead. ■ Bassett's
work was the fielding feature. Score:
Indianapolis.. l 0000100 2— 4
New York 5 3 5 0 0 12 2 *—
Hits, Indianapolis 7. New York 19; errors,
Indianapolis 11, New York 14; earned runs,
Indianapolis 1. New York 16; two-base hits,
Healy 2, Keete, Kwing, Brown: home Ans,
Denny, Hiehardson. Tiernan, Keefe, Gore,
Connor 3; first base ou balls, Hines 3. Ewing,
("ore, Tiernan 2: first base on errors, Indian
apolis 2. New York 2; struck out, Seery 2,
McGeaehy. Daly. Denny, Hines; passed balls,
Brown 5, Daly 1 ; wild pitches, Kwing 1, Mc-
Geaehy 1; time, 1:50; umpire, Lynch.
CHICAGO 13, WASHINGTON 2.
Chicago, May Washington tried
its new pitcher, Greening, to-day, but
he did not prove successful, and he was
batted all over the field. Attendance
400. Score:
Chicago 4 5 0 0 10 0 3 o—l3
Washington,.. 1 0 100000 o—2
Hits, Washington 5, Chicago 17; errors,
Washington 11. Chicago 4; earned runs,
Chicago 8, Washington 1 ; two-base hits.
Pfefler 4. Burns; three-base hits, Sullivan,
Duly: home runs, Sullivan, IIov: first base
on balls, Anson 2, Pfeffer, Williamson;
truck out by K rock 9, Greening 2; passed
passed balls, Daly 2 Densbv 1 : wild pitches,
Greening 4: time, 1:50; umpire. Valentine.
DETROIT 0, BOSTON 13.
Detroit, May Kelly tried hard to
beat Boston to-day, but the efforts of his
entire team in that direction would have
been ineffectual. Detroit was deter
mined to lose, and the way in which it
went about it demonstrated its ability to
play the worst game of ball ever wit
nessed. The features of the game were
the stupid base running of the home
team. White and Howe's idiotic fielding
and Kelly's muff of an easy liv when
the bases were full. Score:
Detroit 2 00300010—6
Boston 2 5 0 0 2 0 0 4 *— 13
Hits, Boston 14, Detroit 11; errors, Boston
•12, Detroit 5 ; earned runs, Detroit 2, Boston
7; two-base hits, Howe, Brouthers 2, White,
iNash 2, Wise; three-base hits. Johnston,
Kelly: home run, Sutton; first base on balls.
Ganzel. Brouthers, Hiehardson, Morrill; hit
by pitched ball, Brouthers, Hanlon: first base
on errors, Detroit 3, Boston 2; struck out, by
Conway 1, by Sowders 2; passed ball,
O'Rourke; wild pitch, Sowders; time, 2:10;
umpire. Decker.
AMERICAN ASSOCIATION.
Kansas City Terribly Trounced —
Other Games.
Louisville, Ky., May The Louis
ville team put up a strong game to-day,
and easily defeated Kansas City, out
playing them at every point. Fagen
was wild and easily hit, while Chamber
lain was steady and his curves puzzling.
Aside from Fagen Kansas City played
an average fielding game. Mack and
>w>lt" led Louisville's batfcimr, with
White and Browning following close.
Except McTamnianv and Barkeley,
Kansas City was weak at the bat. At
tendance light. Score:
Louisville 0 0 0 0 2 2 G 2 o—lB
Kansas City. . .0 0000 o—o
Hits, Louisville 13, Kansas City 8: errors,
Louisville 5, Kansas City 12: earned runs,
Louisville 9. Kansas City 3 ; two base hits.
Browning 2, Werrick; three-base hit. White;
first base on balls, St ration. Mack, Collins,
White, Smith. Davis. McTammiuiv: first base
on errors, Louisville 3, Kansas City 2: struck
out, Davis 2, Fagen 3, Rowe. Mack. Smith,
Werrick; passed balls, Cross 1, Briody 2;
wild pitches. Chamberlain 1. Fagen 1; time,
two hours; umpire. McQuade.
CIXCIXXATI 7, ST. LOUIS 8.
Cincinnati, May 9.— Baldwin's wild
throw to Riley in the eighth inning of
to-day's game, in an effort to effect a
double play, gave the victory to the St.
Louis Browns. Score:
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0 3 4 0 o—7
St. Louis 4 0000 102 I— B
Hits. Cincinnati 8, st. Louis 8; errors. Cin
cinnati 7; earned runs, Cincinnati 0, St.
Louis 1: two-base hits. Nicol. Fen nelly;
double play, McPhee and Keilly; first base
on balls. Nicol. Tebeau. Robinson 2, King 2;
hit by pitched ball, McPnee, Corkhill, Car
neuter. McCarthy; first base on errors, St.
Louis 2: struck out, by Mullane 4, by King
4; passed balls, Baldwin 2, Boyle 1; wild
pitch, Mullane; time 1:45; umpire Does
cher.
ATHLETICS 3, BROOKLYN 5.
Philadelphia, May Gleason's
errors gave the Brooklyn club another
victory to-day. The visitors made four
singles in the first inning, which with a I
fumble by Gleason netted three runs,
and two singles and a fumble and a wild
throw by ("leason gave them two more
in the fourth. (lame was called on ac
count of rain. Score:
Athletics O 0 0 0 2 I—3
Brooklyn 3 0 0 2 0 o—s
Hits. Athletics 8, Brooklyn 9; errors, Ath
letics 5, Brooklyn 3: earned runs, Athletics
2, Brooklyn 2; two-base hit, G leason; home
run, Stovey; double plays, Smith, McClellan
and tin-: firs: base on balls, Lark-in. Pinck
ney: first base on errors. Athletic.- 1. Brook.
lyn 3: struck out, Poorman 2. Sullivan. Car
uthers; passed halls, Town'send 2, Buslioug
2; time. 1:20; empire. Ferguson.
OX THE OLD GROUNDS.
President Thompson Says Satur
day's Game Will Be Played
There.
President Thompson, of the base ball
association, sat in the club head
quarters in the Davidson block yester
day, with a soberer look than usual on bis
face. Jim Duryea, the pitcher, sat
near him, and he looked up at the wet
cloulds and looked thoughtful. The
new base ball grounds are entirely
under water and a part of the old park
is Hooded. A game is scheduled for
Saturday of this week, and there was
small prospect of the grounds being in
j condition. This was one of the tilings
which President Thompson was think
ing about.
"Where will the Saturday game be
played?"' asked a Globe reporter.
"On the old grounds,'' said Mr.
Thompson. "If there is no more
water there than there is now, I think
play will be possible. There is no hope
that the new grounds will be in shape
probably not before the second series
of home games, but if the water gets
no higher on the old ones we will try it
there. We have not made any arrange
ments for any other grounds.' We have
gone on tire supposition that we could
play there. It's pretty hard luck. If
the water had let us alone the new park
would have been ready. I don't think
there is a shadow of doubt that it will
be iii shape when the team gets back
from its next trip."
'STANDING OP THE TEAMS.
Relative Positions of the Clubs of
Three Leagues.
The St. Paul team is spiking itself
down in last place, another peg having
been driven yesterday. The record of
the teams is appended:
Played. Won. Lost. Percentage
Dcs Moines 5 5 0 1.000
Omaha 0 5 - 1 . .831
St. Louis 8 5 3- .025
Kansas City....... 0 3 3 .500
Milwaukee . 5 2 3- .400
Chicago 0 2 4 .333
Minneapolis 8 2 G .250
St. Paul 0 15 .100
111 the American association the St.
Louis team recaptured first place. The
Nationals stand as the day previous.
National. Amecicax.
Won. Lost Won. Lost.
Chicago 12 2 St. Louis 10 4
Boston 12 3 Cincinnati .12 5
New York... 5 1 Brooklyn.... 12 0
Detroit 8 7 | Athletic 8 i)
Philadelphia 7 Bj ßaltimore ... 7 8
Pittsburg.... 5 10 Louisville ... 7 11
Indianapolis. 3 13 Cleveland 0 10
Washington. 2 11 Kansas City.. 3 12
Games To-Day.
St. Paul at St. Louis.
Minneapolis at Kansas City.
Milwaukee at Dcs Moines.
Chicago at Omaha. "
Boston at Pittsburg. ■'"":..-
New York at Chicago.
Philadelphia at Detroit.
Washington at Indianapolis.
Brooklyn at Philadelphia.
THE gAJfrT ftAtJL T)AtLY GLOBE: TEHXRS^^ MOBNTN& MAY 15, 188 S.
Baltimore at Cleveland.
St. Louis at Ciuciuuati.
Kausas City at Louisville.
THE SHAW BENEFIT.
The benefit for John Shaw to-morrow
at the Minneapolis ball park promises
to be a great financial success. The
tickets are for sale at Leland's store on
Nicollet, and* are going very rapidly.
The team that Shaw will captain will
be very strong, there being five profes
sional players, and the remaining four
are all promising amateurs. The - other
team is composed of ex-college gradu
ates, and there will be representatives
from Harvard, Yale, Williams and
other Eastern colleges. - -V. - ■
BALTIMORE RACES. <:
How the Flyers Came in Yester
day at Pimlico.
Baltimore, May 9.— For the second
day of the spring meeting of the Mary
land Jockey club at Pimlico the weather
was cloudy and warm and the track in
good condition. The fields were not
large, but all the races were well con
tested.
First race, for three-year-olds, with non
winning and maiden allowances, three-quar
ters of a mile— Starters: King Fan, Defence,
Branch. Young Duke. Brown Charlie, Crich
ton, Falatka. ; Brown Charlie won by two
lengths, Defence second, Crichton third.
Time. 1:15%.
Second race, Vernal sweepstakes tor non
winning three-year-olds, one — Starters:
Maiden Hair' Revolt gelding, Joe Lee, Re
fund. Ella Smith, Defaulter. Defaulter won
by a length. Joe Lee second, Revolt gelding
third; time, 1:45.
Third race. Clabaugh memorial stakes, for
two-year olds, one-half mile — Starters:
Sourire. Buddhist. Little Barefoot. Holiday,
Hot Scotch, Single Stone. Buddhist won by
three length-"*, Holiday second, Little Bare
foot third; time. *50_u
Fourth race, handicap, winning penalties,
one and one-eighth miles Starters: Le
Logos, Ten Booker. Bela. Lizzie Baker. Le
Logos won by three lengths. Ten Booker
second, Bela third: time, I :ss*,-*.
Fifth race, penalties and allowances, one
mile— Starters: Paymaster and Tit ' Willow.
Paymaster won by a short length; time, 1:4.6.
ENTRIES FOR TO-MORROW :
First race, one mile— Salvini, 95; Michael.
87; Seed Tick, 108; Paymaster. 108; Al
Reed, 111; SamKcene, 97; ('olden Reel, 90.
Second race. Chesapeake stakes, one and
one-fourth miles— Belle d'Or. 113.
Third race, three-fourths of a mile— Duke
of Bourbon, 115; Flagaletto, colt, 103;
Britannic. 113; Harry Russell, 110; Charley
Arnold, 95: Hawley, 90; Ban Box, 108";
Revolt, gelding, 93.
Fourth race, the Peyton handicap, one and
one-eighth miles — Vosburg, 94; The Bour
bon. 110: Bess, 112; Glemnound, 107; Al
Reed, 100; Klamath. 102; Panama, 107.
Fifth race, one mile Sam Brown, 112;
Lottery. 110; King B, 105 Claypate, 104;
Wanderment, 110; Nellie B. 104.
Tips— First race. Paymaster and Sam
Keeue: third. Duke of Bourbon and Harry
Russell; fourth. The Bourbon and Bess;
filth, Sam Brown and King B.
LEXINGTON RACES.
A Big Crowd Out on the Third Day
of the Spring Meeting.
Lexington*, May The third day
of the spring meeting of the Kentucky
association was largely attended,
weather clear and fine and track in
good condition.
First race, selling, purse $300, usual allow
ance for three-year-olds and upwards —
Starters: Lela May, 95, Covington; Delia,
85, Freeman; John Gray. 108. McCarty;
Arundle, 115, L. Jones; Jaubert, 103. Taral;
Myrtle, 93, Barnes: Lepanto, 114, Gibbson.
Lela May won by a length and a half, Myrtle
second, Delia third.
Second race, the -Breeders' stake for two
year-old colts and fillies, $1,000 added by
the breeders of Kentucky— Starters : French
Park, 115, Fitzpatrick; The Lioness, 112,
McCarty; Champagne Charley, 115, Mur
phy: Brown Princess, 112, Taral; Cassius,
115, Cooper; Castaway Second, 115, Coving
ton; Outbound. 115, Ellis. French Park won
by two lengths from Brown Princess, who
was a nose in front of The Lioness, third.
Time, 1 :17.
Third race. Clay stakes for three-year-olds
vho have not won a race prior to Jan. 1,
1888, $50v» aided, one mile and a quarter-
Starters: Van Trump, 118, Murphy: Long
Roll. 118, Hathaway; Ceawood. li.B, Mc
carty. Ceawood won. Long' Roll the same iv
front of the favorite, Yon Trump. The race
was a farce from the beginning, and created
a great deal of merriment. Time, 2:16%.
Fourth race, handicap, purse $400, one
and one-sixteenth starters: Asceola
100, Moore; Barrister 90. Barnes; Fabulous
90, Allen; Derocbment 90, Covington;
Bouita 105. Stoval; Kosciusko 105, Green;
Castaway 88, Watson. Barrister won by
two lengths from Asceola, who was four
lengths in front of Derochmcnt, third.
Time, 1:49%.
Fifth race, selling purse, usual allowance,
one mile — Starters: Red Stone, 107, Breek
enrfdge; Jennie McFarland, 107, Covington;
Mishap, 93, Barnes; Red Stone won by a
bead, Jennie McFarland a length in front of
Mishap. Time, I :4(J*U.
TO-DAY'S ENTRIES.
** First race, three-quarter mile— Jacquehn.
87: Wary, 108; Catalpa, 103; Little Sis, 91;
Don Regent, 89: Princess Blaudina, 91.
Second race, oue and one-half mile—
on. 118; Mompslier, 115. -I.- . • :.' •
Third, three-fourths of a mile— lis. 90;
Liantha, 91; Volatile, 94: Marchina, 87;
Mahoning, 92; Kosciusko, 110.
Fourth, sell, one mile— Lucky Jim. 101;
Unique, 105; Tudor, 94: Uallie'B, 77; Black
Knight, 82.
CROOKED TIJRF3IEN.
How They Were Dealt With by
the Board of Review.
Chicago, May 9.— board of re
view of the National Trotting associa
tion met last night and remained in ses
sion until midnight, President Johnson,
Secretary Morse and all the members
being present. The first case was that -
of James Boardman, of Jackson, Mich..
and Frank Withkoff. of Detroit. Both
were expelled for complicity in pulling
the man' Jennie F at Rochester last
year, and George Tufts, the driver, was
expelled by the Rochester Driving asso
ciation. In the case of M. Bernard
Howes and the chestnut stallion Circu
lator, alias Standard Bearer, the unlaw
nil winnings were paid last year and
the horse reinstated on payment of $155
entrance fees. Bowes was fined 8100
and reinstated. George Ileitzman,
owner, and Leon talk, driver, of Min
nie Schafer, were expelled last fall for
suppression of time and applied for re
instatement. Application refused. In
the case of M. .Morse vs. Frank Maris,
J. S. Smith and the mare Alice Peyton,
alias Lady Stevens, Staris was expellee!
and Smith and the mare suspended
until the unlawful winnings are repaid.
Smith was lined §100 for changing
names.
THE TRIGGER.
Conclusion of the Northwestern
Kennel Club's Annual Shoot.
The first annual shooting tourna
ment of the Northwestern Kennel
club was concluded yesterday, there
being a large increase the attendance
over that of the preceding day, and
some excellent shooting. The several
contests and prize winners is shown in
the following list: Sweepstakes were
shot off in the morning and regular
events in the afternoon. The tourna
ment was a success financially and
otherwise. Below arc the results of the
shooting:
""FIRST SHOOT — TEX PEOIUAS.
First money, §12.80, Daly ; second money,
59.00, Burkhardt Griggs; third money. so.4o,
Anderson; fourth money, $3.20. Paul: fifth'
prize, titty cigars, Blakely.
SECOND SHOOT— FIFTEEN SINGLE TEORIAS.
First money, $14. 10. Daly: second money,
§10.80. Wiiiiii, Holt: third money, $7.2'"',
Paul; fourth money, $3.00. M. F. Kennedy;
fifth prize. 100 cigars, C. Thompson, Banna.
THIRD SHOOT, NINE SINGLES, THREE PAIRS.
First money, $18.90. Balsom, Burkhardt:
second money. §14.15, Kennedy. Hanna:
third money. §9.45, Daly, Paul. "Anderson,
Holt; fourth money, §1.70, Wanu, Lamprey;
fifth, box oranges, Blakely.
FOIHTU SHOOT, TEN SINGLES, FIVE TAIRS.
First money. §21.00, Hanna; second
money, $10 20, Blakely; third money, §10.80.
Anderson. Wanu: fourth money. §5.10,
Burkhardt; fifth, silk umbrella, Kennedy.
PRIZES— BEST AVERAGES TWO DAYS' SHOOT.
First, §30. Daly: second, corduroy hunting
suit, Balsom: third. $20. Warm aal Bolt;
fourth. Winchester rifle. Paul: fifth, bamboo
bass rod, Anderson ; sixth, Mcintosh coat,
Hanna; seventh. Mcintosh hip boots,
Blakely ; eighth, silver pocket -flasK, Wesrer
son : ninth, corduroy blouse, Hanson *, tenth,
hunting boots, Ponsonby.
English Races.
London, May 9.— the Chester
meeting to-day the race for the Chester
cup was won by J. C. K. Homfray's
aged brown horse Kiiisky. The Duke
of Westminster's four-year-old brown
colt Saville was second, and Lord Brad
ford's four-year-old. brown colt Chippe
way third. There were twelve starters.
Lacrosse.
Members of the St. Paul Lacrosse
club will meet at the Nicollet house this j
evening at 8 o'clock, ; with a view to j
taking steps for consolidating with the
Minneapolis club aud forming a strong
team to defend the Twin Cities.
Two Fights on the Tapis. \
Special to the Globe.
; Tower, Minn., May 9.— Billings Linn
and Tom Manning are to fight to a finish
Saturday night with hard gloves.
Tommy Burke and Cronin will fight ,
ten rounds with hard gloves *f or $100* a.
side. •■■.-■".. : •'-' J
. , row
;'V Sports, Limited. u a 'fl
Pat Killen, O. 11. Smith, Jim Griffin, George'
Siddons, James Reynolds, Prot. John Clark -
and several clever amateurs will participate
in a special exhibition to be Riven at Prof.:
Clark s rooms, 153 East seventh street, ifti
day night. .;.;■. -p- }.;p -- . - . . . .„,-,
□ Elmer Foster left last night to join the >*e[w i
York Base Ball club at Chicago to-morrow.
He thinks that he will meet with better sucj
cess with the stick than in the opening chifaP
pionship games. "
! The "Minneapolis High School club will
play the Macalester team at the Minneapolis
pall park on Saturday afternoon. - '- '
I The Diamonds, of Minneapolis, wish to ar
range games with any amateur clubs in the
Twin Cities. " '
•-'-• ia- '"V-- ->"•!
GLENNED IN STILLWATER.
. * fl'tO
Mrs. Sarah Staples' Alleged la-;
.-.-..: sanity — Other News. ; r sm.
The examination of Sarah E. Staples *
before the judge of probate, on the peti
tion of her children to have a guardian .
appointed, was continued yesterday
afternoon, and a number of witnesses
were examined. A conclusion of the'
case will not be reached before Friday
or Saturday. The defense, has not
begun its evidence yet. The petitioners
show by a number of witnesses that the
property she has tried to sell is worth
several thousand dollars more than the
price at which she has offered it, and
show also some very strange conduct on
her part.
The Democratic primaries will be held
in the city to-night. There is as yet but
little excitement, and the delegation
from this counts*, which will be practi
cally settled by the caucuses is not
likely to lie a partisan one. There is an
evident disposition to send to St. Paul a
delegation of good Cleveland men, who
will ignore minor issues and who will
unite with the masses of the party in se
curing a unanimous quota of represent
ative, harmonious Democrats.
The lake has crept up to a point
higher than it has been at any time this
spring, and within two feet of the high
water of 1882. The cellars and base
ments of Main street are all flooded, and
there is no sign of an abatement. The
current is running very swift past the
bridge.
The board of county commissioners,
after a session or several days, ad
journed yesterday afternoon, it appro
priated $1,000 for the opening of the St.
Paul Park road for the purpose of aiding
voluntary subscribers to put the road in •
passable condition. The usual grist of
bills was allowed.
The Stillwater water company has
elected the following officers : Presi
dent, E. VV. Durant; vice president, K.
T. Horsey: secretary and general man
ager, H. H. Harrison; treasurer, JR. S.
Davis.
The examination of Tim Fox, who
tried to throw himself into the lake
Monday, has resulted in his being de-"
clared of unsound mind, and he will be
s-'iit to the hospital at Rochester in a
few days.
Linda Culberron. of Valley Creek,
Washington county, has been granted a
pension since the date of his discharge
from Company B, Third regiment, Min
nesota volunteers, in ISGS, amounting to .
§540.
A number of drives have come down. .
The large volume of water is moving
the logs along much easier than was ex- v
pected when they were sent up.
The Crusaders of this city held an en
thusiastic meeting last evening.
W. S. Conrad has been appointed
.guardian of Tim Fox.
«-*•**■ —
To Lovers ol' a Good Cigar.
Just received, direct from Key West,
the La Arlitas, five sizes. Guaranteed j
to be elegant. Try them, at . Hippler & J
Collier's All-Night Pharmacy, Seventh
and Sibley streets. * :
Choking Catarrh. 'yS.
Have you awakened from a disturbed sleep .
with all the horrible sensations of an assassin
clutching your throat and pressing the life
breath from your tightened chest Have
you noticed the languor and debility that suc
ceed the effort to clear your throat and head
of this catarrhal matter? What a depress
ing influence it exerts upon the mind, cloud
ing the memory and tilling the head with
pains and f strange noises! How difficult to
rid the nasal passages, throat and lungs of
this poisonous mucus all can testify who
are afflicted with catarrh. How difficult to
protect the system against its further prog
ress towards the lungs, liver and kidneys,
nil physicians will admit. It is a terrible dis
ease, and cries out for relief aud cure.
The remarkable curative powers, when all
other remedies utterly fail, of !->anfoi*i>'s
Radical Cube, are attested oy thousands
who gratefully recommend it to fellow-suf
ferers. No statement is made regarding it
that can not be substantiated by the most re
spectable and reliable references.
Each packet contains one bottle of the
Radical Cube, one box of Catarrhal Sol
vent, and an Imi-roveo Inhaler, with treat
ise and directions, and is sold by all drug
gists for SI.
Potter Drug & Chemical Co., Boston*.
KIDNEY PAINS.
m KIDNEY PAINS.
With their weary, dull, achimr,
lifeless, all-gone" sensation, re- !
lieved in one minute by the !
Cuticura Anil- Plaster. * The
first and only pain-subduing Plaster. Abso
lutely unrivaled as an instantaneous and
infallible antidote to pain, inflammation ami
weakness. At all druggists, 25 cents; five
for SI: or, postage free, of Potter Drug &
Chemical Co.. Boston. Mass.
SOME DOCTORS
honestly admit that they can't cure
Rheumatism and Neuralgia. Othera
say they can — don't. Ath-lo
pho-ros says nothing but — cures.
That's the secret of its success.
Years of trial have proved it to be
a quick, safe, sure cure.
Concord, N. H.. Sept. 3, 1887
In my own family Athlophoros was used
as a last resort, the user bavins.- suffered
from rheumatism for years and having
been treated for the disease by different
physicians in this State and Massachu
setts without even temporary relief. I
Upon my recommendation scores of peo.
pie have used this remedy with the same
results claimed for it. C. H. Wilson.
Dubuque, lowa, Jan. 3, 1888.
Athlophoros has completely cored mo of
nervous headache, and I feel thankful for
alt the good it hin done me.
Mrs. Louise Cherry. - ' ! '
43* Send C cents for the beautiful colored pic
ture, " Moorish Maiden." f [J
THE ATHLOPHOROS CO. 112 Wall St. N. Y.
O'/j*
FOR SALE, CHEAP.
The most elaborate BAR
OUTFIT in the Northwest, con- !
sisting: of over 2,000 inches
of Mirror Glass and Furni
ture, all hand-carved. It
must be seen to be appre
ciated. 24 Washington aye.;
No. Box, 312.
A. H. KNOWLES,
Minneapolis.
BOWER'S
School of Shorthand.
ESTABLISHED 1831-.
Shorthand and Typewriting School
EXCLUSIVELY.
All brandies of shorthand work thor
oughly taught, and instructions strictly
individual. Success^ by mail lessons
guaranteed. Send for circular. *
G. 13. BOWER,*
622 Nicollet Ay« Minneapolis. Miua.
MORE FACTS
For Doubting Thomases, Cowardly Business Rivals,
■ . Prying Pauls and Anonymous Libellers.
We herewith give the result of a chemical analysis, made by one of the most
, eminent chemists in America, from whose appended titles it will be readily un
i derstood that as to character, standing, ability and integrity this gentleman's
reputation is absolutely unassailable and his opinion incontrovertible, The
analysis was made upon several different bottles of Dr. Buckland's
SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE,
procured by this "gentleman from reliable wholesale dealers in this city whose
standing is such that there cannot be the faintest possible suspicion of collusion
or jobbery of any kind.
A ■•; he chemist whose analysis we append is HENRY A. MOTT., jr., Ph. D., E.
I M., F. C. S., &c, formerly Professor of Chemistry in the New York Medical Col
; lege and Hospital for Women; Member of the American, Berlin and Paris Chem
ical Society; Fellow of the Chemical Society of Loudon: Member of the Society
| of PubllcAnalysts of London; Member of American Association for the Advance
ment bf Science; Member of the N. Y. Academy of Sciences; Member of the
I Medico-Legal Society, &c. ; Author of the "Chemist Manual," "Was Man Cre
ated?'"Artificial or Oleomargarine Butter," "Adulteration of Milk," "Testing
the Value of Rifles by- Firing Under Water," "The Laws of Nature" (No. 1, Mott
Series), &c.
A B ".V YORK. April 30, ISBS.
REPORT OF PROF. IIEXRI A. MOTT, PH. 0.. EX. ».
SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE CO.
<-F Vl' i. »:.m;.\ : Pursuant to your request. I have purchased in
the open market some of your SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE. I hare
submitted the same to a thorough qualitative analysis and I have
the honor to report that I find the SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE en
tirely free from any trace of the alkaloid morphine or any of its
salts.
I am, gentlemen, respectfully yours,
„ (Signed) HENRY A. MOTT, PH. »., IX. ».
P. O. Box 1,457.
Dr. Buckland's SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE is Nature's own tonic, pure, re
liable, harmless aim marvelous in its action. It is free from every conceivable
form or trace of any injurious ingredient of any kind, and the systematic perse
cution which has been pursued against it for months past has originated solely in
business and professional jealousy and an endeavor to stamp out if possible so
valuable a remedy and one which has played such havoc with the ordinary trade
in proprietary medicines.
SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE is safe for the octogenarian, the adult, the school
boy and the infant. It has cured disease after disease that has been pronounced
hopeless by some of our most eminent physicians. There is not an eminent medi
cal man ia the profession to-day, if he is liberal-minded, unbiased and honest,
who will not attest to the marvelous effects of SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE in the
most dangerous diseases.
SCOTCH OATS ESSENCE COMPANY.
160 FULTON STREET, NEW YORK.
A St.Paul Clothing House that is Managed and Controlled Exclusively by St. Paul Men.
"John, go down to the store and get me some
smelts, and if you can't get smelts, get cake;" so
said an eccentric master to his servant. If we can't
sell Summer Clothing this weather, we'll sell
So we've filled one of our large windows full of Um
brellas, making the largest display of Umbrellas
ever seen in the West. We marked these Umbrel
las at unusually low prices, so that any man, or
woman either, can now own a first-class umbrella
for very little money. Every Umbrella we sell warranted
for one year. $1, $1.50 and $2 for best quality, fast
colors, Ginghams, all sizes. All-Silk Umbrellas,
with elegant silver or gold heads, for $5. Extrava
gant and elaborate Umbrellas, the very best that
are made in the world, $6, $7, $7.50, $8, $9, $10,
$11 and $12. An enormous assortment of styles for
you to select from; women's umbrellas as well as
men's "Adonis" or walking-stick umbrellas.
IWNOTICE THE UMBRELLA WINDOW.^m
BOSTON
OITE - PRICE OLOTKEIISra- HOUSE
THIRD STREET, CORNER OF ROBERT,
ST. F^LTJL.
JOSEPH M'KEY & CO. ST. PAUL'S RELIABLE OUTFITTERS.
We have no branch houses, and are not a branch of any house.
& BROS., |
DEAJLEICS IN
FINE ART
Gas Fixtures!
96 East Third Street,
And 16 Second Avenue West, Duluth.
WE WART
TO BUY
IU DU!
A First-Class Residence,
Worth from $15,000 to 130,000, on St. An
thony hill. Only owners or agents with
exclusive contracts need apply. j
117 E. Fourth Street.
DE A "17 IV -Cjfeo Caused by Scar- j
UiliJ\j: i\ .CjDO let Fever, Measles,
Gatherings. Catarrh, Old Axe, Etc.. Etc., en
tirely relieved by a device which is pos- j
itively invisible, and which has been recom- i
mended by every physician who has exam- !
ined it. It is successful in cases where every j
other device or remedy has failed. It may be :
worn six mouths at a time without removal, I
causing no pain or inconvenience. For sale i
only by the inventor. '
H. "A." WALKS, - Bridgeport Conn.
___ — — — — — — — —^— — — — — '
OFFICES FOR RENT.
6DEI.IGHTFCT, OFFICE "ROOMS
newly finished and ready for occn "
pancv ; three or four double offices on dif
erent floors,and a large oflice with Vault on j
ground floor of new Glosb building, are tor j
rent. Unequaled in the city. Inquire at !
Globe counting room of '
LEWIS BAKER, Jr. j
SALE OF VALUABLE
REAL ESTATE
UNDER A
Decree in Partition 1
Juliet P. Mattocks. Plaintiff, vs. John Mat
tocks. Sarah Mattocks, Brewer Mattocks,
Emma Mattocks, Julia B. Northrup, Henry
J. Northrup, Helen P. Spencer, George-
Spencer, Walter 11. Mattocks, James Selby
Mattocks, Sherwood S. Mattocks, Fanny T.
Mattocks and Jessie P. Mattocks and All
Persons Unknown Having or Claiming an
Interest in the Property Described in the
Complaint in this Action, Defendants.
Notice is hereby given, that by virtue of a
decree of the District Court of the Second
Judicial District and County of Ranisey, State
of nesota.rendered and made in the above
entitled action on the 11th day of April, A.
D. 1888, whereby, among other things, it was
decreed that the property described in the
complaint be sold by the undersigned
referees, at public vendue to the highest
bidder for cash, that we will sell the south
east quarter of the southwest quarter of
section twenty-four, township twenty nine,
of range twenty -two, lying aud being in the
County of Ramsay and'stale of Minnesota, at
the front door of the Court House in St. .
Paul, at the corner of Wabasha and Fifth
streets, on Saturday, the 2d day of June,
A. D. 1888. at 10 o'clock in the forenoon,
to the highest bidder therefor for cash.
Ten per cent of the bid of the party to
whom said land is struck off must be paid
down at the time and place of sale, or the un
dersigned will again at once offer the same
for sale; balance of bid must be paid upon
confirmation of sale aud delivery of deed.
The tract will be sold in one parcel.
It. W. JOHNSON,
J. J. WATSON.
W. H. HVNDMAN,
Referees.
RQ W/nnn *** Fifth Street,
Un- ffUUU- SIOUX CITY, IOWA.
>g"p\ Reculnr Graduate in Medicine
JS-aj A —20 years' hospital and pri
_<saEgS b va:e practice— lo in Chicago
/BpttMs&k fa „ul New York — Estob
ftt'.\ S 3&f m WjLf ished In sloux City
nrfl_-i .ft <*i_* {no Years. Has the
— ~~ B ammmm largest Medical and Sur
gical Institute and Kye and Ear
Infirmary In the West— Rooms for pa
tients at fair rates: facilities to meet any
emergency— A Quiet Home and best care and
skill for Ladies during Pregnancy and Con
finement Dr. \V* Ol) is still treating all
Private, Nervous, Chronic and .Spe
cial diseases, Seminal Wealcness
(vital losses), Impotency (loss of power)
and all Fctna'e, Diseases, Irregularities,
Cures guaranteed or money re
funded— fair. Terms cash. .
No injurious medicines used. — Patients at
a distance treated by mail.— Medicines sent
everywhere free from gaze or breakage. —
State your case and send for Opinion and
terms.— Consultation strictly confidential,
persounllv or by letter.— Send fee postage for
Illustrated 84-page BOOK (for both .sexes)
andMKDICAL JOL'IUCAi,. (e*f"Meu
tion tills paper.) ♦
TQ*!^pifeSS
a a I. i-rtn B^J gs PS effects of youthful
<&» ' ISB&» 10 errors, early de
cay, lost manhood, etc I will wild a valuable
treatise (sealed) containing fnll particulars for
home euro, free of charge. Address,
PROF. F. C. FOWLER. Moodua. Conn*
PI §1 Bill I SEND $1, $2.
II fed 1 a M I or S'" for a Box of
til Bit 19 13 MACK'S Cue Home*
2*3 0131 I I I • made CANDY. 100
al 1 * * § i . Kast Seventh Street
111111 I I St. PauL [
¥¥ firi i
A Little Honey Will Guy Saturday
(ONLY).
"I Q Cts. buys an Unlaim-
J-*J dried Shirt, Union
Linen bosom, worth 50c, at
| U.S. CLOTHING CO. |
• _____ _____ _ _____
f ' rT fit Cts. buys Sailor Suit,
[ V * *-* from 4-1 years, can
- ■ » not be bought in any store in St.
Paul less than 82. at
U.S. CLOTHING CO.
*1 Kfm Buys No. 1
nPX.OI/ Union Cassi
mere Suit, 4-12, cheap at 82.50.
at
U.S. CLOTHING CO.
C&O QKBuysaCkild's
ff)__..__.OCorduroySuit,
selling elsewhere at §4, at
U.S. CLOTHING CO.
"I fit Cts. Buys a gcoi pair
-*-«_* of Boy's Knee Pants,
at
U.S. CLOTHING CO.
"I A Cts. Buys a pair of 4-
JLVF ply 1600 linen Cuffs,
worth 25c; $1 per doz., at
U.S. CLOTHING CO.
OISTE OEISTT"
For a Child's Bordered Handkerchief.
THREE CENTS
For a Man's Bordered Linen Handkerchief.
Of No one ever saw lower prices pinned to "Better Goods" in every de
partment than at
U. S. CLOTHING CO.,
Corner Seventh and Jackson Streets, under International Hotel
STANDARD GOODS
LOWEST PRICES I
Times are dull, and. though we are doing a good business, perhaps more
than any competitor, we are very anxious to sell goods, and will offer lower prices
than ever before in St. Paul.
<£"! CERTAIN DEALERS SAY I CAN
wA*J not sell a new 11-k. filled case Kent's
size watch, with new stem wind and set El
gin movement, for 815 : call and see; 10 per
cent off to dealers, cash, iv half-dozen lots;
warranted.
<lft"l X— SOMETHING IN LADIES' SIZE,
wAfJ fully guaranteed.
<£"|O— DUEBER OR BOSS 14-K. FILLED
»j3lO ladies', elegantly engraved, with fine
Elgin movements.
COO-COST 850— A BOSS GOLD FILLED
«■*»>*»•(_? hunting, stem wind ease, lever set
mansard, full engraved, with a tine Currier
Springfield, 111., movement, in perfect order;
shows but little wear.
COO— I4-CARAT GOLD FILLED SCREW
<$>*j£s case and nickel movement, both
made by the Waltham Watch compauy, and
first-class in every respect.
w*JO— OPEN FACE, GOLD FILLED 11-K.
■fl»0O handsomely engraved, with an en
tire new Appleton, Tracy & Co. nickel move
ment, jewels set in solid gold setting, Bri
quet hair spring, patent ninion and regulator
movement, too well known to call for any
more remarks.
CI R— GOLD FILLED, OPEN FACE,
•{pj-«y stem wind watch, with an Elgin
movement, cut expansion balance: good
timer.
IJOCJ-A ROSS FILLED HUNTING, STEM
"P'vO wind, top and bottom engraved,
with a Rockford movement; an excellent
timekeeper. mSM
( J;^lH 8125, AND ACTUALLY
•IpUU cost 814"'. Heavy, 10-k., UO-dwt.,
gold case, beautifully engraved; has been in
use but a short time: fine B. W. Raymond,
gilt adjusted, patent regulator and pinion;
very accurate timekeeper.
QUI )-COST 885— A UK. HINTING
"3J)Uv/ gold case, stem-wind, mansard
style, full engraved, with a full jeweled
Hampden movement; jewels set in gold
setting; very close timekeeper.
©On— NEVER -COST LESS THAN 8125—
S+'OW A very heavy 14-k. Dueber gold
case-box style, one of the handsomest en
graved ' cases in stock; Appleton-Tracy
Waltham movement; in perfect condition;
almost new; a bargain.
eon— VERY SIMILAR in CASE TO
■JjXjU the above-described case ; oval on
edge; heavy, vermicelli, engraved; has a
fine nickle movement. Elgin: jewel iv gold
setting; patent regulator and pinion.
CJL!/=1— WORTH 8100— LOUIS XIV. PAL
*4+>Dt/ ace joint perfectly smooth'; case,
11-k. has a monogram on front, but can. be
taken off at a small expense: movement a
fine three-quarter interchangeable Elgin, and
at above price a rare bargain.
CO /=»— LOUIS XIV. GOLD CASE WITH j
«4PO*v a Waltham movement in perfect I
ordert:cut expansion balance; well worth I
850 to 800- .
COO— COST S4O-LADY HUNTING
•ipz-wO gold watch ; stem winder and seller; .
Louis XIV. 13-jeweled Elgin mpvement. |
-EMM— BEAUTY; LADY'S HUNTING j
•JJJ^-HJ 14 carat gold case: vermicelli en- j
graved, with a plain band through the con- '
mrrrrarij X INGHAM
I Private office for confidetrf v • J-f • -*>-**' M AAZl.lfl)
glial business. You will seel <~,r\—r i i #-*»•'
Buo evidence of a Pawnbroker's 32 7 J 3.C KSO Street,
Koffice. „_, „»_-, *
!*!> «w ..Muu»mw.j> l i"..t. ii ii.i«^l -*'< lAIL.
THIS WORD
i ' : ffir3_^"^>h-~ n~ n r'-W'"_i'^B«« "_," ■*_■■■£'
INSTALLMENT
V?'-*:V::>v ; :"v;-..- v;; ;^^ ; : : ;v^f. : ■-.^-. : Sv^ : y, ;^F,' i -.v.v -V .•:>•?
' -. -*-'* ' '-"'► ,'*-"' s 'J
Means from us much more than it usually does. By it we mean that we offer yon
your choice from one of the largest and best selected stocks of Furniture, Carpet?
and Stoves in St. Paul, on easy terms and very close prices. We trust you will
call and give us an opportunity to prove to you that we mean just what we havl
said. SMITH & fc'ASWELL, 839, 341 A B*3 E. Seventh Street.
B
ter: fine nickel Elgin movement; would be
cheap at SOO.
tfc-yn-LADY-S HINTING GOLD CASK,"
f^v fine nickel jc-.fi'lcd movement, dia
mond set gold hands: any party warning a
small and neat watch for any lady should sea
this.
<S1 O-SAME AS ABOVE; CASK IS OVAL,'
SP-lt--" handsomely engraved with lendsnpa
on both sides; diamond-set bands; neither ol
the above can be told from new.
CI rX i' Sir.:— A LARGE LINE OF OPEN*
-|,*.I.\J face Indies' gold watches.
INK BRASS PLAQUE WITH A VERY
neat clock in center: porcelain dial;
good timepiece and very ornamental.
FAIR OF VERY FINE BISQUE
figures: will close then out Fit 840: they
are mounted in an elegant plush mat and
bronze frame.
C;^n-AN ELEGANT BALL OR Ll*
%J*J\J brary clock; antique oak and
elaborately trimmed in brass; has the old
fashioned brass weight, winds up by drawing
the chain down: exposed heavy bran pea*
dalam; strikes on a line-toned calhdral gong
the half and full hour; raised porcelain
figures and bronze index hands; nothing
finer in the city. tost 978 to import and
pay duty in New York.
IN SILVERWARE I HAVE A LARGE
A line of fruit and cake baskets-, ranging
In price from S3 to $85; butter dishes,Bls to
**!*■<: tea sets, from $15 t05125; iii fact, any
article made In silverware, both for table as
well as ornamental use. I handle exclu
sively in Hat ware the elebrated Roger A
Bro. goods. Prices lowest in the city.
PERA GLASSES IN GOLD, SILVER,
pearl, rubber and kid, ranging in price
from 8'" to 850.
N ELEGANT AND LARGEST LINE IN
the Northwest.
I" A RUE ELD GLASS, 80.50.
QNE LARGER GLASS. $10. ~
FINE »BARDOU, NOTHING BETTER.
from 815 to $•.;.">.
SILK UMBRELLAS. FROM St TO SO
O inches In size: gold, silver and natural
wood handles; from 82.50 to SIS.
MARBLE ANDIRON CLOCKS INKLE*
i'J. (jant designs, ranging from 88 to
3150.
B~~ BONZES IN DIFFERENT DESIGNS;
side pieces iv large variety.
HANDSOME PLUSH CLOCKS, NEAT
X design, porcelain dial, gold-plated bauds
and dial sa:.h : cost 825; close out for 511.
C%-A VERY HANDSOME BRONZE
%>»J*J clock wilh black marble bate; sido
figure of a lady playing a clarionet ; very
tasty and very tine timepiece.
Q^n-A LARGE, FINE WHITE BRONZE
•J*J\' clock with two elegant figures rep
resenting a hunter and the other of a fisher;
Clock supported on a fine white bronze stand
ard, and the bead resting on a fine black mar.
ble blab, ornamented in bronze figures.

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