OCR Interpretation


St. Paul daily globe. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1884-1896, June 29, 1888, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059522/1888-06-29/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

SUFFICIENTLY CLOSE.
St. Paul Wins Again From
Minneapolis—The Score
5 to 4.
Remarkably Pretty Contest
Between Dcs Moines and
Kansas City.
The Chicago Maroons Do Up
Jim Hart's Pet Aggre
gation.
Billy Sowders Pitches a Four
teen Inning Game Against
Washington.
The second of the Minneapolis-St.
Paul series,- played at Minneapolis yes
day, was close and exciting, and pre
sented that frequent paradox where one
team will outbat and outfield another
and yet lose the game. Minneapolis did
the playing and batting and St. Paul
did the winning. Minneapolis ' put. in
March to pitch his first professional
game and, though his pitching was ef
fective, his wildness cost the game. He
was touched but five times, of which all
but two w( > pudgy little hits. Duryea,
the long-dri. 7n-out cyclone, was hit
eight times, including two doubles and
a home run, Minneapolis virtually
earning her four runs. The business
was done in the third inning, when
March nearly filled the bases as free
gifts, and then made two wild pitches,
letting in four runs for an inning that
might have been a shut out. Both
teams put up a beautiful fielding game
and several fine plays enlivened the
afternoon. Bower's umpiring was
as "rotten*' as usual, which is
saying about all that is necessary.
Minneapolis scored in the first inning,
Howe leading with a hit and scoring on
two outs. Scattering hits followed
throughout the game, but no runs were
made until the seventh, when Tebeau
drove the ball over the fence for four
bases. March was very wild at the be
ginning, giving three men bases on'
balls in the first inning and one in the
second, but clever playing kept the men
on bases. The third brought disaster.
Murphy led with a punky hit to right,
and Carroll got a base" on balls. Murphy
scored on Morrisey's hit, and a wild
pitch advanced the runners a base each.
Walsh's fumble of Veach's bounder
filled the bases, when a wild pitch,
Reilly's base on balls and an out sent
three more runs over the plate. Again
there was no scoring until the seventh,
March doing good work, but in that
inning Carroll got a base on balls and
scored on two passed balls and an out.
Minneapolis made it interesting in the
ninth inning, Tebeau's base on balls, Mc-
Cullom's double and Broughton's single
sending in two runs, but Power had it
in for March and called him out on
strikes, ending the game. The official
score follows:
MINNEAPOLIS. A B V. 1 R 9 B P O A E
Hawes. 1b... 4 1 2 1 12 0 0
Walsh, ss 4 C 0 0 -1 5 1
Brosnan, 2b.. 4 0 0 0 2 10
Tatton, rf. ... 4 0 1 O 0 0 0
Kreig, If 4 0 0 0 10 0
Tebeau, 3b.... 3 2 2 0 «* 3 0
McCullom, ci. 4111100
Broughton, c. 4020540
March, p 4 0 0 0 0 7 7
Totals 35 4 8 2 24 20 8
ST. PAUL. AMU 1B S T. V l) A E
Murphy, cf.... 3 12 0 0 0 0
Carroll, rf. ... 1 2 0 2 0 0 0
Morrissy, lb. . 4 1 2 2 15 0 0
Veach, If 3 10 0 0 0 0
Keillv, 3b 3 0 0 0 110
Shafer. 2b..... 4 0 10 15 0
Pickett, 55.... 4 0 0 0 15 1
Kemmler. c... 3 0 0 0 9 2 1
Duryea, p. ..„. 3 0 0 0 0 12 1
Totals 28 5 5 4 27 25 3
Minneapolis.. 1 0000010 2— 4
St. Paul 0 400010 *— 5
Earned runs, Minneapolis 3, St. Paul 1;
home run, Tebeau; two-base bits. Tebeau
and McCullom; bases on balls, off March 7,
off Duryea 1 ; struck out, March 4, by Dur
yea 8; first base on errors, Minneapolis 1,
Paul 1: left on bases, Minneapolis 4,
St. Paul 0: wild pitches, March 2, Duryea
1 ; passed bails, Broughton 2; time, 1:45;
umpire, Powers.
A SPLENDID CONTEST
Between the Teanis of Dcs Moines
and Kansas City.
Special to the Globe.
Kansas City, June 28.— Des Moines
played an errorless fielding game to
day, but had to play ball all the time to
win. It was a pretty contest from the
start, full of brilliant plays, some of the
running catches being the most difficult
seen on the grounds this year. Despite
this fact it was a pitchers' game, neither
giving a base on balls and both fielding
their positions perfectly. Steams played
a fine game at first for the visitors, while
Ardner carried off the honors for Kansas
City. The outfield had very little to do,
the worst part of the game being Gun
son's wild throw to second in an effort
to catch Holliday in the seventh inning,
by which the asile centerfielder crossed
the plate. The only unpleasant feature
of the game was in the seventh, when
Steams blocked Johnson at first, after
the latter had made a long hit to left.
Johnson was severely bruised and
Umpire Hagan allowed him to go to
second in consequence of Steams'
action. Cushnian's only break was the
balk he made in the second inning.
Score :
KANSAS CITY. AB nIBSBPO A X
Cartwright, lb 4 0 0 0 7 10
Manning, ss... 4 0 2 112 0
Hassamaer, rt 4 0 1 0 1 0 0
Ardner, 2b. ..2 10 0 3 10
Johnson. 3b. 303 1001
Campan, 1f.... 3 0 0 0 10 1
Bradley, cf.... 3 0 0 0 0 10
Gunsou, c 3 0 0 0 11 O 1
Conway, p.... 3 0 0 0 0 14 0
Totals 29 1 6 2 24 19 3
DBS MOINES. A B U IBSBPO A E
Hollidav.cf.... 4 11110 0
Quinn, 2b ... 3 0 O 0 2 1 0
Steams, 1b.... 3 0 0 0 15 2 0
Macullar.ss... 3 110 0 10
Shafer. rf 3 0 0 0 0 0 0
Alvord, 3b 3 0 0 0 13 0
Van Dyke, If . 3112000
Traffley. c. .. 3 0 118 10
Cushman, p... 3000080
! — i — |
Totals |2S 3 4 4 27 16 0
Kansas City 0 1 0 O 0 0 O 0 o—l
Dcs Moines 2 0 0 0 0 0 o 1 x— 3
Earned run. Dcs Moines 1 ; three-base hit,
Maeullar: two-base hit. Johnson; double
plays, Steams, unassisted. Steams and
('uinn: first base on errors, Dcs Moines 1;
left on bases, Kansas City 3, Dcs Moines 1 :
passed balls, Trafliey 2; base on balls, by
Cusbman 1; time, 1:25; umpire, Hagan.
BRENNAN GOT RATTLED.
He Reversed One Decision, Fined
a Player, and the Maroons
"Won.
Special to the ('lobe.
Chicago, June 28.— The Maroon-Mil
waukee game this afternoon was abso
lutely without features, outside of
Sprague's pitching. He struck out
eleven men, but was very wild, keeping
Dugdale hopping about like a jack-in
the-box. At the beginning of the game
the sun shone warm and bright, but it
soon was obscured by the clouds and a
cold wind sprung up which numbed
both players and spectators. There
was a little excitement in the sixth,
when Umpire Brennan called Hanra
han's foul a fair ball. The ball started
fair, but the wind carried it foul. In
running to the line Brennan slipped
and fell, and did not see the ball strike.
The Milwaukees threatened to stop the
game, and after a fifteen minutes' wran
gle Brennan reversed his decision.
During the fourth inning lie lined Cu
sick $5 for back talk. A rather larger
audience than usual was tempted out by
the balmy .weather of the start of the
game, but each man. repented in sack
cloth and ashes i before ; he had shivered
through the nine innings. Score: ■■■'
--■ MAROONS. ABRIBSBTO A _
L0ng,' 1f...... 4 3 2 11 1 0
Hanrahan, ss. 4120011
Lange, 3b. . . . 5 0 .3- 0 1 4 1
Hengle, 2b..7. 5 10 0 00.
Schoeneck, lb] 4 0 0 0 10 "0 .0
Moriaritv.cf.. 4 110 2 0 1
Dugdale," c.... - 3 1 2 - 0 11 2 1
Rbeims, rf.... 4 1 0 O 1 0 0
Sprague, p.. ... 2 10 0 1 12 O
Totals ...j. 35 8 11 1 27 20 4
MILWAUKEE. A It IBSBPO A E
Forster, 55.... 4 0 1 -'O 0 1 O.
McAleer.cf 5 2 2. 0 2 0 0
Strauss, 3b.... 4 113 11
Cusick. 1b.... 3 1 O O 4 0 0
Lowe, 1f ...... 4 0 0 0 3 0 0
Maskrev, rf... 4 0 0 o*7l 11
Pettee,2D 4 0 1 1 1.1 O
Warner, c 3 10 0 9 0 0
Heup.p 4 0 10 16 0
Totals 35 5 6 2 24 10 2
Maroons 13 0 0 0 3 10 *— 8
Milwaukee.. ...3 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 I—s
Earned runs. Maroons 5, Milwaukee 1 ;
home run, Moriarity; bases on balls, off.
Sprague 2, oft* Heup 3; hit by pitcher, by
Sprague 1, by Heup 2; passed balls, Dugdale
2, Warren 1; wild pitches, Sprague -1, Heup
2; struck out. by Sprague 11. by Heup 7:
left on bases, Maroons 8, Milwaukee 0; time,
2h; umpire, Brennan. „
DONG DRAWN OUT.
Boston Could Not Best "Washing
ton in Less Than Fourteen In
nings.
Boston, June 28.— McGunnigle, of
South Boston, brother of the manager
of the Brooklyns, was put in to umpire
this afternoon's game, Daniels being
detained by illness in his family. The
former was way off on many of his de
cisions, both nines suffering about
equally, but the Washing tons making
several kicks that delayed the game
greatly. About 1,400 people saw the
game. Score
BOSTON. Mi I! Il sepoa _
Wise, ss 6 0 0 0 3 9 3
Johnston-, cf . 7 4 4 2 10 0
Tate, 7 12 18 4 4
Nash, 30. 5 2 1 2 4 *2 0
Kinsman. 2b.. 6 14 0 3 3 0
Hornung, if... 6 0 0 *0 3 0 0
Brown, rf 5 1 3 2 3 0 O
Morrill, 1b.... 6 O 1 0 16 1 1
Sowders, p.... 6 0 10 15 3
. T0ta15. ...... 54 9 14 7 42 24 11
WASHINGTON. ABB iBSBPOA E
H0v.cf.. ...... 5 12 1111
Wilmot, 1f.... 7 14 12 01
Daily.tf 7 0 2 15 0 0
Shock, ss 7 0 0 0 2 3 3
O'Brien, 1b... 6 1 1 0 13 0 0
Myers, 2b 6 0 2 . I , 10 2 3
Deasley, c.... 5 10 0 7 6 2
O'Day, 6 0 110 9 6
Donnelly, 3b. 6 3 1 12 0 0
Totals 55 7 13 6 42 21 16
Boston .... 2 0000 10000 2 0 2—9
Washington 0 0000 2 300 0 020 o—7
Earned runs, Boston 5. Washington 4: two
base hits, Johnston, Kinsman; home runs,
Johnston. Brown, Wilmot; first base on balls.
Wise, Nash 2, Brown, Hoy, Deasley; first
base on errors, Boston 5, Washington 4;
struck out. by O'Day 7, by Sowders 4; wild
pitches, O'Day 3; time, 2:53; umpire, Mc-
Gunnigle.
WON BY HEAVY BATTING.
Porkopolis Gets to Windward of
Baltimore.
Cincinnati, June 28.— Cincin
nati's won to-day's game by their heavy
batting, as they lined Shaw's balls out
almost at will. Serad on the other
hand was very effective, as he kept the
Baltimore's hits well ' scattered. A
heavy rain in the third inning made
the fielding in the latter part of the
game very uncertain. Shindle's fine
work at third was the feature of the
game. Attendance 1,600. Score:
CINCINNATI. IB] B 111 8 O A E
Nicol, rf. 5 13 1 10 0
McPhee, 2b... 5 3 »2 0 5 5 1
Keilly, lb 5 2 *'3 2 11 0 0
Baldwin, c... 5 12 0 3 0 1
Corkhill, cf.. 3 0 1 0 5 0 1
Carpenter, 3b 5131130
Fen noil v, ss... 5 1.10 0 5 1
Tebeau, 1f..... 5 110 10 1
Serad, p .. 5 110 0 2 0
Totals 43[ 11 17 4 27 15 5
BALTIMORE^ ABU 111 SBPOA E
Greenw'od, ss 5110121
Griflin. .... 5 0 10 2 2 0
Burns, If 5 12 0 10 0
Pureeil.rf .... 4 0 10 2 11
Farrell, 2b... 2 1 0 1 62 4
O'Brien, c.... 4 0 10 3 11
Tucker, 1b... 4 12 0 7 0 0
Shindje, 3b... 4 0 0 O. 5 3 1
Shaw, p. 3 1 0 0| 0 5 1
Totals 36 5 8 li 27 16 9
Cincinnati 1 4 0 2 1 10 2 o—ll
Baltimore 2 000001 1 I—s
Earned runs, Cincinnati 0, Baltimore 2;
two-base hits, Keilly. Baldwin, Serad; three
base hits, Tebeau. Fanell. Griffin; double
plays, McPhee and Reill}-. Fennellv, McPhee
and Reilly: Fennelly, McPhee aiid Reillv,
Purcell and O'Brien; first base on balls, Nicol,
McPhee, Keilly, Corkhill 2, O'Brien 2, Shaw;
first ease on errors, Cincinnati 3, Baltimore
4; struck out, McPhee, Baldwin, Fennelly,
Tebeau 2, Greenwood; passed ball, Baldwin;
time, 2:05; umpire, Keenau.
SHUT OUT WITH EASE.
9 —————
The Browns Do Up Cleveland to
Yon Der Ahe's Taste.
St. Lotus, Mo., June King's
magnificent pitching contributed greatly
to Cleveland's shut out to-day, while the
champions won by their effective hitting
in the fourth inning. The visitors for
the second successive time played a
perfect fielding game. Brilliant plays
were the order of the day. Strieker,
Gilks, Herr and Comiskey did great field
ing. Tom Dolan caught a beautiful
game and did the best hitting of any
body. Score:
ST. LOUIS. AB KIIISBIPO A E
Latham, 3d... 5 0 1 0 12 0
Lvons.cf 5 0 1110 0
O'Neil. If 3 1 2 1 1 0 o
Comiskev, lb.. 4 12 2 7 2 0
Kobinson, 2b. 2 10 10 3 1
McCarthy rf.. 3"1 11200
Herr, ss .40 1 02 3 0
King, p 4 0 10 17 1
Dolan, c 4 0 2 O 7 2 0
Milligan, lb.. 10 005 10
Totals 35 4 11 6 2" 20 2
. CLEVELAND. AB RI£SB[:PO A E
Hogan, rf 3 0 10 2 0 0
McKean, 1f... 4 0 0 0 .2 0 0
Hotaling.cf... 4 0 2 0 2 10
Faatz. lb 4 0 0 0 9 00
Strieker, 2b.... 3 0 0 0 3 4 0
Gilks, 3b 3 0 0 0 14 0
Albert, ss 3 0 0 0 10 0
Snyder, c 3 0 10 7 10
Crowell, p.... 3 0 0 0 0 5 3
T0ta15....... 30 0 4 0 27 15 3
St. Louis 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 I—4
Cleveland.. 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
Earned runs, St Lonis 4; two-base hits,
McCarthy Dolan, Hotaling; first. base on balls,
Robinson, O'Neill. McCarthy; hit by pitched
ball, Hogan; struck out, Hogan, McKean,
Alberts 2. Crowell, King, Lyons, Herr; passed
ball, Snyder 1 ; time, 1 :40; umpire, Gaffney.
SUPERIOR PLAYING *
Gave Brooklyn the Edge in a Dong
and Exciting Game.
LouisvnxE, Ky., June — Twelve
hundred people witnessed a long and
exciting game of ball to-day between
Brooklyn and Louisville. Brooklyn
won by superior playing, though Louis
ville was up to its better days. Interest
centered in the eighth inning where
Louisville passed Brooklyn, to be passed
in return when the visitors came to the
bat. Stratton's pitching was fair. Mays
was very strong. Docscher failed to
arrive and Mike Walsh took the place
of Buckalew as umpire, the latter hav
ing proven unsatisfactory. Score:
LOUISVILLE. AB Ii IBSBPO A E
Collins. If 5 1112 0 0
Mack, 2b.... 4 2 1115 0
Browning, cf. 4 1 1 - 0 1 0.0
Wolf, ss :.... 4 110 15 1
Stratton, p.... 4 0 2 0 0 2 0
Werrick, 3b.. 4 0 0 0 2 2 0
Kerins, rf..... 3 10 12 0 0
Smith, lb 3 0 0 0 13 1 1
Cook, c 4 10 0 2 0 0
T0ta15....... 35 7 6 3 24 15 2
BROOKLYN AIS It IBSBPOA E
Pinckney, 3b.. 5 3 2 115 0
O'Brien, 1f.... 5 0 11-300
Caruthers, m.. 4 2 10 3 0 0
Foutz, 1b...... 5 2 2 19 0 1
Smith, 5 2 5 0 3 2 ,-3
Silch, rf... ... 5 0 10 0 0 0
Radford, 2b... .40 20 3 20
Mays, p.. ..... • 5 0 0 0 15 0
Hoibert, c 3 0 10 4 0 1
Totals. 41 9 15 3 27 14 5
*'r00k1vii.......3 1 100 0 O 0 4—9
Louisville ..... 0 0 1 2 0/00.3. I—7
Earned runs, Louisville 4, Brooklyn 4;
Earned runs, Louisville 4, Brooklyn -4;
THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE FKI.DAY MORNING JUNE 29, 1888.
Two-base chits. Wolf, ' Radford 2, O'Brien,
Caruthers," G. Smith; ,• first , base -on balls, '
Browning. Kerins, S. Smith, Caruthers, Rad- i '
ford, Hoibert; hit -■ by; pitched ball, Mack;
first base on errors, Louisville 3, Brooklyn 2;
struck out, Mack, Stratton, Kerins, Hoibert;
passed balls, Hoibert 1, Cook 3; wild pitches, •
Stratton; time, . 2 hours; ■_ umpire, Mike
Walsh. ■ - -;: - '
ROWE RETIRES.
The Manager of the Cowboy
Town's American .Association
Team Given His Conge.
Special to the Globe. *c
Kansas City, Mo., June " 28.— Dave
. Eowe. the manager ot the American as- *
sociation team of this city has been re
leased, his release to take effect the Ist
of July. «Sam Barkley, the second base
man of the team, will be field j captain,
but the name of the new manager has
not yet been announced. Rowe's re-"
lease has been expected for some time.
His career as. a manager has not been
such as to please the association. The .
first disagreement dati*o* back to last
March, when the stockholders I thought
he was assuming too much, authority.
Personally. Rowe is liked here, but it is
believed a new manager will get better
results from the team. 7.7 7
Too Wet to Play.
Specials to the Globe.
Detroit, June Detroit-Chicago
game postponed; rain.
Indianapolis, June Indianapo
lis-Pittsburg game postponed ; rain.
Kansas City, June 28.— Kansas City-
Athletic game postponed; rain.
HOW THEY STAND.
Relative Position of the Teams in
Three Leagues.
The Western association teams stand
as follows:
7"-7-""7 P4r
• Played. Won. Lost.' centage
St.Paul 40 26 14 .050
Moines 35 22 13 .628
Milwaukee 40 21 19 .525
Kansas City 40 • 20 20 .500
Omaha 36 18 18 .500
Chicago 40 19 21 .475
Minneapolis 43 15 28 .348
AMERICA!*. NATIONAL.
Won. Lost .. Won. Lost
St. Louis 34 15 Chicag0. .....34 16
Brooklyn 38 17 Detroit ......32 18
Athletic. .30 19 Boston 32 22
Cincinnati. .31 21 New Y0rk... 28 23
Baltimore 24 27 Philadelphia 25 24
Cleveland 17 34 Washington .17 33
Kansas City.. 14 33 Pittsburg ....16- 31
Louisville 15 37 Indianapolis.l 633
Games To-Day.
St. Paul at Minneapolis.
Milwaukee at Chicago.
Boston at Philadelphia.
Washington at New York. 7 77 ;
Detroit at Indianapolis.
Chicago at Pittsburg.
Brooklyn at Louisville.
Athletic at Kansas City.
Baltimore at Cincinnati. ,-*■
ALL BROKEN UP.
The Winnipeg Rowing Club Is in
Hard Luck. y.'7
Special to the Globe. ' » ,
Winnipeg, Man., June 28.— Winnipeg
Rowing club is in hard luck. The senior
four had become accustomed to their
new shell and were rowing in fine time
and form, but unfortunately Caldwell,
No. 3, received a telegram yesterday
summoning him to New Brunswick to
the death-bed of his sister. Caldwell
left last evening. None but rowing peo
ple can comprehend the serious loss of
one man to a crew, for it completely de
moralizes it. When a crew is selected
the proper balancing of the boat, the
of the men, tlieir style of rowing
and a dozen other such points are kept
in view. But Capt. Ganet is bound that
tlie event shall not go by default, and he
has therefore decided to get up a
scratch crew at Minnetonka, tak
ing in two men to row with
himself and Patton. the bow. It is
probable that Turnbull and Fox. both
of whom will compete in sculling con
tests in the regatta, will be the two men
selected. Of course, the quality of the
crew will be greatly impaired from its
original form, owing to the lack of prac
tice together, but Gault says it is the
best that can "be done under the circum
stances, and 'Winnipeg must be repre
sented. The Senior four have won the
St. Paul cup twice in succession, and if
they win it again the cup becomes their
property. The break-up in the crew is,
therefore, a double misfortune. An
other drawback about the scratch crew
will be the fact that Turnbull and Fox,
being entered in other' events, will be
tired men when they row in the Senior
four race. Unfortunately for the Jun
ior fours while out practicing they
broke their shell so badly that Waters,
of Troy, N. V., had to be sent for to re
pair it. He is here now for that pur
pose. Turnbull is sculling well, and
expects to give Muchmore a close race.
SURPRISES AT SHEEPSHEAD.
Short Horses Win in Almost Every
Case.
New Yoke, June 28.— The weather
at Sheepshead bay was very tempest
uous and the track ankle deep in mud.
Short horses won in almost every case:
First race, seven furlongs — Lee won.
Brother Ban second, James A I, third. Time,
I:3l**.
Second race, five nnd one-half furlongs—
Harrisonburg won, Mv Fellow "second, Sor
rento third. Time, 1 :22"&.
Third race, one mile and a furlong— Rupert
won, Aurelia second. Time, 2:00%. ' They
were the only starters. .."«s**s > s
Fourth race, one and one-halt miles—Race
laud won, Marauder second, Tea Tray third.
Time, 2:42.
Fifth race, one Rapine won, Royal
Arch second, Frank .Ward third. Time,
1:40
. Sixtn race, one and one-half miles, on the
turf— Bob Miles won, Orlando second, Chau
ticler third. Time, 2:45
ENTUIES FOB TO-DAY.
Following are the entries for Friday's
races at Sheepshead : TSgJjS
First race, purse, three-fourths of a mile
Grimaldi. 10B: Suitor. 104; Royal Arch, 110;
V L S. 99; Flageolette, 99; Mona, 100; Gol
den Reel, 95 ; Clay Stockton, 88 ; Salisbury,
103.
Second race, sweepstakes, six and one-half
furlongs— Little Barefoot. 110; Blazon, 110;
Jay Flee, 106 ; Volunteer, 113.
Third race, sweepstakes, seven-eighths of a
mile— Golden Reel, 97; King Crab, 97; Aura,
97; luverwick, formerly Invermore filly, 97;
King Idle, 104; Charlie'Dreux, 100: Satisfac
tion, 102 Kentucky Ban, 95 ; Austrienne,Us.
Fourth race, haudicap, one and one-fourth .
miles— Exile, 120; Favor. 120; Ordway,
113; Letretia, 100; Valiant, 100.
Fifth race, rapid stakes, seven-eighths of
a Saxony, 106; Eolian, 106; Oarsman,
101; Bess, 101; Biggonette, 101 Bradford.
104; Britannic, 104; Fitzroy, 104; Her Lily
ship, 97; Benedictine, 97.
Sixth race, handicap, three-fourths mile on
turf— Crusader, 118; Subaltern, 118; Edisto,
121 ; Joseph, 121; Ofalece, 131; Exile, 128;
Oarsman, 123. ■ -
Fitzpatrick Bested Lane.
Special to the Globe.
New Yokk, June 28.— Dominiek Fitz
patrick, of Elizabeth, and Thomas Lane,
of Boston, fought ten desperate rounds
at Myers' Grove, Staten Island, to-day.
The light was for a purse of $100 and
gate receipts. About 100 sports were
present, who paid $3.50 apiece to see the
light. Fitzpatrick won in v the tenth
round, when he knocked his opponent
senseless. . _ .
s_i
Legal Holiday, July 4.
Take a trip on the St. Paul, Minneap
olis & Manitoba railway. Cheap rates.
; ss» .
Excursion Rates for July 4
Will be made by the St. Paul, Minneap
olis & Manitoba railway. Tickets sold
July 2, 3 and 4 good returning until the
sth, inclusive. -. 777
— sß>-
Lake Minnetonka Trains,
Via the St. Paul, Minneapolis & Mani
toba railway, leave St. Paul 5, t9, *10 a
m.; 2, H, 5. 6, 9 p.m. .
Arrive St. Paul, 5:20, 9:20, 10:20 a.m.;
2:20 5:20, +8:20, 11:30 p. m. .
f Except Sunday.- * Sunday only. .
Leave _ and , arrive : at Minneapolis
twenty minutes later and earlier re
spectively.. ~.;:
Short line trains between St. Paul and
Minneapolis every thirty: minutes, leav
ing union depot in each city on the
even and half hour during the day. '
Four tracks, heavy rails," quick time.
See Short line folder for details. '
-•-
Send for Your Friends .".'
To come when they can get cheap rates
via the Manitoba road, July 2, 3 and 4.
Tickets good returning until the sth, in-
elusive. •
FETLOCK DEEP IN MUD
Washington Park and Sheeps
• head Tracks Made Heavy/ ;
by Rain.
Winnipeg's Rowing- Associa
tion Loses Some Sorely .j'JJ
' ; v- Needed Strength. I lg?
Harvard Laid Out Cold -by
the Columbia College }.xJ!
Crew. • ; <y,
Some Fast Trotting at Eau
Claire and Mystic liv,
Park. | £'
-7y -.'"-.-■ I (,rt
. . .-it
Chicago, June 28.— 1t rained early,
this morning and the result was a very
muddy track and a small attendance at
the Washington Park races. .7 75:71 7
First race, for three-year-olds and upwards,
seven furlongs— starters: Rambler, 104; Hec
tor, 107 ; Parkhill, 99. Betting, 2to 2 Ramb
ler; 3 too Hector; 8 to 1 Parkhill. Pools:
Hector, $25; Rambler, $11: Parkhill, $4.
Hector and Rambler got ■ off first, the former
taking and retaining the lead until tlie eighth,
pole was reached when Rambler went to the
trout, winning easily, Hector second and
Parkhill third. Time, 1:37*4.
. Second race, for two-year-olds, five fur
longs—Starters: Mamie Fonzo, 105; Devonie,
115; Belle of Nantura, 115; Joyful, 105;
Richland, 105 ; Chorie Blossom, 105 ; Neva
C, 105. Betting: 2to 1 Mamie Fonzo; 10 to
1 Devonie; oto 1 Belle of Natura ; 4to 1
Cherie Blossom : 5 to 12 to 1 the others.
Pools: .Fonzo, ''s3s; Blossom, $17: Nature,
$17: field, $50. Mutuals paid straight,s47.so.
Fonzo took the lead, with Cherie Blossom
and Joyful behind her. She never lost the
lead, winning ihe race in a gallop, Demote
second by a neck from Belle Nature third.
Time, 1:11*4. *
Extra race, same conditions as second
race— Starters: Castaway IL, 115; Zoolite,
105; Cassandra. 112; Santa Cruz, 108;
Thalia, 105; Queen of Trumps, 105; Iris,
105 ; Rollin Hawley, 115. Betting: 2 to 1
Santa Cruz, 6 to 1 Zoolite, 2 to I Cassandra,
stolo to 1 others. Pools: Cassandra, $25;
field, $30. Iris led until the bottom turn,
with Cassandra second. At the eighth pole
Zoolite was leading, when Castaway came
forward and a pretty race ensued, which
was won by Castaway by a scant head from
Zoolite, second, and Cassandra third. Time,
1:10*6. --77. -v
Third race. Oakwood handicap for all ages,
with $300 added money, one Starters:
Dad, 102; Grisette, 109; Egmont, 119; Bea
consfield, 110; Flitter, 95* Paragon, 113;
Lewis Clark. 110; Cary, 113. Betting: 12 to
1 Dad, 4 to 1 Grisette, 8 to 1 Beaconsfield, 7
to 5 Egmont, 5 to 20 to 1 on the others.
Pools: Egmont, $50: Grisette, $25; Paragon,
$21; field, $26. Mutuals paid $74.40. Eg
mont, Beaconsfield and Dad were the first to
show. The two first went in the lead. In
the stretch Dad drew out and challenged
Grisette, who had taken matters in hand.
Dad won by a head from Grisette, Beacons
field third. Time, 2:00%. ,
Fourth race, purse $400, selling, for three
year-olds and upwards, one mile— Starters:
Lottie Wall, 105; Kheder Khan, 105 Love
laud, 93; Jennie McFarlaud, 105; Wan
deroo, 104 ; Tern Berlin, 109; Clara C, 109 ;
Janbert, 100; irma 11. 90; Antonio. 104;
Jim Nave, 104; Emma Johnson, 105 ; Echo,
109. Belting: 5 to 2 Lottie Wall; sto 1
Khedar Khan; sto 1 Overland ; oto2o to 1
the others. Pools: Cottie Wall, $40; Jau
bert, $20; field, $00. Irma II and Clara C
were the first away, but Tom Berlin soon
took the lead. At the three-qunrtters Lottie
Wall took matters in hand and reached first
place, Kedar Khan and Loveland being, sec
ond and third. Time, 1:54*, i. ; ; 7
Fifth race,j>urse $500, all ages, one - and
one-fourth miles. Starters: Wahoo, 119;
Santelene,. 100; Glen Fortune, 103. Bet
ting: Bto 5 Wahoo; 4to 1 Santalene; o. to 1
Glen Fortune. Pools: Santalene, $50;
Wahoo, $30; Glen Fortune, $10. Glen For
tune was practically out of the entire race
and Wahoo won easily. Santalene and Glen
Fortune were second and third. Time, 2:25:
ENTRIES FOR TO-DAT.
Following are the entries for Friday's races
at Washington park: •. . ; . ; ;
. First, purse, one mile— 108 ; Key
note, 108 ; Pyramid, 103; Aristi, 118; Quin
doraß:lle, 100; Amelia F, 100. > t
Second, purse, three-quarters mile— Lottie
Wall, 113; Mamie Hunt. 102; Quotation,
102; Cassie. 100; Tarn Berlin, 117; Barney
Lee, 110; Hattie 8, 108 : Badge, 107; Sayre",
113; Famine, 90; Bonanza; 110. *) . •;
Third race, Kenwood stake, five-eighths of
a — Baronoff, formerly Mercury. 108;
Lake View, 108; Gymnast, 103; Cali^nte,
108: Zacatecas, 108; Brewster, 103; Once
Again, 113; Heron, 118; Monsoon, 115; So
So, 115; Thomas J. Rusk, 115; Proctor
Knott, 115; Bootmaker, 115.
Fourth race, selling, ' one and one-fourth
miles— Fosteral, 95; John Daly, 89; Drum
stick, 79: Myrtle, 89 ; Emma Johnson, 87.
Fifth race, purse, mile heats— Calcutta,
108; Arundel. 110: Headlad, 117; Lepanro,
117; Mirth, 93; Somerset, 110; Marshal
Luke, 113.
Eau Claire Races.
Special to the Globe.
Eau Claire, Wis., June 28.— The
meeting of the Eau Claire Driving Park"
association was continued to-day, two
events, the 2:40 trot and free-for-all trot
being decided as follows:
Trotting, Monitor Prince, H. S. Cole
man, of St. Louis, 2, 1, 0, 1. 8, O. 1 ; Dixie,
George Smith, Hastings, Minn., 1, 2, 0, 3, 1,
0,2; David P. Lew. Fossum, Minneapolis,
3.3.3,2,2. Time. 2:38%, 2:4314, 2:41%,
2:40%, 2:40. 2:42, 2:4 lVs.
Free-for-all trot— First Call, W. E. Schuk,
Minneapolis. 2. 2, 1. 1, 1: Kit Curry, H. D.
Keiger, Deretown, <>„ 1, 1, 2, 2, 2. Time,
2:30, 2:32%, 2:35, 2:32, 2:33%.
COLUMBIA TOOK THE CAKE.
Their Brawn anil Muscle Too
Much for the Harvard Crew.
Special to the Globe.
New London, Conn., June 28.—
was generally believed here this after
noon that the two-mile race between the
Harvard and Columbia freshmen crews
would not . take place on account
os the heavy storm which prevailed,
all day. Nevertheless the referee de
cided that the race would take place.
The wind blew across the course and
the rain came down in torrents at the
time the race was to commence. At 5
o'clock the referee gave the word "go."
Harvard was the first in catching the
■ water and got a slight lead on the Co
lumbias. Both crews rowed thirty-four
strokes to the minute and Harvard
retained the lead for nearly an
eighth of a mile. At the half mile Col
umbia had a clear lead, and was rowing
a powerful and even stroke, while Har
vard was pulliug with a determined but
ragged stroke. When the mile has was
reached Columbia was two lengths
ahead, and from that on to the
finish they had everything their
own. and rowed over the course very
leisurely, while the Harvard crew
worked very hard, but were over
matched by the New Yorkers, who won*
easily. Time. Columbia, 11 minutes, 51
seconds; Harvard, 12 minutes, 8 sec
onds. The big race between Yale and
Harvard, four miles straightaway, will
take place to-morrow afternoon at 5
o'clock. Offers of $50 to $40 on Yale are
without takers. _ „ yj .
. ■
If our Life
Is in danger while your blood is impure.
Gross food, careless personal habits, and
various exposures render miners, loggers,
hunters, and most frontiersmen peculiarly
subject to eruptive and other Wood diseases.
The best remedy is Ayer's Sarsaparilla. A*
powerful alterative, this medicine cleanses
the blood through the natural channel*, and
speedily effects a cure.
Ayer's Sarsaparilla,
Prepared by Dr. J.C.Ayer & Co., Lowell, Mas*.
Price $1 ; six bottles, $5. Worth $5 a bottle.
Patent Laws--Jas, t. ft ii..a.T.san,
Koom, 15, Cpliom _>;..„t-y 7_:mieupoli-»7
Solicitor of Patents, '.Counsellor in Pat
ent cases. Two years au Examiner in
C.ft Patent Office
em cases. > T
U. f » Patent
trW A St Paul Clothing House Exclusively Owned
and Controlled by St Paul Men.
—» ■ iii
B. O. P. O. H.
I When the little fellows need any Clothing be
sure and bring them to onr Boys' and Children's de
partment. Kilt Suits, made from Flannels, Cassi
meres, Tricots and Worsteds, elegant in style and
appearance, from $2.50 to &10. These Kilt Suits
are for little fellows from 2 to 6 years of age.
Linen and Gingham Kilt Suits for hot weather,
$1.50 and $2.50. Boys' Short Pant Suits (for
boys from 4 to 14 years of age), with extra pieces
for patches and extra buttons, $2.50 to $ 1 0. A
special bargain in a Boy's Blue or Gray ALL
WOOL Suit for $4. Boys' Long Pant Suits for
Boys from 10 to 18 years of age, $3.75 to $20.
Boys' Blue and Gray Jersey Suits, $3 to $5. Boys'
White Flannel Suits, $6.50 and $7.50. Boys'
Sailor Suits, Blue, Gray or Brown, $1 to $9. Boys'
Short Pants, 25c to $3.50. Boys' Long Pants, $1
to $5.50. Boys' Shirt Waists, Flannels, Cambrics,
Penangs' Cheviot, Linen and Percale, 25c to
$2.25.
Our Boys' Clothing, like our Men's, is the very
best and most reliable that can be made and war
ranted in every particular. Our prices are guar
anteed to be as low or lower than the same quality
of Clothing can be bought for in any city in the
United States.
BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S CLOTHING DEPARTMENT
ON SECOND FLOOR. PLEASE TAKE ELEVATOR.
BOSTON
i . ..'7.7--t-:''
; 03STE - PRICE CLOTHING HOUSE !
THIRD STREET, CORNER OF ROBERT,
!;' ST. PAUL.
JOSEPH M'KEYSi CO. ST. PAUL'S RELIABLE OUTFITTERS.
'■■-:■ The Largest and Finest Clothing House in the West.
W.LI DOUGLAS
$0 OHUI.. GENTLEMEN.
The only fine calf S3 Seamless Shoe in the
world made without tacks on nails. As j
stylish and durable as thtjse costing $5 or 56, I
and having no tacks or nails to wear the
stocking or hurt the feet, makes them as
comfortable and well-fitting as a hand-sewed 1 ;
shoe. Buy the best. None genuine unless j
stamped on bottom "W. L. Douglas $3 Shoe,
warranted."
W. L. DOUGLAS §4 SHOE, the original !
and only hand-sewed welt SI shoe, which i
equals custom-made shoes costing from $6 i
to $9. v.^ y-.:7-
W. L. DOUGLAS §2.50 SHOE is unex
celled for heavy wear.
W. L. DOUGLAS $2 SHOE is worn by all i
Boys, and is the best school shoe in the world, j
All the above goods are made in Congress,
Button and Lace, and if not "sold by your
dealer, write W. L. DOUGLAS, Brockton,
Mass.
FOB SALE BY
GEORGE J. KIRTLA> D.
W. W. THOMAS, 416 Wabasha St.
ROCHETTE & SONS, 211 West Sev
enth St.
PALMER & FOREST, 136 East
: Seventh street.
MONEY
I TO LOAN
yy ' y ON *„-.-
'lmproved or Unimproved
I Property at Current Rates.
SMITH & TAYLOR
[ . 317 JACKSON STREET, |
INMANTBANS POBTATION LINE j:
The Fast aud Staunch Steamer . ■ ■
4Mhk
OSS I AGE,
Will leave the Northern Pacific Dock at DU
LUTH for PORT ARTHUR, and Interme- I
diate North Shore Ports every Monday and j
Thursday Evenings at S o'clock.
Returning, will leave PORT ARTHUR for
DULUTH every Tuesday aud Friday Even
ings at 5 o'clock, touching at intermediate j
points.' For fi eight or passage apply to the .
INMAN TRANSPORTATION LINE, Duluth, ,
in person or by letter. ' •
CI II nil I SEND $1,52.
H ill I I II 8 or S3 tor a Box of
li ill I I ¥ 1 MACK'S fine Home-
SfclilS I I I I made CANJjY. 100 |
ffl 1 1 I 9 I - Eafit Seventh Street. '
111! I I St. Paul. 77777
SURGICAL
INSTRUMENTS
Artifical Limbs I
Artificial Eyes)
ELASTIC STOCKINGS!
Galvanic Batteries and Belts]
CRUTCHES 1
Wheel and Invalid Chairs!
Archer Barber Chairs]
The Largest Exclusive Dental and Sup
gical Depot in the Northwest.
LAMBIE & BETHUNB
311 Wabasha St.. St. PauL
NOW is the time to attend
to any alteration or
REPAIRS
On Furs. You get better work
for less money. We make a
specialty of
STORAGE I
Insuring you against damage
by moth or loss by fire. Call
and leave your * address and
we will send for your furs.
RANSONUIORTON,
99 and 101 E. Third St., St. Paul.
FIR WOOD, SIOUX ClTy/io%Va.
Un< TvUUU. Sioux city, iowa.
_&Z > Regular Graduate in Medicine
_S-a * —20 years' hospital and pri
___WS____ 9 vate practice— lo in Chicago
______k*s_\___\ m '"d New York — E&tab
_BS_£V__i_K& J Lj Ishrd in Sioux City
W/BKw_______T >me V ears. Hag the
~ ■»sTi*s_is_is — ' largest Medical and Bar
si cal . Institute ; and - Eye and Ear
Infirmary in the West— Rooms for pa
tients at fair rates ; facilities to meet : any
emergency— Quiet Home and best care ana
skill for Ladies during Pregnancy and Con
finement. Dr.W'-OD is still treating all
Private, Nervous, Chronic and Spe
cial diseases, Seminal Weakness
(vital losses), Impotency (loss of power)
and all 1* em a c Diseases, Irregularities,
etc. Cures guaranteed or money re
funded — fair. ' Terms cash.
No injurious medicines used.— Patients at
a distance treated by Medicines sent
everywhere free from gaze or I breakage.—
State your case and send for Opinion and
terms.— Consultation strictly confidential,
personally or by letter. Send 6c postage for
Illustrated 84-page BOOK (for both sexec)
and MEDICAL. JOLKXAL. (t_TMea
tion this paper.) :
PARASOLS! ggg A KID GLOVE
Attract ---»» sale
JS BARGAIN IfflJBS
___B__________il ■■•>.■■■-. . EBBi__-C_______B__l

Friday is our Regular Bargain.Day throughout the
year. TO-DAY we are determined to fairly outdo former
efforts. This being the first Friday in our Second Semi-
Annual Clearing Sale, we naturally want to make it a
very busy day. We feel quite certain that the annexed
list of prices will accomplish the result.
Parasols suffer to-day. Our entire T nv n nQ A /}/ c
stock, : including all the highest , ' ova / a Las!) UfS '
grades of novelties, in Parasols and Count of 25 Pel
Sun Umbrellas, a line unsurpassed /■»__ _v^«, m~. } *- 77
in the Northwest; all marked in plain Lent trom forked
figures. ; Price. 1-4 OFF.
15 pieces Moire Antique Dress Silks,
in Beige, Terra Cotta, Cream, Yellow, T". 7)«„ fin„
Orange, Serpent, Cardinal, Pink; I O-Uay OUC.
former price one dollar.
150 Fine Gauze and Feather Fans, „, .■ ■ _■- „, 0
in all colors, worth up to $3 each. Choice To-Day $1.48.
- '—. — 'r~— — — — •■• ; ■
25 Pieces American Printed Chal- rtnQ/u » TUIO unDU
lies left; assortment somewhat CLOSING THIS MORN
broken. ING AT 6c.
The greatest Kid Glove Bargain of
the season; for this day only we offer j _ _
our entire stock of the famous Cour- all Gn Tn._oflu
ovisier Kid Gloves, without doubt " /
the best Glove shown in this coun
try, every pair warranted; the low- n * <£/ QQ D /
est price ever named being two dol- Ui y91»0%7 ruir.
lars per pair. 7y
Gent's Genuine Swiss Ribbed Un- i_\f\f% - #
derwear, long and short sleeves; QH __•_?/! '
regular price one-fifty. . v^v _###_»■»
1 Case Gents' lmported Balbriggan, c „ - „■""
genuine French Goods; have soid filing on Friday
freely at one dollar. - 63 Cents.
20 Pieces Fancy Dotted Swisses — "
Fancy Dots on Ecru Grounds; regu- . '• - '^7
lar price 30c and 35c. All Go at 15c To-Day I
J_W-BB^^
% ; - ST. FJLXJIj.
Our 2d Great Semi- Annual Clearing Sale
_ I __ Now in Progress.
■' " ' ■ • ■ ■ ■ - »
g_«a--Bg_j___ i_at****___________r*__B__ ljiiii i ir-*-^»-r— " j " ■ ■■"- - '»"■'■""!
I R. A. LANPHER I CO.,
MEN'S FURNISHERS
I AND ;
Sillies !
I Shirts To Order. . Satisfaction Guaranteed.
\ ' 153 East Third Street, four doors above Merchants Hotel,
j ST. PAUL.
t-wmm^*^m-m-m-mmeß-wm-m^m-m-W--^mm--^^m^mmamm*-mmmmm--m
GREAT BARGAINS
-IN*-
Low Cut Shoes,
SCHLIEK & CO.,
89 East Third Street. - - - St Paul. Minn.
Henry E. Wedelstaedt & Co.,
ST JLTIO3STER,
Engraves Wedding Invitations, Announcements, Visiting Cards, Monograms,
Crests, Seals, Dies, etc. Stationery Stamped and Illuminated. Call and see the
novelties in Staple and Fancy Stationery. Seaside Libraries. y:'.'>r.:;
REMOVED TO 95 EAST THIRD STREET ST. PAUL, MINN.
We Send : 7 : .-. - .7. „".'■- .-'. j .•"■,.
WALL PAPER BY EXPRESS
or Freight., Send Two Dollars for our package of ten rolls elegant white back
paper— enough for ordinary rooms— with 20 yards 6-inch border to match; as dark
or light as you please, for side walls or ceilings and all new designs. 50 samples
. of A\ all Papers . _____ '
MF835583 fiflk B fBSD9jBBH BK3 *SB S3SD^ sowt j\ _\_9______n_______\ g_
SENT FREE!
•■.-.■
Upon receipt of 15 cents to pay postage. OLIVER BAKER, Leading Carpet
Drapery and Wall Paper House, 417 and 419 Wabasha Street, St. Paul.
■''j*-&mmmmi*-MMms&a*Mmui!3n ; -".'•.
ST. PAUL BOTTUNG WORKS
128 Dakota Avenue,
[:M^. ? . (Telephone 919-2.)
Agents for Jansen & Craid's
ORANGE CIDER,
. And manufacturers of
LEMON SOUR.
- These dolicious drinks, besides their I
thirst-quenching ; and other agreeable i
qualities, are potent aids to good dices
; tion,' tonics,* and food to the nervous ap- !
| paratus, form the best g remedies for de
rangements of the mucous membranes, I
and while powerful j lor good are abso- i
lutely without harmful ingredients or l
j qualities. 77* 7777 7 - !
Send for catalogue, and ; beware "of j
j worthless imitations. Our line of bot
tled goods is . the most extended \ and
< complete of any similar house on earth
"5~
Union Milk Co.,
238 West Third.
271 West Seventh.
* DBAL-SRS IN
Pure Milk and Cream;
Choice Creamery Butter, Fine Dairy
Butter, Strictly Fresh Eggs, Full
I Cream Cheese, Pure Strained
Honey, Cranberries, Apples, Lem
ons, Oranges, Preserves of all
kinds, Apple Butter, Jellies of all
Kinds, Navy Beans.
{STSpecial Bates to Hotels and
Boarding- House*.
E. L . ILGEDlGtcTProprietor.

xml | txt