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St. Paul daily globe. [volume] (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1884-1896, December 23, 1888, Christmas, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059522/1888-12-23/ed-1/seq-7/

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FOR A STATE'S GOOD.
A New Capitol Building 1 an
Actual Necessity for Min
nesota.
The Present Structure Dan
gerous, and Unfit for Use
by Officials.
What May Be Done in the
Coming Session of Law
makers-
Plans for a Capitol That
Would Reflect Honor
Upon All.
In some form or other there will come
before the legislature of 188- proposi
tions looking' to the erection of a new
-late capitol, commensurate in size with
the needs of the departments, and in
eleiranee with the position and size
1,1 Die State. The present slate
capitol has outgrown i'> useful
ness, and exists principally for the
purpose of killins. oil mankind through
bad ventilation and crowding. First
built so cunningly that when completed
none. detected the swindle perpetrated
upon the stale, it has since then been
Calling into a state of innocuous desue
tude. Bill alter bill id repairs has been
inclined to make its floors safe, to keep
the roof from tumbling in, or to devise
home way in which pure air could be
got in 1 ." the building and bad out. it is
rvrobable that up to date the structure
Kjas cost the taxpayers nearly $800,000—
a sum which, in the hands of a capable
architect and builder, would have
adorned Capital square with a building
ii ■ line and durable a-> the new city hall
and court house.
The members of the legislature of
IS"-*" remember the long agony of sixty
days of sitting in tin* putrid air and
under the sinking roof of the senate
Biol house chambers. None of them
have forgotten the day of the high
license debate, when, but for timely
Warning, the roof would have come in
_n the members and scores of the firs!
•people of the -.tat-, gathered there to
listen to the sneaking.
It is not necessary to go on enumerat
ing the defects. Tin* list would cover a
page of this paper, 'lhe point in view
is that the next legislature, in all proba
bility, ill be asked to take the lirst
steps toward the erection of a new state
•capitol
li is not the Intention of those inter
ested to demand any large appropria
tion at the start, 'i heir plans ate of
•such a nature as will take some years
for their execution. \V. at they pro
-pose has been outlined to the (ii.oiu*; as
.'olio as:
it i- assumed that the capitol site will
remain in St. I'aul, for there is no popu
lar demand for its removal, nor any pre
text for a change beyond the desire of
ambitious small towns to be boomed by
securing it. The rail facilities of St.
I'aul make it an advantageous point: it
is lhe political and commercial center
til (he state, and the capital is within its
borders already. These circumstances
conspire to make a change seem very
Lmnrobnble.
ST. I'M i- STATE LINES.
,
The focal point for ten great main
lines and twice; as many branches which
gridiron the state in all quarters, it is
seen that legislators and public men
have but few inconveniences in reach
ing the capital and far more compensa
lions alter arriving than they would
ever enjoy, in the wilds of Kandiyohi
county or some other inconvenient lo
cality.
It is not thought advisable, either to,
•■nil lain * any propositions looking to
the location of the capital in the Mid
way district. Fifty or a hundred veins
front now such a location may be feasi
ble: just, now it is regarded as the
height of insanity to think of it.
"The new capitol," says a member of
lhe present house, "will he located
where il now is, if the wishes of those
ino-t interested have any weight."
in I****; the city of St. Paul, when cap
itol removal was being agitated, author
ized its members of the legislature to
proffer the state Exchange street ami
the block en which the French cathedral
stands in consideration of the location
ol the capitol upon it, and tin square on
which tin present building stand-.
I'his would give to Capitol square the
[olio wing boundaries:
Cedar.
r rr~ "~ c* •»■" ■■■••■■ *
•j Pre*- .** ; . •
I II i* ii
1 — 1 x : : ir.
Capitol. a ; i
Wabasha.
N.., i The dotted portion indicates the
Itrcets and squares St. Paul proposes to
Sedicate to the state, and which is equivalent
... ;• cash oiler of 51.000.000.
The acceptance of this offer would
give to the capitol grounds a frontage,
on both Cedar and Wabasha, of nearly
".on feet, with sides on Ninth and Tenth
of .''on Ice*: each. The shape of the
square and its size give ample room
for the construction of a capitol of suf
ficient size to meet all demands for the
next too years, and of such architectural
beaut} as to command the admiration of
(ill strangers and he a constant source
id pride. Aside from these considera
tions the location is such as to be easy
Df access to that great body of pro
fessional men who must have quick
access to the archives of the state.
The one proposition to be made to the
legislature of which the Globe is
cognizant is that the governor be author
ized to appoint a capitol building com
mission, this commission to be composed
ot* twelve members, tour to represent
"St. Paul, four to represent the state, and
lour to represent practical builders and
architects, and that after the state has
accepted the proposition of St. Paul as
to the site.and election of a new capitol
is authorized, this commission in
spect various capitol buildings through
out the Union and from them prepare a
plan for the Minnesota one, wiiieh shall
embody their best points. This commis
sion shall be in existence for live
years, and there be placed at its dis
posal each year for the construction
of the new capitol -K50.C00; but all ex
penditures must be made under the
governor's and state treasurer's author
ity. In this way ii is hoped to make the
burden of the exptAise easier borne by
■spreading it over •> number of years;
nnd, at the same time, by limiting the
nuiouut to be expended for any one
year, to place a check upon waste and
extravagances that so otten creep into
large public enterprises. This is only a
rough outline of whatis proposed, for
mally of the details are not yet (level
THE SAINT PAUL DAILY GLOBE: SUNDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 23, 1888.— THIRTY-TWO PAGES.
oped, and will not be until a bill Is
drafted.
There is probably not an architect in
the city who has not an idea of just how
the new capitol should be desigued.
The favorite material with all is, of
course, iron, stone and brick. Iron for
joists, beams, etc., stone for the exterior,
and brick for the wall facing. There
appears to be a prevalent feeling that
the eutire exterior should be of stone, as
the new city hall and court house is.
Two ground plans suggested the
Globe reproduces:
This proposes to follow out tin- form
of the present capitol to some extent.
The main building of stone would be
five stories in height, surmounted with a
tower. The wings would each be four
stories high and of stone and brick. The
first floor would be for the most im
portant state offices: the second devoted
to the legislature entirely; the third to
the supreme court and judicial offices:
the fourth to the leiral and historical
libraries; the fifth to clerical depart
ments. Elevators would be provided;
fan ventilators: detached heating ap
paratus, as at present. The work on
the whole would be on the order of the
plain, but solid, and more for public
service than public ornament. It is
estimated that a capitol of this descrip
tion could be erected for 11,200,000 and
thai it would not take over three years
to construct it. The second design is of
a more ambitious nature and greater
cost.
NO. '_.
Cedar.
The cross form is preserved. The
height of this throughout would be live
stories, and the exterior entirely of
stone; the first story of brown stone,
the remainder of white granite* the
porches entrances and hall floors to be
of the Sioux Falls quarries. The de
sign includes for the legislative halls,
on the second floor, ceilings and walls
which, through paintings and oilier de
vices of art, shall commemorate histor
ical events at the time ol the settlement
of the state. 'I he cost of this buildihg
is estimated at 13.000,000. Doubtlessly,
before the lawmakers get through with
the . subject, designs for much more ex
pensive buildings will be placed before
them. The capitol building question
lias come to stay, as is evidenced by the
quiet steps being taken to secure neces
sary legislation lor building. The legis
lature of the coining month, after ninety
days of suffering in the present
structure, will be willing enough to aid
in the project. _
■«>
LOVE UNLEASHED.
A Sequel to Tin; Quick or (he
Gone-Before; by 'Mclfe Rives.
POUT („!>.
Ilhiih was no
moon that night.
There ought to
have been.accord
ing to the alma
nac, but < haste
Diana, when she
saw what rakish
things were
as** eep in Lalage
lily's garden,
hastily tied a nu
bia about her
bead and ton-ore to shine.
OHAITEI* 1.
He rushed Loin the front door of
Liberie, took the steps at abound and
sued like an ostrich up and down the
long avenue which led to the road.
It was bitter cold, but he felt it not;
although in the agony of his parting lie
had forgotten both hat and Inverness
cape. The frozen ground crunched and
creaked beneath his tread; sudden hail
rattled around. Hearing nothing, he
went his way, hungering after the past.
He recalled their meeting after she
had sent him that waggish telegram,
••This time It's for keeps;"' how, listen
ing to the storm, they had sat together
in the dark at the top of the grand
staircase— she with Iter plush-like arms
yoked about his neck, lie remembered
her unique words:
"Listen, Duck, how the willows wig
wam! Hear the wind coughing down
the avenue! lie. the torrent as it ar
gles down the gorge! I'm frightened,
Duck ; kiss me. Duck
The memory of the kisses well nigh
strangled him. Unrequited love was
doing its work; so was auger; so was
jealousy. Itomeo was a snowball—
Othello, in the climax of his fury, an
icicle, compared with Duck Kverhot
that night nWM
111 touched a grove of sycamores—
the grove went off like a Inciter .match.
All Virginia saw the flame and under
stood. Well they km that do woman
save Lalage lily could implant such a
lire in breast of man.
""•HAITI*"*" ii.
The earth all around and about Duck
soon became hotter than summer;
orchards bloomed! Two twelve-thread
plume-birds came up direct from the
equator, and began nesting in a paw
paw tree.
lie telephoned for his tennis suit, and
began marking oil a court.
••Anything for distraction!" cried
Duck.
CllAlTEr. 111.
And Lalage— what of her?
She slept in the spare room; but, Ur
ine of that, took her bedding, at 11 :""0,
into the billiard room, and passed the
rest of the night on the pool table.
"Like a sport in a crowded miner
hotel," murmured Lalage, as -.lie crept
beneath the blankets.
r ii An* Hi: iv.
At sunrise the forcing house exploded,
and strawberries, which from the fury
of the forcing were as large as cannon
balls and much hotter, thundered to the
heavens and whirred northward.
>
"What's a-whisk?" exclaimed a polar
bear, teetering on an iceberg in the
Arctic ocean, as one of the blistering
berries singed his tin on its way to the
sea.
"Love's a-whisk!" answered another
berry, as it drilled a tunnel into the
very core of the ice.
"Love's a torrid thing!" growled the
polar bear, quitting the now perforated
berg.
.loin* Wor.Tiii'M Wont*.
. Christmas Hits.
CHAMPAGNE cork,
enrobed in a red flan
nel ball dress and
gilded, makes a hand
some penwiper for
your literary friend.
A pair of blue gog
gles is a suitable gift
for your pretty-eyed
rival.
Do not forget to send
your rich aunt a prize
Christmas card.
A receipted dressmaker's bill is a nice
present for a wife to give to her hus
band.
The best thing for the forty-year-old
maiden to give her dilatory lover is a
hint.
Your son-in-law would probably like
it if you gave him arest. ■-, JBfr*
FIIEE.
Oh, how delightful ; oh. how entrancing.
From this drear thralldom soon to be free I
With wildest joy, then, my heart is dancing;
Dancing so gladly now with glee,
TRIBUTES TO MEN
Of the Saintly City Who Have
Won True Honor and
Fame,
With the Brains of Genius and
the Muscle of Ancient
Titans.
What the Globe Hopes May
Yet Fall to the Lot of
Each.
Christmas Greetings From a
Great Newspaper to
Great Men.
C. _. FLANDRAU.
"Statesman, yet friend to truth; of soul
sincere,
In action taithfu! and in honor dear."
GEN. RC1. 1. 11.
"In peace there's nothing so becomes a man
As modest stillness and humility.''
ALEXANDER RAJ-SET.
"His hair just grizzled
As in a green oid age."
CRANKING PEABURr.
"Seest thou a man diligent in his business?
lie shall stand before kings; he shall not
stand before mean men
DR. CHRISTIE.
"Careless their merits or their faults to scan,
His pity gave ere charity began."
11. H. RICE.
"Huff blest i 6 he who crowns, in shades like
these,
A youth of labor with an age of ease."
EDMUND RICE.
"Ay, every Inch a king."
ALBERT SCHEFFER.
"Honest labor bear- a lovely face."
GEN. BIBLE Y.
"That life is long which answers life's
great end."
HENRY P. II'IIAM.
"An honest man's the noblest work of
God."
D. U. MOON.
"He wears the rose of youth upon him."
W. l. m'urath.
"For he doth nothing but talk of his
horse."
a. R. M'GI-L.
"He hears merry tales and smiles not."
W. H. DIXON.
"He is a proper man's picture."
A. I). taljiadoe.
"A kinder gentleman treads not the earth."
RAMSEY CROOKS.
"You know I am a man of expectations."
A. 11. BTI< KNI.V.
"Whose word would puss on "change soon
as his bond."'
WILLIAM DAWSON.
"Trained to knowledge, industry and fru
gality."
PAUL MARTIN.
"The bubble of my ambitions was pricked
in my youth. I am but a plain business
man."
w. E. BURTON,
"A right merry man— .l pleasant man — he
hath held office una 1101 sutfer&d by it."
A. "HERMANN.
"Touch not upon this matter of my leav
ing. There be grief the heart would con-
I). W. INOEBSOU
"Thy modesty's a candle to thy merits."
M. laOKAN.
"The fickle goddess, Chancel yet beheld
her as Ids mistress."
W. M. CAMPBELL.
"if the wind be fair for me. and the enemy
not over keen, 1 may hold this port for a
twelve month yet."
Xl .--KIT. HUNGER.
"A good song, a good story, and a good
friend. Happy be who possesses all three."
GEORGE SEILEIIT.
"His very fool hath music in it,
"As he comes up the stairs."
COL. ALLEN.
"The real simon pure."
STANFORD NEWEL.
"He thought as a sage, though be felt as a
man."
D. R. NOTES.
"Type of tho wise who soar, but never
roam."
,t. J. HILL.
"Tour fortune, I have heard, I think, is
■ample. '
AL PLOUKNOT.
"May thy shadow never grow less."
MAJ. POSTLETIIWAITK.
"An epicure— yea. my lord— a man of most
goodly stomach.*'
T. P. OAKES.
"fie had ambitions, a score or more, fair
ventures for a fairer fortune."
JOHN ROCHE.
"Methinks the man who moves with ease,
and not the age's passion, runs a longer
rate." •
W. P. jirr.UAV.
"The Napoleonic mind is distinguished by
Its entire separation from that of the com
mon herd."
JOBS T. BLACK.
"A Are! A tire! The pates of hell are
open and all the worlds a-tire."
DENNIS I. VAN.
"Luck is the pood stress of many men
where wisdom lags and fortune fails." "
GEORGE R. FINCH.
- "Such a paunch as he bad. my lord. One
might see at a glance that he was the prince
of good fellows."
H. F. STEVENS.
"lie who eats well, drinks well and sleeps
without dreams has a most merry life."
O. O. CVLI.F.N.
"The sober garb of modesty rests well upon
thy shoulders."
BiSII. ARMSTRONG.
'•Such an uncommon rogue for chaff: mv
life npon it 1 feareahis raillery more than a
■saracen's lance." .
». A. MONTORT.
"A man of letters, withal a banker."
R. A. SMITH.
"There are some in these hard, hard days
upon whom Fortune ever smiles."
HENRY A. CASTLE.
"A man of angular parts and scathing wit
all Home feared my Lord Angelo. \\ hen
he died they took his pen and cast it in the
Ti_er."
AL GOTER.
"Shentlemen. shirts vas necessary tings.
Shoos: so much then vas I a humble mer
chant in -bins."
GEORGE FREE-MAS'.
"A well-shod man travels a long way over
rough roads."
L, W. RCTCDLETT.
"He could mathematically demonstrate the
width ot the narrow and straight way, and as
for the blocks of gold with which Hea-ren ls
payed, he had a measurement tor each." '».
V c. B. BRtrSSOK.
"These short men have often great souls
for wit." V -:. -' V*-
GATES A. JOHNSON.
"The permanency of our government de
pends largely upon the-- character of our
officials.''
GEORGE B. CLASOX.
"It was the wont of Falstaff, Recording to
the ancient chroniclers, to make merry, for
he was a bitter foe to heaviness of heart and
& funeral gait."
IT. R. ME ROT AM. .**
"Thrice happy he -whom public choice-
not public force— calls to the throne of
state."
MERr.ru. BTD-R.
'•Thc-re be those who commune with spir
it-, and see moustrous things. I wot not of.
1 fear the plague is on them. - '
THOMAS COCHRAN.
'•He was a soldier of the cross— a most gal
lant Crusader."
JOHS B. SANBORN.
'•Your bluff old campaigner has always at
his command -rood fellowship and a good
story."
HORACE BIGEI.OW.
"Learning joined to kiudly manners and a
warm heart iuaketh a pleasant man."
ii. R. BRILL.
"An upright judge."
DUE WILKIN. *
'•There rested upon this man the snow of .
age and on his face was written the story of
wisdom." (
JUDGE EGAS.
"A most conscienceless wag— he must en- *
joy nothing but his own wit aud the folly of
all men." ;
S. G. SMITH.
"It was the cue to Elsmere's nature that ,
he was an unconscious foe to the conveu- ;
tionalitics of religion— the modern artificial
ism of orthodoxy "
jop. m'ket.
"Good clothes - like good manners fit i
; easily."
D. D. MERRILL. |
"A good man's religion may be the least
conspicuous part of him."
JOHN CLARK.
"It was a characteristic of Fagin that he
never forgot a face."'
BISHOP 18-LAND.
"The priest has been a potent factor in the ,
course of civilization since the first."
CHARLES MONFORT.
"Mine inn is my castle. You may rest
there in safety. My cook is on guard."
LEW MAXFIELD.
"There was thi.- rich odor of spices about
him. as if his argosies Drought home rare
spoils from the Indies."
GEORGE MOELLER.
"Tne defeat was most glorious, sir, and,
though my master was stabbed at three
times, he 'scaped without a wound save, you
know, sir. the heaviness of heart such as do
lea! may cause."
P. R. WELZ.
"A good host mi feci la a merry house."
ANSEL OPPENHEIM.
"He pricked the steed of Fortune with the
spur oi great ambition.*'
A. T. c. PIERSON.
"LiKe driven snow, his beard blew in the
wind." *'
mtMm
THK SAGE ()«*•* XIXTXGER,
The wise old Goths, in the land of Ice
nnd snow in the ancient pagan days,
established the Yule feast and cele
brated it in the season when the exeat
logs blazed on the hearths and warmed
their souls to kindliness and the sense
of brotherhood. And the wiser pioneers
of Christianity, with a broad eclecti- 1
cism, wedded the festival of Odin and f .
I bor to the creed brought from the j '
sands and beats of Arabia, and sancti- j
fied its rude abundance with higher and
nobler meanings drawn from the stable !
of Bethlehem and the hill of Calvary. j ,
May all good thoughts and tender and j
loving emotions hallow the day and .
bless it forever.
ma.
VATKII ■ OK ALL.
St. Paul's Supply of the Aqua
*\Vas Never so Good as Now.
The annual report of the board of
water commissioners of St. Paul shows
the following valuable data for iss*-:
Receipts $560,935
Disbursement- " 545.477
Cost of high water reservoir 1 B.(*o* l
Payrolls for year — 114.589
Gallons of water pumped. ...454 507,080
Total No. 5 hydrants .. 1,134
Miles of main's laid this year. '_Si_
Total m'les < f mains 1311,.
Secaeuiry John Caulfield and Superin ,
tendent Overton feel justly proud of ;
the work done this year. The sum i
total represents more than that ot any j
previous twelve months. Aside from >
the relaxing of Important mains in the ;.
wholesale district and extensions in the,'
suburbs, the new reservoir for St. An- j
thony hill service lias been completed, (
and the preliminary steps taken for the |
laving of a thirty-inch serv cc main tor ■
the high service, and which will cost ,
ridO.OOO.
i
ATTENTION, COL. BAKU.
If sooner or later the gripmen of the :
cable line do not learn fen ston the cars j
completely when
passengers are get
ting on and off, de
signing citizens
will induce the en
gineer of some
railroad train to
lay for you with
this illustrated ef
fect We suffer
and we wait our,
time .
A Triangular Tragedy.
XJron the triangle he would play.
"'■ He also sang a little lay.
He would not live alway.
.< His manner it was gay.
They did him slay.
In a cruel way, .
One winter day,
.-- And now his
Voice is
Hushed
For
1 A.
FUN AND FROLIC.
Rich, Rare and Racy Gossip
, About Thing-s in St,
I Paul. ; --„„,>
1 — ■•*- "%
The Latest Jokes and Stories
for the Sunday Globe '••
j Readers. V -V-
Spicy Reading for the Busi
! ness Man and His Better
Half.
Personal Points to Make
| Young: People Laugh and
Be Merry.
F THE nu
merous fur
establish
ments in St.
Paul, there is
probably none
that nave a
more com
plete and
varied stock
than is to be
found in the
store of
Charles E.
Dannc berg,
"Manufacturer
of Fur Goods and Dealer in Raw Furs,
at -OS to 212 East Seventh street. Mr.
Danneberg has been established in this
city for the past eight years, and previ
ous to locating here was in business in
Detroit. Chicago, New York and Indi
anapolis. He has a large factory on the
upper floors of the buiidinsr he occupies,
and skilled workmen there employed in
the manufacture of Fur Garments of all
kinds, lis* is a direct importer, also, of
Russian, English and Astrachan Fur
Goods, and ha 3 a summer storage for
fur clothing. He travels considerably
himself, and pays regular visits to the
large country trade lie has, especially
in this state.
Repairs for Any stove Made.
American Stove Repair Works. 186
aud 188 West Seventh street. This is
the only establishment of its kind any
where west of Chicago, and was started
in ISB4 as a branch of a Chicago house,
and purchased tne following year by
the American Stove Repair Works. As
indicated by the head-lines, the princi
pal business is the manufacture and
handling of Repairs for all classes and
kinds of Stores and Ranges, a larsre
stock of (.'actings for this purpose being
always earned: and where such parts as
are required cannot be selected from the
goods already in store, they are pro
cured from the manufacturer direct
or made to order. In connection with
this the Northwestern agency of the
Danville Stove company, of Danville.
Pa. is held by this house, these Stoves
being sold both to the trade and at retail
by them. The industry is a very merito
rious one. and deserves the liberal trade
it has experienced at the hands of our
citizens.
A Man
May travel from the Atlantic to the Pa
cific, but in all of his journeys he will
never find a more replete collection of
Cents' Furnish
ings in all the
latest styles and
at such low prices
under one roof as
is to be found at
tin-establishment
of Donohue <..
Gagen. 25 East
Seventh street.
They have an ex
tensive line of
neckwear, includ
ing novelties from
Paris, the latest
out. Hats, seal
caps and mufflers
of every descrip
tion for handsome
and I o neiymen. They make a specialty
01 their shirt department, are agents
for Wilson Bros. 'shuts. Their window
is alwhy.-* filled with niceties to catch
the eve of a good dresser, and is one of
the attractive features on Seventh street.
Micbaud Brothers,
Wholesale and Retail Grocers.—Pre-em
inently the Largest, .Most Complete and
the Finest Stock of Fancy and Staple
Goods in the Grocery line in St. Paul, is
the Retail Grocery House of Michaud
Brothers, at the corner of Seventh and
Wabasha streets. It occupies the first
tloors of Nos. 425 and 4.7 Wabasha
street, and the large basement under
neath. In this house the firm carry a
magnificent stock of" the Choicest Gro
ceries, that would at any time invoice at
least $2d,uou, while their annual sales
reach the enormous sum, for a retail
business, of S&VI.OOO. Michaud Broth
ers make no specialty of anything other
than to keep the very best class of goods
that can be obtained either in the
United States or abroad. And they
keep everything that enters in any way
into the Grocery line, either Fancy or
Staple Their goods are purchased in
St. Paul, Chicago. New York, Boston.
New Orleans, and every other city in
the United States where any line
can be purchased most advantageously,
and also import direct from Europe. In
the store they employ twenty first-class
salesmen, noted for their attentivcness
and politeness, and they keep nine teams
engaged constantly iii delivering and
receiving orders. "The business was es
tablished in a comparatively modest
way iti 1576, by two older brothers of
the present firm, and under the same
style, the present firm succeeding the
elder Michaud Brothers in ISB6. The
present principals are Sinai, Adolphe
and Louis Michaud. All three are na
tives of Montreal. Canada, Sinai coin
in'.' to St. Paul in 1877. Adolphe in 1879,
and Louis in 1-8 L All are young men,
full of enterprise, energy and ambi
tion, and eminently adapted for the
management of a business in which they
have made so magnificent a success.
Nor can their success be attributed to
mere chance of location or fortuitous
circumstances. It was achieved by
their ability to select the very best of
everything, to have everything in the
Grocery line that any customer could
ask for. and to sell everything at rea
sonable prices, together with giving the
closest personal attention to every de
tail of their business. '
; THE GR-.XI) CENTRAL HOTEL
occupies the two upper floors of the
above building, with the entrance on
S venth street. This is, the most con- ,
veniently located hotel in the city, be- .
ing within two blocks of all points of
interest. The rates are reasonable, the
tare good, and the service and rooms A
No. I. J. L. Sauvinet is the proprietor,
and exerts himself to make life a pleas
ure r*i bis guests.
GOAL!
GOAL!
IMPORTANT
TO ALL
Coal Consumers.
The Best Is Always
the Cheapest.
The following article on Anthra
cite Coal, taken from . Johnson's
Encyclopaedia, shows the amount of
volatile matter contained in coal
found in the Lehigh Districts, where
the
CROSS CREEK
LEHIGH COAL
Is mined, compared with Lacka
wanna and Bituminous Coal:
'•Anthracite Coal is an important
fossil fuel. The hardest variety of
stove coal consists, when pure, al
most exclusively of carbon. It
burns slowly, with intense heat,
without smoke.and with little flame.
Anthracite, like all other varieties
of coil, is of vegetable origin, and
is, in fact, formed from softer and
more bituminous coals, by the ac
tion of subterranean heat, which
has drawn off most of the volatile
matter. Anthracite has no definite
composition, but shades imper
ceptibly into graphite on one hand,
and into bituminous coal on the
other. The coals of Pennsylvania
show a regular gradation of com
position in going from the East to
the West, and receding from the
focus of metamorphic action in the
Alleghanies.
"FOR EXAMPLE, THE COAL
OF THE LEHIGH REGION IS
MOST BARED, AND CON
TAINS THE LEAST AMOUNT
OF VOLATILE MATTER-3
TO 7 PER CENT; THE SCRAN
TON (LACKAWANNA) COAL
FROM 9 TO 12 PER CENT;
THE SEMI - BITUMINOUS
COAL OF BLOSSBURG AND
BROAD TOP FROM 17 TO 25
PER CENT; THE BITUMI
NOUS COAL OF WEST PENN
SYLVANIA FROM 3 TO 50
PER CENT.
"The density and great heating
power of Anthracite Coal make it
an excellent fuel for household pur
poses, while its freedom from
smoke especially commends it for
combustion in cities. For the gen
eration of steam. Anthracite has no
superiority over the best bitumi
nous and genii-bituminous coals.and
as a domestic fuel, cannel is pre
ierred for open fires from its cheer
ful flame and facility with which it
is kindled; but the steadiness,
cleanliness and economy of an
Anthracite fire will always make
it the staple fuel of the communi
ties which can obtain it. Anthra
cite occurs, and is largely mined in
Wales, Ireland and other parts of
Europe, but the most extensive and
productive beds of Anthracite are
those of Pennsylvania."
This superior grade of coal has
just been introduced into this mar
ket, and can only be purchased at
wholesale and retail of the under
signed, who are the sole shippers
and dealers.
PIONEER
Fuel Co.
licollet and Washington Avenues
MIBBEAPOLIS.
209 East SeTe&tb St., - ST. PAUL. I
Established
years a 30
Mail and
THIRD
7

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