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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, July 27, 1898, Image 10

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1898-07-27/ed-1/seq-10/

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AeRIOyLTSIRAL-OOMRIiERGIAL-INDUSTRIAL-FIMAMCsAL
8
START IN CATTLE BREEDING
: ~ ~^
NEEDS OF MORE BEEF CATILE
IN MINNESOTA
How n HoKlnninw May Be Made In
tin' Industry V Gooil Homo
Market at South St. Paul Poor
Grades of Stackers From Dairy
Paras the Hulk of Preseat offcr
lll»M.
A shipper to the South St. Paul sto-.-k yards
was giving to the writer, a few days a?o,
. in, Interes Ing points of experience in his
portico. .ar line of occupation. He "is a NiTth
n.ik, ea tanner, with a s«e--ion of land of his
-wi. and tlie range of tributary lands upon
which to graze cattle. Ke is now earing for
some MO head and bringing them to markee
Whenever he ian make a selection of enough
that are sufficiently fat to kill. He remarked
incidentally that there was much encourage
ment afforded to those engaged in ihe In
ilu.iry hy reas n of the eis'.ence of so good
a market at this pclnt to which, cs he sail,
all tie railroads seemed to run. He was
ask. .1 some questions as to profl's and the
grades of animals which made the best re
turns. I lis answers were substantially tei
the effect that raising and feeding good
Cattle was profitable, but th it it was fo ly
to f. t.l poor stock and hogs to make any
money in the enterprise.
This man usuai:>- buys his young stock
on this market. He knows precisely what he?
wants, and never buys unless 1 ? can secure
it. On this occasion he was returning home
without having made any purchases, be
cause he failed to see a single stocker in
the pens that it would pay to ship. He said,
however, that oftentimes he was able to pick
out some rood lots, and that nearly all
those which he will market here this cming
season will be animals selected at the Soueh
St. Paul yards. "Hut." he added, "the only
weakness here is that so many of the young
cattle offered are dairy stock, and they are
no good for fattening. I have tried It and
know what I say is so. Fcr Instance, one of
the steers I brought in today was a Holstein.
When I bought him I knew, of course, whit
breed he was, and I paid $5 less for him
than for the others. He was a good-looking
fellow, and I thought I would Just take
him for an experiment. He took his chancs
with all the ohers; had Just as much fe?d
atid care, but when he w.'nt into tV.e yards
he brought a little over $10 less than the
others. You can't put the fat on him. and
that is all there ts of it."
A careful inspection of the young strek
which has Just been coming forward during
th* past six weeks or two mon'hs Indicated
the scarcity of really fine specimens in th se
lines. Occasionally there have been sceme
which bore the markings of the Shorthorn,
the Foiled Angus and the Hereford Strains,
but these were few. I'ndoub'rd'.y the f.-ct
that the large dairy interests of Minnesota
and Wisconsin are so large has much to do
with this condition; but it wou d seem that
fanners, recognizing the proximity of so ex
cellent a market, would incline to expand ths
industry of growing beef cattle in cenju c
tion with the dairy herds.
Some excellent advice Is frequent'y cilled
forth by correspondents se>klng in drm i lon
who write directly to live stork or farm pc l
od>als. As an indication of this and b cause
Of the value of tee advice aff-rdd and th
source whencj it is drawn we submit the fol
lowing from the lowa Homestead:
A START IX CATTLE.
A correspondent who desc-ibe-s h:m elf as
having recently married, and gone to farml g
on his own account, writes asking for s in ■
suggestions as to how he had bettr malt.- a '
st.irt in growing beef cattle. Re says hi'
he lies been familiar with t'.:e ordinary farm
management oi cattle ever since he W ; big
enough to be- about them: that he Leiieves b-tt
cattle have to b? well bred, but that he h*s
no present Intention of becoming a brtcde
of j ore bred stock, although he may drift :nte>
tils kind ft breeding if he finds h-'ni*=elf ad
art -I ;o the work. He won d iike some Irnts
al* v* how v txgen. and whither to start with
pun bred cattle.
/. ..uming rhat our correspondents fs*ih,
tastes nt:d e-urrounding conditions are of the
kit: 1 that make it proper for him to en-are
to growing beef cattle, wo wou.d no: a v 'e
h.m, at least for the present, to pure-ha c
a teen- bred female herd. Instead, w. wou d
collect som, god native cows, thr number
•i.e., ,-,,,,. *„,,•:,, s; , 0l ;he farm wheh
■o< pocketbook was han or reasonably Nt
taking care, however, to get good" cow;
Ugh to do i-o one is L--n*;e!Yd to buy
number than he- woeild like to h ye"
neta selecting the br.ed preferred If h
number pf erws is fa'rly large, a good pure
bred bull should be purchased a-d In t I
<v... 1 - BUrt that he suita. after stutvi a
1 th as regards ird ve/uaiitv an?
'■ ful pedigree. One's be ? t tffari should be
directed to such a Election as comes n a est
the tyre ol steer that it is d sired to •■ o
uuet-, ..nd lake special pains to se.- that he
„;i. s .3, . canrtitnUon. He should b
str.- ge, m top and bottom lines, block* 1 w
built, strong through the heart and in the
with full ruirters and bone enough to
carry plenty of Desk. Look to his h.de too
and see that it la m Uow and well cVre
with a good coat ot fine hair. bec>u«e th s
is the best sign of a good feed r. If Ihe sk n
Is thin a -id harsh and the hair wiry you r'oi't
want him. When the lines upon which 11
Proposed to move forward have b.eu select d
and the character of the animals It is pro i s d
to raise js fixed ln the mind, don't s.bc
quently depart from them unless it be.-m-s
wr.aiii that an entire mistike was made n
adopting them. If the number of rows se
cured is small, then it may be better n-t to
buy for the present but to secure the u'e of
r'' ' • 2ft the „ b P that IS ln 8 «Bht in th's
cat although the matter wil' rot le hi
entirely within the control of the b ginn. r s
it would be if he were in a situation ti h
a purcha-er. Ha- lr.g defr.i lned on the breed
don t swerve from it: don't ÜB3 a S , ioit-hrn
for a v.-hi c. and then a Polled Angus and then
a Tri :ord, but having made- th.- s-l<cton
t n ,? L* m \ W . hUe «- hM «f«"« bulls tl?m
ume to time, don't cress bre.*d. Sive the
Ho, ,K aIVP£ an X feed "" the calv * s from ih
tlin* they are born until they are ready to
sell, in whatever shape they are tobe'od.
By retaining the heifers until all it is des id
to carry are supplied, it will not b" I'M
unti the cat-le grower can comment w"W«S*
ou. the poorest and the aged cows, and h
herd will soon be half blood end be ter. S .me
p ace along the line, if there has been a
hsposiUon to try growing pure bred st ck
? m " X L WO u KOod *•*■**•«« cows of th" br el
«H*. h^ h 5.1 b " H b " lorgs ma - v Purch/seV
and this wil give a start in blood. Vlig b'* to
registry, while the r.-st of the herd will soon
become, for all practical beef purpose i eou il
to pure bred. Never be Mnnt. dlo us' Q o i
IWW gr *i e - bulls, howevor, no matter how
good an individual he may be. A man wth
T WW! n w ney ' and "offlclent expert nee <o
teach him how to spend it. c n buy Droit?
muc.i as he pleases and Is not ] k.-lv to Vo
wrong. but m beginning with cattle and Unit
ed means and experie nee, it is. as in a mos
any other branch of bu*ine=s. be-st to b : gin la
a small way. and. being sure that lines along
which It must grow are right, let is grow.
MONTANA WOOL OUTLOOK.
The yield of wool ln Montana this year
•will be exceptionally large and pelces be te •
than they leave been in several yea*s. Sheen
raisers are better off financially and are not
pressed by hard-times and "industrial de
prcs-ston" to let go at any offer the buyer
may see fit to make. There is a big differ
ent when a man is in a position to be md -
pendent This year the demand for both
mutton and wool ls sfong, and the flockmas
ter on the range who is In no hurry to sell
car. got tbe full strength of the market for
both. Prosperity in this industry Las attract
ed more people to the bueinesi'and so for a
tine thete will be a s ro-g demand for br ■ d
lr-ee stock. There will come another time
Wfcen I*. will be oveedone. but probably not
for a few years.— Drovers' Journal.
RECORD-BREAKING IRON OUTPUT.
Pig iron production for the first ha'.f of
this year, by statistics of ths American Iron
and Steel asFociition, surpassed all previous
records, reaching the grand total of 5,869,708
gn.-ss tons. The fact that this output has
bf-rely met the demand, ln the face of a s ate
of war, will not prove encouraging to thcsa
Europeans who have been hoping for th»
time when our cost of production would
ap.sin prohlb't us exporting iron and st' el 10
tle-iir domain. It is gratifying, locally, to
note that Pennsylvania leads In the increased
output with 255.167 tons over the previous
six months, and that Ohio is next with an
Increase of 260,024 tons.
The indications from Iron and steel are
that the country ls prosperous and that,
after the war is over, it will enter upon a
period of commercial and industrial activity
never before equaled. As a. matter of fact
t 1 erj is even now an Increase in the ffUlpuc
p-f manufactures. The furnaces of the coun
try have started the second half of the year
at a rate to exceed tbe output of the first
half and other manufactures are endeavoring
to keep up .with the pace they set,— Pit s-burg
Despatch.
WHEAT WA2 LOWER.
*.;« -aeroas Receipts and Lack of De
muiid t'nust'tl the De
cline.
j L
WHEAT SUMMARY.
Prey.
Close. Day.
September. Minneapolis. .64%-% 66%-Vs
Se| t mber. Chicago 65 4 t7>fe
S.ptember, Duluth 66/4 65%
September, Xew York 70% 72' A I
i _j_
i i
"CHICAGO, July 26.— Generous receipts to
i day and lack of demand caused decided weak
j ness In wheat. July closed 3*>4c lower, Sep
tember %c and December 1e%91%C down. Cor*a
declined %@ :< 4c. Oats lost VtC. Provisions
; collapsed with wheat ; pork closed 37% c low
er, lard lOfllL'li.c off and ribs I&OT7M-C down.
Weather of the most favorable character
for the spring crop and reported depression
of prices at Liverpool and London caused a
weak feeling here at the opening. July was
; much weaker than more distant deliveries.
I owing to the freedom of the movement of
i new wheat and the consequent greater re
| luctanee of millers -md shippers to continue
; paying premiums for immediate delivery. The
I weather ln the United Kingdom and con
tinent was said to be favorable. Harvesting
I was reported progressing in Russia and Itou
| mania, with prospects of an enormous yield.
The spot price here was down 4e and out
! side markets showed a corespondinrg decline.
: Futures became heavier under that break
In the cash markets, and prices continued
on the downward course until the close of
the session.
' The total receipts at the Western primary
markets were 760,000 bu. against 706 000 bu
list year. Chicago received 237 carloads,
lof which 94 were contract. A year ago local
! receipts were 264 cars. Minneapolis and
: Duluth reported 119 cars, against 559 last
year.
| September opened Vi@-%c lower at 66-!4@
66% c, and declined to tVJAc the closing price.
j December started down at 66%ff66%c,
I fell off to 65% c, then firmed up to G5%@65 r iBC
iat the c-ose. July, which closed yesterday
at 74c. left off today at 70'4c.
i Scattered showers and cooler weather start
ied corn lower. Scalpers were disposed to do
| considerable selling and some of the prom
inent bulls also sold freely. The country.
; however, was a good buyer through com
mission houses and ft steady feeling wis de
i veloped at the decline. The decided weak-
I ness of wheat ln the last hour of the ses
! sion had a depressing effect and took all
. the bull sentiment out of the crowd. Sep
tember opened -H^'.ic lower at from 35c
■' down to 34-lic. rose to 35% c, then reacted to
i 34% c, closing with sellers at 34Zc.
i Oats were almost steidy on a good sea
; board demand. SoDtember opened %c lower
j at ante, rose to 20% c. reacted to 20% c, thia
firmed up to 20Zc, the closing figure.
Provisions opened easy on the soft feeling
in corn and a somewhat lower market for
hogs. The market had an appearance of
firmness at a moderate decline until near
the close, when prices slumped off on the
j break in wheat. September pork opened 5c
j lower at $9.95 and dropped to ?9.62 to the
j closing figure. September lard began 2%(&0c
down at J5.60, rose to $5.62. then fell to $5.57%
at the close. September ribs started 2%c off
at $5.67 and declined to $5.52%, the closing
figure.
EFtimated receipts for tomorrow: Wheat,
140 cars: corn. 230 cars; oats, 130 cars; hogs,
30.000 head.
The lee-.ding futures ranged as follows:
Ib r s
i . § t &
jj r* r M
Wheat— f™ j
l v, y I 73 73 70 70*4
SePt ! <•«%! 66%) 65% 65V4
Dec I 66%! 66%! 65% 65%
corn —
J u 'y t 34% 1 35 34% 34%
g«l* I 35 | 35% 34% l 34%
P/ c ' 85%) 35% 35 35%
, * la y I 37% 38 37% 37%
Oats—
July I 25 25 24% 25
tffPt I 20% 20% 20% 20%
M»7 •__ i 23% 23% 23% 23%
Mess Pork —
Jttly q 55
T Se pt 995 995" 962% 965
Sept 560 5 «2%l 5 52% 55W
Oct 565 5 67%! 5 57% l 5 57%
Short Ribs— 1 -
Sent 5 67% 1 5 67% 1 5 52%' 5 52%
_ oct '••■• ••••jjj 5 6 7-^l 5 67%|_5 55 I 5 55_
Cash quotitions were as follo-.vs: Four-
Steady. Xo. 3 spring wheat, 70@, c *oc; Xo. 2
red. 71%e; No. 2 corn, 34 7 :v«r35c: Xo. 2 oats
24%e25.-: Xo. 2 white, 2S(g2i ; w.c; Xo 3 white'
27% c: Xo. 2 rye. 45c; Xo. 2 barley, 32®36c|
.No. 1 flaxseed. 94c: prime timothy seed, 52.55
Mess pork, per bbl, $9.60*39.65: lard, per 103
lbS,'- Js.Eotg's.Es; short ribs sleles (loose) $5 35
«i.'-70; dry salted shoulders (boxed) 4»i'ssc
short clear sides (boxed). $5.55tt}6.05. Sugnrs!
cut loaf, unchanged. Receipts— Flour, 10 TOO
bbls; wheat, 71800 bu ; oats. 333.800 bu: oats
(242 200 bu: rye, 11,900 bu: barley, 2.200 bu
! Shipments— Flour, 7,900 bbls: wheat 17.200
I bu; corn, 486.000 but aits, 165,100 bu: barley,
I SOO bu. On the produce exchange today tlie
huitcr market was firm: creameries, 13%t§
] 17% c; dairies, 12@15c. Eggs steady; fresli,
j lie.
MINNEAPOLIS GRAIN.
MINNEAPOLIS, July 26.— Wheat opened
weak and ruled quiet and lower.
July wheat opened at >7%e, bple,g the fame
as Monday's close, and remalued steady op to
noon.
September wheat opened U 65% c, against
G6%(fi66%c, Monday's class, deeeltned %c, gain
ed %c. dropred to (s'L.c, fl-med up %c, soil
at 65% c and advanced to Gs%c by 11:45 a. m.
and lost %c by 11:50 a. m.
December vhe>st cp:ned at 64% c. a°a'n~t
64" s (fi6f>o, Monday's cloe-p, loert %c, gained %c
and lest %c by 11 o'clock.
The cash wheat market has m new f a area
to note. There is a dearth of arrivals of
country wheat. The deimand a', th* sampl?
tf-bles Is very light.
July wheat closed at 87% c, September at
64%@64% and Dcco-mber at G3%e563%c.
RANGE OF PRICES.
Open- High- Low- Closing.
Wheat. ing. est. e -t. Ties. Mon.
July 87% 87% 87% 87% $7%
September 65% 65% 61% 64v& 66%
Decomber 64% 61% 63% C 3% (5
On Track— No. 1 hard, 90% c; N-\ 1 nor.h
ern, 89% c; No. 2 northern, t4%c; Ju'y oats.
34% c: July corn, 32%t*.
The market during Ota noon hoar was weak
and almost panicky, with no one knowing thee
reason for the w-eakn-es*.
SOME SAMPLE SALES.
No. 1 northern, 7 cars 89
No. 1 northern, 5 cars, f. o. b !!!! 83
No. 1 northern, SCO bu, f. o. b !!S9
No. 1 northern, 1.4C0 bu !!...!is9
No. 1 northern, 1 car, to arrive 8*!
No. 2 northern, 2 cars, f. o. b '6
No. 2 northern, 1 oar, poor , !si%
FLOUR.
There Is no chanse in quo'ations, but mil
lers are asking r, ■•? and likely to g*t it.
The whole atmosphere ls changed for the b t
ter.
First patens $4 91.515 21
Sorts In bulk 4 'b'dfh 0)
Middlings, in bulk 3 83<fi~4 0)
Red dog, 40-lb sacks, f. o. b 8 60@3 80
BRAN, SHORTS AND COARSE GRAIN.
Bran, In bulk $9 00® 9 5)
S'^rts, in bulk U W .@ u B0
Middlings, in bulk 12 00tfi2 50
Red deg, 40-lb sacks, f. o. b 14 CrVTrli 5>
Feed in 2<,«-lb s^cks, $1 par ton ac'difonai
in 100-lb sacks, $1.50 additional. The ma ket
is strong, with s good advtnca f r all grades
Mills are generally sold ahead.
Corn— Strong; No. 3. 31^@31%c; No. 3 yel
low, 321-; No. 4 corn, 31c.
Oats— The oat market Is strong; N-*. 3 24' i
®24% c.
Rye— No. 2 rye is quoted at 44% c; new at
44% c; no sales.
Barley — Feed barley quoted at 25c.
Feed— The trade ls fair for this season of
year, with values steady.
Coarse corn meal and cracked
corn, in s?.cks, per ton, sacks ex
tra ■ $11 75®12 00
No. 1 ground feed, 2-3 corn, 1-3
oats, 80-lb sacks, sacks extra 12 75eg13 00
No. 2 ground feed, % corn, % oats,
80-lb sacks, sacks extra 13 25®13 59
No. 3 ground feed, 2-3 oata, 75-lt>
sacks, sacks extra 13 73® 14 00
In wood 26e extra Is charged.
Rye flour, per bbl $2 st}®2 75
Rye flour, standard, p er bbl 2 30®2 45
STATE GRAIN INSPECTION.
Northern. No
Railroads. No. 1. No. 2. No. 3. RJI. Gd
G. N.— B. Dlv 1 6 1 1
G. N.— F. F. Div 16 1
IC, IM. & St. P 1 .. 4 'a
M. & St. L IS
Northern Pacific 8 .. . 1
jC, St. P., M. & 0.... 1 2 6 "3 ..
Totals 24 9 13 9 ~2
! Other Grains— Winter wheat, 69 cars; No.
3 corn, 28 cars; No. 4 corn, 12 cars; no grade
corn, 1 oar; No. 3 oat 3, 12 oars; no grade oats
I 2 cars; No. 2 rye, 16 cars; no grade rye, i
car; No. 1 flax, 4 car;s; rejected flax, 1 car.
Cars Inspected Out— Wheat. No. 1 northern.
101 cars; No. 2 northern, 70 cars; No. 3, 82
cars; rejected, 2 cars; No. 4 oe,-rn, 5 cars;
No. 8 oats. 1 oar; No. 1 flax, 10 cars; No. 8
flax, 1 car.
RECEIPTS AND SHIPMENTS.
Received— Wheat, 89 cars, 69,920 bu; corn
10,050 bu; oats, 4,240 bu; barley, 450 bu; rye!
4,800 bu; flax, 400 bu; oil, 78,000 lbs; flour
125 bbls; hay, 101 tons; fruit, 852,220 lbs; mer
j&audljwt 1j,4£U68 lbaj limbec. 85 wmLaoatim.
and piling, 2 cars; barrel s ock. 1 car; ma
chinery, 432,750 lb3; coal, 837 ton 3; wood, 63
cords; brick, 26,000; Heme, 3 cars; cement, 230
tb!s; stone ard marble, 6 cars; dree^ed mea's.
128,82* lt>=- fajlrcad* Lft'.erials, 2 ral; sun rei,
23 cars; car lots, 433.' - . - -
Shipped— Wheat, 47 cars, 3-3,66.1 bu; cam,
2,920 bu; oats, I.OSO bu: ry.\ 6,840 bu; larf,
2,220 bu; oil. 100,160 lbs; flour, 50,081 bbls;
miilstufrs, 1,812 tons; fruit, 15<,E00 lbs; mer
chandise, 2,184,140 lb3; lumber, 45 cari; post!
and piling, 1 car; machinery, 493,100 Rs; c.a',
20 tons; wood, 10 cords; briclc, 9.0.0: c mint,
125 bbls; household g-ods, 21,(rl0 lbs; st.ens
and marble, 3 oars; live s-teck. 2 cars; htd r e,
pelts, eti;., 60,000 Iks; railroeid mate.lals, 2
cars; sundries, 13 cars; car lots, 7to.
DULUTH GRAIN.
DULTH, Minn., July 26.— The market was
dull and v,-eaker; September opened %c off.
at 67*jic; tod off to C7%c at 9:40, and at 12:3J
was qu;ccd at 67% c. Cash, 5.000 bu to ship
pers at July price. Mills last week ground
25,815; shipped, 23,725; have, 20,663; rji roeids
received 80,550 flour; shipped, 87.325; have,
47.265. Receipts— Wheat, 33,642 bu; corn. 15,
--110. Shipments— Wheat, 45.868 bu; cm, 40,
--0(0; flsx, 110.000. Xo. 1 hard, July, 84c; S?p
tember, 67% c; Xo. 1 northern. July, BSe;
cats. 25fi24e; rye, 43% c; barley, 25c; flax, Psc:
September, 91c; corn, 34c; September c o^ed
at 66% c; spot Xo. 1 hard. 84c; Xo. 1 northern,
t-3e; Xo. 2 northern, 79c; No. 3 spring, 77c;
to arrive, No. 1 hard, 84c; Xo. 1 northarn,
83c.
ST. PAUL GRAIN.
Quotations on grain, hay, feed, etc., fur
nished by Griggs Bros., grain and seed mer
chants:
Wheat— Xo. 1 northern, BS@B9c; Xo. 2 north
ern, 85@87c.
Corn— Xo. 3 yellow. 32%©33 c; Xo. 3, 32@32%c.
Oats— Xo. 3 white. 25@25%c; Xo. 3, 24%@24%c.
Barley and Rye— Sample barley. 24@32c; Xo.
2 rye, 42(?i'43c: Xo. 3 rye, 41@41%c.
Seed— Xo. 1 flax, 92c;' timothy seed, [email protected];
red clover, [email protected].
Flour— Patents, per bbl. $4.70(f?5; straights,
$4.30*T4.50; bakers', [email protected]; rye flour,
$2.50@3.
Ground Feed— Xo. 1 feed [email protected].
Coarse Cornmeal— sl2. [email protected].
Bran— slo(3lo.2s.
Shorts in 8u1k— [email protected].
Hay— Market lower; receipts heavy: choice
lowa 'and Minnesota upland, ?5.25(5<5.75 ; Xo.
1 upland [email protected]: low grade, $3@4; good to
choice timothy. $6@7.
Straw— Oat, $2.50@3; rye, $2.75@3.
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS.
GRAIX GOSSIP.
Gossip by private wire to C. H. F. Smith
& Co., St. Paul( members of the Xew York
stock exchange and Chicago board of trade.
Clinton, lo.— Corn ls suffering badly In this
vicinity.
St. Louis— Orthwein tells me Kansas and
the West are offering wheat very freely.
Looks like all the holes are filled.
Kansas City — Beloit, Kan., advises that
corn is about gone up.
XEW YORK.
XEW YORK, July 26— Flour— Receipts, 13,
--809 bbls; exports, 27,163 bbls; market weak
and s©loc lower. Wheat— Receipts, 121,450
bu; exports, 93,781 bu; spot weak; Xo. 1 red,
71c; Xo. 2 red, 75%@76c, f. a b., afloat,
export trade to arrive; options were weak
all day. Aside from bearish Liverpool cab!es,
selling was prompted by larger arrival of new
wheat: July. 74@78c, closed 75c; September,
70%*571 13-16 c, closed 70% c. Corn— Receipts,
143 700 bu; exports, 184,136 bu; spot easy;
Xo. 2, 39% c, f. o. b., afloat; options opened
easy under reported rains, rallied on cover
ing but broke finally with wheat and closed
%c lower; May. 41%@41%c closed 41 %c; July,
38% c. Oats— Receipts. 134,500 bu; exports,
280.389 bu; spot steady; Xo. 2. 28c; Xo. 2
white 32c; options dull and weaker; Septem
ber, 25% c.
GRAIX VISIBLE SUPPLY.
XEW YORK, July 26.— Special cable and
telegraphic despatches to Bradstreet's Indi
cate the following changes in available sup
plies last Saturday, comcared with the
preceding Saturelay: Wheat, United States
ar.d Canada, East of Rockies— Decrease, 993,
--000 bu: afloat for and ln Europe, decrease
3,500.000 bu: world's supply, total decrease,
4.493,000 bu. Corn. United States and Can
ada, East of Rockies— Decrease, 1,919.000 bu.
Oats, United States and Canada. East of
Rockies— Decrease, 1,549,000 bu. Among the
more important reductions, not reported ln
the official visible supply statement, are the
decrease of 121,000 bu at Manitoba and On
tario storage points, and 75 000 bu at Minne
apolis nrivate elevators. The Important gains
not otherwise reported, ls the increase of
110,000 by at Chicago private elevators, 64,000
bu at Xew Orleans and 56,000 bu at Galves
ton. The combined stock of wheat held at
Portland, Or., and Tacoma and Seattle, Wash.,
was a decrease of 2SO 000 bu from last week!
ST. LOUIS.
ST. LOUIS, July 26.— Wheat lower; Xo. 2
red cash, elevator, 70c bid; track, 70% c; July
69-^c; August, 65% c: September. 64%cr Del
cember, 65c: Xo. 2 hard. 67&@r70c Corn lower;
Xd. 2 cash. 33% c: July, 32% c; September. 33®
33% c; December, 33M*c. Oats lower; Xo. 2
cash, 24c; track, 25(525%c; July 24c- Mny
23% c; Xo. 2 white, 29%©30 c. Rye> lower; 46c
for new. Flaxseed lower: 88c. Lead lower
$3.82%. Spelter lower; $4.32%.
MILWAUKEE.
MILWAUKEE, July 26.— Flour Btfady.
Wheat lower; Xo. 1 northern, 89c; Xo 2
northern, 88c; September, 67%0. Oa-ts steady;
27%@28%c. Rye lower; Xo. 1. 4!%@45c. Bar
ley steady; Xo. 2, 45% c; September, sample,
29%<&31%c.
ST. PAUL PRODUCE.
A Fairly Active Market Under
and Egrets Continue Finn, With
Limited Offerings.
The produco market was only fairly active
Receipts of butter were light, but nrire^
steady at quotations. There is a good de
mand, particularly for higher grade;. Of
fc-rifgs of eggs were als-o small sr. P,icr>s
were firm. There was no session of th?
board of trade. The following are the street
quotations:
Corrected exclusively for The Globe by
the secretary of the beard of trade:
Bananas — Cr.otca shitp ; g— Lirpe bunches, $2
@2.25; small bunches, ?1.73@2.
Bep.ns— Per Bu— Brown, $1; dirty lo's, CO&S-;
fancy navy, $1.25; medium, hand-nicked.
$1.10.
Beef — Per Lb — Country-dressed, fancy, 6®
6%c; rough, 3%@4c.
Berries— Blackberries, 24 pts, 73@$1; 16 p's,
fancy, $1.50; blu< berries'. 16 qts, 9i**®sl.lt>;
1-bu basket, $2; Iv qts, LOc; ra-spberrlce. red
24 pts, $1.25®1.35; black, 16 qts, $1.25; bla-k,
24 qts, [email protected]; currant?, red, 16 qts, 75c
©•$1; white, 16 qts, [email protected]; red, 24 qts,
[email protected].
Butter — Per Lb — Creameries, extras, 15%5;
creameries, firsts, 14®14%c; creameries,
gathered cream, 11%@13%c; imitations, 13
13% c; dairies, hand separator, 14c; dairies,
extra, 13@13%c; dairies, fire's, ll@13c; la
dles, extra, 12c; ladle-a, jacklrg stock, lie.
Cabbage— Per 100 Lbs— Hom.3-gtrown, 25@?5c.
Cheese— Per Lb— Brick, No. 1, B%@9c; brick
No. 2, 7%@Sc; Llmburger, new, 7@B%c:
Swiss, 12@13c; twins, fancy, Minnesota and
Wisconsin, new, 9c; Young America, fancy,
new, 9@9%c: Swiss cheese, old, 16@16%0-,
rrlmcst, 6tg-6%c.
Cider— Sweet, per bbl, [email protected]; sweet, per
half-bbl, $2.75: hard, per bbl, $5®6; hard,
por half-bbl. [email protected].
Dried Peas— Per Bu— Fancy, yellow, 80®85c:
medium, yellow, 70@75e; fancy green, 80®
85c; medium green. 70@75c.
Eggs— Cases Included, Per Doz— Fresh stock,
lo?s off, ll@ll%c; seconds, Be.
Fish — Per Lb — Pickerel, 4%c; pike, 7c; crop
pies, 7c; trout, Lake Superior, 8c; white
fish, Be.
Frogs' Legs — Per doz, s@loc.
Grapes — Per Basket — Concord, 40®50c.
Grape Fruit— Per Box— California. [email protected].
Hogs— Clean, Per Lb — Heavy, clean, 4.% c;
light, clean, 4%@5c; medium, clean, 4%c.
Honey — Per Lb Sections— Buckwheat, Beg9c;
extracted amber, 6@6%c; extracted white,
B%@7c; golden rod, 10c; white, choice, 10®
lie; white, fancy, 13c.
Lemons— California, 800 to 3605, $4®4.50; Mes
sinas, choice, 800s, $4.50@5; Messinas, fancy
300s, $5(5)5.50; Messinas, choice, 3605, $4.50®
5: Meissi-nas, fancy, 3605, $5.50.
Maple Sugar— Per Lb— Vermont, In bricks
10c; Western, in bricks, 10c.
Maple Syrup— Per gallon, 75@80c; per half
gallon, 45®50c.
Melons— Watermelons, 20®25c; eantelopea
large, doz, $1.75; gem melons, basket $1 '
Mutton— Per Lb— Bucks, 6®5%c; countrv
dressed, 7%®8%c; milk lambs, pelts oil,
Onions— Southern, sacks, $l-75@2; California
sacks, $1.76® 2.
Orange-e— Per Box— Blood, $3.50; Mediterra
nean sweets, $2.75@3; seedlings, choice, $2®
2.25; seedlings, fancy, $2.25®2.50
Peaches— Per Basket— California $125* Ai
bertas, 16 baskets, [email protected]. ■»■•««
Plums— Royal Kartlve, $1.2501.50; Tradagey,
Pears— s2.7s.
Potatoes— Burbanks, carload lots per bu
20@25c; new potatoes, 45®500; mixed stock'
per bu, 20c.
Poultrv-Per Lb-Spring, live chickens, 13®
14c; live hens, 7%®Bc; live ducks, 8o; live
geese, 6c; live old cocks, 7o; live turkeys,
Veal— Per Lb— Coarse and thin, s%c* extra
fancy, country dressed, 7%c; good, 90 to 100
lbs, 6%@7c.
Vogetables— Green— Beans string, per bu
box, 60c; wax, per bu box, BOc; beets per
doz bunches, 10c; cantelopes, basket $1 25*
cantelopes large, per doz, $2: cucumbers'
per doz, 25c; egg plant, per doz, 750* let
tuce, field, per bu, 10c; lettuce, head, per
bu, 25c; new carrots, per doz, I0o; new
turnips, per bu, 36c; onions, per doz 10c*
parsley, per doz, 15c; pie plant, 100-lb box'
40c; radishes, per doz bunches, 6c; spinach'
per bu, 25c; tomatoes. Southern, crate 50c :
L watarcreaa. dfUk. iHox ..aoaaeberrles, 10 g,t*!
THE ST. PAUI, GLOBE WEDNESDAY— JULY 27, 1333.
75@S0c; peas, 50c; mint, doz, 75c; water
melons, "io@2sc.
Pigeons— Tame— Old and young, alive, doz,
65c; squabs, fancy, doz, $1/
LIVE STOCK MARKETS.
More Liberal Receipts of Cattle and
Sheep Cattle ami Mouth Strong
and Active— Sheep Lower.
South St. Paal. j
SOUTH ST. PAUL July 26— Receipts at I
the Union stockyards were: Cattle, 700; I
calves. 250; hogs, l^OO 1 ; sheep, 700. There |
was a fairly good run of live stock generally I
and especially of cattle and sheep. Several
carloads of beef cattle were offered. Thu
market was strong and active. The receipts
of hogs were not so large and the quality
was Inclined to be Inferior. Prices were
strong for grades. There was a slight low
ering ln sheep quotations
UNIOX STOCK YARDS, South St. Paul,
July 26.— Receipts. Cattle,' 779; calves, 252;
hogs, 1,106; sheep, 73. The market wa3 strong,
and good hogs, of which there were only a
tew bunches, sold around $4. Considerable
common stcck wtfs on the market. Repre
sentative sales:
Xo. Wt.DkgTPrice. Xo! Wtbkg.Prlce.
1 5tag... 570 ..$2 00 !l0 213 ..$3 80
5 96 .. 3 *.5 15 234 .. 380
9 101 .. 325 15 218 .. 380
3 206 .. 35) 25 212 . . 380
8 251 .. 360 31 207 80 380
7 294 .. 360 29 251 80 385
4 232 .. 360 67 254 200 385
6 313 .. 360 27 210 .. 385
2 340 .. 360 21 238 80 385
4 300 .. 360 19 218 80 385
6 305 .. 360 47 '. 249 160 3 85
4 312 40 3 60 '44 227 .. 3 85
6 348 120 360 33 280 160 385
19 320 ..3 60 19 223 ..3 85
10 277 40 360 36 216 160 385
H 314 .. 360 22 218 .. 390
8 324 .. 360 38 237 .. 390
8 325 80 360 26 232 80 390
11 295 .. 365 24 180 .. 395
2 330 .. 365 42 229 40 395
2 305 .. 370 15 197 .. 400
18 280 80 3 72U. 18 304 .. 400
6 218 .. 3 75 "39 247 ..4 00
8 ........174 .. 375 114 278 120_4 00
Cattle— Several loads of fed Canadian cattle
were on the market selling to Swift at $4.85.
The common stuff was medium to fair and
brought steady prices. Good stockers were in
gcod demand, but common stuff is very dull.
Representative sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
Xo. . Wt. Price!!^. Wt. Price.
1 860 $2 25 1 750 $3 25
4 975 2 25 1 800 3 25
5 870 2 40 1 .' 1100 3 30
6 875 250 5 880 3 35
5 970 2 05 4 805 3 35
1 910 2 75 3 793 3 35
1 1100 2 75 2 940 3 35
1 950 2 75 2 1040 3 35
1 895 275 1 .....1120 3 40
2 970 r 2 85 6 1103 3 40
2 925-2 90-5 1010 3 48
1 930 3 00 5 924 3 40
5 994 3 10 1 1150 3 50
1 S6O 3 10 1 950 3 50
2 965 "3 15 1 930 3 65
2 ............1020 315 2 ...„..„... 860_3_75
Stock Cows and Helfefs—
Xo. Wt. Price iNci! Wt. Price.
1 500-S3OO 1 380 $3 50
3 420 3 20.12 432 3 50
2 855-3 25U 560 3 50
1 600 3 25 1 230 3 50
1 670:3 25 5 720 3 60
1 650;32513 383 3 60
2 565.3 30 1 370 3 65
2 790 3 35 1 220 3 75
3 653 8 40 3 163 3 75
9 394 3 40 2 230 3 75
1 480 345-4 210 4 00
Stockers and Feeders —
Xo. Wt. P-rlecvNo! Wt. Price.
2 325 $3 00 7 253 $3 90
3 576 3 1528 227 3 95
7 478 3 1516 404 3 95
3 733 3 2012 391 4 00
2 730 3 40 9 973 4 00
1 930 3 50 2 440 4 10
1 830 3 50 1 170 4 25
2 875 3 00.1 180 4 50
1 250 3 75 3 150 4 60
6 508 3 75 j 1 ISO 4 75
1 610 3 75 7 230 4 75
4 1122 3 75,1 230 4 75
6 458 3 80 2 200 4 75
1 860 3 85| 8 260 4 75
5 .440 3 8514 264 4 85
9 502 3 801 3 2'l 4 10
12 516 385 1 217 4 90
2 205 _3_ 90*7 ?"3 4 95
' Bulls— ' -
No. Wt. Prleie.'|No. Wt. Price.
1 t*:*o $2 60 1 6CO $3 40
1 ... U.70,2'%6 463 3 50
1 Wit 2 !>5 1 1570 3 25
1 1120 3 00 1 600 3 00
2 900 3 00 5 630 3 10
3 1163 3 00 1 ISSO 2 90
1 1300 3 10 2 1325 3 00
1 950 3 10 2 700 2 95
2 ....... 535 3 20 1 300 3 00
3 853 3 25 1 840 2 80
Butcher Steers —
No! ~Wt. Price. No. Wt. Price.
20 1257 .$4 7530 1307 $4 85
SI 1393 4 85 1 1520 4 85
26 1409 4 85 1 1350 4 85
29 1433 4 85 1 1400 4 85
28 1376 4 85 1 1200 4 85
18 1320 _4 85 1 1600 4 85
Milkers and Springers —
Xo. Price. Xo. Price.
26 cows for $1040 00 2c& 20. .for $72 00
1 c & 1 c.for 33 00 1 cow ... for 27 01
1 cow ....for 37 00, 1c & 1 c..fr,r 35 00
2 c & 2 ..for 80 00, 3c & 2 c.for 320 00
1c & 1 c.for 36 00 5c & 3 c.for 225 00
1 cow for 34 00 1 cow for 1)00
1c & 1 C.for 41 00, 3c & 2 c.for 105 00
1 cow for $2S 00 1
Veal Calves—
__ Wt Price. lXo. Wt. Price. '
2 125 $3 75 2 145 $3 35
2 140 4 75. 3 . . „. . .____ „_l2O 435
Sheep — -A liberal run and lower markets
elsewhere caused a decline of 10@25c *iere.
Good stuff sold the best. Representative
sales*
No! Wt.Prtse.tNo. Wt. Price.
1 buck 160 $2 75 50 lambs 68 $5 10
2 buck 3 143 3 0033 lambs .... 57 415
2 83 3 50 2 bucks 140 3 00
4 102 4 0012 lambs .... 67 5 I*s
2 ....110 4-0 15 ......115 4 25
8 lambs .... 62 5 00 6 98 4 00
3 lambs .... 53 5 25, 3 lambs 6.'. 5 00
20 lambs 63 5 2." 6 lambs 50 4 00
7 lambs .... 66 535 28 lambs .... 78 5 25
65 lambs 75 5 35 1 buck 140 2 50
4 lambs .... 97 4 1016 lambs .... 74 5 00
8 100 4 0012 lambs ....111 4 25
90 lambs 68 5 25 2 bucks 110 3 00
Disposrnox of stock.
Cattle. Hogs. Sheen.
Swift & Co 355 997 270
W. E. McCormlek 14 ... 179
Staples & King 11 2-t 73
The Sutphin Co 22 24
Joe Wallace 120
Shimmer & Thomas 21 ... ...
Hogan Bros 108 ... ... 1
C. Mikelson 39
E. J. Xannatt 35
M. Keller 25
J. Wolfe 16
Spangler & Co 36
Parker & Co 13
J Bolton *
Lytle & Raeburn if?
Mosher J-5 ... ...
E. C. Price 5
Haas Bros 10
Hankey Bos 19
Ronan Bros 10 ...
Gibson Eros ... 118
Leo Gctlfried ... 65
Others 7
MILCH COW EXCHANGE.
Lytle & Raeburn's Report— As usual, the
good No. 1 fresh cows and forward springers
command good prices; all animals fit for use
of dairymen are In demand, the grass, drying
out, curtailing the supply of milk, and this
Is sending cows up ln price. Beefers and
canners also in request. Representative
sales:
2 cows $100 00 3 cows $140 00
2 cows 65 001 cow 87 50
AMONG THE SHIPPERS.
The following shipper^ were on the market:
L. P. Lee, Fergus Falls, cattle and calves;
Wm. Johnson, Lindstrom, cattle and calves;
Gustavus Peterson, Lindstrom, cattle; Uhl
mann Bros., River Falls, Bheep; Riley Bros..
Ellsworth, cattle, hogs and sheep; E. P. 1
Stokes. Montlcello, cattle and hogs; Charles
May, Plato, mixed load; A. L. McDowell,
Hutchinson, mixed loadl G. Schuneman, Tur
tle Lake, mixed load; 6. T. Spangler, Aurora
ten loads cattle; Jphn,.Jockway, Aurora, cat
tle; Lyko & McCoy, West Concord, mixed
load; B. Wilson, •tßicevllle hogs and sheep
Anderson & Urdahl, , Marietta, mixed load
Frank Wenz, Fairfax,, mixed load; Palmer
Bros., Fairfax, m^xed ,16ad; Dawson Bank ot
Dawson, mixed load; 'P. Eschew, Woodlake
oattle and hogs;' Proll & Kruppel, Gibbon'
mixed load; John: Hegerle, Waconla, mixed
load; M. K. Wolfe, Kellogg, hogs; Robertson
& Cogswell, Zumbrota. hogß and sheep; C.
Nelson, Northfleld. mixed load; Porter, Young
& Williams, Le Roy, sheep; Carver Broß. &
Co., Faribault, hogs and sheen; Laughlln ft
Martlnek, Owatonna, oattle and calves; Wels
ner ft Thamert, Bloomer, cattle and calves;
Frants Bros., Springfield, sheep; C. O. Marl
tin, Madella, hogs; C. Depue, Madella, two
loads hogs; C. H. Mandal, Madella, hogs; O.
C. Beyers, Lake Benton, hogs; C. W. Cham
berlain, Amboy. hogs; J. Schmidt, Melrose,
three loads cattle; W. F. Pearson, Watson
oattle and hogs; McKay ft Swingle, Applel
ton, cattle and calves; V. Perron, Milbank
mixed load; F. Fredeen, St. Croix Falls, cat
tle, calves and hogs; G. Schmidt, Osceola,
mixed load.
Midway Hone Market. """
Barrett ft Zimmermaa'a reporti A relax la.
trade was felt on the market, yet it had no
important feature ln the negotiation of stock,
as market from now on for four months will
nave quiet days occasionally, but in general
nave a good trade. Some flne, heavy drafters
y?r r e BSli at. from $140 to $167 a head. The
low grade horses are hard to sell on this
market, aend will be better disposed of else
where. Western, or the so-called brand-d
horses have been ln good inquiry,
and usually find a ready disposal on this
market. The nominal value of serviceable,
sound horses, from four to seven years old,
are as follows:
_ . Wt. Price.
Drafters, extra, ranging 1,700 $160
Drafters, common, ranging 1,700 100
Farm horses, extra, ranging 1,500 125
Farm horses, common, ranging 1,50) 75
Drivers, extra, ranging 1,100 176
Drivers, common, ranging 1,000 80
Chicago.
CHICAGO, July 25.— The gen r.)l market for
cattle today was not so strong as yesterday.
Choice beeve3 sold sa lsfaco ily, but under
cable offerings ruled we k: selling s' loc low
er. Choice steers, [email protected]: medium, $4.8)
@4.95; beef steers, [email protected]; s'.ofkers and
feeders, J3.40JH.50; bu"l3, $30-4. 2">; co-»s and
heifers, $3@4; calves, $3 5 @7; We t -n steers,
$4.30(55.30; Texans, $2.50(3)5.10. Trade in hrgi
was -fairly active at strong prices; far to
choice, $4.02%@4.17%; packers $>.s:@4;
butdhers', $3.8054.12%; mixed, 53.85^4.0 %:
light, [email protected]; pigs, [email protected]. Buye.s d'd
not take hold of sheep very eagerly and pr c?s
declined 15@2Sc. Fair to cheeeict* fh el, $1®
4.50; Westerns, [email protected]: rams, [email protected] goi
to choice lambs, $5.80t?f6; prime, $6Q6.15. R3
celpts—Cattle, 4,010; hog 3, 19,00; she p, 9.0J0.
Sloiiie City.
SIOUX CITY, July 26.— Cattle— Receip's. 6)0:
Monday, 817; shipments, 19). Market, i-teac'.y
on killers. Stockers, slow: 36 be?ves. ay
1.171 lbs, $4.75; 22 beeves, ay 1100 lbs, $ .9).
Cows, 4 ay 1,020 lbs, $2.50; 3 cows, ay 930 its,
$4.25; 9 stock heifers, ay 742 lbs, $1.60: 12
stock heifers, ay 6(8 lbs, $4.10: 1 bull, 130)
lbs, $2.96; 4 bulls, ay 950 lbs. $3 4'; 2 lull-,
ay 559 lbs. $3.75; stockers and fee-ders, 18 ay.
801 lbs, $4 15; 7 stockers and feeders ay 437
lbs, $4.35; 10 calves, ay 286 lb3, $5 45: 12 year
lings, ay 542 !bs, $4.60. Hfgs, 22.0C0. ion
day, 465; shipments, 75. Market, ste_dy. Sel
ling, [email protected]. Bulk, [email protected].
St. Loulh.
ST. LOUIS, July 26.— Oattle— Receipts. 4,BX>,
Including 3,500 Texans; market steady fcr na
tives; easy for Texans; native spring and ex
port steers, [email protected]; light and dressed beef
and butcher steers, [email protected]; stockers and
feeders, $3.25@4; cows and heifers, [email protected];
Texas and Indian steers. [email protected]; cows and
heifers, $2 [email protected]. Hogs— Receipts, 5 000;
market active and 5c higher; Yorker's, $3 WKa)
4; packers, [email protected]; butchers'. [email protected].
Sheep— Receipts, 3,300; market steady; native
mutton, [email protected]; lambs, $4@6.
STOCKS WEEE HIGHEE.
Many Strengthening Element*, In
cluding Peace Talk and Porto
Rican Victory.
FINANCIAL SUMMARY.
Prey.
Close. Day.
Bar silver, New York ....09 59%
Call money, New York.l'/iOl'/i WOttS
NEW YORK, July 26.— A eoncatn atlon of
causes was responsible for the awakening of
the stock market tteday from the l'jh rgy
that has held it foif nearly two m, o h 3. T.ie
bears had their Innings early ln th« day, as
sisted by a lower range of p Ices for Amer
icans from London. LatT Nor hw st ml iU
subsidiary road, Omaha, had a rally, an 1
from them the movement broad- ned mi
strengthened all through tbe rair-tad list.
Strength was also radiated from a group of
bituminous coal roaeds, includ ng Norfolk &
Western pfd, Chicago, India ntpo'is & L uis
ville pfd, Baltimore & Ohio and Wheel'ng &
Lake Erie pfd. The movement in th se stocks
served to make rather con^picuoi's the qu et
ude of other soft coal stocks, which have b en
assigned an important pla'e ln the rend n?
plan of the amalgamation of s'ft c _ al int r
c-sts. The activity and strength ln Suga
was also a dominating lnfluer.c; in tie nta-
ket, accompanied though it was by all forts
of sensational rumen", and very obvi u?l.'
manipulated to squeeze the shor s. Peac .*
rumors were renewed in the lat:*r del'ngs
and the announc-inent of the su'-c ss ul land
ing of the United States focss in Porto Kict>
also added to the buoyant tendency of tho
trading. But the most potent el ment in th?
situation vvas the growing certainty th t ai
abundance of money would ecu inue at the
command of the business of thi3 c v try.
Sterling exchange fell %c addlt'onal In ih?
actual rate* and %c in the pos'd ra'es. De
mand sterling at $4.84% ls w'thin %c of th?
level where recent god lienp-ir'atlrns have
been made. The treasury ha-i r c?ived about
$10,C00,0C0 from tne bond issue, whl h le ud s
the subscriptions for $300 or ltS3, wit' ou'
affecting tbe money market. Tiie ra-m nt of
the rest of the substription is 'n in? a l.nents,
which will be offset by the di hurs m-n s o.i
war account, thus assuring th? money mar
ket against future dis urbance3. Call m ney
fell to 1 per cent tcday.
The surplus of tdl° mon-y was ye y evi
dent in the bond market. To'a' Falis 4,305
--000. United States old 4a rrgi'tertd advarcel
%c and the n«-w 33 (When issued) del n d %t:
ln the bid price.
Total sale o-f stocks teddy wTe 321 501
shares, Including Atchison p'd. 14,100; B. *
0., 7,492: Burlington, ir..3'o: L & N., 5,775:
Manhattan, 7,547; Reading, 12,075: Miss uri
Pacific, 340: New York Central 362.; North-
Pacific, 6,0?0: Northern Pacific pfd. 10.743:
Rock Island. 10.S90: St. Paul, 17,5 T >4: St Paul
& Omaha, 3.545: S-outhern pfd 3 712; Un on
Pacific, 18,850: Spirits. 4,330: T^ac*c\ IV 0;
C. O. W.. 6,615; Pacifle* Mall, 3 575; Sugar,
77.200; Rubber, 6.637: Western Uniem, 6,131-
PARIS, July 26.— Spanish 4s clifel at 38.10.
Tne following were the fluctuations of the
leading ral.way and Industrial shares, fur
nished by C. H. F. Smith & Co.. members
New York stock exchange and Chicago board
of trade:
oIW p 2
I ..ft'-! 8*
gl l * 1
Am. Tobacco I 120%| 121%T120%i 121%
Am. Spirits 11%1 12V«,| 11%1 11%
do pfd I 35 I 35%! 33 | 34%
Atchison ! 13*41 13%| 13>41 13%
do pfd I 34%| 35%| 34%! 34%
Am. Cotton Oil I 23% 124 | 23% l 23%
Bay SUte Gas I 3%| 3%! 3%i 3%
Brooklyn Rapid Tranl 54%! 55%| . r >4%| 56%
Bait. Ohio 13 I 14%| 13 i 14%
C, B. & Q J 105%! 106% 1 105% i 105%
C, C, C. & St. L...1 41%! 42%! 41%! 42%
Ches. & Ohio I 22%| 22%| 22%| 22%
Chicago Gas I 99% 1 100% | 99%| 99%
Canada Southern I 53% l 53%! 53%! 54%
Col. Fuel & I 120 20 I 20 i 20%
Chicago Great West..! 15 I 15%| 15 | 15%
do pfd A I 39%| 39%| 38 I 38
Delaware & Hudson...! 10«% l 107=54! 106%! 506%
Del., Lack. & West..! 152%! 153 | 152 I 153
Duluth I I I I 50%
D.. R. G. & W 50%| 50%| 50%! ."0%
Erie I 13 I 13 I 13 i 13%
do pfd I 35 I 35 I 34%| 35
Genera: Electric ...J 39% l 39% l 39%| 31%
Great Northern pfd..| 127%! 127% l 127 i 127%
Hocking Valley | I I I 5%
Illinois Central I 108% l 109% 1 108% 1 109%
Jersey Central 89% 191 I 89%! 90%
Kansas & Texas I I I I 10%
do pfd I 34%! 35%| 35ffl! 35
Lead I 85% 35%| 35%| 35%
Linseed Oil I 13% 1 14%| 13%] 13%
Laclede Gas I 50%> 60% | 50% l 60%
Louis. & Nash 53% l 54%! 53%! 53%
Lake Erie & West ..I 71 I 71% 1 71 I 71
Laether pfd ! 67% 1 68 | 67% i 67%
Lake Shore ! I I I 1*9%
Manhattan Con I 105%| 106%! 105%! 103%
Met. Traction I 151*41 151% i 150%:. 151%
Minnesota Iron I 71 73 I 71 | 72
Minn. & St. Louis I f I 28%
do lst pfd I I ! r-8
do 2d pfd I .1 1 59
Missouri Pacific .... 34%| 35% I 34% i 35%
Michigan Central I | 1106%
N. P. common 23% | 30%| 29%! 30
do pfd 70%| 71% 1 70%, 71%
New York Central ... 118 I 118%| 118 ! 118%
Northwestern I 129%| 131 | 129%! 135%
New York Gas 198% I 199 198 % I 198%
North American .... 6% I 6% I 6%i 6%
Norfolk & Western . . 53 I 54 | 53 I 53%
Omaha I 83%| 84%! 83%! 84-54
do pfd ! J 156
Ontario & Western I I 15
Paclßc Mall 29 | 29%| 29 | 29%
Pennsylvania Ry I 117% i IM*%I 117%| 117%
Pullman ! 209%| 203 % I 209%! 209
Reading 18 I 18 | 17% 1 18
do lst pfd 42 I 42%! 41%! 41%
do 2d pfd 21% 1 21%| 21 I 21
Rock Island I 96% 91%| 96 | 96%
Southern Ry I i 8%
do pfd 30% 1 31%! 80% 1 31%
Silver certificates 1 1 1 68%
S. R. &T. Co 6| 6 I 6| 6%
Sugar Refinery 136% l 139%! 136%, 139fii
St. Paul 99% 1 100% 1 99% i 100%
Tennessee Coal 26%| 25%! 26% | 25%
Teas Pacific 12% 12%| 12% i 12%
U. P., D. & G 6%| 6%l 6 6
Union Pacific 24 24%| 24 | 24%
do pfd 80% 1 61%| 60% i 61%
U. S. Rubber 31% 132 | 31 %l 31%
Western Union 92%! 93%j 92%! 93
Wabash I j 7%
do pfd 18% 1 19 18%' 19%
Wheeling & LakeE..| 2 | 2 | 2 i 1%
The following were the closing quotations
of other stocks as reported by the Associated
Press :
Canada Pacific... 8476 S. P., M. & M..157
Canada South ... 54% Southern Pac 20
Cent. Pacific 15 V. P.. D. & G 6
Chicago & Alton.. 160 Wheeling & L. E. 1%
C. & E. 1 57 do pfd 10%
D. & R. G. pfd.. 60% Adams Ex 101
Fotr Wayne . . . .170 American Ex 135
.Manhattan U ....100% United States Ex. 40 ,
Met. Traction . .. .151% Wells-Fargo Ex. .113
Michigan Cent. ..101% A. Cot Oil pfd .. 78%
N. A. &C. pfd.... 37 Am. Spirits pfd... 34)4
N. J. Cent 90'/jAm. Tobacco pfd.l26
N. Y. Cent 118*4 Cons. Gas 198%
N. V., C. & St. I* 13 Com. Cable Co. ..170
do lst pfd 65 Gen. Electric .... 31%
do 2d pfd 35 Illinois Steel .... 56
O. R. & N 48 Load pfd 103%
O. S. L 28% Nat. Lin. Oil ....13%
Pittsburg 170 Silver certificates. 55%
St. L. & S. P.... 7%5. R. & T 6%
do lst pfd 61 Sugar 139%
St. Paul 100% do pfd 113%
do pfd 151% I J. S. Leather pfd 67%
St. P. & O 84% U. S. Rubber pfd. 9%
do pfd 155 I
BONDS.
U. S. new 4s, reg.i2sVN.~j!" C. 5s Hl
do coup 125% N. Car. 6b 12">
U. S. 4s 10 j do 4s 102
do coup HO jN. P. 6s 112%
do 2ds 97 do prior 4s .... 99%
do ss, reg 111%' do gen. 3s 05
do ss, coup ....112%N. & W. 6s 122
District 3 655.... 116% N. W. sons 142
A.la., class A lf-8 | do deb. 5s 116
00 B 100 ,0. N. lsts .: 11l
do C oa do 4s 96%
do Currency ... 90 ;0. S. L. 6s, t. r.127%
Atchison 4s 95 I do ss, t. r 104%
do adj. 4s 70% Pacific 6s of '95. .102
Can South. 2ds. .108% N.Y..C. & 5t.L.45.105
L. & N. P.. t.r. 5s 1*6% Reading 4s 83
n* I* o '* 5 l 114% R. G. W. lsts.... 80
,<• <Pv, & ~ D - *H45.1«4%5t.L.& 1.M.c0n..5s 98%
1). & R. G. ls.s ..109%5t-L.& 5.F.gen.65.117%
_ d 0 4 f, 95 Bt P. con 145
East Term. lsts. .105 Se.P. C. & P.lsts.llß
Erie Gen. 4s .... 73% ldo 6s nfiu,
&T" & Dl » t8 - tr - 73% South. Ry. Bs!!!! 95
a *V le o' s"*i***J2*^l' R - & T * 65.... 71
*\£S' A ' Cs - 104 Te '*n* new set 3s. 91%
„*>**; *• 105 T. P. L. G. lsts..ltlo
H. & T. C. 5s ..119% do rg. 2ds .... 113
do con. 6s IU U. P. 4s 97%
lowa Central lsts.lol U.P., D. & G"ists 7"V4
La. new con. 65.. 104 Wab:>*h lst 5s . .116%
L & N. Unl. «.. BS%I do 2ds .90
w iss ?, url . 6s ICO We& t Shore 4s ..108*4
M., K. & T. 2ds.. 65% Va. Centuries ... 71V?
VI d 0J a • M>%| do deferred .... 5
N. Y. Cent. 1818115%!
NEW YORK MINING STOCKS.
CtioloFTT 7so 14 Ontario ......... tffA
Crown Point .... 02 Plymouth 12
Con. Cal. & Va... 31 .Quicksilver 125
Deodwood 30l do pfd 3 50
Gould & Curry .. 05 Sierra Nevada".! 45
Hale & Norcross. 47 00 Standard 150
Iron Silver 75 Union Con 15
™ e * ica n 08 Yellow Jacket ... 10
Ophir 131
BOSTON MINING SHARES.
Allouez Mln. Co.. 3%|Frank/Tn 12>A
Atlantic 26vJocseola mt
Boston & Mont.. 208% |Tama rack 154
Butte & Boston .. 24% Wolverine 23V4
Calumet & Hecla.otO Parrott . .. 22%
Centennial . . .. 14 7t
WALL STREET GOSSIP.
hi^ *. \ ork l tock 6° SS 'P- reported by H. Hol
2SL» m°s' and brokers, 341 Rob rt
fng St PauT German - Amer:can bank buill-
Post ft Flagg wire us: "Tho Influence of
lower London had the effect of giving us a
I^ cr fl optnln X- Then prices rallied and be
«££ . on that although limited in
™ u » wa s of a very good character. The
market continued extremely dull until miefdiy
Z a l?J°^ lnxiea toryJMby commlsston houses
ftflnfrli S "P war , (Js * Peaca news is the In
fluential factor in the present rise. Su ar
» .i n P henon >enally strong all day the
snorts hav.ng been punished severely, fh c
is nothing on this stock, but there must h ye
been some Inside buying or the stock could
not have sustained the rlrte in the way It has.
The cose was very strong at about .01
prices.
FOREIGN FINANCIAL.
NEW YORK July 26.-The Evening PoH's
L-ondon financial cablegram says: The stock
markets here continued lifeless today th*
stagnation being incrased by the Gocdwt-od
races. The settlement shows a good ac-oien*
and Is favored by easy money. Contargoes on
Americans were about 2% per c*nc. T c
general tone of Amerlcens "was gocd but n
vestment stocks were lower on lntlc'a'-'ons of
dearer money. The markets ware quit but
the close was decidedly firm on New Yo k
support. The discount market is rbtng en the
fall of American exchange. The question of
gold exports to New York ls freely di'cu=sed
some people affirming that gold miy go rext
1 month. Such talk, however is prtmnu.e.
NEW YORK MONEY.
NEW YORK, July 26.— Money on call easy
Wp% Per cent; last loan 1&; prime mercan
tile paper S^(g4. Sterling exchange, weak
X i S*?., a S tlla l bu s'**e«s in bankers' bills at
$4.84% for demand, and $4..'3<£?7 4.'-3*i4 for B'xrj
days; posted rates, $4 81%@.4'.85 and $i.-6?S
4.86*4; commercial bills, $4.83*/.@-4.' 3. Sly r
certificates, 58%£*59%; bar silver. 59.
BANK CLEARINGS. J
St. Paul, $575,489.58.
Minneapo'ls. $1,0.1776.
Chicago, $15,066,900.
Boston, $14,645,763.
New York, $111,534,618.
TREASURY STATEMENT.
WASHINGTON, July 26.-Today's statement
of the condition of the treasury shows: Avai'
|lß9 e 76 C 4 a OSO balance ' ? 2 65.377,013; go d reserve,

MISCELLANEOUS.
ST. PAUL HIDE MARKET.
Quotations oa hides, tallow asd grease
furnished by D. Bergman & Co., 186 E*st
Third street, St. Paul:
HIDES.
Green Hides— No. 1. No 2.
Green hides 08 .07
Branded, all weights 07 !c6
Bulls, stags, old oxc-n, tare, 3
Ilbs1 lbs 1/v.r;;- 06^ * 05^
Long-haired kips, or runners.. .08 .07
Veal cslf, 8 to 15 lbs lo 08%
Veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs 03 .07
Dry Salted-
Heavy steer, over 60 lbs 0314 -OSli
Heavy steer, over 60 lbs. butt
branded 08 .07
Heavy stpcr, over 60 lbs, side
branded 03 .07
Native cow, free of brands, 25
lbs up 09»4 .OS**
Branded cow, all weights 08 .07
Bulls, stags and oxen 07% .06V4
Veal calf skins, 8 to 15 lbs ir .<K\i
Veal kip skins. 15 to 25 lbs 09 .07^
Veal deacons, under 8 lbs 35 .25
Veal long-haired kip, 8 to 25
Veal slunk sk'ns 15
Veal glue stock 01
Horse, with tall and mane,
large 2.50 1.50
Horse, wi*h tail and mane.
colts and small 1.10 .80
Dry Flint. Montana-
Heavy butceter, short tr'mmed. .14 .15
Light butcher, short trimmed.. .14 .15
Heavy butcher, long trimmed. .13 .14
Light butcher, long trimmed,
under IS lbs 13 .14
Fallen or murrain 08 .10
Kip, 5 to 12 lbs 14 .15
Calf, under 6 lbs 14 .16
Minnesota, lowa, Wisconsin*, Dakota-
Dry, 12 lbs and up 12 .10
Dry kip, 5 to 12 lb 3 12 .10
Dry calf 15 .12
Dry glue 02
Dry salted 08 .07
%L - %80 BQI
SHEEP PELTS.
Domestic-
Minnesota, lowa. Wiscons'n and Dakota-
Washed weol, e3tlma'ed per lb. ... .20
Territory-
Dry flint Montana butcher,
per lb, actual weight .11
Dry flint Montana mur.ain, per
lb, actual weight •CO
Dry flint Montana shearing,
per lb, actual weight 01 .06
Northwestern Dakota pelts same as Mon
tana.
TALLOW AND GREASE.
No. 1 tallow, cakes or bbls 03
No. 2 ta'low, cakes or bbls 02%
Rough tallow, fre? of bones 01
Grease, white, cltoiee '3
Grease, yellow, c'.io'ce 02
Grease, brown, dark ; .02
Grease, bone, white oi%
Market dull.
DEER SKINS.
Dry, red and blue, per !b 2 , i@>.12
Winter, long-haired, per lb 16®. 18
Green, per lb @.C 8
BOSTON "WOOL MARKET.
BOSTON, Mass., July 26.— The demand for I
wool is rather better Just niw and s-h-jws »n |
improvement over that of the past few i
months. The past week shows more m-derats I
oswe.fjerl sw%r — ngor k. :.6g cmf cmf craf I
lots taken as well as seem? good s!z-°d blccks. I
The following are the quotations frr the le d- |
lr.g descriptions: Territory w oe. Montani, i
flne medium and fine, 15©17 c: do ecoured, 453 ; '
do staplo, 48c; Utah, Wyoming ,ec f.n • m -
dlum and flne, 14@16c; d> sceiurel, 45-fil'V'e
do staple, 4?c; Australian wools, S'-ourei
basis, combing, superfine, 70@72c; gcod, *5-i>
6«c; average, 62®55c; Queensland combing,
65c.
NEW YORK DRY GOODS.
NEW YORK, July 26.— The week rems de
stined tob c another dull one? in dry goods.
Sellers explain the situation by s:y:ng th .t.
buyers have not yet awakened to th- n-ee<
sity of filling stocks, which, in mrst cas b.
are de-pleted. The mail trd is co tiaue tt>
overtupple the strre trading from day to day.
Staple cottons are quiet in n.arly al! grades.
Bleached cottons aro quiet and ie.:t. re c s.
Coarse colored ge>ods show quiet resul s
Prices are Arm and seme lines aro sctrce.
Print cloths are quiet.
NEW YORK COFFEE.
NEW YORK, July 26.— Coffc-e op lons opaTHd
steady at unchanged prices to 10 peelnts high
er, showed in vt3tm.nt orders r.ot --cen fjr
a long time past; foreign repreientativ s al o
bidding. Closed steady, unchanged to 5 p.lnts
higher. Sales, 28,250 bags, including August
6.40-35.E0C. Spot coffee, Rio, duel; No 7 in
dolt &S&J Jobb1 "^ -i^' q u.t ; 7 Co n r-
SEED MARKETS.
nn^iFt 00 ,-. Jul ? r 26 *-The flaxseed market
7uh h,^ e m.f ga,n ,oday ar<l continue! weeik
wl« b « Ut " ttk ; tradln S <Jone. Receipts hera '
™ " c a". 3 cars at Duluth and 1 car tt
Mlnn^poi's. Cash flax at 93c, Northwen Z®
S?«z. P 2^i bB 5 Cash tira °thy seed clo.ed at
Z., alVt and clover seed at S3 25 ncr 100 YYm
Minneapolis flaxseed quoted at %i%c per bu!
BUTTER AND EGGS
i»M^ W b Y(>, i X*K * July »•- Butter-R-^elp-s
FINANCIAL
To loan on approved propert/ . i
Minneapolis and St. Paul
5 on 6%
In Sum* lo SAI».
R. M. NEWPORT & S9H
__^^_l__^^^^
VERMiuT&CO^
BANKERS
and Dealers in
U. S, Government Bonds,
NASSAU & PINE STS.,
NEW YORK CITY.
BROKERS.
O. H. F. SMITH £ 00.
Members ■! *J. c , w T °rl< stock Exctiat> ?9 .
I Chicago Board of Trade
Mlcli.el Uor„„. ~~HW^eT UoramT
M. DORAN & CO.
BANKERS AND BROKERS.
3MJackßon St St. Paul, Minn.
H. HOLBEfrT^TsOJ^
Ban'cerj an J Broken,
341 KOBERT STKgBT, ST. PAUt,
*?«7) MERCHANTS.
GRIGGSBROa
Sta-acl merchants.
Millet. Hungarian, Seed Corn, Buck
wheat, and other late planting seeds.
Write us for prices, stating* quantities
wanted.
Thli^^d^darjitroat-i, st. Paal, Miax
LIVE STOCKS.
LYTLE & RAE3URN, OATTL'J DEALSS3.
Family and IJairj Voom a Hpscla'.l ,
lINIONSIOC-i YA.iitS flrauch, XUI*M-
Cow Market. Mi fuiveHity At.. St Paul. '
TRAVELERS' GUIDE.
Trains leave ana uri-ve at j,*. faul WW toi.
INION DEPOT. "siBLEY STREET.
Emt&El lo ° Ea " t «*W Street,
n jryJiy/AI Thone 114 S.
Leave. | a Dally, b Except Sunday. I Arrive
b9 :05am!.. . Breck. Dlv. & B'chesT.. I bs :2spm
J bß :2oam -F'gus Falls Div. £ B'ches.l bi ::,pai
I ti- :2oam ...Willmar, via St. C10ud...! ti 15pm
; a" :00pm Breck.. Fargo. Gd.F'kj.W'pgi a7:iaauj
al:3opm Alaska Limited I a6:lspm
I t4 -35pm ..Excelsior & Hutchinson., nil: 15am
aß:oopm| ... Crookston Express I a7.3oam :
fc. ASTEKN ftUNKKSOTA RAILWA V.
ggggj Dulnihl^estT^enor. | gJJa.g '
{o*£& TICKET OFFICE
Uwo) s{h & Robert Sts.
McfvV> v ~ n 3iiti:3 . st * ft*
N^-gjgJ 1 ' Mi.wa-jki-o Station, Minneapolis.
Dining v.d Pu Imin Cars on Winnipeg* Coast Traina.
PlC.flO Mill, Dally; Far.ro, Boz*manJ '-* av <* |Am<*«
I'uite, Helena. Missoula Spokane,
Tacoma. Seattle and Firtland i:3opir s:lopm
Dakota aad Kialtota Zzmcm, :.m,
MoorheaU. Faruo. Fer^m* Falls
Wahpeton, Ciooksioa, GvanJ Korkt,
Graficn and Winnipeg 7:3opm 7 :i3«m
FargO Lo:al, Daily except Sunday.
J?t. (Jl„u.i. Orti trdft-i! Kar-ro 8:303^6 :00pm
"North-WesterriTnV'— C., St. P..M7&0
Office, 395 Robert St "Phone 48t).
Leave. I a Dally, b Except Sunday. Arrive.
aS:lsam|.. Chicago "Day Express"..! bD:s;pm
b6 :3opm j.. Chicago "Atlantic Ex.". .Iall:3 «m
aSelOpm .Chicago "N. W. Limited 'J a7:soaai
b9:?sfitni. Duluth, Superior, Ash ar.d boeOSom
all :00pm| Duluth, Superior, Ashland.' a6:50"-im
• a9:3sam!.Su City, Omaha. Kan.City.! a7:.'spm
1 b4:soptn!Mankato, New Ulm.Elmore'blO-Olam
j a7:4spmlSu City. Omaha. Kaa. City] a7 :2sam
ST. PAUL & DOLOThTT
From Union Depot. Offlce, 396 Robert St.
Leave. | a DailyM) Except Sunday.; Arrive!!"
a9:ooam| DULUTH ! «T:l6mi
"iigfl WEST SUPERIOR I ■iJ.SS
Trains for Stillwater: a 9:05 am. ai2:l!),
a2:is. a 5:35. a 7:30 pm. For Taylor'. Fal.a:
■S :osam, aJ.l.'.pm, ba :3spm.
_Leave.j " lArrive.
7:2opmJ . . .Atlantic Llmlted~(dally). .7: 7s:iiam
9:osamJ.Rhlnelander Local (ex. Sua.)/ s:ospm
f WEST. I
I:2spm! Pacific Limited (daily) 17:05pm
ISt. Croix Fall:! Local Exceptl
I Sunday. From Broadway |
6:00pm! Depot, foot 4th St I 9:l3am
6 :3opm! Dakota Express. Lv. Mln-I
I neapolls, Except Sunday I10:00atn
BUEIINGTON EOUTE~
FIA'EST H}\l.\^ OX EAKTH.
LvTfotl BTATIONS. _ |Ar!From
8:15 am!.. Chicago, except Sunday..; 12:15pm
8:15 am!. St. Louie, except Sundiy.J. .. .
B :ospm!. Chicago A SL Louis, daily.,'' 7:45 am
Ticket offlce. 40j Hobert StT ~T«Y~ j«7
Hcago GresT WkkrFrl
"The Maple Leaf Route."
Ticket Office: Robert St., cor. sth, St. Phone in,
Trains leave from St. Paul Union Depot.
♦Daily. -"-Except Sunilav. J.etive. Arrive.
DubiKj'-ie, Chicago, Waterloo, ( +B.lo am ;-i?.3opm
Marsh; lltown. Dcs Moines... <. *B.lopm *7.43 am
St. Joseph and Kansas City.. ( *B.lopm*l2Jopn
MautoiviUe Local *3.55 pin *10.45 am
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad.
Ticket Offlce. 365 Robert St. 'Phone 98.
a Dally, b Except Sunday |Lv. St.P.;Ar. St."pT
Chicago "Day" Express.. bS:lsam blOelOpm
Chicago "Atlantic" Ex a2:sspmjall :30am
Chicago "Fast Mall" a6 :sspm al :00pm
Chicago "Pioneer Limited". aß:lopm[ a 7 10am
Chic, via Prairie dv C. div. b4:4opm blieisam
Pet.rla via Mason City a4 :4opm tall :lsam
Dubuque via La Crosse.. bS:lsarablo:lopm
St. Louis and Kansas City. aß.3sam| a6:2spm
Milbank and Way bß:2oam| b6 30pm
Aberdeen and Dakota Ex.. aT :ospm a^ :lsam
WJSCONSIW CENTW*C
City Offlce, 873 Robert St. 'PhODe Xo. 631.
Leave [Arrive
StPaul All Tralna Dally. IStPaul
Eau Claire, Chippewa FalU, 1
S:ooam Milwaukee and Chicago — ]B:lsam
Ashland. Chippewa Falls. Osh-f
7:4opm kosh. Milwaukee and Chlcago.l4:lopm
iS7 - &~StTt. Depot— Bpoaiiwny & 4th.
MINNEAPOLIS &~ST. LOFTS R. R.
"AL.ISERT LEA ROUTE."
Leave, ia Daily. b Except Suuuay.| Arrive.
IMankato. Dcs Moines. Ce-|
b9:lsam!..d.ir Rnnids. Kan. City..) b«:3opm
bS:4f : am l . ..Watertown. New Ulm. .J b4-SKnm
tF.tOnpm! New Ulin Local |blo:2iam
s7-00pm'Des Moines & Omaha Lim.! aS :loam
a7:oflpm!Chicago & St. Louis Lim.! a8:10am
b4:4spm!Albert Lea & Waseca Local!blo:3:am

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