OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 05, 1899, Image 16

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1899-02-05/ed-1/seq-16/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

lllillllllil llllglll I illlllllllllll I
MISS MARGARET LIVINGSTON ASTOR CHANLER, THE YOUNG WOMAN WHOSE HEROISM DURING THE W4.R
HAS BEEN REWARDED BY A BEAUTIFUL GOLD MEDAL.
DRESSES FOR
WINDY DAYS.
The Rainy Day Society Will Now
Turn Its Attention to
March Winds.
SKIRTS THATDEFY BREEZES
Many of Them Are Weighted Around
'the Footftand Others Are
Mm eh Stiffened.
B A I N V-DA V FACINGS"aXD LLNIMS.
NEW YuilK. i<Vi>. 3.— An Englishman
is proud to be out in the -rain because it
elves him an opportunity to turn up the
THE CONSULTATION.
. "'-■. ■-'
™'.C ' i^.^J? F LOOPIXG TiIE SKIRT SO THAT IT CAN BE LOWER
ED IN CASE OF CLEAR WEATHER. THESE DESIGNS WERE
DRAWN FOR THIS NEWSPAPER BY THE BEST L4.DY
TAILOR IN NE W YORK CITY.
— ■ — i ' __ : i ___
__!_§__^^_(i£*s ds*sv __B^B _______r _U_hb ( \i_, jt
_i_v_s ——————ll^mh^"*""^ _ __J^^^_jtk_ls b -«_________ m_L _^_B ______> ____ _____^fe_ _f _oß____v i^L__B ■Bkw^ s9_bo_n__i^
A GLIMPSE OF THE FEBRUARY WOMAN AS SHE SHOPS. WALKS. GOBS ACALLING. TRAVELING AND IN OTHER WAYS BEGUILES THE TEDIUM OF THE DATS THAT ARE TOO WET AND TOO <X>LD FOR TENNIS. GOLF AND OTIT^R OUTDOOR RT>OKTg.
▲ WOMAN HONORED BY CONGRESS.
legs of his trousers and show the Bond
street finish. He likes to display the.un
der part of his coat collar and to pull his
coat around him to exhibit its handsome
seam' work. A poor garment may look
very ' well on a, fair day— like a, homely
woman under a gaslight — but when it
comes to a trying situation, then you see
the actual face of things. There never
was a cheap coat or a cheap skirt that
could be worn on a rainy day with im
punity. There never was a cheap dress
that did not show its cheapness merciless
ly in a good March gale.
Women of wealth in New York city
pride themselves on having a very nice
outfit for rainy or windy days. They say
it looks poor to go out holding up one's
every-day dress when the heavens are
sending down their drops and the winds
are whistling. To prove this they order
their expensive wet weather costumes of
Fifth avenue tailors, .and sally forth in
them on a rainy day to show how well
equipped they are for all kinds of weather.
Many of these rainy day dresses have
oilcloth bindings which look quite pretty.
On the inside the binding is< carried up six
or eight inches higher than on the out
side, so that it is impossible for the skirt
to get wet. The finest, thinnest oilcloth is
used for this purpose. At' the rubber
stores you can buy cloth- by. .the yard at a
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE — SU?*±)Ai FEBRUARY 5, 1899.
f^^fe^ffi^ Others
- rubber cloth'
plaids C ln Ul ? an be * ta tned in Scotch
«.£i v *} ILcl , ln plain colors with a face
FivSa n^v reS ? blei ladies ' <*>& thus
tu ' r * a very neat appearance
it tith Or v a e?v ! kht may - P^er to
w,f • S ln case of fair weather,
wusinesri women's suits are deliirhtfm
well dressed, -nodlsh, up to date trim
f' ld P^.tty, and that Ls one remn
day R r.,?T neSS . WOFld ° f NCW York tO
"a> ■ rulecl Partly by women
mere are numerous rainy-da y sorio
ties in New York, composed of women
who make a study of dresses to weaMn
of 'th^r^n! 1^ Dai . sl ?s," as the members
or the club promising to adopt short
skirts when streets are muddy and the
spring thaws make the crossings ankle
deep in slush, are called, are busy nre
panng for the inevitable March wind
\\ hen a perfect cyclone sweeps through
the valleys between the tall buildings on
Broadway making an umbrella impossi
ble, and when the rain beats from every
direction, the comfort of a short skin
and waterproof garments can be appre-
RAINY DAISIES!
The Rainy Day Club has not a uni
form because each member has her own
particular ideas as to how a rainy-day
dress should be made. y
It is generally like an ordinary blcy-
So ce ™ d , r - eSS - The skirt5 kirt 1S t0 the anffi.
bometimes an entire suit, consisting of a
cape and skirt, is made of dark blue rub
ber cloth, though more often rain-proof
serges and cravenette are employed
A very serviceable rainy-day costume
was worn by a dainty little brunette yes
terday on Twenty-third street. A dark
blue rain-proof serge, heavy and rough
was used in the dress. The little jacket
was cut not unlike a Russian blouse fit
ting the figure loosely, and belted with a
stitched band of the serge.
The skirt was quite scant and of ankle
length, just above the hem were rows of
tiny tucks, and flaps on each side of the
front width buttoned over spacious pock
ets.
The hat worn was a small black der
by, and the warm gray castor gloves were
seen.
Many women prefer the dresses made
with straps and buttons, but unless a
woman is very slender they are inclined
to look clumsy, but they have the ad
vantage of being easily adjusted. A skirt
of the usual length is made with seven
stitched straps of the same material de
pending from the belt, three buttonholes
are made in each strap and three but
tons sewed on the skirt, so when a rainy
day comes the straps are buttoned down
over the buttons and the fullness caught
up around the hips. If the day changes
to good weather then one Is not made to
feel ridiculous in a mackintosh or even
a short skirt.
By the judicious use of tiny brass
rings and tape another woman has in
vented another skirt which can be easily
lifted above the ground. Another idea is
to have a short skirt made of rubber
cloth buttoning down the left side The
dress skirt is carefully pinned up and the
mackintosh skirt buttoned over. A word
about the shoes. So many women com
plain that the heat in cars and stores
make rubber shoes "draw" so much that
they are exceedingly uncomfortable so
the very stoutest tan leather shoes' are
being adopted; the extension soles are
quite ns thick as an ordinary man's shoe
with broad round toes and low heels
There is no doubt that they are' wa
terproof. They are considered very smart
MARY GOODWIN HUBBELU
SHORT COURSE FOR
TRAIM NURSES.
New York and Boston Now Have
a Two Months' Training
School
A two months'- course for trained
nurses has be<?n established by a New
York medical institution. Young wom
en who wish to know ..the elements of
nursing are put through a course of train
ing which lasts oniy eight weeks and
turns them out with a diploma.
At the end of the course they are
examined by a physician upon their work,
and if competent they receive a certifi
cate saying that they* "are qualified to
take care of feeble, elderly persons, lit
tle children, chronic cases and convales
cents." Their work does not in any way
clash with that of, the hospital nurses.
The young women are qualified to
go into households -where there is a slight
illness, and to care for the case. They
are tauglit to know symptoms and are
able to judge if a case becomes worse;
then the more expensive trained nurse 13
called in. The salary of the .short course
yoiu-.g women ts only $10 per week; and
People who can not "afford Jfi'O for a
trained aurse gladly avail themselves
of their services.
The course pursued by the pupils
consists 01 forty lectures, live each week.
These are delivered by an experienced
trained nurse along lines which have been
carefully laid down by Dr. Grace Peck
har.i Murray, with the assistance and co
operation of other physicians.
In addition to attendance upon the
lecture, at least four or five hours of prac
tical work daily are required from mem
bers of the class. Much of this prac
tical ■ work is performed in the various
hospitals, where the pupils are admitted
and welcomed as assistants to the regu
lar corps of trained riurscs.
Among the subjects treated in the
lectures are the observation and record
ing of symptoms, which must be under
stood in order that the. doctor at each
visit may receive- an', intelligent report
of the patient's condition: the diet ol
the sick and the management of 'help
less persons. Practical instruction is
given on the dressing 61' wounds, liandag
mg. the making of beds and numerous
other points necessary to the making ol
a competent sick-room attendant. .
After receiving their certificates, the
women who wish, to become professionals
register with the committee In charge
of the 'course and are ready to take
positions. They wear A uniform of dark
b!uc. gingham, with white caps and
aprons.
The classes for the professionals, and
for those who are merely taking the
course without the intention of support
ing themselves thereby are kept separ
ate,, although the instruction is the same
in both. The tuition -fee for the former
is $12 and for the latter ?20.
Boston has had such' a school for
several seasons and has found it most
successful.
The plan has met -'with the approval
1 of many of the beef-known . physicians
in New York, airgmg,i whom are Dr.
Charles Mcßurncy, Dr.- George- F. Shrady
and Dr. Grace- ' Pockha-m, Murray.
Some of the -wortien .who have-' inter
ested themselves iii,ic are Mrs. Abram
S. -Hewitt. Mrs. William ~G, Choate-, Mi«s
Grace, Dodge, Mrs. ;Pierre LorillardV jr..
arid Mrs. Scth Low. a ■ 3
. ' ; — L£ ■■■•; • . • • •
They haven't confidett, their secret to me,
But I know* the engagement's begun, -
For he's ordered a bicycle built for two,
She a rocking chair rbuUt 1 for one! - :
„-^y
A BOX OF BOX-i)OSS.
A pretty fold of paper lace
A golden tongs with ribbon tied;
And dainty morsels all in place
To greet her when she looks inside,
"With chocolates and rose leaf flake
And fruits glaced all pink and white;
Kingdoms may totter— banks may break
But Angelice will feast to-night!
BREAD AND MUFFINS.
POTATO BREAD.
Boil four white potatoes and mash;
add three eggs, one-half cup sugar, one
cup shortening, one pint of water, one
yeast cake, flour enough ta make a aponge;
let it rise two hours; add salt to taste;
make up like bread; set to rise again;
make out in pans; rise .and bake.
MUFFINS.
One egg, two tablespoonfuls sugar,
one cup milk, one and one-half curs flour,
one teaspoonful soda, two teaspoonfuls
cream tartar, a pinch of salt, butter the
size of a walnut. Beat the egg, add sugar,
then cream tartar, and peat very light.
Then add the butter melted, and soda dis
solved in milk, the salt and flour. Beat as
light as sponge cake.
, • ** .... ■ ■•*
LOVE PUFFS..
One pint of. flour, one pint of sweet
milk, two eggs; beat the egg» well and stir
in the flour and milk; bake in little iron
pans in quick oven.
SQUASH BISCUIT. v
One large cupful of squash boiled and
mashed fine, one cup of bread sponge, one
half cup of butter, one-half cup of sugar
mix thoroughly with hands, then add
enough flour to make soft dough; cut in
biscuits and let rise about an- hour. Bake
in steady oven and eat warm.
CREAM MUFFINS.
One pint sweet milk, one-half cup
sweet cream, butter size of a walnut, ona
tablespoonful of sugar, one egg, one level
teaspoonful of salt, two teaspoonfnls of
cream tartar, one teaspoonful of soda
flour enough to make a very thick batter
that will not drop from thespoon; bake in
muffin pans.
THE BEST AND LATEST PICTURE OF THE COUNTESS.
AN AMERICAN GIRL'S PALACE.
The Countess Castellane Has Given a House Warm
ing in Her Magnificent Paris Home.
Americans are patriotic.
It is a strange fact that when Amer
ican girls marry abroad they lose their !
popularity in their own country if they ;
do not sometimes return to it and show ;
their patriotism in a practical way.
When. Anna Gould, younger daughter
of Jay Gould, married Count Oastellane
nearly four years ago, she wont abi'oad
declaring that she would rqturtl often to
the land of her birth fcr a. pleasant so
journ under the American flag. But
though seasons have come and seasons
have gone since then, and though Ameri
can society would gladly renew acquaint
ance with her, Anna Gould has not vis
ited this country, nor from present re
port is it likely that she will soon do so.
The gayety of Paris life is such that
she has found enough to constantly oc
cupy her time and her thoughts, and
this, together with the little Castellane
family, has kept her busy. She has also
been intensely interested in the building
of a home which is to be the most mag
nificent private dwelling in Paris, and
upon which she has spent millions.
Firmly imbued with the American
idea of a home, the young Countess, for
she was only 18 when she arrived in Paris
as a bride, immediately began to look
around for a spot upon which to build
a house.
The Count, who !r her law in all mat
ters, suggested that it be a reproduction |
of the Trianon and that, it be situated
in the heart of Paris. They decided to
take their time selecting the site and so
deliberate were they in the matter that
their friends thought they had given up
the idea of building. A year and a half
after their marriage it was announced
that the Countess had paid $740,000 for a
piece of land on the corner of the Avenue
Eois de Boulogne and Avenue Malakoff.
And soon after the architects quietly let
it be known that they had been asked
to build a veritable palace upon the de
sign of the Petit Trianon at Versailles in
which Mme. Pompadour lived. At the
same time the Count and Countess gave
orders to the most famous artists and
decorators of Paris for the furnishing of
the rooms and the painting of the ceil-
An order was given for a set of foun
tains for the gardens. These were to be
of most elaborate structure. Soon after
the order was given the designer called
at the Castellane home. After some hes
itation he begged permission to inform
her ladyship, the Countess, that foun
tains built upon such an elaborate scale
would cost a great deal of money. In
fact $500 every time they played five min
utes or $100 a minute for the time they
played.
The Countess with a careless gesture
signified that the cost made no difference
and directed him to go ahead.
Soon after the Count spent $1,000,000
for bric-a-brac and statuary with which
to adorn the palace, and both he and his
wife gave the most liberal orders to tha
Paris artists. One picture. "A Dream of
Spring." for the centre of the dining
room ceiling, is rumored to have cost
$50,000.
But it was not until the new year that
the house was completed, although it had
been in course of construction for nearly
three years. It is not as yet entirely
done, but the family have moved in an"d
have given several house warmings. A
large force of workmen are still em
ployed and they are still putting the fin
ishing touches upon the exterior carvings.
Some idea of the size of the house and its
magnificence can be formed from the fact
that 150 workmen have found employment
there for two years and twenty decora
tors have been constantly at work.
The stone is the same as that of
which the Arc de Triumph is built, and
the columns of marble in the halls are
purest Italian. The ball-room is of mar
ble trimmed with gold, and the dining
room is fitted out with the rarest of
woods.
In Paris the Countess Castellane is the
THE HOME OF AN AMERICAN GIRL IN f ARI3.
modern good rairy. On Christmas she in
vited all the children of all the workmen
who have been engaged on the building
to come to her new house. She had an
orchestra to play for them and a very
nice dinner for them to eat.
IN A FEBRUARY GALE.
Iff
THE RAINY DAISIES ARti DRESSING TN A WAY TO DEFY THE SPTMXO
GALES.
A FRONT VIEW.
THE PRETTY
SPINNING_WHEEL
The Princess of Wales Uses It
for Making Useful Home
Ornaments.
It takes a princess to revive a fashion.
The spinning wheel of our grandmothers
is coming into fashion again. It is" not
as necessary as it was in their days, but,
on the other hand, its decorating qual
ities are recognized better now than then.
No less a person than the Princess ot
Wales has set the fashion of reviving tlie
spinning wheel. She is adored by all Eng
land, and what she does is sure to be
copied. The fashionable maids and
matrons of this country are not likely to
lose time in adopting the fashion, and in
proving at the same time their respect
for the royal example.
The Princess's eldest daughter, the 1
Duchess of Fife, is also addicted to the
spinning wheel; and so are a number of
other members of the. numerous royal
tamily of England. Many- other women
of rank who enjoy the friendship of the
Princess have loyally followed her ex
ample, and it is through some of them
that the British public has learned that
the picturesciue spinning .wheel is now a
common object in the homes of the great.
The Duchess of Fife has a whe^l of '
blnck walnut, mounted with brass, which,
though oy&r a hundred years/old, is In
good working order. With it she makes
yarn which is subsequently knitted into
excellent golf Btoddnga for her husband.
■In this way she i.s able to make a saving
,of perhaps ?20 a year on the household
expenses, but that is probably not so
much of a consideration to her as the
satisfaction of having set a commendable
example of housewifely industry. The
British princesses are very fond of set
ting good examples and their industry is
endless.
The Princess of Wales makes all sorts
of pretty articles with her wheel.

xml | txt