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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, April 28, 1899, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1899-04-28/ed-1/seq-1/

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Of course you do not
have to be told that' < *' r *' < *
fill I Sill NEWS
Is printed in the GI.OBE, and only
in the Globe, in the Twin Cities.
This paper covers the whole field,
and does it accurately.
VOL. XXII.— NO. 118.
STATUE TO H\W
PHILADELPHIA DOES SPECIAL
HONOR TO THE MEMORY OF
THB SILENT WARRIOR
rUESIDECTIAL PARTY PRESENT
THREE GENERATIONS OF GEN.
<; It ANT'S FAMILY TAKE PART
IN THE CEREMONIES
GKEAT CROWDS WERE THERE
Next to the President Mrs. Grant and
Mi~> lto .< iiiaij Sartoris Were
MiiNt KiitlmsinwtifHlly Cheered by
the I"eo»le Prealdent and Capt.
Cc-Khlan, of the Raleigh, Meet in
i'alrnioiint Park.
PHILADELPHIA, Pa,, April 27.— 1n the
presence of President McKinley and his
wife, members of his cabinet, three gen
erations of Gen. Grant's family, and a
large crowd of people, Miss Rosemary
Sartoris, granddaughter of Gen. Grant,
today unveiled a heroic equestrian statue
of her illustrious grandfather in Fair
mount park. Although the day was not a
holiday, in honor of the event there was
a great outpouring of patriotic citizens.
Flags were everywhere displayed
throughout the city, and all the ships In
the harbor were gaily dressed in colors.
This city each year commemorates the
birthday of Gen. Grant, but never did
it celebrate as It did today. The
weather was beautiful, the morning broke
dull and gray and with every indication
of rain, but early in the morning the
sun came out and his warm rays were
never again crossed by clouds during the
day.
President and Mrs. McKinley enjoyed
themselves immensely during their out
ing today. Everywhere they were warm
ly greeted by the people, to which both
of them graciously responded. The presi
dent showed no signs of his recent slight
indisposition. Next to the president and
his wife, Mrs. Grant and Miss Sartoris
shared the attention of the people, and
they, too, were cheered everywhere they
appeared. The unveiling was a great
success in every way. Not an accident
marred the occasion, nor was there a
hitch at any time during the day.
The statue Is Located In a beautiful
spot along the east drive of the Schuyl
kill river, in Fairmount park. It is the
gift of the Fairmount Park association
to the people of Philadelphia.
The gallant little cruiser Raleigh, now
lying in the river off this, city, was not
lost sight of during the unveiling cere- '
mon'es. AH day long great crowds visited
the river near where the cruiser is lying,
and hundreds of people paid a visit on
board and were shown about the vessel.
The only active part the cruiser took in
the ceremonies of the day was the firing
of a salute as the monument was un
veiled.
PRESIDENTIAL PARTY ARRIVES.
The ceremonies of the day began at 12:30
o'clock when the presidential party ar
rived at the Broad street station of the
Pennsylvania railway, from Washington.
The party came in a special train. Be
sides the president and Mrs. McKinley
the party included Secretary of the
Treasury Gage and Mrs. Gage, Secretary
of the Navy Long and Mrs. Long, Attor
ney General Griggs, Secretary of the In
terior Hitchcock, Dr. Rixey, Mrs. Mary
Grant Kramer, Capt. Algernon Sartoris,
grandson of Gen. Grant, and George B.
Cortelyou, secretary to the president.
They were met at Wilmington, Del., by
President Frank Thompson, of the Penn
sylvania railway; Charles C. Harrison,
provost of the University of Pennsyl
vania, and George H. Converse, on be
half of the committee of Fairmount Park
Art association, having in charge the
event of the day. At the station the
party was received by the committee on
arrangements.
When the president arrived a great
cheer went up and was continued all
along the route to the Bellevue hotel.
The ladies of the party were received
itnd taken care of by the ladies' recep
tion committee, of which Mrs. Charles
C. Harrison was the chairman. The fa
mous First Philadelphia city troop was
the president's guard of honor. After
the entire party arrived at the hotel an
informal lunch was served. The lun
cheon lasted until 2 o'clock, when the
start was made for Fairmount park.
President McKinley's carriage was drawn
by four richly caparisoned black horses.
In the carriage with the president were
Secretary Gage, Mayor Samuel H. Ash
bridge and George H. Converse.
TRIP TO THE STATUE.
When the president emerged from the
hotel he was again warmly greeted and
along the entire route of four miles he
bowed almost incessantly in response to
the cheers from the great crowd which
lined both sides. A long line of car
riages followed the president's carriage.
They contained the cabinet ministers.
Gov. Stone, of Pennsylvania, and staff,
and other prominent men, including Gen.
Nelson A. Miles In civilian attire, Ad
miral Silas Casey, Capt. Clark, of the
battleship Oregon fame; Capt. Joseph
K. Coghlan, of the cruiser Raleigh, and
Adjt. Gen. Peck, representing the state
of Vermont. They were followed by
carriages containing Mrs. McKinley, Mrs.
Grant, Miss Sartoris, the wives of cabi
net officers and members of the ladies'
reception committee. A warm greeting
was extended to Mrs. McKinley and Mrs.
Grant all along the route. Everywhere
handkerchiefs were fluttered as they
drove by.
When the presidential party reached
the monument, at 2:15 o'clock, they found
a great crowd awaiting them. The
crowd started to cheer and never ceased
until the ceremonies were begun. As the
president stepped from his carriage he
was saluted by twenty-one guns fired by
Division A, naval force of Pennsylvania,
The president was escorted to a place in
the center of the stand, which was close
to the statue. As the invited guests
passed him he shook hands with each and
iiad an especially warm greeting for Mrs.
Grant and Miss Sartoris.
PRESIDENT AND CAPT. COGHLAN.
A most pleasing incident was the greet
ing between the president and the intre
pid Coghlan, captain of the Raleigh. This
was the first opportunity the president
had of -talking to the commander of the
Raleigh since his arrival in this country.
Everyone watched to see how the fighting
captain would be received by the presi
dent of the United States, and a great
cheer went up as the president stretched
forth his hand and grasped that of the
commander. The president wore a
f ¥ %l fmi $ lobe
broad smile, and seemed In every way
pleased to greet the captain.
The president engaged in conversation
with Capt. Coghlan, which lasted for ful
ly two minutes. The captain then took
a seat directly behind the president.
Mrs. Grant was given a seat nearest tha
monument. Next to her was Mrs. Me-
Kinley, and to the latter's left sat Mrs.
Mary Grant Kramer. Miss Sartorls was
escorted to a seat behind her grand
mother. The young lady was attired
in a gown of pink Bilk, tastefully
trimmed, and in her hand she carried a
huge bunch of sweet peas. Brig. Gen.
Frederick D. Grant, who had just ar
rived from Porto Rico, looking hale and
hearty, took a seat beside Miss Sar
toris, and next to her was her brother,
Capt. Algernon Sartoris.
Mayor Samuel H. Ashbrldge presided at
the ceremonies and after formally wel
coming the president to Philadelphia, he
called upon the Rt. Rev. O. W. Whit
taker, bishop of the Protestant Episcopal
diocese of Pennsylvania, to deliver the
invocation and prayer.
STATUE UNVEILED.
The mayor then made a short address
and was followed by John H. Converse,
who presented the statue to th« commis
sioners of Fairmount park. As he con
cluded speaking Miss Sartoris mounted a
small platform near the statue, pulled
the cord which held the national colors
about the figure and the horse and they
both appeared to view. The national
guards, of Pennsylvania, then fired a sa
lute of seventeen guns. The gallant
cruiser Raleigh, lying in the Delaware
river, nearly four miles away, was given
the signal at the same moment, and she,
too, belched a salute of seventeen guns.
Mrs. Grant took a long look at the
bronze figure of her husband, and as she
pat down she could be seen wiping tears
from her eyes.
As the Hon. Louden Snowden was mak
ing an address accepting 1 the monument
on behalf of the park commissioners, the
Chinese naval reserves of this city
marched up and laid a wreath at the
base of the statue. The president bocom
ing interested in them it was explained
to him that they were organized last
fall, during- the peace jubilee, by the
Christian league of this city. The wreath
was a magnificent one, and measured
more than three feet in diameter. In the
center was the following inscription:
"From his excellency, the Chinese min
ister, to the United Slates, Wu Ting
Fong, as a token of his respect for the
memory of the late Gen. U. S. Grant, and
a tribute of friendship from the Chinese
empire."
Wreaths were also laid at the base of
the statue by the Daughters of the Revo
lution and the Pennsylvania command
ery, military order of the Loyal Legion.
REVIEW OF TROOPS.
Then came the review of the 6,000
trocps. The parade was started at 2:30
o'clock and the line of march was north
on Broad street from Spruce, around the
city hall to Spring Garden street, thence
west to the river drive in Fairmount
park, and then up the drive past the
statue. The parade reached he reviewing
stand a few minutes after the state had
been unveiled. The column was led by
two companies of sailors from the cruiser
Raleigh, in command of Lieut. Command
er Phelps. The sailors were the heroes
of the procession. President McKlnley
clapped his hands vigorously as they
marched by him, keeping perfect step.
They were followed by details of marines
and sailors from the League Island navy
yard, the First. Second, Third, Sixth,
Nineteenth and Twentieth regiments,
Battery D and the Second city troop of
the Pennsylvania national guards and a
number of other minor military organi
zations. After the review the president
and the others of the distinguished party
returned to the hotel. On the return
trip Gen. Miles rode in the carriage with
the president.
PRESIDENT ENTERTAINED.
After a brief rest at the hotel, President
McKinley was entertained at dinner by
President George F. Converse in the as
sembly room of the Union League club.
About 100 guests were present, among
whom were members of the president's
cabinet, Gen. Miles, Gen Casey, Capt.
Coghlan, Brig. Gen. Fred D. Grant, Capt.
Algernon Sartoris and Mayor Ash
bridge.
Upon invitation of Mr. Converse the
president made a few remarks. He spoke
pleasantly of Philadelphia, and he re
ferred to it as the place where great war
ships and many locomotives are built.
He concluded by asking those present to
rise and drink to the splendid army and
navy, which request, it goes without say-
Ing, was promptly and cordially complied
with. Secretary Long and Gen. Grant
also spoke briefly.
While the president was being enter
tained at the Union League Mrs. McKin
ley, Mrs. Grant, Miss Sartoris and the
other ladies from Washington were
escorted to the handsome residence of
Mrs. Joshua Lipplncott, directly opposiLe
the Union league, and there entertained
at dinner. Other guests were the mem
bers of the ladles reception committee
and Mrs. Alexander Van Renneslaer.
GRANT MONCMENT.
The Grant monument, as it now stands
is exactly the same size as the one in
l-nion Square, New York. It was de
signed by Nathanial Chester French and
Edward C. Potter, both American artists
The former modelled the figure of Gen!
Grant and the latter the horse They
have endeavored to depict the hero in
the position of a dignified and quietly
Imposing "silent man on horseback," and
in so doing have departed from the con
ventional. There is an absence of the
dramatic action shown in the prancing
steed and waving sword. Instead the
general rides his horse in deep thought
In expression and features the face is
indicative of a strong, though latent and
modest personality. He Is clad in field
garb, with high cavalry boots, close
buttoned coat and a long cape or coat
falls In folds over the horse. The latter
stands firmly on his four feet, with head
turned slightly turned to one side The
whole aspect of the statute is one of re
strained strength.
The idea was conceived by the Fair
mount Park association, and the work Is
presented by the body to be place in the
park. The height of the statute from the
bottom of the plinth to the top of the
rider's hat Is fifteen fleet one inch The
total weight is five tons. The pedestal
is built of Jonesboro granite and the
total cost was $32,675.35.
GEN. WHEELER'S TRIBUTE.
Guest of Honor at the Plttaburg
Grant Dinner.
PITTSFURG, Pa., April 27.— Politics
gave way to patriotism at the annual
banquet of the American Republican
club, in honor of the birthday of Gen.
Grant, tonight, and instead of the names
of such prominent Republican leaders
among the speakers as McKlnley, Har
rison, Reed and Sherman, the army and
navy had the call, and the guests of
honor were Gen. Joseph Wheeler and Ad
miral Winfleld S. Schley.
The dinner was held at the Hotel
Schenley, and in many respects was the
most successful ever given by the club.
Covers were laid for 365, and had there
been room probably twice this number
of tickets would have been sold. Pre
ceding: the dinner the distinguished guests
held a reception which lasted more than
an hour, and it was long after the time
fixed for the banquet when the guests
filed into the banquet hall to the inspir
ing strains of the Stars and Stripes.
Hon. C. L. Magee was chairman at the
dinner table, and Clarence Burleigh, city
attorney, was toastmaster. Maj. Gen.
Wheeler responded to the toast "Grant."
Convention Called.
HURON. S. D., April 27.— (Special.)—
The Republican state central committee
tonight named June 28 as the. time and
Redfield as the place for holding state
convention to nominate supreme court
judges.
FRIDAY MORNING, APRII, 28, 1899.
CRUSHING DEFEAT
FIGHTING BEFORE CALUMPIT
WILL PROBABLY TERMINATE
THB PHILIPPINE WAR
REBELS ARE MORALIZED
INFLUENTIAL FILIPINOS "WANT
PEACE, BUT ARE AFRAID TO
ENTER REBEL LINES
MINNESOTANS AT THE FRONT
Together With the Oregon Regl
ni*nt the Thirteenth la Marching
Westward, to Co-operate With
Gen. Mac Arthur's Forces — Enemy
Were Strongly Entrenched When
Attacked by the Americana.
NEW YORK, April 27.— (Special.)— A
special from Manila
"It is believed that the war with Agui
naldo's forces is about ended. The crush
ing defeat of the rebels before Calumpit
broke the backbone of the Filipino re
sistance, and the fighting from now on
will likely be wholly of the guerilla sort.
It is the intention of Gen. Otis to pre
vent the Filipinos from returning to their
strongholds, and thus to shut them off
from supplies and ammunition. Deser
tions from the Filipino army are reported
to be on the increase, and the end is
thought to be not far distant."
LAWTON'S ADVANCE.
MANILA, April 27.— Gen. Lawton's ad
vance has been a remarkable demonstra
tion of the resistless energy which char
acterises all his undertakings. The last
troops forming his column only reached
Norzagaray today. The men were badly
played out, as during the past two days
they have dragged bullock carts over
jungles, and through swamps, cutting
their own way for miles. They will rest
three days and then, with Col. Summers'
command, consisting of the Oregon and
Minnesota regiments, the troops will re
sume the march westward, co-operating
with Gen. Mac Arthur's forces in the im
portant enterprise.
The ambulances, today, with a strong
escort, are bringing Gen. Law ton's
wounded and a few of those who have
been prostrated by the heat across the
country to the railroad.
A report has gained wide currency
among the volunteers that the govern
ment intends to ask that there be no
fighting after Calumpit is captured, and
that it is the Intention to replacee them
at the front with regulars, which are be
ing brough here on board transports.
SEEKING TERMS.
The committee of Filipinos organised
to mediate between the Americans and
Aguinaldo fears to approach the rebels
after the refusal of the latter to receive
the Spanish commissioners who were
bearing a white flag. The committee
after consulting with the American com
missioners proposed to tell Aguinaldo that,
while no terms except unconditional sur
render could be off ered -after the lengths
to which the war had been carried, they
could assure the rebels that they would
be treated according to the American
traditions of leniency to the conquered,
nad that there would be no punishments
or confiscations of property if they laid
down their arms. The leaders of the
committee told United States Consul
"Williams that they would go if he would
accompany them, believing the rebels
trusted Mr. Williams. The latter, how
ever, refused, having no authority in the
matter. He said:
"I do not believe the Filipinos would
harm me, but they might detain me for
months."
The American commission is hampered
in its work of enlisting the support of
friendly Filipinos by the fear expressed
by many of them that the "anti-expan
sionists" may obtain control of the Amer
ican government and cause the withdraw
al of the American troops from the Phil
ippine islands, thus, they claim, leaving
the natives who have assisted the Amer
icans at the mercy of Aguinaldo' s fol
lowers. Under these circumstances men
of property are reluctant to take the risk
of becoming Identified with the American
regime.
REBELS IN FLIGHT.
Gen. Mac Arthur's division crossed the
Rio Grande today and advanced on Apa
lit, completely routing the flower of the
rebel army. The enemy were very
strongly entrenched on the river bank
near the side of the railway bridge. Gen.
Wheaton sent Co. Funston across with
two companies of the Twentieth Kansas
regiment, a couple of privates swimming
the swift stream with a rope under a
galling fire, for the purpose of guiding the
raft. Hhe men crossed in squads of twen
ty and attacked the left flank of the reb
els, who scuttled like rabbits into covered
ways and trenches. The rest of the regi
ment was compelled to cross the bridge
in single file along the stringers. All the
woodwork and much of the iron work had
been removed. The first Montana regi
ment followed the Kansans across the
bridge.
NATIVES KILLED.
The First Nebraska regiment, acting as
a reserve, attacked the rebels in three
lines of trenches, driving them out, kill
ing sixteen and wounding many. In the
meantime a large body of Filipinos, esti
mated at no fewer than 3,000,. led by Dan
tonl Luini, on a black charger, evidently
with a view of reinforcing the rebels that
were engaging the Nebraskans, apeared
in the open field two miles to the left.
Emerging from the jungle the enemy
formed an open skirmish line, two mlle3
to the left, with very thick reserves fol
lowing. They advanced at a double quick
until they were about 2,000 yards from th 9
American line, when Gen. Wheaton or
dered his troops to flre. The rebels who
were evidently unaware that the Ameri
cans had crossed the river, broke and ran
in the direction of Macubule. The other
Filipinos fled towards Apelt station.
The heat in the early part of the after
noon was terrific, but a drenching thun
derstorm, which came later, greatly re
freshed the Americans.
Most of the rebels fled to Apalit station,
where two trains were waiting them.
They left hurriedly, presumably for San
Fernando. The towns of San Vincente
and Apalit were simultaneuosly burned
and evacuated by the natives. Twenty
prisoners were captured, Including a
Spaniard. The American troops also cap
tured a brass canon and a quantity of
arms and ammunition, and the same
Continued oa Third Page.
' JOHN M. TRUE AND HIS GREAT MARRIAGE LAT' V
MADISON, Wls. , April 27.— Assemblyman
John M. True, whose antl-Gretna Green
bill will soon become a law, is one of the
most remarkable men in the legislature.
He has ever protested against the rep
utation of his state for "easy marriages,"
and has always arrayed himself against
the immoral in this commonwealth. He
was for a number of years the secretary
of the State Agricultural society, and
made it a great power, but when It fell
into the clutches of the race horse men
FAVORS MRS. GEORGE
REPORTED BALLOTING OF THE
JURY THAT WILL DECIDE THE
FATE OF THE WOMAN
EIGHT FAVOR A3 ACQUITTAL
Remaining Four Are Said to Be
Holding? Out (or Nothing; More
Than Manslaughter — Charge as
Delivered by the Jndifc to the
Jury — Great Interest Taken In
Outcome of the Famous Caae.
CANTON, 0., April 27.— The jurjr which
■will decide the fate of Mrs. George was
charged and retired this afternoon. At
1 o'clock this morning no verdict had
been returned.
At no time after the jury went out was
the court room deserted. The nearest ap
proach was about 6 o'clock, when the
Judge went to dinner and an evening
meal was ordered to the jury room. The
spectators, many of whom had been in
attendance all day long, filed out. Their
places were promptly taken by others,
who came" to stay out the evening.
Judge Taylor went to the hotel just
across the street, leaving 'instructions
with the bailiff that She would be in readi
ness to be called up at midnight and
would come to the court room to receive
a verdict at any time during the night or.
early in the morning that the jury was
ready to report. Meanwhile Mrs. George
was In her cell in the jail, also awaiting,
and ready to come into the court room
and hear her fate. Relatives and friends
remained with her, and her' appearance
and manner indicated hope.
Shortly after 11 o'clock Judgo Taylor
left the court room and retired to the
hotel across the street. The attorneys
in the case left shortly afterwards.
The most persistent report at midnight
was that the jury stands eight for ac
quittal and four for manslaughter. The
feeling now is that no verdict will be re
ported before morning.
The delivery of Judge Taylor's charge
to the jury occupied thirty-five minutes.
The points in the charge bearing special
ly on this case, and aside from the usual
form were as follows:
CHARGE TO JURY.
That Mrs. George 'has been suspected
and charged with the perpetration of a
crime does not teii<J in any degree to
show her guilt or remove from her this
presumption of innocence which the law
casts about her.
"If you find from the testimony that
she did in fact kill said Saxton, as in the
indictment set out here, the is no justifi
cation or excuse or defense, but such
mitigating conditions are to be consid
ered for the purpose, of enabling you to
determine whether Joe not said homicide
was committeed \oi«h' deliberation and
premeditation. The Alleged wrongs and
misfortunes of the defendant, or the fail
ure of the deceased %o keep any of his
alleged promises, or- both of these to
gether, would furnish" no justification for
taking his life. Neither did the defendant
i have any right to taite the law into her
hands to right any', wrongs which she
may have suffered, or which she claims
to have suffered. What threats, if any
were made by her against him, their na
ture and character,- the circumstances
under which they were made, if any at
all, and the weight to be given to them,
are all matters for you to determine in
the light of the evidence and circum
stances In the case. I
The fact that the ; defendant was not
called as a witness iin her own behalf
is not to be considered by you as any
evidence or even a circumstance against
her. The defendants attempt to prove
an alibi is no admission of the crime
charged, nor does her failure to prove
an alibi, if she has failed to prove It,
necessarily infer any presumption that
she was present at jthe time and place
when and where tha crime is alleged to
have been committed!
MOKE FORGERIES.
Further Evidence of the Innocence
of Dreyfns Is Produced.
PARIS, April 27.— A great sensation has
ben created by the statement made before
the united court 4f cassation by M.
Paleologue, one of tjie secretaries of the
foreign office, whose! evidence establishes
a new forgery. The Soir, an anti-Drey
fuslte organ, violently attacks the minis
ter for foreign affairs, M. Delcasse, under
whose orders M. Paleologue's second de
position was made. It charged M. Del
casse with giving i o!ut the evidence of
fered before the court, particularly that
of M. Paleologue, declaring that nobdy
else could have had any interest In mak
ing it public.
The Figaro also .publishes Commandant
Esterhazy's depositions, merely covering
ground he had ajj-eady himself covered
in interviews and articles.
The report that <Csl. dv Paty de Clam
has been arrested turns out to be untrue,
but It is understood' that at his own re
quest he will be examined on Saturday.
The Temps will t announce tomorrow
he was the foremost of the members who
helped to wreck the organisation and
secure the transfer of the state fair to
the state board of agriculture. Mr. True
is the representative of the First district
of Sauk county, and was a formidable
candidate for the speakership against
George H. Ray, but withdrew. He is a
native of New Hampshire, and is sixty
one years old. His reputation for re
spectability and for hatred of vice of all
kinds is widespread and enviable.
BULLETIN OF
IMPORTANT NEWS OF THE DAY
Weather Forecast for St. Paul:
Fair; Northwest Winds.
I— Cyclone In -Missouri.
Grant Statue Unveiled.
Filipinos Giving Way.
George Jnry Still Out.
2— Thief In the Capitol.
Grand Jnry Report.
3— Minneapolis Matters.
Northwest News.
4— Editorial. .
Trust Investigation.
News of the HailruadH.
6 — Snorting; News.
Western Season Opens.
o— Markets of the World.
Bar Silver, 03 l-4e.
. Stocks More Active.
Supreme Court Decision*.
7— Civic League Work.
B— ln the Field of Labor.
St. Paul Social News.
Leonhauser Inquiry.
OCEAN LINERS.
LIVERPOOL— Arrived: Catalonia, Bos
ton; Teutonla, New York.
BREMEN— Arrived: Lahn, New York,
via SouthamDton.
NAPLES— Arrived: Saale, New York, for
Genoa.
HONG KONG— Sailed: Empress of India,
Vancouver.
ST. MICHAELS— Arrived: Steamer Ems,
Naples, Genoa, etc., for New York.
TODAY IN ST. PAUL.
METROPOLITAN— Dark.
GRAND— "A Royal Prisoner," 8:15 p. m.
Palm Garden— 2 p. m. and 8 p. m.
Memorial Day Meeting, Garfleld Post
hall, 8 p. m.
C. E. Rally, Merriam Park, 8 p. m.
Special Meeting Board of Aldermen, 8
p. m.
Cleveland High School, senior class play,
8 v. m.'
that the court of cassation has applied
to the minister for the colonies, Georges
Guillain, to deliver the document, which
was found in French Guiana in 1807
among other Dreyfus documents, and
sent to the colonial office under the strict
est precautions. It is alleged that this
document asserts and proves the Inno
cence of Dreyfus.
.«■».
DAY AT GALENA.
Postmaster General Smith Addresses
Former Neighbors of Gen. Grant.
GALENA, 111., April 27.— The annual
celebration of the birthday of Gen. Grant,
under the auspices of the Grant Day as
sociation, drew together an Immense
crowd of people from the northern por
tion of the states of Wisconsin and lowa.
Aside from the military procession the
feature of the day was an address by
Postmaster General Smith.
GOING TO DETROIT.
Secretary Alger Will Attend Sons
of Revolution Convention.
WASHINGTON, April 27.— Secretary Al
ger, accompanied by Maj. Hopkins, his
military secretary, and Mr. Victor L. Ma
son, his private secretary, will leave here
tomorrow evening for Detroit, where
they will attend a banquet given by the
national convention of the Sons of the
American Revolution next Tuesday
evening. Maj. Gen. Merritt and Brij.
Gen. Wheeler also will be present at tha
banquet.
1 _■■».
HOTJSE SPEAKERSHIP.
Representative Henderson, of lowa,
Announces His Candidacy.
ATLANTIC CITY, N. J., April 27.—Rep
resentative D. B. Henderson, of lowa, an
nounced his candidacy today for the
speakership of the national house of rep
resentatives. To an Associated Press
representative Gen. Henderson said:
"As the action of Mr. Reed and the
information from many quarters clearly
indicate that he will not again be a can
didate for the speakership, and as the
lowa delegation is united fn" favor of my
candidacy, I have decided to enter the
race."
, -•«-
Overcome by Gas.
JACKSON, Minn., April 27.— (Special.)—
An accident which resulted in the death
of Ole Gunderson, of this place, occurred
on the farm of M. A. Nielson, five miles
from Jackson, this afternoon. Gunder
son was helping some well diggers and
descended into the well, where he was
overcome by gas and died before he could
be brought to the surface. Tha deceased
had no family here and nothing is known
of his relatives.
PRICE TWO CENTS HotWKt*
TORNADO DESOLATES
A MISSOURI TOWS
More Than Half a Hundred Lives Sacrificed to
the Storm in Kirksville, Missouri.
FOUR HUNDRED BUILDINGS WERE LEVELED
Fire Adds to the Work of Destruction, Lending Light
by Which Seekers tor Bodies Are Enabled to
Work— Twenty- Five Dead Are Taken From the
Ruins — Many Believed to Have Been Incinerated
—Storm Cuts a Path Through Portions of
lowa and Wisconsin.
KNOWN DEAD.
WILLIAM B. HOWELLS. A. P. GLAZE. MRS. A. W. RANSCHOTT.
MRS. W. H. SHKRiIi H.\. MRS. A. F. GLAZE. A. C. GIBBS.
JAMES WEAVER. MRS. BEN GREET*. MRS. A. C. GIBBS.
THEODORE BRIGHAM. MRS. JOHN LARKIN SR. A. C. SEAL.
ED BEEMAN. MRS. T. MAHAFFEY. JAMES CUNNINGHAM.
MH.S. W. W. GREEN. MRS. C. WOODS. MRS. MITCHELL.
MISS BESSIB GREEN. A. LITTLE JOE WOODS.
MRS. HENRY BULLING- MRS. A. LITTLE. MRS. JOE WOODS.
TON. A. W. RANSCHOTT.
REPORTED DEAD.
MRS. PECK. COL. LITTLE AND MR. PECK.
MR. ANDERSON. FAMILY. MR. ANDERSON.
MRS. STEPHENS. MRS. PESSCHOTT AND MR. STEPHENS.
DR. BILLINGS. CHILD.
KNOWN INJURED.
Miss Hobaon. Miss Evans. Inunllw brother*.
Harry Mitchell. Sam Weaver. WIIIU Kello gs .
Mary Mitchell. Will Parka. Holli. Kellogff.
Mr. and Mr«. Ikenniston.
REPORTED INJURED.
Maud Waddell. A. Miller. Mr,. John Barley.
Mrs. T. Bullock. Dunne Mills. A. C. Bowman.
Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Kirk. Ernest Mills. Mrs. Mary Peorlian.
A. L. Peel. Andrew Roberts. A. T. Cook.
W. S. Smith. Esther Little. Beeman, child.
George Hennons. Ina Green. Anbury Green.
Mrs. Miller. William Bragg.
KIRKSVILLE, Mo., April 27.--A gathering storm that had been threatening
all the afternoon broke upon Kirks-lHe at 6:20 o'clock tonight in all the fury
of a cyclone. A patli a quarter of a mile wide and as clean as the prairie was
swept through. the eastern portion of the city, and 400 buildings, hotels and
mercantile establishments were leveled to the ground as scattered ruins.
In the heavy rain that followed the people who had escaped turned out to
rescue the injured. For two hours not much was accomplished, as all was
confusion, but by 8 o'clock twenty-five bodies had been taken from the ruins.
It Is expected that the list of the (lend will reach between fifty and sixty,
if not to exceed that
THOUSAND INJURED.'
Almost 1,000 people were more or less Injured. Daylight will be ueces
sary before an adequate ustimate of los s of life and property can be had.
Each blanched face reports a new caluraity.
Intense darkness prevailed after the cyclone, and the rescuers were at a
disadvantage for a short time, until lire broke out In a Sotsen places In the
ruins and shed light over the scone. No attempts were made to extinguish the
fires, partly because Lhe rescuers had no time and partly because of the need
of light. On both sides of the storm's path the debris was piled high ami
burned fiercely. In all probability a number of bodies have been incinerated.
PATH OV STORM.
The storm first struck the eastern portion of the city near that part oc
cupied'by the boarding houses of the students of the American School of
Osteopathy, state normal school and McEdward's seminary. It was just sup
per time for the students and it is thought very probable the list of the dead
will be well filled with students, as a large number of these boarding houses
night these three institutions of learn- were demolished. As tax as known to
Ing escaped the storm.
The storm then went northwest and wiped out Patterson's nursery, pull-
Ing the trees out of the ground and hurl ing them through the cUy.
A second section of the cyclone followed the first, two minutes ifter. It
came as an Inky black cloud? covering the whole town, but paused above the
houses. It undoubtedly struck the ground a few miles out of Kirkville.
FIFTEEN KILLED AT NEWTOWN.
CHILLICOTHE, Mo., April 27. — A tornado, probably the sanv 1 one that
swept over Kirksville, struck Newtown, a small town in Sullivan county, to
night, and caused terrible destruction.lt is supposed that fifteen peopl" were
killed In the city, and that many others were killed in the country near
there. A great number of buildings were blown down. A heavy rain fol
lowed the tornado, adding greatly to the damage. A Chicago. Milwaukee. &
St. Paul railroad bridge is said to have been washed out. Ouly a partial list
of the casualties can be obtained, lhe station agent of the Chicago. Mil
waukee & St. Paul at Newtown reports the killed and wounded as fol'
lows:
«<» ,
KILLED.
SHERMAN REAPER, wife and LABON EVANS nnd two da .iali U-r«.
three children. WILLIAM HAYS, wife and child.
SERIOUSLY INJURED.
Three Hayes children. M. J. Jones, wife and two children.
Ella Evans. David Ford, wife and three eh 11-
Mrs. Mary Gregory and daughter. • dr-em.
Mrs. Pierce and sister. Mr. McQniston and wife.
Mrs. Finuif. Moie Gnymon and wife.
Mrs. Herman Wilson. Mrs. John Johnson.
Mr*. Llmblne.
VICTIMS IN AGONY.
Work of Rescue Taken Up by the
Survivors.
KIRKSVILLE, Mo., April 27.— 1n the
heavy rain following the cyclone the peo
ple who escaped the calamity have turn
ed out to rescue the injured and hunt the
bodies of the dead. Professors, citizens,
men and women, students of the Ameri
can School of Osteopathy, together with
all the doctors resident in the town, have
formed rescue hospital corps to hunt out
the injured and set fractured bones, bind
up wounds and ease the pain from lac
erated hearts. From every part comes
the cry to send surgeon*. There are men,
The G1.083 this mornincr circulates
More papers than on the Ist day of
April Its paid circulation in St.
Paul is larger than that of any
other moring paper.
women and children in agony.and the res
cuing corps are lifting roofs of houses
Rnd other ruins along the path of the
storm in search of bleeding forms.
Patrol wagons, private conveyances and
all kinds of stretchers are In service, yet
the supply is wholly inadequate, and the
wounded ones are limping out of the
wreckage and making their way as best
they can to asylums.
Half a dozen wretched dwellings took
fire Immediately after the cyclone passed.
The flre bells rang out a call for help to
the needy, but they were not able to stop
these isolated fires. They were left to
their own. course. Light from thesa
Continued on Third rajse.

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