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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, April 28, 1899, Image 7

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1899-04-28/ed-1/seq-7/

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DECISIONS BY CANTY
GREAT NORTHERN GRANTED NEW
TRIAL, IN THE ROSTAD DAM.
AGE SI IT
ERRORS IN THE TESTIMONY
An Appeal of the Probate Court of
Ramsey County in Relation to
Bxecutora' Keen Failti The City
of Rc-d Wing; Loses In Its Snit
With (. up til. the Lower Court's
Decision Itc-lns Confirmed.
Judge Canty yesterday handed down
four decisions in the supreme court, in
one case recording a reversal of the low
er court. In a contention between A. H.
liosiad and the Great Northern Railway
company the latter is granted a new
trial. The action was brought by' Rostad
against the Great Northern for personal
injuries received from exposure while ac
companying a car of stock from the
Kelso farm to St. Paul. It was during
one of tin.- big snow storms in 1897 and
the caboose in which he was- riding was
Miio t lacked and taken for a live mile
trip back <vi the right of way to assist
in digging a. passenger train out of the
Bnow. Kustad claims he caught a severe
cold by reason of the door being constant
ly open, and that it brought on acute
rheumatism. He claimed that he should
have In en lioiiiieil of the intention of
the crew to take the caboose away from
the train, and given a chance to get out
and wait 111 Crookston for its return. The
syllabus:
Anton 11. Hosted, respondent, vs. Great
Northern Railway Company, appellant.
Syllabus— l. Where a person exposd
to cold was. shortly afterward, attached
by inflammatory rheumatism, held, under
the circumstances of the case the Jury
might find without the aid of expert evi
dence, that th^ rheumatism was caused
by the exposure.
Where the plaintiff, a passenter, in a
caboose attached to a freight train, which
was making a regular scheduled trip,
was, before he or the train reach their
destination, taken off in the caboose -on
a branch line, on an irregular side trip,
without notice or warning, and exposed
to cold und injured in health,
Held, the jury were warranted in find
ing the- carrier guilty of negligence which
caused the injury.
2. Held, the admissions of the conduc
tor made, after returning from the side
trip and starting again on the main trip,
that he did not so notify the passenger,
because, he the conductor, was so busy
he forgot to do so. is not competent evi
dence against the carrier in an action
for such iniury.
Held, this error would not be cured,
even If the evidence had subsequently
become competent at impeaching- evi
dence, unless the court charged the jury
that It should not be considered for any i
other puriiose. and In order to pave his
rights, appellant would not be required
to retiuest the court so to charge.
?•. A certain ruling held error without
prejudice.
Held, it was within the scope of the
general duties of the brakeman to no
tify the nassenger to leave the caboose
when it was nLOUt to be taken off on
the side trip.
Judgment reversed and a new trial
granted. —Canty, J.
State of Minnesota, ex rel. Samuel Neu
man. as administrator, etc., respondent,
vs. Probate Court of Rams _-y -County of
Minnesota et al., appellants.
Syllabus — 8., the executor of the es
tate of F., dies without tiling his account
in the probate court, thereupon. H. was
appointed administrator de bonus movo
of the estate of 8., H. was appointed
administrator of the estate of 8., and the
probate court ordered H. to file, in the
estate of F., and account of the receip's
and disbursements of H., as such ex
ecutor; H. did so. the account was con- I
tested, and the court, after a hearing, de
cided that at the time of his death, 8.,
as executor, was chargeable with a bal
ance of $1.65<U2 due from him to the
• state of F. ; thereupon the court allow
ed 11. compensation and attorneys' fees
out of the estate of F., for such account
ing and orderrd N. to nay the same.
1. Held, the order allowing snch com
pensation and attorneys' fees is not ap
pealable, and, therefore, may be reviewed
by oerUorarL
2. Held. H. stcod in the sr,o"s of B. in
Tnakine such accounting:, and is not en
titled to compensation or attorney's fe;s
out of the estate of F.
3. Held, the netltion for the writ of
certiorari shows error upon its face, and
is sufficient. Judgment affirmed.
—Canty, J.
The findings In the other cases were as
follows, the orders, as stated above, being
signed by Judge Canty:
F. A. Seebold, appellant, vs. Sans J.
Tatlie, respondent, order affirmed.
Oliver H. Guptll, respondent, vs. City of
P.ed Wing, A. W. Pratt and F. Busch, ap
pellants, order affirmed.
QUAY WILL BE SEATED.
His Friends Assert That the Votes
Ar? Alreatiy Pledged.
PITTSBURO. Pa., April 27.— Senator
Quay's friends in Pittsburg and Allegheny
are wearing a broad smile. They claim to
have information that the senator has
completed a poll of the United States
senate, and secured absolute pledges of
flxty-scvrn votes in favor of seating him
on the commission issued by Gov. Stone.
There will be only eighty-six senators
in the upper branch of the Fifty-sixth
congress, owing to the deadlocks in Dela
ware, California. Pennsylvania and Utah,
en that forty-four votes will be sufficient
to insure seating Quay, If he has them.
Quay's lieutenants claim that he will not
have fewer than sixty-seven, and some
of them believe there will be no concert
ed opposition, owing to the fact that the
three national chairmen — Hanna. Jones
and Butler— are In favor of seating him.
It Is also claimed that after the Quay
managers decided to maintain the dead
lock to the end of the legislature a pre
liminary poll of the United States senite
tia? made, which, at the time, insured the
favorable termination of a contest for
the seat, and that the McKlnley admin
istration fell Into line with the under
standing that the Pennsylvania delg-.i
tion to the next national convention
should support the president for a re
romlnatlon.
The Democratic affection for Quay, it
Is said, dates from the time that he engi
neered the retirement of the force bill,
the McKlnley tariff bill havins been held
tip In the senate by the Southern Demo
crats, who were loudly lndisrnant at the
attempt to pass the force bill.
BABY CARRIAGE FOR TRTTE.
Winronnln I,ci;Wla((irs Show Appre
eintton of the License Bill.
MADISON, "U'ls.. April 27.—Assembly
man True was presented with a baby car
riage and doll by his colleagues for se
curing the passage of his marriage li
cense bill. It bore an appropriate legend
nnd was carried In amid applause. Mr.
True blushed a deep crimson, but rallied
and made a graceful speech, christening
the doll No. 11 (the number of his bill)
and hoped that It would have less vicissi
tudes than the bill had.
The senate refused to recede from its
amendment to the anti-pass bill making
violation a felony instead of a misde
meanor, and ordered a conference.
ASP IN THE MAIL.
Nptv York Man Belie-rei* ' Some One
Planne-d His Death.
NEW YORK, April 27.-An attempt to
kill George E. Sterry Jr., secretary of the
firm of Weaver & Sterry, 79 Pine street
was made yes-terday when an asp was
sent him through the mail. The address
written in faded ink on the box that
held the snake, was In a woman's hand
but by his quickness the merchant es
caped injury. Mr. Sterry has put the
case In the hands of detectives.
Homeseekers' Excnrniona Via Chl
cagro Great Western Railway
May 2 and 16th, to points South and
West at very low rates. Call on J P
Elmer, city ticket agent. Fifth and Rob
ert sts.. for full information.
MAY WHEAT SLUMPED
HEAVY RAINS THROUGHOUT TUB
WHEAT BELT THE PRIMES
t U NX OF UKCLIXU
JULY ALSO SHOWED LOSS
Corn Joined in tlic Down-word Move
mm. While Oata Stood Steady—
Report* of Drought From Russia.
Caused a Bullish Feeling to Per.
vude the Wheat Market at the
Opening. ■
Prey.
Close. Day.
May wheat, Minneapolis 69% 69%-%
July wheat, Minneapolis 70% 'iisfe-ft
May wheat, Chicago 71% 71%
July wheat, Chicago 72 1-16 72*4
May wheat. New York 77 77
July wheat, New York 7614 76%
May wheat, Duluth 71 71&
July wheat, Duluth 71% 72%
CHICAGO, April 27.— Heavy rains
throughout the wheat belt caused a slump
iv.- the wheat market today. An early
advance on rumors of crop damage in
Russia, Germany and France was all
lost. May closed with a loss of %c, a d
July Me. Corn declined %c; oats closed
unchanged; provisions lost sc; lard and
ribs 3%c each.
Reports of drought from Russia put
wheat traders in a bullish temper at the
opening, and a little later the strength
was abetted by claims of rust through
out Germany and France. May started
%(3'"6c higher at 72@72%, and the market
was bid up quickly at 72% c. A denial
of the Russian damage brought about
considerable modification of the early
bullishness, and when heavy rains were
reported in Nebraska and Kansas, liquid
ation set in which continued until the
end of the session. May declined to
71c, and closed at 71 14 c; Ju'y opened %c
higher at 72%C<73c, advanced to 73% c, sold
off to 71 %c and closed at 72@72%c. For
eigners sold options on the swell.
Receipts were light, Chicago having but
48 cars, seven of which graded contract
and Minneapolis and Duluth 334, against
333 the same day a year ago. Western
primary market receipts were 455,000,
compared with 450,0000 last year. Atlan
tic port clearances of wheat and flour
equalled 289,000. Export demand was
poor.
Corn was active and advanced on cov
ering due to light receipts and small
country offerings. The improvement was
lost, however, under liquidation caused
by favorable seeding conditions, and re
ports of increased acreage. Receipts 162
cars. May opened % higher at 33% c.
Small stocks and fair buying by eleva
tor interests steadied oats. Cash de
mand was good. Receipts 182 cars. May
started unchanged at 26VLc, sold sparingly
at £C%<g26Vic, and closed at 26% c.
Provisions were slow and easy, with
speculation light. May pork opened 2%c
lower at $8.97%, advanced to $9.00, and re
acted to $8.95 at the close. Fluctuations
In lard and ribs were small.
Estimated receipts for Friday: Wheat, j
40; corn, 170; oats, 180; hogs, 21,000 head.
The leading futures ranged as follows: I
I Open - 1 High-| Low-I ClolT
I ing. I est. I est. | ing.
Wheat— f j
May 72% 72% 71 71%
July 73 73% 71% 72%
c Sept_ 72% 72% 71 72%
May 34% 24% 33% 33%
July 35 35% 34% 34%
Q Sep^ 35% 35% 35% 35%
May 26% 26% 26% 26%
July 24% 24% 24" -24
Sept 22 22% 22 22
Mess Pork
May 8 97% 900 895 895
July 915 9 17% 9 12% 9 12%
Sept 935 935 930 930
Lard-
May 515 5 17% 5 17% 513
July 5 27% 530 5 27% 5 27%
Sept 540 5 42% 5 40" 5 12%
Short Ribs-
May 4 67% 470 4 67% 4 67%
July 14 82% 453 4 82% 4 82%
_Sept_. .;... [4 95 497% 495 " 495
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour
quiet: unchanged. Wheat— No. 2 spring
rl%@72^4c: No. 3 spring, 67%@72c- No 2
x? d> 0 75^ 6%c - Cor "- N o- 2, 34% c. Oaots
-29030c. Rye— No. 2, 59. Barley— No 2 I
37@44e. Flax Seed— No. 1, $1.16"; North
western. $1.20. Prime timothy seed, $2 32%
Pork— Mess, per bbl, $8.95(ffi5!).00. Lard per
100 lbs. $5.12%@15. Short Ribs sides (loose)
$fGO@BS; dry salted shoulders (boxed),
4H@334c; clear sides (boxed), $4 90@$5 00
--short clear sides (boxed), [email protected].
Whiskey— Distillers finished goods per
gal, $1.26. Sugars— Cut loaf, unchanged
Corn— No. 2 yellow, 34%<fr35. Clover Seed
—Contract grade, $6.25. Receipts— Flour, |
12,00 bbls; wheat. 84,000 bu; corn, 228 000'
bu; oats, 175.000 bu; rye. 5,000 bu: barley i
18,000 bu. Shipments— Flour, 11,000 bbls
wheat, 9,000 bu; corn. 758.000; oats, 175 000
bu; rye. 5,000 bu; barley, 62,000
On the produce exchange today the but- '
ter market quiet and easy, creameries
o£ l6c^ dalry ' 11@14 - E^ s - steady, fresh
12%. Cheese, weak, creams, 11%@12%.
MINNEAPOLIS.
MINNEAPOLIS, April 27. -Wheat open
ed higher and ruled fairly stron~
«o May w h ,f at °F ened a t 70c, against 69%*1>
69;£c Wednesday's close, gained %c, lost
16c \Jlr me ? Un to 79 % c. lost %c, again sod
at <o%c, declined to 69% cby 11:30 and by
noon held at 6y%@7oc. y
Ju'y w^eat opened at ll%c, against 71%
f '^^ednesday, lost l-16c, firmed up
to 71%@.1%c, sold at 73% c twice, advanced
J? J 2 * 1 and sold down to 71%<?£71%c by
11:30, and by noon held at 71%<-
The cash wheat market was active but
P"C| r wer c relatively a little under those
of Wednesday. Both mills and elevators
companies were free buyers of No 1
northern at %c over the May price
May wheat closed at 69% c and July at
Wheat. Opon-High-Low-Thurs°Wed'
, , ing. est. est.
April 69 % 70%
May 70 70% 68% 69% 64 %
July 71% 72 7u% 10% ?l£-%
September ™ 6 5% 68«4
On track-No. 1 hard, 70% c; No 1
northern, 69% c; No. 2 northern, 68% -
Apr " . o , at , s - April corn, 3(i%c; flax
seed, $1.13% c.
Curb on July wheat, 70%.
Puts on July wheat, 70%.
Calls on July wheat, 71%.
FLOUR— The uncertainty us to wheat
prices keeps the flour market rather auet
Prices are well held~
,o^>JS at l nts - S 3 - 6^®^; second patents,
[email protected]; first clears, [email protected]. The fol
lowing are the quotations In cotton sacks
98 and 49 lbs: rye flour, per bbl nure'
$2.60; rye flour, per bbl, XXX, $2 40- rye
flour, per bbl, Standard. $2.30; Graham
flour, per bbl, $2:55; bran in bulk, $10.2G@
10:50; shorts in bulk, $10.25@1050; middlings
in bulk, [email protected]. 8
Oats— No. 3 oats, 27%@27%c; No. 3 white.
Rye— No. 2 rye, 53% c.
o,,S oirn^ Very firm: No - 3 yellow, 21%@
31% c; No. 3, 29<g31c; No. 4, 28%@29c
Feed— Course meal and craked corn in
o^'ti^WiT' eacks extra - to Jobbers
No. 1 ground feed, 2-3 corn, 1-3 oats, 8011b
sacks, sacks extra, 513.75@14
No. 2 ground feed, % corn, % oats, 75-lb
sacks, sacks extra, $14.7E©15
WALL STREET GOSSIP— New York
stock gossip, reported by H. Holbert &
Son, bankers and brokers, 341 Robert
street. National German-American Bank
building, St. Paul. Strong, Sturgls & Co
wire us: "We should regard this as an
off day in Wall street, producing but lit
tle business and causing a minor number
of fluctuations. In railroad shares we
have had a very good class of buying in
D. R. G., both common and preferred, the
latter being in our opinion particularly
desirable. Our friends who have been
buying are shrewd and they expect the
preferred shares to go to 90 and the
common to about 40. In Atchison pre
ferred we find a bullish disposition. Our
people also have been buying Northern
Pacific common, expecting a steady ad
vance in prices. In Southern Railway
preferred the has been a sale made of
all the remaining treasury stock. This
being off the market the price has hard
ened. Among the industrials we note
much irregularity; but the main position
has been one of steadiness. As yet the
inside information regarding national
steel is not known. Later we think it will
have a most excellent influence. The
electrical shares are dull but healthy and
vehicle securities promise well."
SAMPLE SALES.
No. 1 northern, 58 cars, 70%.
No. 1 northern, 9 cars, 71%.
No. 1 northern, 14 cars, 71%.
No. 1 northern, 2,000 bushels to arrive,
71.
No. 1 northern, I cars, 71
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE, FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 1899.
W. M. CAMPBELL
COMMISSION CO.
Live Stock Commission Merchants,
souT Ju§Ti-r Aui "
Weekly Market Letter.
CATTLE— As expected, the receipts
have continued light during this week,
and a large part of the orders for cattle
have remainded unfilled.
The market haß been steady to strong
on all classes of cattle except butcher
steers, which, following the decline in
Chicago of from 20 to 80 cents, have de
declined here from IB to 20 cents on the
rough and unfinished stuff. The demand
tor good, fat cows and heifers continues
in excess of the supply and they are sell
ing at somewhat stronger prices than last
week, and this may also be Bald of good
quality little cattle, especially light heif
ers.
With the exceptions noted we have no
other changes to make in our last week's
cattle quotations.
HOGS— The receipts have been twice as
large this week as last, and following a
like decline in Chicago and elsewhere, our
market Is from 15 to 20 cents lower than
the highest day of last week.
The range of prices, however, as com
pared with Chicago remains unchanged.
""We Quote today's sales (Thursday) at
$3.70 to $3.52%; bulk, 13.75; rough heavy,
$3.35; pigs, $3.25.
SHEEP— The demand for good fat
sheep and lambs Is still In excess of the
supply, and they are selling at strong
prices as compared with other markets.
We quote good, fat, shorn wethers,
$4.00 to $4.65; good, fat, shorn lambs, $5.00
to $5.25.
Very truly yours,
W. M. CAMPBELL. COM. CO.
No. 1 northern, 25 cars, 10%.
No. 1 northern, 5,000 bushels to arrive,
71.
STATE GRAIN INSPECTION.
Northrn. No
Railroads. N0.1hd.N0.1.N0.2.N0.3.Rj.Gd.
Great Northern ..52 12 3 12
C, M. &. St. P.. .. 60 14 2 2 2
& St. L 9 7 3 .. 1
Soo Line .. 7
North. Pacific ..19 1 .. .. 7
C.,5t.P.,M.&0. .. 41 17 4
St.Paul&Duluth .. 1 .. 1
Totals 189 51 15 8 12
Other Grains— No. 2 corn, 3; No. 3 rye, 1-
No. 3 oats, 10; no grade oats, 4; No. 2
rye, 2; No. 3 barley, 1; No. 4 barley, 1;
No. 1 flax, 7; no grade flax, 1. Cars In
spected Out— Wheat— No. 1 northern, 45;
No. 2 northern, 7; No. 3,; rejected. 10; no
frade, 17; No. 3 corn, 242; No. 3 oats, 39;
To. 1 flax, 17.
RECEIPTS— Wheat, 326 cars, 260,800 bu;
corn, 2,310 bu; oats. 17,400 bu; barley, 670
bu; rye, 1,950 bu; flax, 2,880 bu; fuel oil,
330,074 lbs; millstuffs, 13 tons; hay, 40 tons;
fruit, 131,819 lbs; merchandise, 1,806, 450
lbs; lumber, 16 cars; barrel stock, 2 cars;
machinery, 384,300 lbs; coal, SOS tons; wood,
44 cords; brick, 211,000; lime, 1 car; cement,
425 brls; household goods, 66,000 lbs; ties,
1 car; stone and marble, 6 cars; live stock,
3 cars; salt, 1 car; dressed meats, 144.400
lbs; railroad materials, 2 cars; sundries,
17 cars; car lots, 629.
SHIPMENTS— Wheat, 99 cars, 82,170 bu;
corn, 140,940 bu; oats, 39,680 bu; barley,
1,840 bu; flour. 34,652 bbls; millstuffs, 657
tons; fruit, 60,000 lbs; merchandise, 2,
--139,440 lbs; lumber. 111 cars; posts and pil
ing, 1 car; machinery, 220,200 lbs; house
hold goods, 20,000 lbs, ties, 17 cars; live
stock, 2 cars; linseed oil, 26,830 lbs; hides,
pelts, etc., 55,450 lbs; tallow, 24,000 lbs;
railroad materials, 1 car; sundries, 14 cars;
car lots, 902.
DTJLTJTH.
DULUTH, Minn., April 27.— Market dull
and weaker. May opened *£c up at 72c,
sold off to 71% cat 9:50, up to 7214 cat
10:20, off to 71c at 12, and closed %c off
at 71c. Cash dull at %c under May. Cash
sales: 2 cars No. 1 northern, 72c; 1 car
No. 2 northern, 67% c; 1 car No. 3 spring,
65% c; 1 car rejected, 6614 c; 116,000 bu May
flax, [email protected]>. Wheat— No. 1 hard cash,
73% c; April. 73% c; May, 74% c; July, 73% c;
No. .1 northern cash, 70% c; April, 70^c;
May, 71c; July, 71% c; September, 70% c;
No. 2 northern, 6514 c; No. 3 spring, 63^c;
to arrive: No. 1 hard, 7414 c; No. 1 north
ern, 70% c; oats, 28@28V?c; rye, 57% c; bar
ley, 38@40c; flax, $1.15ȣ; May, $1.16; Sep
tember, 95i/ic; corn, 31i,4c; May, 32% c.
Car Inspection— Wheat, 10 cars; oats, 1
car; rye, 2 cars; flax, 9 cars. Receipts-
Wheat, 14,133 bu: rye. 527 bu; flax, 4,154
bu. Shipments— Flax, 7,631 bu.
OTHEK GRAIN MARKETS.
GRAIN GOSSlP— Gossip by private
wire to C. H. F. Smith & Co., St. Paul,
members of the New York stock ex
change and Chicago board of trade.
Detroit, Mich., writes: Crop damage re
ports from Michigan, part of Ohio, In
diana, and. Illinois, very bad. No improve
ment, and many say only one-third of
last years yield in the four states. We
positively know much of Michigan poor,
promise not over one-fourth crop at best.
The price current in its week crop sum
mary says: General promise of the wheat
crop maintained, but not bettered. Oats
getting a good start In wheat land seed
ed to ats. Weather generally favorable
to crops. Packing-, 395,000, against 435,000
last year. News Bureau: Wheat opened
strong, &@%c over last night, influenc
ed mostly by an Odessa cab'e received last
night, reporting dry weather, threatening
a calamity in Russia. Berlin this morn
ing reports too much rain in Germany
and France.
NEW YORK. April 27.— Flour- Receipts,
12,945; exports, 3,700; dull, easy. Rye flour
dull. Wheat— Receipts, 18,500; exports,
156,811. Spot market weaker; No. 2 red,
80c, to arrive, f. o. b., afloat, and 78c e'.e
vator; No. 1 northern. Duluth, 81 %c, f.
o. b., afloat; No. 1 northern, 82 ] 4c, f. o. b.,
afloat; options closed unsettled, at a par
tial net decline. April, 78%@75%c, closed
7SV£c; May, 78%@78c, closed 7Sc; July,
76 3-16@77 11-1 6 c, closed 76% c; September,
75%@76 I /sc, closed 75% c; December, 76%@
77% c, closed 'i6%c. Corn receipts, 47,775; ex
ports, 123,740. Spot easy; No. 2, 41%@
41%, f. o. b., afloat; options closed heavy,
at *4@%c net decline. May, S9H<i?39 13-1 6 c;
closed 39% c; July, 39%@39%c, closed- 39 l ,ic.
Oats, receipts, 142,000; exports. 100,372.
Spot quiet; No. 2 white, 36c asked. Op
tions dull.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., April 27.— Flour
steady: Wheat, firmer: No. 1 northern,
73@"3%c; No. 2 northern, 71M:C. Oats
.steady, 30@30%e. Rye higher: No.' 1, 59%0.
Barley, dull, No. 2, 45% c; sample, 44@45c.
MISCELLANEOUS.
SEED MARKETS— Chicago, April 27.—
The flax seed market was weak again
this morning, but recovered a little dur
ing the session. Speculation in it is weak
because of reported increased acreage
for the coming crop. Receipts here were
4 cars, 9 cars at Duluth and 4 cars at
Minneapolis. Cash flax at $1.20, May at
$1.16%, July at $1.18 and September at
05c per bu. Minneapolis flax seed quoted
at $1.13% per bu.
BUTTER AND EGGS— New York, April
27. — Butter — Receipts, 3,624 packages;
steady; Western creamery, 14%@18c; fac
tory, 13@15c. Eggs— Receipts, 11,180 pack
ages; firm; Western, 13@13%c; Southern,
12%&13 c.
Chicago, April 27.— Butter quiet and
easy; creameries, 12^1 6c; dairies, ll@l4c
Eggs steady; fresh, 12% c.
NEW YORK COFFEE— New York,
April 27. — Coffee options opened steady
and unchanged aside from switching of
May to later months. Business was com
paratively light, and the market without
interesting new features in foreign news
bearishly interpreted, but sentiment
against further depression for the time
being; statistics about as expected. Closed
quiet, unchanged to 5 points lower. Sales,
5,299 baers, including May, 4.95 c; Decem
ber, 5.65 c.
STILLWATER.
Ilntu Welcomed by the Loggen—
Lumbermen Elect Officers.
Yesterday's rains were welcome to
Stillwater loggers, who are looking for
more water so as to complete their
drives. Some driving is being done on
Tamarack, Spruce river and at Eau
Claire Lakes, but heavy rains will be
needed in order to make clean drives.
The Lafayette Lamb cleared yesterday
with logs for the Standard Lumber com
pany, Dubuque, and lumber for the Fru
den Lumber company. The Bun Hersey
left with a tow of logs for Charles Boett
cher, Jled Wing.
The lumbermen's board of trade held
its annual meeting yesterday afternoon
and elected the following officers: Presi
dent, John O'Brien; vice president, Eu
gene O'Neal; secretary and treasurer, B.
J. Mosier. The selection of a river 'po
lice was deferred until a later date.
Considerable building 1b being done in
Stillwater this spring and several hand
some blocks are going: up.
J. Miller was received at the prison yes
terday from Hennepln county to serve a
reformatory sentence.
LIVE STOCK MARKETS
HOG QUOTATIONS WEAK, WITH A
FAIR run AND OF GOOD
" f, '■>.' QUALITY
J I ;• -
CATTLE STEADY AND ACTIVE
Butcher Staff and I.t^lit Weight
Steer and Heifer Calves Were In"
Demand and Sold 'Well — Heavy
Stuff Wa* Slow and Sold Lower
Sheep and Lajnbs Strong; and
Active.
SOUTH STi PAUL. April 27.— The re
ceipts at the Union stockyards today
were: Cattle, 180; calves, 110; hogs, 1,558;
sheep, 2ii3.
The receipts by cars over the various
railroads were as follows:
Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. Mixed.
C. G. W 1 „ 1
C, M. & St P. 4 6 3 2
M. & St. L. 8 .. I
CSt.P.M. &O. 2 6 1 1
Gt. Northern .1 8
C, B. & N .. .. 1
The cattle receipts today were light.
Some fair to good butcher stuff brought
good prices. Light steer and heifer stuff
was in demand and sold well. The in
quiry for heavy cattle was not so good
as it has been, and prices were a shade
lower. With the exception of the heavy
stuff prices are generally steady. Com
mon cattle of all kinds are selling slow.
The hog market was weak and a shade
lower, with a fair run of good quality
and a few loads of choice hogs. The
choice hogs sold at an advance of 5@7%e
over the bulk price. Sheep and lambs
were strong and active, with a light run.
Hogs— Comparative receipts:
Total for today 1,558
A week ago 215
A year ago 1,104
Market opened weak and a shade low
er. The range on butchers was $3.70 to
$3.82%, with the bulk selling at $3.72%®
3.75. Packers and pigs steady. The run
was quite heavy for Thursday, and the
quality generally good, with a few choice
loads which brought from $3.77% to $382%.
Representative sales:
Butchers—
No. Wt.Dg. Price. No! Wt.Dg.Price.
24 242 80 $3 75 4 160 ..$3 65
47 196 .. 3 7548 265 .. 3 82%
50 240 80 3 7062 220 .. 3 72%
34 175 .. 3 76 49 215 80 8 75
6 267 .. 3 7571 231160 3 72%
40 196 .. 3 7056 235 .. 3 77%
71 255 .. 3 7626 278 80 3 72%
62 245 .. 3 75 67 191120 370
65 213-80 3 70 61 252 80 3 80
71 ...218 .. 376 73 227 40 3 77%
157 234 120 3 7t 72 214 120 8 72%
3 290 .. 3 75
Packers—
2 285 ..$3 35 2 375 40 $3 35
1 420 .. 3 35 4 477 120 335
3 410 .. 335 4 392 .. 335
J. .- 420 .. 335 .
Rough —
1 550 ..$2 00jl ' 490 ..$2 00
Pigs
-10 114 :.. $3 25 8 134 .. $3 25
5 124 .. 325 4 132 .. 325
_2 .........120 .^3 25
Cattle— Comparative receipts":
Total for. today .". 290
A week ago „ 202
A year ago is 9
Market active, with a light run in. I
Butcher cattle « nd light weight steer and |
heifer calves were in demand and all I
offerings sold early at good prices. The
butcher cattle were not choice, but sold
| well. Heavy stuff was not in demand
and sold a little lower. Common cattle
dragged. Representative sales:
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
No. Wt. Price. No! WtTPricel
2 925 $2 75 1 1130 $3 00
1 1040 2 85 1 1200 4 25
1 1120 3 00 1 1120 375
1 820 3 35 1 1020 2 75
1 1040 3 10 2 1120 3 60
2 1145 335 1 1150 3 00
Stock Cows and Heifers—
1 77710053~50 4 62T5375
2.... 440 3 65 4 ...310 3 75
1 900 3 25 2 625 3 75 i
2 340 3 75 5 218 3 85 I
1 870 3 50 1 700 3 00 !
1 7SO 3 30 1 850 3 50 i
3 3573 60 1 ..,,... 600 3 10
1 ..450*3 25 1 ...830 3 50
1 1150 3 25 4 310 3 70
1 390 3 90 2 700 3 65
15 325 3 75 4 362 3 75
7 588 3 65 11 558 3 75
7 493 3 &0
Stockers and Feeders—
3 620 $4 00 2 690~53~00
12 441 4 55 12 303 4 65
4 292 4 80! 4 390 4 00
10 290 4 GO, 8 263 4 85
1 640 3 50 1 480 4 25
1 720 3 50! 5 356 4 65
2 520 3 00 33... 275 4 75
1 510 2 75 1 170 4 80
2 710 3 25'
This: Cows and Canners —
~1 .777 900 $2 25|2 860 $2 10
Butcher Steers — '
4 935 $1 00,19 1075 $4 50
1 760 3 63,16 1193 4 50
2 975 4 00,20 1310 4 60
13 1095 4 35l
Bulls—
1 JI2O $4 50 1 520"$4~00
1 1120. 3 25 1 1440 2 75
1 520=400 1 1400 3 00
1 S7O 3 00 1 1500 3 25
1 1420 3 10 1 1160 3 00
_ Stags and Oxen—
2. . .77.777. . .1330 r54 00 ~i 7.1100 $3 50
1 1530^ 875 2 1560 3 25
Milkers and Springers —
2 cows .T. .'.'.: $7Efob
1 cow and one calf 33 50
2 cows and 2 calves. 65 00
Sheep— Comparative Receipts:
Total for todayu 293
A week ago fl .., t0 110
A year ago 4
Representative Sales-
No. Kind. Wt. Price
153 wool sheep, 11l $4 70
104 shorn limits' 86 5 25
8 mixed -.' .'.. 89 425
68 shorn lanrts 85 5 10
153 lambs — ..T.' 82 6 50
3 yearlings". 133 500
59 mixed 67 4 85
Day's Sales— Cattle. Hogs. Sheep.
Swift & Co 112 1,483 413
W. E. McCormick 2 78
Staples & King 47 59
Wier 24
Stewart 17
Slimmer & Thomas
Pickard 15
Dunbar 40
Skaban 16
Rohan Bros 14
Lathrop 7
McCarthy . 14
R. N. Katz 6
Erickson 7
Clark 12
Engerman & Co 10
Coats 19
Thompson 6
Unclassified, late sales. 25
Among the Shippers — The following
were on the market: Carl Jackson, Clark,
hogs; F. Hipp, Arlington, calves and
hogs; Riley Bros., Ellsworth, sheep; C. D.
Whitmore, Clear Water, cattle; F. C.
Him, Hampton, cattle and hogs; F. East
void, Taopi, hogs; F. Schneider & Son,
Alma, cattle, calves and hogs; B. F.
Flint, Osage, 3 loads cattle and hogs;
G. O. Lee, Medford, hogs; M. C. Black,
Cannon Falls, hogs; Laughlin & Hines.
Owatonna. hogs; Skaban Bros., Taopi,
cattle and hogs; Pettis & Chappel, St.
Peter, hogs; G. W. Dodge, Madila, hogs;
S. A. Scales, Wort.hington, cattle; T.
Dealty, Adrian, 2 J loads hogs; J. J. Weis
ner, Bloomer; cattle and calves; W. Mc-
Coy, Spring ' Valley, cattle, calves and
hogs; F. W. _Hub.bard, Waterville, hogs;
J. Wacek, New Progne, hogs; J. N.
Schotz, Montgomery, hogs: T. A. Rude,
Sacred Heart,- cattle, calves and hogs:
Farmers' and Merchants' bank, of Stew
art, cattlo, calves.and hogs; Hector Lum
ber and Supply company. Hector, 3 loads
cattle and sheep; Kray Bros.. Clara City,
hogs; M. Condon, Clara City, hogs: N.
Sherman, Renville, 2 loads hogs; J. Heg
erle. St. Bonuacius, hogs.
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET—Minneso
ta Transfer^ St. .Paul— Barrett ■& Zim
merman's report: Receipts of horses un
usually liberal. Farm horses were most
ly the class^eceived. Manitoba dealers
were the prHfcipal buyers. Retail trade
brisk. Mulea.ana general purpose horses
well disposed Of. Trade in general satis
factory and firm. Prices are advancing
on good quality of horses. The repre
sentative sales as follows:
Drafters, choice to extra $125 to $160
Drafters, common to good 85 to 100
Farm horses, choice to extra. . . 110 to 130
Farm horses, •ommon to good. 60 to 80
Mules, 1,250 lbs so to 105
KANSAS CITY, April 27.—Cattle—Re
ceipts, 5,000: market steady; native steers,
[email protected]; Texas steers, [email protected]; Texas
cows, [email protected]; native cows and heifers,
{204.66; stockers and feeders, [email protected];
bulls, [email protected]. Hogs— Receipts, 14.000;
market steady; bulk of sales, $3.5603.75;
Chas. L. Haas
Commission Company,
UVE STOCK COMMISSION MERCHANTS,
SOUTH ST. PAUL.
WEEKLY MARKET LETTER.
CATTLE— The range of prices on fat
cattle has not been great enough to
change our quotations.
There have been one or two instances
■where prices were somewhat lower than
last week but there has not been as much
of a decline here as at Chicago and other
markets, considering the Quality of cattle
here this week.
The bulk of fat cattle are selling at
[email protected]. This class of cattle would not
bring to exceed over 10 cents more in Chi
cago.
Our buyers are willing to pay more for
a better class of cattle than are coming
here at present.
The stocker market has been strong to
a shade higher all week on all kinds. The
run has been light and as there are plen
ty of buyers here we have been able to
get very good prices. We do not think
there will be any great change in prices
for the coming week.
HOGS— Receipts so far this week foot
up close to 7,000, as against 2,663 for the
same time last week, and 8,370 for the
same time a year ago. The quality has
not been quite so good as last week, the
receipts containing more rough, old sows
and stags. Prices as a rule have been
very satisfactory to shippers.
Today (Thursday) there were 1,600 here,
the bulk selling at $3.72%@3.75, with some
choice loads and sorted bunches as high as
58.77&@6.50. The demand for good 200 to
220 lb butcher weights is very good, and
we believe that in some cases this class
of stuff was sold as high as it would in
Chicago.
Shippers should be very careful about
overloading now that the warm weather
has come. "We have had quite a number
of dead hogs this week, and we believe
that shippers would profit greatly by
bedding their cars with sand and then,
before loading, wet the sand down.
We do not look for much of any change
next week, but believe that if there is a
change, the prices will be lower, owing
to the fact that the provision market is
weak and dull.
SHEEP— The market on sheep has been
strong this week and the receipts have
been fairly good. Buyers here are pay
ing prices that compare very favorably
with Chicago, and we feel confident that
shippers would not be disappointed after
giving this market a trial.
We think that the sheep market will
continue steady to strong and do not look
for any great change.
Yours truly, .
CHAS. L. HAAS COM. CO.
heavy, [email protected]; packers, [email protected];
mixed, $3.52ii>@3.70; light, $3.47%@3.72%;
Yorkers, $3.60^3.70; pigs, [email protected]. Sheep-
Receipts, 2,000; market firm; lambs, $4.35
@7; muttons, [email protected].
SOUTH OMAHA, April 27.—Cattle—Re
ceipts, 1,600; market active, steady; na
tive beef steers, [email protected]; Western
steers, [email protected]; Texas steers, $3.60®
4.50; cows and heifers, [email protected]; oan
ners, [email protected]; stockers and feeders
dull, $4@5; calves, [email protected]; bulls, stags,
etc., $2.60@4. Hogs— Receipts, 8,600; mar
ket 2%c higher; bulk of sales, [email protected].
Sheep— Receipts, 6,200; market steady to
10c higher; yearlings, [email protected]; Western
muttons, $4.40@5; stock sheep, $3.25®
4.25; lambs, [email protected].
ST. LOUIS, April 27.— Cattle— Receipts,
2,400, including 1,200 Texans; market
steady; native shipping and export steers,
[email protected], and fancy grades worth $5.75;
light and dressed beef and butcher steers
[email protected]; stockers and feeders. $3.20@
4.70; cows anud heifers, [email protected]; Ter^s
and Indian steers, $3.30©4.55; cows and
heifers, $2.25@4. Hogs— Receipts, 6,000;
market steady; pigs and lights, $3.50@3 85
--packers, [email protected]; butchers, $3.50@4.
Sheep— Receipts, 300; market strong; na
tive muttons, $4.65@5; lambs, [email protected] top
for springs.
SIOUX CITY, lowa, April 27.-Cattle—
Receipts, 500; Wednesday, 321: shipments,
1,986; market fully steady.Salesr 2 cows,
average, 893 lbs, $2.35; 4 cows, average
1,060 lbs, $3.60; 8 stock heifers, average,
540 lbs, ?4; 14 stock heifers, average 486
lbs, $4.25; 2 bulls average, 1,245 lbs $V
2 bulls, average 1,800 lbs, $3.60; 2 bulls,
average, 760 lbs, $4.50; 22 stockers and
feeders, average, 910 lbs<, $4.10; 6 stoeke s
and feeders, average, 751 lbs, $l<?0; 26
calves, average, 416 ibs, $5: 87 calves
average, 423 lbs, $5.05; 12 yearlings, aver
age, 528 lbs, $4.65; 21 yearlings, average
428 lbs, $4.60. Hogs— Receipts, 1,300; Wed
nesday, 2.615; shipments. 800; market
strong, selling, $3u.62y 2 <§3.75; bulk of sales,
[email protected]%c.
CHICAGO, April 27.— There was a good
general demand for cattle today, and
prices ruled mostly unchanged. Fancy
grades brought $5.50<g».70; choice steers,
[email protected]; mediums, $4.60ft4.80; beef steers,
[email protected]; stockers and feeders, $3.70@5 15;
bulls. $2.60©4.25: cows and heifers, $3.50@
4.20; Western fed streers, [email protected]; Texas
steers, [email protected]; calves, $4(jf6.60. Trade in
hogs was brisk at essentially unchanged
prices. Fair to choise, $3.87%®4; heavy
packers, [email protected]; mixed, 3.70@3!90; butch
ers, [email protected]; lights, $3.'[email protected]; pigs, $3.35
©3.85. Business in sheep was lively.
Prime Colorado wooled lambs sold at
$6.10, an advance of 5 cents. Wooled
Western lambs brought [email protected]; shorn
native lambs, $5.25(3)5.40, and common to
fair lots, [email protected]. Shorn sheep, $i.75@
5.15; exporters, [email protected]; culls, $3'S>4. Spring
lambs were in demand at $9. ©12.50 per
100 pounds. Receipts, cattle, 8,000; hogs,
26,000; sheep, 12,000.
ST. PAUL PRODUCE.
Butter and potatoes steady. Sweet po
tatoes, eggs and pineapples are lower.
Cranberries are higher. Other produce
about steady.
The following are the quotations cor
rected daily:
Apples— Per Bbl— Fancy stock, $5.50@6;
No. 1, [email protected]; common stock, $3.50@4.
Asparagus— Two-thirds bu box, $2.
Bananas — Large bunches, [email protected];
small bunches, $1.75@2.
Beans— Per Bu— Fancy, [email protected]; dirty
lots, 60@65c; brown, fancy, *1.25; medi
um, hand-picked, $1.20.
Beef— Country-dressed, fancy, 6@6%c;
rough, 3%@5c.
Butter — Per Lb — Creameries, extras,
16c; creameries, firsts, 15% c; dairies, ex
tras, l%c; firsts, 13@14c; roll and print,
12<gl3c; packing stock, lie.
Cabbage — Home-grown, $4.50 per 100 lbs.
Cheese— Per Lb— Brick, No. 1, 12i/.@l3c;
brick. No. 2, 10@10%c; Limburger, 8@
12c; twins, fancy, Minnesota and Wis
consin, 12%@13c; primost, 6@B%c; Young
Americas, fancy, 12% c; Swiss, old, 12%
@14c.
Cider — Sweet, per bbl, [email protected]; sweet, per
half -bbl, [email protected].
Cherries— California, 10-lb box, $2.
Cranberries — Bell and bugle, $7.50@8 per
bbl; bell and cherry, [email protected] per bu.
Dates— Hallowell, per lb, 6c; Ford, per
12-lb package, $1.20.
Eggs— Fresh, subject to loss off, new,
lie; seconds, Be.
Figs— California, 10-lb box, $1.40.
Fish— Per Lb— Pickerel, 5®5%c; croppies,
7c; trout, lake, 7%c; whltefish, 8c; pike,
7%c.
Hogs— Clean— Per Lb— Heavy, 4%c; light,
4%@5c; medium, 4%<§4%c.
Honey — Lb Sections— Buckwheat, s<g6c;
extracted, amber, 6@6%c; extracted,
white, lie; white, fancy, 13@14c.
Lemons— California, 300s to 3605. $3.50®
3.75; Messinas, 300s to 3605, [email protected].
Maple Sugar— Per Lb— Ohio, in bricks,
10c; Vermont, in bricks, 10c; Western,
in bricks, 10c.
Mutton — Per Lb — Bucks, sc; country
dressed, 6@7c; milk lambs, pelts on 12
@14c.
Nuts — Almonds, new, small quantities, 16
@17c; almonds. Tarragonas, sacks, 100
lbs, 16c; Tarragonas. small quantities,
17c; filberts, sacks, about 200 lbs, 9@
9%c: filberts, small quantities, 10c; hick
ory- per bu, $1.50; peanuts, per lb, sffl
6c; peanuts, roasted, 6@7c; walnuts, 8®
9c; walnuts, small quantities, 9@loc;
walnuts. California, solf shell, sacks 100
to 110 lbs, 9',i@loc; walnuts, hard, less
quantities, 12c; black walnuts, per bu,
Onions— Per Bu— Yellow Globes, 65@70c -
Red Globes, 70@75c; other varieties, 45@
50c.
Oranges — Per Box — California, navel,
?3.50@4; California seedlings, $2.50£i3;
Mediterranean sweets, [email protected].
Potatoes — Early Ohios, 60@G5c; early
Rose, 60@55c; Burbanks, 50c; Rural, 50c;
Peerless, 45c; common and mixed, 38@
45c; Jersey sweets, [email protected].
Poultry — Live mixed turkeys, B%@9c;
mixed chickens, 9%@10c; old cocks, 6c;
hens, 10%@llc; ducks, 8c; geese, Be.
Pineapples — Per doz. $2(5<2.50.
Rhubarb— 6o-lb box, $1.40.
Strawberreies— 24-pint case. [email protected]; 14
--quart, $5.60@6.
Veal— Per Lb— Coarse and thin, 6c; extra.
fancy, country-dressed, B@Bc.
STOCKS CLOSED LOWER
OPENING WAS HIGHER THAN YES
TERDAY'S CLOSING FIGURES,
BUT FEtiLJNG WEAK
TRADING WAS PROFESSIONAL
Ball Speculation In Silver n» Well
am Dividend Go««lp Uie-Iped Many
of the Stocks That Were Directly
Affected — Demand for Money
Wiu» Heavy on Expectation of a
Iqneese In tbe Call Money Market.
Prey.
Close. Day.
Bar silver, New York 63% 61
Call money, New York 3% 3@4
NEW YORK, April 27.— Stocks opened
higher this morning, and after moderate
fluctuations either way slid off below
yesterday's prices. There was advices of
crop damage, sterling exchange was
strong at higher figures and call money
waa at the legal rate of 6 per cent in the
afternoon, all of which combined to send
prices oft with a rush, and the market
closed weak under pressure.
The demand for money was Incidental
to the preparations of corporations to
meet May disbursements, and then there
was a disposition among traders to an
ticipate a squeeze in call money tomor
row, when loans carry over to Monday.
There was moderate arbitrage buying
for London account early, and the traders
also were prominent buyers, but the di
minishing commission house business
prompted them to switch their position
and cell for. a turn.
The trading In 600,000 shares was prac
tically all for professional operators. Sil
ver certificates, representing 100,000
ounces changed hands at from 63% cto
6414 c, the latter being the highest figure
in over two years.
The bull speculation In silver, as well
as the dividend gossip imparted strength
to Denver & Rio Grande preferred. Ana
conda Mining had over 3 points knocked
off from its recent advance on liquida
tion Induced by the denial of a large in
terest that the proposed "copper trust"
had control of the property. Manhattan
Beach dropped seven points, the greater
part of which it held on the aproach
of the judicial decision which favorers
of the property hope will be favorable.
Delaware, Lackawanna & Western recov
ered from yesterday's depression, which
was connected with impending rumors of
labor difficulties.
Further improvements were made in all
the standard railway mortgages today,
and Borne new quotations were also taken
at improved figures. Total sales, $4,194,
--000. United States registered 4s declined
%, and United Staets 4s, coupon, the new
4s, coupon, and the 6s, % in the bid price.
STOCKS.
Furnished by Charles H. F. Smith &
Co., members of the New York stock ex
change, Pioneer Press building, who have
special wires to Chicago and New York.
Closing prices are bid:
—Closing—
_ STsJtUghlLowl 27 | 26
Am - % alt 1 U..~u..»i»-ia«S
do pfd 1 79% 1 7<)ia
Am. 8. & W |18500| 68 | 67%| 67% 67
do pfd 6001 98%| 98% 1 98% | 98%
Am. Express 140 1140
Am. Tobacco 200 222 222 222 220
do pfd 146 |1:5
Am. Cotton 0i1... 100 38 38% 37% j 37%
do pfd 94 I 93%
Am Spirits 500 14 13% 13% 1 14
do pfd I 37%
Adams Express 112 112
A., T. & S. F 2200 20% 20% 20%| 20%
do pfd 11300 62 61% 61%! 61%
B. &. O I 100 59% 69 58% 58%
do pfd 76% 76% 70% I 76%
|. R. T mOO 136% 133% 133% 1 135%
B. U. G 153% 153% 153 152%
Am. Unseed Oil 16% 16
do pfd 61%j 62
C, B. & Q 10400 145 143% 143% 143%
Canada Southern 57% 57%
Canadian Pacific. 800 93% 93% 93 93%
C.,C.,C. & St. L... 1100 61% 61% 60% 61%
do pfd ;.■ 97 97'
Chesapeake & 0.. 2900 27% 26% 27% 27%
C. & E. 11l 77% 77 77% 76
do pfd „ 122 122
Colo. Southern ... 100 50% 50% 50%
C, H. V. & T 11% 11% 11%
do pfd 60V> 59% 59%
Col. F. & 1 50% 50% 50% 51'>
do pfd 105 .7
Chi. G. W 11900 15% 16 15 15%
do pfd A 172 72 71% 72
do pfd B 36% 36%
Chi., Ind. & L.... 100 11 11 11 11%
do pfd 45% 46%
Chi. Terminal 18 16 16% 18
do pfd 47 48 47
Con. Ice 46% 45 46% 46
do pfd 90% 90%
Con. Gas 1500|203 197 197% 200
Del & Hudson 1200i122% 121%|121% 121%
Del., L. & W 1500.172 IG9^ 170% 16S 1 /.
Den. & Rio G 12200 25% 1 24% 24% | 24%
do pfd 9900 80 78% 79%| 78%
Erie 200 13% 13% 13%| 13
do Ist pfd 37%! 37% 37% 37
do 2d pfd 19 19 18%| 18
Federal Steel 35500 69% 68 68% 67%
do pfd 5600 86% 85% 85% 85%
Gen. Elec. Co 800|119% 118% 119 |119%
Gt. Nor. pfd 73 7134 191 191
Glucose 73 71% 71% 72%
do pfd 108 108%
Illinois Central 117% 117% 117% 117%
Int. Paper 57% 55% 56% 55
do pfd 86 83% 84% 83
lowa Central 18% 12%
do pfd 45% 46
Jersey Central . . . 1500 120% 119% 119% 119%
Nnickerb'ker Ice.. 100 55 55 55 55'
Lake Erie & W.. 100 17% 17% 17% 17
do pfd 68% 69
Louis. & Nash.... 120001 68% 68% 68% 68%
Lead 1 34 81%
do pfd 1001118% 113% 113 113%
Leather 600 6% 6% 6V. 6%
do pfd 1100 73% 73 73 " 73%
Manhattan Con .. 3000 123% 122% 122 122%
Met. Traction ... 600 252 251 251 252%
Mich. Central 46%
Mobile & Ohio 46% 47
Minn. & St. L.... 4500 61%|
M., K. & T 100 13 13 13 12%
do pfd 200 39% 39% 39 I 39%
Missouri Pacific .. 10600 60% 49% 49%! 50%
Northern Pacific. 2500 52% 52% 52%j 52^
do pfd 600 79% 79 79 79%
N. Y. Central 100 141% 140 139% 140%
Nat. Biscuit 46% 45% 46% 44%
do pfd 102 [101% 102 101
Norfolk & West 22% 1 21%! 3i%l 21%
do pfd 5200 69%] 68% 1 68% | 61%
N. Y. Air Brake 204 196 1202 |190
Northwestern |160y.U59%
do pfd 193 193
North American 12% 11% 12 11%
Omaha 100 95 95 95 95%
do pfd 1170
Ontario & West.. 5400 27% 2C%! 26% 27%
Ore. Ry. & Nay... 100 40 40 40
do pfd 69
Pennsylvania Ry 135% 134"?; 135 135
Pacific Mall 100! 52% 51%| 51%| 62
People's Gas 14500!128Vi 127%!127%!127%
Pullman 600 |161 |160%
P.,C.,C. & St. L 57% 56% | 55 (56
do pfd 86 85%
Reading 200 23 22% 22% 22$ i
do Ist pfd 3400 65% 64V, 64% l 64%
do 2d pfd 35% 34% 34%! 34%
Rock Island 1500!l]7%!116%im!*llll>3ii
Southern Ry 1700! 13%| 12% l 12%! I'%
do pfd 68001 54M.1 53% 1 RSTij 53%
Southern Pacific. 6001 33% l 33%| 33% l
St. L. & S. W I 14%! 14% 14%! 14 '
do Pfd I 34% l 33% 33%j 33%
St. L. & S. F I 11% li%| 11%!...?:
do Ist pfd I I 71 I
do 2d pfd I 39 | 38W 38>i| 39
Silver Certificates.! 52001 64% 63% 63%|
Stand. R. & T....1 100! 10% l 10%! ]0%l
Stand. Dlst 600! 21V>I 21% | 20%! 2i%
do pfd 200) 70% 69% i 69% i7l
Sugar Refinery ... 268001171V169 '170 i 169%
do pfd I 100|U6%|116Villl6%iil6U
St. Paul 9900!12R%i128%:i28%1128%
do pfd 200169 1169 1169 1169
Smelter 52% 62%! 52% i 52
no pfd 91 90 90 | 90%
T. C. & 0 3700 64 163 6H% 63%
Texas & Pacific 23%! 23 22% 1 23%
Union Pacific .... 1200| 47% l 46% 46 1 *! 46%
do pfd i 34001 79%! 79% 79% l 79%
U. 8. Express | | 53 ! 54
U. S. Rubber 600 i 52% | 62% 52% | 52%
do pfd 100J115 1115 115 1115%
Wabash 9001 B%| 8 I 8 I 8%
do pfd 2001 23^.1 23%| 23% l 23%
Western Union ...I 19001 92M 1 92 I 92 | 92
Wheeling & L. E.| 10001 I.W 13%| 13W 13i<,
do pfd I 1001 34V.1 34141 34%! 34%
T. C. R. T. C0...| I 71% l 71% 71%! 71%
Central Pacific .. 7001 51 ! 50%! 51 j 51%
Bag & Paper j 33 | 33 j 33 ! 34
do pfd I 84 I 84 ! 83%! 8-lVi
N. S ! 62%1 59»il «0%l 60%
do pfd I 91V 90X41 91 I 91
Am. Mining Co 68% 64' I 64^1 68
Am. Tin 48 47 ! 47% 1 47
do pfd I 91H! 91
C. Tobacco 61% 60%| 60% l 60%
do pfd 91% 90% 190 I 91
D. Match :.... (139 i 139
«C. Q. W 93 I 91%| 91%1 92%
•Ex-dividend, 4 per cent.
BANK CLEARINGS.
St. Pau1— 51,206,208.40.
MlnneapoU»-SI,2S9 > 2SBk
FINANCIAL.
b» MONEY A?
To loan on Improved proper*
MiuneapolU and St. FauL
In Xnnii to Salt.
4 per rent allowed ou ilx months depailt
R. M. NEWPORT & SON,
Beeve Bide . Pioneer Frew Bid*.
, Mionenpolli. St. Paul.
GRAIN.
WHolesoie Flour, Feed, Gram. Hoy, seeds, Etc
ktale Agent* Orlawoltt Hale Tiei.
181-188 E. Sixth >t. St. Paul. Minn.
TetTTwoooT
PRODUCE COMMISSION,
89 Ea>t Thld Btrcet -
Consignment Solicited.
BROKERST
AwrliGSir^foEßirX^con
BROKERS.
< «-°£° l1 *' Provis!o «s» Stocks and Bonds.
10. E. Fourth St., ST. PAU L. MINN.
Long Distance Telephone 751,
iuTcuMiNi;
BROKER.
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and
Provisions.
Stocks carried without ioterest charges.
The best service in the Twin Cities.
3 Bnd4 Kasota Bldg., Minneapolis.
327 Jackson St., St. Paul.
ldlcbael Duran. *
M. DORAN 6c CO.
BANKERS AND BROKERS.
3fUacksof^St^^t. Paul, Minn.
C. H. F. SMITH & GO.
Memben ■( New York Stock Exchange
t <- nicago Board of Trade.
Hocks Jionds.tirain, Promttons and. Oj>t3*
H. HOLBBRT & SON,
Bankers and Brokers,
341 Robert St. St. Paul.
M. 0. WRIGHT A^oH
MAN KICK* AM> UUOKi K>. '
Room B. Endicott BuiltXlna,
Telephone 204. ST. PAUL.
Chicago— $19,419,671.
New York— 1207,760,710
805t0n— 527,329,343. *
BONDS.
U S 2s reg~loo~7~do"4s.Tr 94~
d° I s r eg 107%' N. Y. C. lsts"'"u«4
,do new 4acoupl3o do 4s 104
, do old 4s reg..li2% N. P. klti.' .'.".'.".' .SO
, do old 4s coupll3% do 3s " 6S^
r do 6s reg n\% do 4s .. "104
, do 6s coup.... 113 N.Y..C.& StX4slO7>.4
•District 3s 655... 117 N. &W. Con. 4s 95$
Ala. class A.... 110 do gen. 6s 130
do class 8....110 Or. Nay. Utm.'.'.m
do class C....100 do .s . iosw
do currency... 100 O. S. L. te'.""^^
Atch. gen. 45.... 101% do con. Bs 112
r. a Jt - n 4 l Reading gen. 'is 89
Can So. 2d5....in R. G. W. lsts 97%
C - &O. 4%s 95 St.L. & I.M.cSslilS
r A \% i-118 |t.L. & 5.F.g.65124%
C.& N. con. ,5.144 St. Paul Con 188vt
do sf. deb. 55.123 St.P.,C. & P.1 5 t5122%
Chi. Term. 45. 100 do 55...
D. & R. G. istslOSV Sa. Rv. 6s "" 110
do 4s 102 V., S. R. & T. 65." " 84
E.T.,Va.& G.lstslOs% Term. n. s 5s 97
™ : Tb%i& S* *£ 2 & s PaC - IStS^§
Gen: Elec. 55. ...115 U. P. tell! ".""loSi
G H &S. A. 65112% U.P..D. & G.lsts 90
floM? -A m^ Wabash lsts.... 117%
H. & T. C. 65... 111y, do 2ds . 991Z
do con. 6s 112 West Shore 4s 113%
lowa-Cent. lsts.llo Wis. Cent lsts 6&4 i
X.C..P. & G.lsts 68 Va. Centuries..! 84
La. new con. 45.110 do deferred 8%
L. &N. uni. 4s. 98% Col. So. 4s '" 87
t M ll _K^&_T._2ds. 68
boston^mlning shares. '
Allouez Mm. Co 11*41 Quincy~ .168
Atlantic „ 37% l Adventure 13%
Boston & Mont.3Bl Tamarack 245
Butte & Boston.lo3 Wolverine 48
Cal. & Hecla. ..S4o Parrott 89
Centennial 43 Humboldt . m
Franklin 27%! Union Land ... 10%
Old Dominion .. 47% i Winoria 16>4
Osceola 95 I
NEW YORK MININ GSTOCKS.
Cholor $0 30 Ontario $8~50
Crown Point ... 1 06 Ophir 1 ao
Con. Cal. & Va. 1 80 Plymouth 10
Deadwood .. .. 60 Quicksilver . ..2 50
Gould & Curry.. 38 do pfd 850
Hale & Norcross 2-I. Sierra Nevada.. 95
Homestake 55 00 Standard 2 26
Iron Silver !>7 Union Con 50
Mexican 55 Yellow Jacket . 40
~f6rEIGN~FTNANCIAT j ~New" York"
April 27.— The Commercial Advertiser's
London financial cablegram says: "Mar
kets here were brisk ror a time today,
but the tendency was dull. Silver was
very active. The official price was 28% d
but it has been dealt in at 29Ud, and It
closed at 28"4 d. The rise is thought to
be over for the present. Americans wore
hard here. but. in the absence of New
York support, dragged in the afternoon.
Denver & Rio Grande and Norfolk &
Western were exceptionally strong. There
was considerable profit-taking in Mexi
can railway. A rally came later with
silver and copper shares eratic. Coffee
was down £1. Arbitrageurs are shy of
buying here, for fear of being called on
to deliver In America. The Credit Lyon
naise is said to have effected last night
a large sale of Anacondas in New York
at the equivalent of 14 9-16. The price
here has open 12%. Tt closed at 12%."
TREASURY STATEMENT-Washing
ton. April 27.— Today's statement of the
condition of the treasury shows: Avail
able cash balance, $250.525,580; gold re
serve. $244,299,903.
NEW YORK MONEY— New York, April
27.— Money on call at 3<54 per cent. Prime
mercantile paper, 3%@4% ver cent; Ster
ling exchange strong, with actual busi
ness in bankers' bills at $4.57%<5>4.57% for
demand, and $4.BSV*'S"».BSV> for sixty days
Posted rates. J4. 85tf?4.56 and *4.87%@4.88.
Commercial bills. ?4.84%. Silver certifi
cates, 63%<Sfilc. Bar silver, 6314 c. Mex
ican dollars, 48%@50c.
INDIAN IN LUCK
MARINETTE, Wis., April 17. — Mitchell
Peters, a Shawana Indian, ts a living
witness of a drunken man's luck. Petera
was one of a driving crew that broke
a big Jam above Sturgeon Falls. He made
the desperate attempt of trying to cross
the river on a log, and was carried over
the falls. The falls are forty feet high
and consist of two pitches and a rapids.
Peters was given up for dead, and the
driving crew thought It useless to search
the river for his body, as the logs were
piling over the falls at a fast rate.
Imagine the surprise of all when Peters
walked into camp the next morning for
breakfast. Some thought it was his ghost
until he was in their midst. He had been
swept down the river by the rushing
water and up against the river bank, and*,
he managed to crawl out and went to
sleep. A few scratches on his head were
the only injuries sustained.
The Sturgeon falls is one of the most
lieacherous places in the Menomlnee
river region, and a few years ago three"
girls were swept over In a boat ana
drowned

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