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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, June 14, 1899, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1899-06-14/ed-1/seq-5/

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IrENZER WAS OUTDONE
THAT IS THE SECRET OF THE DE
FEAT OF COMISKEY'S MEN BY:
THE HOOSIERS
NEWTON TWIRLED IN FORM
He Clearly nnd Indisputably Out
pitched the Saintly Twlrler—
Apostles FouK'ht Hard, but Could
Not." Overcome the Handicap
fowbera Took the Ki*-oiis Into
.. Ciiimii —Minneapolis Had It Easy".
- Played. Won. Lost. P.C.
Minneapolis ..43 . 24 . 19 .55$
■ Indianapolis to 22 , 18 .550
Columbus . 39 21 is .*">•;■■
-St. Paul 41 21 20 , .512
Detroit ..: 41 21 20 .512
Milwaukee .'. 42 21 21 .500
, Buffalo .. 40 17 23 .415
Kansas City 42 17 25 .405
GAMES SCHEDULED FOR TODAY.
Columbus at Detroit.
- Indianapolis at Buffalo.
INDIANAPOLIS. Ind., June .13.— (Spe
'•■ Newton proved himself more than
'a match for Denser today. He clearly
OUtpltChed the big fellow.. He* was well
supported and the team hit well behind j
him. and all portended a Hoosler
victory . that was- earned. -The Saints
fought hard to win, but they could not
hit the balls .that Newton-sent over.sue
' "cessfully enough for this. Two errors
were made behind the gentleman with
."the south wing, but only one was costly.
It was on an unusual play. Spies took a
long chance in running out .a hit to sec
ond ' base'and got away with it only be-
cause Stewart muffed McFarland's as
sist
There were but few points in the game
in any way extraordinary. Geier was
i doubled up in the* first Inning by taking
too big a lead on a fly ball that McFar
land captured. He whipped'lt in to Allen.
who threw to first, completing a double
•play. The Indians scored in the second,
third and seventh, while St. Paul tabbed
up runs in the second and ninth. iZZ-t
The Indians first broke the ice. as far
as scoring was concerned. Fleming
opened' the Inning with a one-base drive,
took second on a play and scored on
Hickey's triple, which got away -from
» . Burke In right.
The Apostles chalked up a pair In their
half of the second. Lally and Isbell
reeled off singles, and with one out Shu
gart hit for three sacks. Spies was.hit,
Denzer struck out and Burke tiled to
Newton.
In the seventh Denzer grew liberal and
handed Hickey a base; Kahoe sacrificed.
Newton shot one to Glenalvin, who threw
wildly to first. Hogriever then corked
but a three-bagger down the right j line,
two going over the pan. - Hoggie himself
scored on a long fly of Stewart's. This
gave three runs and a safe lead, accord
ing to the batting at the time.
In the ninth inning Spies got a base
hit. with Shugart retired. Denzer, .with
two strikes, on him, was called from the
box and Fisher substituted. Fisher was
thrown out. Spies had gained second on
Stewart's muff of McFarland's . assist
after his single. Burke popped up a high
one behind Motz. -which went, for two
bases, Spies' scoring. Gefer7 ended the.
game, with a fly that Allen gathered In.
- Attendance, 500. Score: _/ *-'"-;
Indianapolis. AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Hogriever. rf 4 1 2 2 .0 0
"Stewart. 2b ........ 4 0 0 2 11
McFarland, cf 4 13 3 2 0
Motz. lb 3 0 17 0. 0,.
Fleming, It* :... 4 1 1 3 .v,7o^-T-"t>"J
Allen, ss 4 0 0,,*\2; .2;7'J ;
Hickey, 3b 2 1 ."-.TV?!:" I.' I
Kahoe, c 2 .0 ,J '-*6--:l'"0
Newton, p 3 11110
Totals 3a.-;-r*i-i^fl£*s^^..B.S^2
St. Paul. AB. R. H. TO. A. E.
Burke, if :4 0 71. " 0.7. 07 "• 0
Geier. 3b 5 v-.O:- 1 2 :-. 2 2-.0-.
Glenalvin, 2b ....>, 4"-~-tT'-0 "7 3 -.2 -,' 1-
Lally. If -..4 -M:- 1 J..1 r*-..07?,0-
Isbell, lb ..4 1 1 11 Z-OZ*9
Preston, cf *i;;-4it--7(K:, r-.*o--*-"--l -T^O;--:'. .ft
Shugart ss .-.v.^.-^O 2.240
Spies, c 3 114 '" 10
Denzer. p 2 "0". 0 o'* 4 0
♦Fisher 10 0 0 0 0
T0ta15............35 3 -.8 24 .13 •.1
Indianapolis- .. ...» 110 0 0 3 0 *-5
St. Paul .."... .......Qz2\o 0 0 0 0 0 I—3
♦Fisher batted for Denzer in ninth. . "
Bases on balls, by Newton 1. by Denzer
1; struck out,-by Newton G, by Denzer 2;
hit by pitcher, by Newton 2; two-base
hits, McFarland 2. Burke; three-base hits,
Hogriever, Hickey, Shugart; , sacrifice
hits, .Motz. Kahoe; double plays, -McFar
land, Allen, and Motz; stolen base, Mc-
Farland; left on bases, Indianapolis 4,
St. Paul 8; umpire, Mannassau; time, 1:10.
.-7 THIRTEEN INNINGS.
";.-- .-'-- ■..""» T" "-. -•
Minneapolis Captured . Stubbornlyl
Contested Game From Detroit.
l DETROIT, Mich., June 13.—(Special
. By hard work and the most brilliant kind
of fielding the Millers took the final game
of the series from Detroit, after thirteen
fiercely fought innings. Hutchison was in
grand form, allowing but six hits In
eleven Innings, and, as the day was very
warm, he retired in favor of McNeeley,
in the twelfth, rather than take a chance
when he felt his strength waning. Young
Gaston pitched the entire game for De
troit, and, while hit somewhat harder
than was his opponent, the south-paw
made a wonderful record, and had; It not
-been for Dillard's error, he might have
been playing yet. That mlsplay was the
SHED SKIN
20 TIMES
Little Boy Terrible Eczema. Mass
of. Sores from Head to Foot.
Not an Inch of Body Unaffected.
Skin Came off with Bandages.
. Screams Were Heart-Breaking,
- -3 Doctors & Institute no Avail.""
CURED BY CUTICURA.
• My little boy broke out -wi th an itching rash.
1 tried three doctors and medical college but
he kept getting worse. There was not one
square inch of skin on his whole body unaffected.
He was one mass of sores, and the stench was
frightful. At the time I was induced to try
Cdtici.ra remedies, he was so bad that I l_jd
to cut his hair all off, and pat the CDTicuiiA
.. (ointment) on him on bandages, as it was im
possible to touch him with the bare hand. In
removing the bandages they would take the I
skin with them, and the poor child's screams
. - were heart-breaking. After the second appli
cation of Cuticdeu. (ointment) I saw signs of
improvement, and the sores began to dry up.
His skin peeled off twenty times, but now he is
entirely cured. I used Ccticoba Rksolvkjtt
for his blood, and a stronger and healthier
boy yon never saw than he is to-day.
ROB'T WATTAM, 4728 Cook St., Chicago, 111.
CUTICURA
Begins with the Blood and Ends with
The Skin and Scalp.
That Is to gay, CuTicr/Bi Resolve* purifies the
blood and circulating fluids of IluMoiiGzniss and
thus removes the cause, while warm baths with
Ccticdba Soap and gentle anointings with CoTr-
Gun* (ointment), greatest of emollient skin cures,
cleanse the skin and scalp '•"crusts and scales,
atlay itcldxi, burning:, and *• mmatlon, soothe
and heal. Thus are speedii>, permanently, and
~ economically cured the most torturinjr, disflgur- "
; log hui-ior? of the skin, scalp, and blood, with
loss of hair, when the best physicians and all
- other remedies fall. ■ .- -- ■ . - :
.: 80M throqshont the world. I*ott_j- T>. Aim C. Com*..
Prop* .Burton, liov to^-nreTo-tpringSkinLiiseaiea.lnM
im YOUR SKIN d_^c^ r_i__^
.. --■-■-.- . - ■ ,•. - .
' only v one ' that. proved costly^. as , the wild
throw by Hutchison did not affect the
"score, and-Smith's fumble in the thir
teenth did,not do any damage. The field
ing of both teams was wonderful, and
It was not In spots,;, but "from start to
finish of the highly exciting game. Newt
Fisher-put up a star game ~ behind the
bat, and It was his two bagger down
the left field - foul fine that won the
game in the thirteenth inning, after Dil
lard's .error gave Smith a life, and Abbey
lined out a clean single. ..-..
Detroit scored in the first inning on
a single by Eagan, Elberfeld's. sacrifice
and a two-bagger by Dungan. In the
second a base on balls, another sacrifice
and Buelow's single sent another run
across the plate.
Hutchison opened' the third with a
single, and was forced out at second by
Davis. The latter advanced one sack
when Nance walked, and took third after
Dungan caught Wilmot's" long drive, scor
ing on the throw to second when Nanco
stole the base. .
The score was . tied in the seventh.
Hutch walking to first and being forced
out by Nance after Davis tried to sacrifice,
and struck out Wilmot and Andrews
came to the rescue with singles, and
Nance trotted" home. 7 .... '.
In the eleventh Inning Detroit had a
man on third, but a fine stop and throw
by Andrews ended the trouble, while the
sensational play of the-game was made
by Davis, in the twelfth. Slater.was on
second," and Buelow hit to center for a
base, an absolutely perfect throw by the
little fielder cutting Slater off at the
plate, and saving the game.
The Millers left for Kansas City tonight,
all of the men being in good condition
and confident of returning home on top.
or very-close to first "place. 'Attendance,
1.000. Score: : '* '". -'; -yz
Detroit.' . ' 7 AELR. H. PO. A. E.
Eagan. 2b "...".."..... 5. 1 1 7 3 0
Elberfeld, ss .5 0 0 5 9* 0
Duiigan, ,rf .•....•...•.Cvo^' 11 0 : 0
Dillard. 3b ......-.;.. 6 **>'*S- r 1 "*r 1' "4 1
Barrett, cf ..3 0 0-5- 0- 0
Slater. :lb ........... ...3i i-1, -0. 12 -. i 2 0
Stalltn.gs, If .....,.:. 3... .0 .- 0 5 0 0
Bufelow, c. .; 5 0 3 3 0.-0
Gaston"; p .;..;.....": 5 0 1 0.2 0
Totals .. :...... 40 : -2. 7 -39 20 "l
Minneapolis. • AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Davis, cf .-....'6.1*0-2 1~ 0
Nance, If ........-:.-.. 5 -1 . 0 "2.'• 0O-
Wilmot. rf 6 0 2 3 0 0
Andrews, 3b ........ 6 0 13 3 0
Werden, lb ...:..... 5 0 1 18 0 0
Smith, ss ..'..:."..... 6 1* 2 2 5 1
Abbey, 2b... ..5 115 5 0
Fisher c 6 0 2 3 3 0
Hutchison, p ...... 4 0 1 12 1
McNeeley, p ».l* 0 0 0 1.0
Totals .. 50 .4 10 39 20 . "_
Detroit .. 110000000000 o—2
Minneapolis .. 001000100000 2—4
Innings pitched. Hutchison 11, McNeel
ey 2; base hits- off Hutchison 6, McNeeley
1; two-base hits. Dungan, " Fisher; sacri
fice hits Elberfeld, Stallings 2; stolen
bases Dlllard. Nance; first base on balls,
off Hutchison 5. McNeeley 1, Gaston 4*
first base on errors. Detroit 1. Minneapo
lis 1; left on bases. Detroit 8, Mlnneapo
-1 -i" xTtr" c'k ? ut>. by »ton 2. Hutchison
1, McNeeley 1; time, 2:40; umpire, Sheri-
BISONS LASSOED.
Cowboys* Landed Them In 11 Game
That Wan Wan In the FiMt.
. BUFFALO, June 13.-(Speclal-)-Kan
sas City won today's.game In the first
Inning, batting out six runs—more than
the Bisons made in the nine. The home
team was outbatted by the visitors.
Amole was so.easy in the first that the
Cowboys seemed determined to cinch tha
victory right there,, and they succeeded.
In the sixth they again landed on him
for two : runs, and the end was there
.Hastings, for Kansas City, kept the hits
.that he gave well scattered. Attendance,
,600., Score: „-* ; . . -■-, - .-/;.;:
X&P 1- irTTTpaie k. c. Irihipi\ie
[White, 2b 1115 2 1 HTn. ss. 21 114 0
Garry, cf 1 I 3 0 0 G'm'n, cf 2 II 51. 0 0*
w* 0?' S3j - 2 2 7 OG'nz'l, lb 1 21131 0 0.
u*^- 1, ,r}\ I 2 01,0 0 Gear, rf **f 01 22 9 0"
Hid r, If 0 i| 0-0 1 M'ler, If. 1 3 0 01 1
SJ BBy-,--lbl 1| 110 110 R'm'r. 3b II 120
Gg'r. 3b. OLII 1 2 1 Viox. 2b.| 1 0 1! 4 0
Dgn s. c. 0 1[,5 0.0 W'ls'n. c 0 1 4 01 1
•A-niole, p. 0 Oj 12 1 H't'gs, p. 0 2 0 3 0
I—[— ,—j" l_f_|_i_i_
Totals ,] 5| 81271141-4 Totals .1 813 27 13 2*
Buffalo 0---2 2 0 0 "0 1 0 0-6
Kansas City 6 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 o—B
Earned runs, Buffalo 3, Kansas City 1;
three-base hit. Massey; two-base hits,
Householder. Ganzel. Miller; bases on
balls, off Amole. 4 (Hulen, Miler, Hast
ings 2),-; off Hastings 1 (Eustace); struck *-
out. -by. Arrive 3- 'G-an-jef, Raymer. Hast- !
ings). by Hasting. 4. * (Garry, Eustace '■
Greminger. Amole); left on bases, Buf
falo 4, Kansas** City. 1; double play,
■White to Eustace; stolen base, White
time, 1:35; umpire, Cantillon.
COLUMBUS WON.- EASILY.
Defeat ed-the Foam Blowers In a
i Game That Was -fever In Doubt.
COLUMBUS, June (Special.)— T
oday's game was never in doubt, the locals
winning from the Foam Blowers almost
without effort. Jones pitched in fine form,
and beyond his work there was little In
the way of features save . the fielding
of Genlns and Nlcol. Columbus has
released Lewee,.and Glllen was at short
In. today's game. Attendance 300. The
score: . r r . - __- -yiZiy
Col." RIHIPIAIB- Mil. ' IRIHIPIAIE
P'n'ns, cf 0 01 1| 0 0 W'd'n, rfl 0 0 1 0 0
P'k'g, If 1 01 21 0 OWe'v'r, If 0 0 II 01 0
Fr'nk. rf.| 2| 2 2 0 0 Nlcol. cf. 0 1 3 0 0
T'b'u, lb) 0| 0111 01 0 H'll'n,-. 2bl 1 1 .7 2 1
B'b'r, 2b : 0! 1| 2] 3 0 Gray, 3b ) 01 0 0 4 0
Hall, 3b 1021 33 0 Sfff'd. lb 117 0 0
Gillen. ss 01 II 3! 3 2 Shoch,- ss; 0 1 3 11
Su'v'n, c 113 lj 0 Speer, c | 0 1 21 0 1
Jones, p 0 0 0 II 0 Reldy, p.] 0 0 01 2 0
— — I—l—l— ,*Barnes. 0 0 0 0 0
Totals I 4 7127(111 2, ■(_(_(_:_:_:
. . I Totals 121 5124 9 3
Columbus ...........2 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 *—
Milwaukee .. 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 o—2
•Batted for Reldy In the ninth. : .
.= Two-base hit, Frank; home runs, Sulli
van, Stafford: sacrifice hit, Genins; stolen
base. Weaver; first base on balls, off
Jones 3; hit by pitcher. Pickering; first
base on errors, Columbus 2, Milwaukee 2
left on bases, Columbus 5, Milwaukee 7
struck out. Reldy, Sullivan, Frank
double play, Hallman.to Stafford;, passed
ball, Speer; time, 1:20; umpire, Haskell.
NATIONAL LEAGUE.
Baltimore Finally Broke Snperbtu*
Winning Streak. ..
„ ' , , Played. Won. Lost. P.C.
Brooklyn 49 37 12 .755
Boston 47 ' 32 15 681
Philadelphia .........46 27 19 .587
Chcago .... :..-...;".V."48 '- 28 20 .583
Baltimore ............ .47 27 .. 20 .574
St. Louis ....47 .27.. 20 .574
Cincinnati ...46 23 23 500
New York ...... .....48 22 ' 26 458
Pittsburg 47 . 21 26 447
Washington .. .......48 17 31 " .354
Louisville .. V.......'.48 14 34 292
Cleveland *... : ........45 z -8 -- •"• 37 .178
GAMES SCHEDULED FOR TODAY.
Boston at New York. -'
Washington at Baltimore. "
Pittsburg at Cleveland.
St. Louis at Louisville.
Cincinnati at Chicago.
BALTIMORE, Md., June 13.-Baltlmor9
and Brooklyn played a . double-header
today, and broke even. Six singles and a
two-base hit, ; two ; passes -to - first and
three errors In the seventh inning of the
opening: game gave 7 the Orioles eight
runs. Hughes was steadier in the second
trial. Four singles and a triple gave Bal
timore what • seemed a winning lead in
the third inning, but Kitson was an easy
mark, and fielding errors - behind him
turned the tide of victory. Attendance,
6,208. Score, first game: •' 7. -.
~BaL IR II"PA~E Brook. IR|H|P|A|E -
MGw, 3b 2 3 15 0 Csey. - 3b 01 0 0 3 1
His. If.. 0 3 2 0 OK'ler, rf. 1 2 2 0 0
Bde, cf. 1110 0 A'd'n. cf. 0 0 1 0 0
S'k'd, rf. 1 2 1 0 0 Kelly, If. 014 10
Ktr, ss. II 2 1 3 0 D'len.'ss. 01 0 14 0
L'C'e. lb. 2 215 2 0 J's. cf,rf. 0 0 0 0 0
O'B'n. 2b 112 4 0 M'Gn, lb 0 2 12 1 1
son, c. 1 2 3 1 0 Daly, 0 0 2 2 1
M'G'y, p. 10120 F'rell, c. 10 110
- — h- M'J's; p.: 1 l n 3 0
Totals .101627 17 0 . . ■: _____ _
'-" -'• ■ Totals .1 31 624 151 3 ;
Baltimore .. .....0:2 0 0 0 0 8 0 ♦—10 '
Brooklyn-... ...;..0 0102000 o—3 ''
Stolen bases, McGraw 2. Holmes. Mc^
Gann, Shreckard, Kelster; two-base hits "
MeGann,: Robinson, Kelly, Brodle- sacri
fice hits, Keeler, O'Brien. ..Casey,--Daly
double -plays,- Kelly and' Farrell. McGraw
I to La Chance to McGraw.McGann to Cas-
THE ST. : PAUI^ GLOBE, WEDNESDAY, JUNE 14, 1899.
ty to Dahlen; first, base on balls, off Mc-
Glnnlty 3, off McJames 4; j hit by pi Ichor,"
Kelly, MeGann;- struck • out, by McGln
nlty 2; wild pitch, McJames; - left on
bases, Baltimore -6; earned runs,. Balti
more 6, Brooklyn 2; time, 2:05; umpires,
Burns and Smith.
... SECOND GAME.
Bait |R)H PA El Brook. |R|ll|P|A|E
McG.'. 3b. 12 2 4 0-Casey. 3b li 01 2 01 0
H'm's. if 113 0 OtjVson, cf 12 0 0 0
.B'die. cf. 1 1 1 0 OfKelly, rf| 01 3 31 0 0
S'k'rd, rf 117 1 3 D'len, ss 0 1 6 2 0
K'ster, s. 1 2 1 1 0 Jones, rf 1 12 0 0
La C, lb 0 2 9 01 OMcG., lb. 1 18 11
08., 2b.. 0 0 3 10 Daly. 2b.1 2 2 1:4 0
R'b's'n. c 0 2 1 2 0 Grim, C. 0 2-4 3 1
K'son, p. 0 0 0 2 0 Hues, p. 0 0 1 2 1
Cham, coo' 01 0 0 ■•--••■ ■ —I : .—
I—l Totals . 612 27112 3
Totals ,| s|ll|27|ll| 3 ■ ■
Baltimore 10 4 0 0 0 0 0 o—s
Brooklyn .. 0 0 2 2 0 10 1 o—6
Stolen bases, • McGraw 2, . Shreckard,
Casey, La Chance, Kelly, Kitson; three
base hit*. Keisu*-, Anderson, Shreckard;
sacrifice hits. MeGann, -Hughes; double
plays, Shreckard, Robinson and Me-
Graw; first-base on balls, off Kitson 2,
off. Hughes 4; struck out. by Hughes 3;
passed . ball. Grim; * wild pitch, Kitson;
left on bases, Baltimore 7; earned runs,
Baltimore ,i. Brooklyn 2; time, 2:30; um
pires, Burns and Smith. .
QUAKERS TOOK TWO.
WASHINGTON,. June 13—Philadelphia
took -two games from the Senators to
day. The reason for the loss of the first
game was that Weyhing was hit hard
and the home team made bad errors.- In
the second Piatt was.- Invincible. At
tendance, 4.000. Score, first game:
Wash. R H]P|A]E Phila. |R(H]P!AIE
Blagle, cf 1] 41 41"©' 0 C'ley, lb.| 11 1 61 1 0
Barry, If 1 21 II 01 0 Tinas, cf| 1 0 3 0 0
B'ner, 2b 0 2 0 3 1 D'h'y, If. 2l 2 12 1
A'ton, 3b 1 1| 11 0 Odds, 2b. | 11 II 7 21 0
M'g'e, a.| 1 0| 4 2 0 Flick, rf.| 2 2 1 0| 0
F'm'n, rf 1 .11 21 0 OiL'der, 3bi 1 2.3.210
C'sldy, lb 1 3! 7] 0 1 "vTF'd. c. 1 11 It 0
' W'h'g, p. | 1 1 0 1 0 Cross, ss 1 2 5 6 0
P'den, ssl 3 0 5 2| 1 P'hue, p. 1 1 0 1.0
P n'n, p.. 0 II 0 li Ojß'h'dt,. p 0 *0 01-1
] —— 1
Totals . 10 15 2-11 9J 31 Totals .. 1112127J1.6|. 2
• Washington ..-..0 014 0401 o—lo
Philadelphia .. ..0 2 3 0 0 4 0 2 *—
Earned runs, Washington 7, Philadel
phia -6; two-base hits,. Bonner, Cooley;
- three-base hits, Lauder, Delehanty; home
' run, Delehanty; stolen '•"bases, '■* Dineen,
McFarland. Cross; double plays, Dele
hanty to Cooley, Childs to Cross;* first
- base on balls, off Weyhing 1, off Dono
,. hue 3, off Dineen 3, off Bernhardt 1; hit
by pitched ball, Padden, Thomas. Childs;
struck out, by Weyhing 1, .by Dineen 2;
left on bases, Washington C, Philadel
phia 5; wild pitch, Dineen; time, 2:20;
umpires, O'Day and McGarr.
SECOND GAME. '
Wash. RH|P!A E| Phil. IRHIPAE
SI gle, cf 0 0 1 0 0 cry, lb I 0 110 1 0
Barry, If °-1 '1 0 O.Th'as, cf 0 1 2 0 0
?^ r ' 1_ 2-2-1 3 i-Orh'y, lfj 11300
Athn, 3b 0 0 0 1 OC'llds, 2b 0 2 2 2 2
Butler, c 0 0 0 10 Flick, rf 0 0 0 0 0
F m n, rf 0 0 3 0 0 L'nd'r. 3b 0 1 1 0 0
Cdy lb 0 112 3 0 Dogs, c 0 0 6 10
Merc pOO 36 1 Cross, ss 002 2 0
Pad n, ss 0 1 3 1 0 Piatt, p 12 0 2 0
Totals .| Q| 3124115] 2 ; 'Totals ~2~8 261~2
Washington ...0 0 0 0. 0 0 0 0 o—o
Philadelphia 1 0 0 0 10 0 0 •—
•Atherton. out for interference.
.Earned runs. Philadelphia 2; two-base
,' Cassldy; stolen base, Slagle; double
plays Douglass to-Childs, Padden -- to
Cassidy; first base on balls, off Piatt. 2*
struck out, by Piatt 2; passed ball, Butler;
left on bases, Washington 4, Philadelphia
6; time. 2 hours; umpires. O'Day and Me
' GOOD BASE RUNNING.
SSS55S_^*?_P June ".-The Giants, de
feated the - Bostons through good base
Sff? 1. 11.* by Doyle in the fourth and a
wild throw by Long -in the seventh. Both
Seymour and Lewis - pitched ' well: The
latter . was fortunate In having several
apparently safe, hits cut off by fielders.
Attendance, 2,500. . .Score; 7.
Bost. , |RiH|P!A|E| N. Y. IRIHIPTaIe
Stahl rf 2 2 II 01 OjT'nan, rfl 112 10
Ten'y, lb 12 7! 3| 0 W^son.' s 0 0 4 4 1
Long, ss.j II ? 6! 31 lI.V'H., "Cf. -1 0 1 0 0
C 11ns. 3bi 0 1 2| 2] 0 Doyle, lb 2 2 5 0 1.
Duffy, If. -0 1 1| 0 .OG'son, 2b 1 1-IJ-5-0-
H m'n, cf 0| li 21 0 0 08., j If.. .0 0-30- 0
S ford.* 2bl .0 Ifl| UliW'ner, c. 0o! ' 8 2: 0
■Brgen, c 0 -Of 2' 2 lH"t'n, 3b. 0 2 4 '2 2
Lewis," p. HI 2| 2 PS'y'ur, p. I■o' 01 0
*' Totals. .1 4].8|24|13 4) Totals . ~6:~6 27J15 ~i\
Boston .. 2.0 0 0 20000-4
New-York •■; .1' 0- Q l ,Q 2---2 0 *—6
Stolen r bases, Duffy, Collins, Hickman.ii
Doyle/ Van Haltron. Bergen, -Tenny; "two
: base hits. .Gleason, Tenny;'double plays
Long (unassisted). Tlernan .and Warner;
first base on balls, off Seymour 2, off
Lewis 3; hit by pitched ball. Wilson;
struck out, by Seymour 5, by Lewis 2*
j balk, Seymour; left* on bases. ; New - York
2, Boston 7; .first base by errors. New
i ?P- „l*. Boston *3; time. 1:49; umpires,
! Lynch and Connolly. •_ -.
EXILES LOST THE GAME.
5 CLEVELAND, 0.. June 13.— Cleve
™l?. _ went down a&ain today before the
Pittsburg team. Their errors contributed
largely to the result. Attendance, 75
Score: ' -
Cleve. jR|HPIA|Ei Pitts. |R|H]P A
£0^ d - ,V I 3 4 °l OD'v'ri. rf.l 2 2 2 0 0
™r ly IV ? I 3 o'OMcCy. If ii 21 ii 0 0
inn. 2b| 1 2 3| i. 0 W'ms, 3b 0 0 21 21 0
McA'r, rf 0 0 0| 01 OftfcC'y. cf II -2 3 1 0
lv n, 3b .0.0.0] 3| O.Clark, lb 1| 2 8 0 0
Lhd, ss 0 3 3-1 4 Ely, .ss 113 5 0
T'ker, lb 1 212 0 3M'son. 2b 3 3 4! 10
S'gost, c 2; 3 2| 0| Ojß'man, c 12 4 0 0
Kn'p'r, p. I 0 0 0 31 0 Rhlnes, p 0 1010
"S'gd'n, ,11 01 0 0 ' - ■•__:
„ :. H—l— — — Totals .101527 10 0
-Totals ,| 6 16J2712 7 --■ .- ' ■
| Cleveland 1 0 0 0 0 0 2 0 3—
Pittsburg .5 10 1-10 10 I—lo
♦Batted for Knepper In ninth. '.
Earned runs, Cleveland 5, Pittsburg 1:
left on bases, Cleveland 8. Pittsburg 3*
first base on balls,, off Knepper- 5, off
Rhlnes 2; home run. Quinn; two-base hit.
Schreckengost; stolen bases, Dowd
Qulnn, Donovan 2, McCarthy 3 Mc-
Creery; struck out. by ' Knepper 1, by
Rhlnes 1; double play, Qulnn to Tucker
umpire, Gaffney; time. 2:05.
RACING AT ASCOT.
Meeting- Opened Under the Most
Brilliant Auspices.
LONDON, June 13.— The racing at As
cot opened today under brilliant auspices,
although deprived of the semi-state pro
cession of royalty, due to the fact that
the court was in mourning for Prince Al
fred of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha, I and. the
ctueen: of Denmark. Among those pres
ent were the Prince of Wales, the Duke
of York, the Duke, of 7 Cambridge, - the
Duke and Duchess of Connaught, the
Grand Duke Michael of Russia,' the Duke 1
and Duchess of Marlborough, the Duke
and Duchess of Portland, the Duke and
Duchess of Devonshire.
The Prince of Wales stakes were won
by the Duke of Portland's three-year-old
bay colt Mannero, by St. Simon-Tace
Sloan rode Sir Waldo Griffith's chest
nut colt Kent in this race, but was un
placed. '.-*-.' .7*; '" " ":
The Trial stakes of 10 Sovereigns each,
with 500 sovereigns .added, were won by
the Duke of ' Westminster's colt Good
Luck/ P. Lorillard's filly Chinook, rid
den by Sloan, was unplaced..' The betting
was sto 2 against. Chinook.''... : "
Sloan finished first on Lord v. William
Beresford's chestnut gelding Democrat in
the Couventry stakes. Vain Duchess was
second and Lucie 11. third. Ten horses
ran. The betting was 5 to 1 against Dem
ocrat. - . -' ZZzZzzZ--
The Biennial stake, first year of the
forty-second, resulted in a dead heat be
tween the Duke of : Westminster's brown
colt Goblet and . Lord. Rosebery's brown
colt Epsom Lad. - Tod 7 Sloan rode Lord
Wm. A. Beresford's bay gelding Yumboe,
but was unplaced. - ; :
- The Ascot stakes were won by Lord
Rosebery's Tom Cringle. Lord Farqu
har's Nouveau, Rlche was second and
Mr. Falrle's Chub third. .
Hawthorn Races.
CHICAGO, June Track ? fast Re
sults: . ; '■ . " ■-■--...
. First race, five furlongs—Clara Wooley
won, Erla DOr second; Wasant third
! Time, 1:02*4.
r Second : race, six furlongs—
Bland won. First Brigade second, Sheval
D'Or.third; Time. 1:14. ~ :.' -■"•--.. !
"- Third race, one and one-sixteenth miles
—Monongah won. v. Native Son second El
kin third.:■■-." Time, 1:48%. £~-
.:-; Fourth race, - six - furlongs—Abe Furst
won. Pope Leo second, 7 Hermver third
Time. l:l3i>_. '
Fifth race, three-fourths of a mile—
rat won, Tenole second, Little Slneer
third. Time, 1:14. '.. 7' . Ber
Sixth race,-one mile—Chisel--won. The
Winner second. Plantain third. v Time,
1:42*4* .--.-.- ZZ.Z~ -■ "-r--^ ~-i*-."' t
'z'Z'■■■■ LATONIA RACES. = Z
•CINCINNATI,©., June 13.—Isabey was
the only. favorite that won a purse -at
La,ton!a ■ today, v* feather 7» threatening;
track good- The summaries- v^,- ;,
'•■ First "race, - six furlongs— won,
Mlssoura . second,; John .Boone third.
Time, 1:16. .
"Second race, five furlongs—lda- Ledford
won, . Foneda - eecohd, May Jane - third
Time. 1:02. -' -•• :tt-..v
Third race, mile—Fatherland won. Pros
ecutor second, Dr. --Wlchrow third. Time,
1:43**.. _•
Fourth race, handicap, mile and an
eighth—Jolly wen,. .Samover. sec
ond, Orlmar third.- Tlrffe,.l:ss"i_.;
I Fifth race, five furlongs—John Yerkes
won, Phallas second, Nettle Regent third
Time, 1:03. , . , . -
Sixth race, isabey won, The Elec
tor second, Billy - third. Time,
1:42^2- .' ._
ST. - LOU-IS'RACES.
ST. LOUIS. : 513.-»Three well played
favorites won today. Track fair. Sum
maries: ....-..- ■. :.{'h'>i'i.
_ First race,; five-fijrlQngs-Slboney won.
Special Notice secoßd, John Mlllln third
Time. 1:04. -' ... .7
Second race, six andY a half- furlongs
selling-Midian won. .A'r .Phlnlzy second.
Sir Gatiaii third; "Time: I:2lV_. .-
Third . race, six- furldttg's. selling—
moriss won. Imp. King, second, Belle Ward
third. Time, 1:15%." % :.
Fourth race,' mfle and seVenty yards—
w Oveton won. Gold Band second Duke
of Baden third. Time.. 1:45. v. . -
».FLv a race- rnlle* Streamer "won,
Airblast second,*"' Jim '"• P,7: third. Time
1:41 .;., : ,s. ':.^ ii ;' / v------' -
-Sixth race, five and a half furlongs
selling—Schnell- Lauffer won, Gllssandro
second, Hachmlester third. Time, 1:10.
.' „ TUBUS laKE. "REPUBLICS. 1
They Are Oft *Un K ra«eful to TUelr,
■''■-Benefactors/ .'"""'-' .
west SUPERIOR, "wis!, June 13.—
Pierre, the fornipjr^.jnanagfir- of. H.y 11 Ad
all, the famous Turkish wrestler;' has pur
chased, his tickets to Liverpool and will
sail from New York on the coming Sat
urday. : He "goes from there direct to Tur
key with the avowed intention of bring
ing to this -country a* wrestler who will
make Hali Adali-.loek-dlko a ; deuce along
side of a ten-spot. Pierre is the man who
brought the' famous 1 Yousouf to Amer
ica. It is Well known In sporting circles
how Yousouf shook 'Pierre as soon as he
learned. American*-ways and Pierre re
turned to Turkey.- to get a man to down
Yousouf for his ingratitude. He brought
over Hall Adali,>ut.before Hall arrived
the terrible YdusQ.uf was? drowned in the
wreck of the Steamship Burgogne. Now
that Halt: has sought other, fields than
; Pierre's talent, that enterprising mana
ger is going to Turkey for another wres
tier. He has his -eye upon one Manette
Cordeattl, a Turk weighing 235 pounds.
Pierre claims.; that - Hall Adall ;is , not the
whole show in his coimi,ry and; that Cor
deattl, being the younger, more powerful
and better built man, will be brought-to
this country to make a back number of
:Hali. •::-; -;"v,.'"j-.. ;7Ei!i3lli*PC"7;; 7"T *"*- *,' 7
; WAGER SHOULJO,^-ISOT .BE PAID
If Either Party. Was'■ Betting; on Pri
vate Inforiixatlnn. -
To the Editor of trie •'<■*? to be:"-'
. During the evening ;pf. the Fitz-Jeffrles
contest, while the operator of. Luverne
was copying the "eighth round the St.
Paul operator JLuverne operator
that Fitz was knocked-oiut in the eleventh
round. The operator Immediately,; tele
phoned up to ; where the bulletins - were
being read • that Fitz was knocked out
in the eleventh round-- but the fellow
who . answered the 7 'phone did not tell
it to the crowd, but told it to a " few
friends. : ;:.,..-, •.- "7
One of the friends, lie. told wagered $25
,on Jeffries immediately after being told.*
The gentleman V whom he wagered
the" $25 with heard the truth from the
operator in regard %to telephoning .■ the
news up ahead of the eighth bulletin and
.refused to give up the money upon - the
ground*, that the t fellow who.made--,* -the
wager knew at the time of. the wager that
Fitz had been' knoekedVout. 'Is it. a bet?
What should the stakeholder do with the
money? ._/„._....-.,,.-• ~.-v -IV C. B. ■
- LuVerne v/-Mfhri.'"r'-June" 12. r V" . .- i
:;SECRECY THE RILE. ■'- * "
Shamrock*** Qualities Will Not Be
; .. -•: Made Public. .■>'-;•.=*:''-"
-. LONDON, June; -Russell, the:
yachting representative of Sir Thomas
Lipton, informs the Associated Press that
the yacht Pilgrim"- has "just been secured
for the purpose of .;hpuslng.7.the7 crew of
'the Shamrock^. The Pilgrim will <be
anchored some, distance down New Yorki
bay, and - the crew of. the cup challenger J
will not be allowed s'to'-laiid 1 Until" after"
the races. - The work of sheathing .the
Shamrock was commenced June 7. -.;.'',-;•- |
. The. trial races between the Shamrock
and the ; Prince of Wales'- cutter Britannia
will occur in the Solent, from July 16
to July. 26, but is not intended to do
more than test the Shamrock's qualities
in various points of sailing.
Sir. Thomas -Lipton. arrived at the isl
and of Guernsey this- morning, on board
his steam yacht Erin. -
Bradford Cricket Match.V
LONDON, June 157—1n the cricket
match at Bradford today between the
Australian and the, Yorkshire eleven, the
foT^rra^f^^-S^P 9"l^™* inn ,
for 235 runs. .
.'. - '.Z ■ ■_--■ . -&:»' t : '■•'•■ ■• ::
<■»' .
Universal Broitherhoil.
n *& B', -? a„ he ??*? $; bffl*\Stey, leader and
official head of the Universal Brotherhood
will arrive In St.. Pa*ul,Saturday, June 17'
Her party composes, several high officials
and prominent members.7of the organiza
tion. They will hold public meetings on
Saturday and Sunday evenings, June 17
and 18 in Raudenbush hall. The music
will be furnished by-Mr. Basil Crump and
Mrs. Alice Cleather, .of. the London .Wag
ner society. Meetings are free and all
are cordially invited-?****? .
: Hambold i High School.
The closing exercises of the Humboldt
high school were held last . night at the
school building. /A play, "'What Hap
pened in 1899,' r written by Will Rothau
sen, 7 was presented.-*-Nineteen " scholars
. graduated. . --. -> - - - *
"cheers, ***■ but not inebriates," 'makes
life happier and -better by its beneficent
effects on body and mind. Made by
the Anheuser-Busch: Brewing Ass'n.
OFFICERS ELECTED. ;
Nearjr, of Minneapolis, .New Presi
dent of : State ; Federation.
DULUTH, Minn., June 13.— (Special.)-
Winona and Mankato were candidates
for the n?xt meeting of: the -Minnesota"
Federation of- Labor, and the former
won out. M. E. Neary and M. :A. Mur
ray, of *, Minneapolis,-- were the leading
contestants for the "presidency. Mr.
Neary was elected. Henry Giese, of -St.
Paul, was elected first vice president,
and Miss Leona Michaelson. of Minne
apolis, was elected second - vice president.
W. E. MacEwen "was", re-elected secre
tary and treasurer.. St. Paul was select
ed for the next meeting of the federated
council. The new corincfl consists of J.
B. Morrison, ' C. Gu^ry.' '■ Martin . Jgo,7
Henry . Feger and' Patrick Maloney.
A resolution indorsing the % Soda Its La
bor party - platform f >'&-; tabled. Gov.
Land's attitude in I f-h-or of * the publica
tion of i public school' textbooks by j* the
state 'was indorsed. - Thi federation;went
o" 7 record with ' a v;re§3iution opposing
the issuing of passes to' officials and al
dermen by railroad iolnr)knies.
minister JON f*RIAL.
Crave Charges P_-_f€*red Against
. ;;'. Rev! J. A. : / ,A.! [ 'i>ale. . ; ~
MADISON. Minn., June 13. This after
noon the reporters are excluded from the
j Hague | synod meeting. ■* 7 There 7 was a
secret;session in regard the matter of
Rev. J. A. A. Dale, who Is charged with
conduct | towards some \ members -of 7 his
congregation unbecoming a minister; and
a gentleman. -This forenoon very little of
interest was done with the | exception of
hearing a few reports from standing com
mittees. ;.,' "■-'■.■7''-7-v.*\':. f-". ■"■'*.•"■". -'.'■" :
' The secret session resulted in the unani
mous acquittal of Rev. Mr. Dale, Tomor
row afternoon and evening the friends of
Rev. Mr. Tharaldson,, of .-•: the United
church.- will help '■ their; pastor celebrate
his -twenty-fifth: anniversary as minister
of the gospel;' ■■-.
JOHN W. THOMAS & CO.
MINNEAPOLIS.
' fBBKSS 'j n /ry m. a _ -"--*'- "'*
25th Semi=Annual
Remnant Sale
— WILL BE HELD ON i
Thursday, Friday and Saturday, !
June 15, 16 and 17,1899.
: r^a^HESE SEMI-ANNUAL SALES grow more and more popular, and we <
venture the assertion that the coming and more popular, and we
venture the assertion that the coming one will be a rouser. By <
J_ r - carrying out strictly every promise made to our customers we have :
; ||;*.*■' their full confidence, and ladies who, as a rule, pay no attention to j
, this sort of thing, turn out in large numbers. During July and August we {
, will be obliged to surrender a large part of our store to the contractors for ■■<
■ fire-proofing, decorating, etc., and for this reason we are compelled to work J
- down our stock; consequently, we must make special offerings on many {
* goods which ordinarily we would hold at regular prices. But then we like \
; the enthusiasm, and are glad- to give cur customers the benefit—and J
; we will take in pleasure what we lose in profit. ;
j Here Are Our Offerings; '""I
: . . - *—7 -;;. .... ' ' g> :
| Silks. Dress Goods.
> A larger assortment than ever before in Skirt and l A splendid lot of remnants in dress lengths, skirt {
■ and Waist lengths. In the Black Goods Depart- lengths, suit length* and waist lengths. Pattern <
* meat we have a fine line of remnants, including- suit* in high art novelties, grenadines etc. i
► Crepons and other late weaves. „ | n Linings we have remnants of Moreen, Sile- <
, v- »las, Percalines, Sateens, and Canvas. 1
; Flannel Department. Wash Goods.
> Here we have Remnants, Outing and French Flan- Here we have an interesting assortment of White \
, nels. White and Embroidered Flannels, Tailor Goods,. Organdies, Dimities, Batiste. French i
* Suitings, Bicycle Suitings, Spring Cloakings, etc. Swisses, White and colored Piques. In the heav- '
>>er goods we have plenty of French Ginghams, <
**_■ I aaaa Zephyrs, Corded Novelties, Madras Shirtings, Sat- <
* mmM9M.%f%f^am eens, Percales, Muslins and Sheetings. :':~ <
> - A choice line of remnants in lengths suitable for _•_-_•*"_ Ml ■■_=_. _"_ _=_ '
|. handkerchiefs and children's dresses. A few pieces I «■■ U 11111011110 l ■ *
►. of black drapery nets, waist length. In embroider- We will place on sale about 2,000 yards of M-_ '''
► ies we have plenty, all kinds and widths. yard muslin 4-4 wide, standard brands, yard "TrO J
I Miscellaneous Bargains.
► ■ ■ 'VrfJ ;Z.
I Hosiery. Kid Gloves.
► 100 dozen Ladies' Black Cotton Hose, - ---fl-IS.--.* ■•- About 25doz. Mousquetaire Gloves; former."-----: «-.*?-..-■!
J. "'-..." 25c quality :.X.X---X..ZX.Z... IOC -^ price $2.25; small sizes and large sizes ; Ef|f* -■;
► 100 dozen Ladies' Tan Cotton Hose, •_&___ ; ' 0n1y................ 01F0...!
iz. :.. 25cquality ..;:.,.....;..-;./.,.. „ IOC I S nonfi
> '.:: 25 dozen Ladies* Striped Hose; ftp WllOllOi ~ „-..,.
J:": 7'former price 50c .'..;.....'............. __OG "'; Table Linens, Bleached and Unbleached; odd pat- „!
>**-> ■••': 10 doz. Children's' Plaid Hose, sizes 5, 53^, ".« C__ I" tern cloths', 2 and yards wide; , ft ,
J iV': ;6, 6^only; former prices from 50c to 75c... IOC odd dozen napkins ...•....•.:... LoW'r*f|C6s";
Men's Department. 7777, CS®!®' bro .,„ _*, »««, „-_ ■__..
I 35 dozen. Wash Shield Bows; ■ ;" ''"!___ ": brand; to be L-""•" -. __ 'r * <
> ._.,,. former price 15c and 25c...;..*..;.--..:.-. VV; -<-Z ■.':■ closed 0ut..... , ; VfiFV Cl-£BP •<
: 16 dozen Wash String.Ties—wide "end's; '- r'"_2i_ Muslin ' Wear. :"'!° li
► former price 25c vC ■»■»■«©■■■■ VVVrCiI . .<
►'-■ 6 dozen Wash Four-in-Hands: ' _______ x; fa this department we make our usual Remnant <
I former price 25c.... .v.. -.lUC XX. Sale Prices on .-,- * *-* .;
J 5 dozen Night Shirts, slightly soiled; _____ Gowns. . «
> former price 75c and $1.00.. OlfC Long and Short Skirts.
> 9 doz. Unlaundered Shirts; broken sizes; CA~_ _2^__^__-^!-- ~ '__ :
slightly soiled; former price 31.00 ...... OHO Corset Covers and
! „ V _r* „ -V. '-■,- Infants' Dresses and Sacques. '
' : 3 dozen Shirts, slightly soiled; |?A A Art Department.
former price $1.00 25c and Off C Al*l DGPaPtlflGflt
, 15 dozen Natural Balbriegan Shirts and _fl_ _■ __ tt_.«_, .-_. v __^^s ■ „*< _ j <
Drawers,summer weight? former price 50c. 350 Here We have 3°me SpeC,al off^in Ss in
. Stamped Linens- ; .7-
I Pocket Handkerchiefs. So'oo«L°^_f r rp.«o«3.
A lot of Ladies' Handkerchiefs, all linen;, m■■ -_ Spockle -Goods and «
former price 25c; for this sale IOC . • Art Materials. <
' ' •-•-•,,■■■ . ;
» ; .-•■---..""' . ■ ■ <
Cloak Department.
Here we are making seme great sacrifices, and In the following list our friends will discover !
; unusual bargains. No shop worn, old style garments, but everything new and desirable. *
Jackets. Rain Coats.
; Our entire line ef Ladies' Jackets, strictly man- 7 About 100 Mackintoshes, regular $10.00 to $12.50 *
,; tailored, niceiy finished, coverts, tans, browns, 7 quality, to be closed _Ll___l_C e_ *■*! *•
: ; blacks, blues, navys, etc., Ual-f DS AA j{| out at Half Price:
former prices $10 to $30, at Hall -TPICe „ ■ ■«■ ■ ■ iOO ,
Misses'and Children's Jackets in reds, blues, tans, **9UB&S. *- ' X"Zl?\ ,
" taSlSi^^ Half PriCe > Wut 2°°-Suit». aU this seas°' styles, handsome- \
$7.50 to $20.00, at.......... _»«_■ II 100 rly , tailored and finished in tans, grays, blues, \<
> D*|_. l _| A ___tl_rS_____.__. : ~--' - blacks,-browns and mixtures, many of them silk *
! -tSEGVCIe dKirtS. li™*> former prices $12.50 M-*%4 M ! ft/a <
' The best hanging Skirts in the mar- *____ RA to^°'°o' at *"" riCe 3
ket—our $8.50 and $10.00 line, at;... vDfIWV About 75 Suits, the cream of our stock, r;ch colors .
and fine fabrics, former prices " I■> ___C_C '
Our $13.50 to $15 line, extra long fl^'flf^ il__ $30.C0 to $75.00, at /»3 HifgT '
and suitable for rainy day wear. *9l"lVv - j_***» •-■'---_. ---*• ■ * 3
at*-. _* ______*- Silk Petticoats.
91Pc6l *9lHiri9B A splendid lot, all colors, former Ofs Ctfl|',
; 7 A lot of odds and ends, good-fabrics and stylish prices 510.00 to $16.50, at '9OnO'V <
.r,shapes, former prices ; ____!•_■ Dniaa About 50 Silk Petticoats, our __ JO __*_ 1
-7 $10.00 to $20.00, at -TiaiT .TPIGtS regular $5.00 quality, at ........ $4.UU !
A I _"#■*#• all 11 C — We make any alterations necessary in Jackets and Suits, but we will have to charge <
<**■ ICI dLI U-ll_> the cost and ask the purchaser to come for fitting after the remnant sale hurry is over.' 1
■ ■■'•'•''' • - "":: ■ - *■' ■■' X y-yu
■ — •— .- --**/; ■;••<
' ■ - ■-- ■ 7" ■ .... , -v7';,..;--.J...:,*--'^i~7:- ' '■ i
CL PF CT A I NOT f -We expect a crowd on THURSDAY and have made provision for J
aiP- -■-^~^•a•, •-■-« mviivl(. comfort and reasonable promptness. We have engaged 50 extra ]
salespeople, a number of bundlers, made special provision for delivery of goods, removed all show i
cases, etc., and have additional help in every place necessary for the dispatch of business. <
GOODS DELIVERED FREE IN ST. PAUL AND THE MIDWAY DISTRICTS. -^g
yM—— —-w"-^-^—-—^-— —****************m^^»^^^»^^^^^^^^^
LUNA ASSASSINATED.:
Humor to That Effect Has Reached
Manila.
Z MANILA, June 13.—Information, be
lieved 'to*■ be reliable, has 7 reached here
of the assassination of Gen.; Luna and
his alde-de I camp, Lieut. Pasco; Ramon,
June 8,- by Agulnaldo's,,'guard at the
headquarters of .Aguinaldo.. Luna and
Ramon, it appears, .went to .the; head
quarters .of • the '-■ Filipinos:to; confer with
"Aguinaldo, got Into an 'altercation with"
the, captain -of . the \ guards, ane '. one -of
them: drew a revolver. The 'guard.7then
killed Luna - and Ramon with - their bay
onets. " . .-*_ ■*' 7:7 '
:,-," -.--""! -„ - —•- ... -— Z .'''■■'■
XX:- Grand '•_' Lodge' at Yankton.
YANKTON, S. D.V- June 13,-(Speclal.)—
The grand lodge, A. -F. &' A. M. of : South
Dakota, was called ■to order for its twen-
ty-fifth - annual communication at 10
o'clock this morning, Grand Master Louis
•S. Levoy presiding. "* AIL the grand lodge
officers were present " and nearly every
subordinate lodge represented.' After op
ing.-, exercises, _• the annual address of
Grand Master. Levoy" was presented and
referred to the proper committee. Com
mittees were • appointed and adjournment
taken at noon-until 9 o'clock tomorrow.
The; grand, chapter, Order of the Eastern
Star. South Dakota, also met for its
eleventh annual convention,
This evening occurred the anniversary
exercises and banquet; at which Senator.
R. L.F.'Pettigrew responded to- "The Prog
ress of ;.;• South - Dakota In * Twenty-live
Years." r \z=y - .-_■■ ■■"■'
Robbery Cases Disposed Of.
DEVIL'S LAKE. N. June 13—(Spe
cial.)— the district court today 7 Fred 4
Case was ' found guilty of. robbery • in. the
first degree. Sentence' was not pro
nounced. i'-V'■•.;.-;, ,„..- -... :-.•..., -
William ■ Murphy 'pleaded' guilty : of ' rob
bery, and was sentenced -to one year and
5
five months In the penitentiary. ■"-
The case against D. W. Pinkerton,
charged conjointly with Case and Mur
phy, was dismissed.
" . . **■*■ —■—
'-" *■ Becknian-Becklns.
SHAKOPEE, Minn., June 11—(Special.)
Miss Beckins was united in mar
riage- to Joseph Beckman at St. Joseph's
Catholic church. Sand Creek, this morn
ing. Frank Beckman acted as.best man,
and Miss Mary Beckman at: bridesmaid.
The ("treat Poet N. P. WILLIS said ot
BROWN'S&Sr
BnUW N 3 Troches
7 -"My communication with the world _
very much enlarged by THE LOZENGE:
that trouble in my throat (for which the
Troches' are a specific) having made me
often a mere whisperer.'*-- P. WILLIS.

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