OCR Interpretation


The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, November 02, 1899, Image 6

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1899-11-02/ed-1/seq-6/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 6

<3
M. D. FLOWER, Pres. H. B. CARROLL, Ban. Supt.
St. Paul Union Stock Yards
80. ST. PAUL. MINN.
Best equipped and most advantageous market for the shippers In the
Northwest. Connected with all the railroads.
1,000 Beeves and 2,000 Hogs Wanted Dally,
CHASA. HAAS COMMISSION COMPANY
LIVE STCCK CCMMISSION MERCHANTS.
Rccm 19 Exchange Bld^., Un on Stock Yards, So. St. Paul, Minn.
dIJ corre*i>ondmce will receive prompt attention. Liberal advance* made on Consignment*
Jief'erencea — Union Stock Yards or any Commercial Agency.
ROGERS & ROG ERS,
...LIVE STOIK COMBISSIO4 MERCHANTS...
Room 21 Exchange Building, - South St. Paul, Minn.
Highest market prices obtained for stock. Prompt attention given to all
correspondence and orders. Reference*: Any commercial agency.
I r.lcn Stock Yards, TMIIIFT 1 RS!II^L 800 CUy Stock Y*rJi
tcM.faul, Hlnn. liUbi I Dilv9l sJoux City, low*.
LIVE STOCK COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
ALL BUSINESS AND COHRB9PONDENCB HBCKIVB3 PROMPT ATTENTION.
Liberal advances mnde on eonslKnmeuu. References:-- South St. Paul Slock Yardi Bauk, Sioux.
City National Bank, First National Bank, Kasson, Minn., Parsons
Bros. Bank. Dodge Center, Minn.
WHEAT LOST A CENT
»LADE A SIDDEX DROP OF Fr_L.Y
ONE-HALF AT THE OPENING
OF THE SESSION
.WAR IN TRANSVAAL A FACTOR
Severe British Reversea Had a De
l>re-ssinw Effect Upon Price* — The
Market Slumped Off Steadily and
Closed Decidedly AVealc — Corn
Showed Considerable HeavineMH,
Sympathizing With Wheat.
Prey.
Close. Day.
December wheat, Minneapolis. 6s%-% 66%-%
December wheat, Chicago — 69 1 ,4-% 70%
December wheat, New Y0rk. 74% 76%
December wheat, Duluth 66% 67%
CHICAGO, Nov. I.— Wheat dropped over
lc today. Liquidation by demoralized
longs, because of unexpected weakness at
Xjlverpool, caused the slump. The market
ruled weak throughout and closed with a
loss of Hac for December. Corn also suf
fered from liquidation and short selling
and closed %c lower. Oats lost %c and
provisions from 5c to- 10c.
Wheat made a sudden drop of %c at
the opening ami continued on the down
grade throughout the session. As the
little strength which characterized the
market here was in anticipation of high
er Quotations from Liverpool today, as a
result of severe -military reverses tothe
English army in South Africa, the trade
became demoralized when tha reverse of
that expectation occurred. L_ere was
very little else at the opening to tn
courage selling, but speculators be
came so bearish that in their eagerness
to find purchasers tha market slumped off
steadily, and closed decidedly weak within
a fraction of the lowest point touched
fluring the day. A steady increase 'n lo
cal stocks, together witn an excessive
ly slow cash demand, aride.'! to the sell-
Ing movement during the late trading.
December opened %@%c lower, at 65 / s'3'
We; sol.l sparingly at 70c. declined to t>J^4c
and closed with sellers at 69V;<§6S%c. This
establishes a new low record for the De
cember option this year, the lowest point !
reached! previously being 61*% c.
Chicago received IS4 cars, 23 of which
graded contract. Mlnneapols and Duluth
got 859 cars, compared with 866 the cor
respondlng day a year ago. Total Wes:
ern primary receipts were 1,050,000,
against 1,585,000 last year. Atlantic port
clearances, 444,000 bu.
Corn showed considerable heav'iass,
sympathizing with the decline in wheat.
A slack cash demand, and advance in
rail rates East and a decline in ocean
freights were also used as arguments lor
lower prices. Receipts, 216 cars. Decem
ber opened %c lower, at 31%e; advanced
to 31%@31%c, declined to [email protected]%C, and
closed with sellers at 31% c.
Light receipts and fair cash Inquiry
counterbalanced heavy commission h.r.ise
Belling In oats, and the market, after a
Blight dip early, held steady the remain
der of the session. Receipts, 191 cars.
December opened a shade lower, at 22%$
12', c; declined to 22% c, and eiosed at
&2%c.
Provisions were Blow and weak. The de
cline-in corn, excessive receipts "f hogs
Etrd lower prices at the yards were the
depressing influences. At the close Jan
uary pork was 10c lower, at $9.tiO?p9.<i2 1 _;
January lard, s<i£7%c lower, at $5.25 35.27%;
January ribs, 6c lower, at $4.90.
Estimates tomorrow: Wheat, 128; coin,
J32; oats, 200; hogs, 38,000.
The leading _£utures ranged asfollows:
~ Open-!Hlgh-l Low-j Clos-
ing. I est. I est. [ Ing.
\Vheat— I j I
December 69%-70 70 69%! 69%-%
May 73%-% 73% 73% 73%-%
Corn-
December 31% 31%-% 31-31% 31%
January 30% 30% i 30% | 30%
May 32%-% 32% 32%-% 32%
Oats-
December 22%-% 22%-% 22% 22%
May !24%-V4 24% 24 24-24%
Pork-
December I 8 07% 810 800 800
January 965 965 960 9 62%
Lurd—
December 5 12% 5 12% 510 510
January 530 530 525 5 27%
Bhort Ribs—
December 4 77% 4 77% 475 475
January 1 4 92% 1 A_ 92% 4 87% 4 90 _
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour
tjuiet and easy. Wheat— No. 2 sp*ing, 69%
871 V.c; No. 3 spring, [email protected]%c; No. 2 red,
fO®7lc. Corn— No. 2, 32c; No. 2 yellow,
B%e. Oats— No. 2, [email protected]%c; No. 2 white,
Ide; No. 3 white, [email protected]_j^4c. Rye— No. 2,
$2%c. Barley— No. 2, 39<ft45c. Flax Seed—
IforthwePt, $1.29. Timothy Seed— Prime,
2.30. Clover. ?7.40. Pork— Mess, per bbl
RfrS.os. Lard— Per 100 lbs. $5.17%(55 20
ihort ribs sides Hoope), $4 70tf?5.20. Dry
Salted shoulders (boxed). 5%(?75%c. Short
tlear sides rboxed), |[email protected] Whlskv—
Distillers' finished eroods, per gal, $1.24
Suerar unchanged. Receipts— Flour 30 000
bbls; wheat, 257,000 bu; corn, 55<? 000 bu
t>ats. 474,000 bu; rye, 10,000 bu: barley'
156.000 bu. Shipments— Flour. 16.000 bbls :
*vt>eat. 10,000 bu; corn, 672.000 bu; oats'
122.000 bu; rye. 1,000 bu: barley, 52.000 bu'
On the produce exchange today the but
ter mnrkpt whs ateadv; creameries 15f?>
Be: da'ries. 14fn9c. Eggs steady: 'fresh
y^Ac. Cheese steady; creams, ll%'Q;i2 1 /ic. '
MINNEAPOLIS.
MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 1.-Wheat opened
lower.
December wheat opened at 06Vtff?66%c
against 06%@66%c at Tuesday's close
«old down to 66% c, gained %c, declined
to 66c, firmed up %c, then dropped to
65% c and advanced to 65% c by noon
May wheat opened at 70% c, against
70%«70%c Tuesday, sold down to sK
TOr, gained l-16c, declined to 69% c and
Rained J^c by noon.
The cash wheat market was rather
quiet. The fall on futures caused cash
buyers to hesitate a little. The" result
however, was that the most of the cash
stuff sold about the same as on Tuesda'v
The market was a little stronger' <liir
Ing the noon hour, but not active No
vember wheat closed at 6CO, December at
65%<g65%c, and May at 69%®69V6e
Open- High- Low- Closing
Wheat- ing. est. est. Wed TW*
May ..... 70% 70% 69% 68%-% 7 o%_U
November . ™
fcecember 66U-% 66%-% 65%-% 65%-U 66<_'_
, On Track-No. 1 hard, 68c; No 1 north
«m. 66c; No. 2 northern, 63% c; November '
oats, 22% c; November corn, 29% c; flax
seed, $1.28%.
Flour— The action of the wheat market
has made the flour situation a little
uncertain. Millers, however, say that the
demand keeps up very well. First
patents, [email protected]: second patents, ?8.65
©3.75; first clears, $2.80(32.90; second clears,
[email protected] The market is very firm at the
advance.
Following are the quotations in cotton
sacks, 98 and 49 lbs:
Rye flour, per bbl, pure, $2.65<@>2.75; ry«
flour, per bbl, XXX, $2.45<g2.55
Bran in bulk, $ll<y 11.50; shorts in bulk,
$11(511.50; middlings In bulk, [email protected]; red
dog, in 140-lb sacks, [email protected]
Corn— No. 8 corn, 80c; No. 8 yellow, 30 _)
30% c.
Oats— No. 8 oats, [email protected]%c; No. 3 white,
[email protected]%c,
Rye— No. 2 rye quoted at [email protected]%c; no
sales reported.
Barley ranges from [email protected] Choice
malting held a little higher.
Feed— Trade is growing better and from
now on should increase gradually. Coarse
corn meal and cracked corn In sacks, per
ton, sacks extra, to jobbers only, [email protected]
12.50; No. 1 ground feed, 2-3 corn, 1-3 oats,
SO-lb sacks, sacks extra, [email protected]
SAMPLE SALES.
No. 1 northern, 31 cars, 67c.
No. 1 northern, 1,200 bu, to arrive, 68% c.
No. 1 northern, 1,000 bu. to arrive, 67c.
No. 1 northern, 5 cars, choice, 68c.
No. 1 northern, 1 car, 67% c,
No. 1 northern, 2 cars, 68% c.
No. 1 northern, 6 cars, 66% c.
No. 1 northern, 2 cars. 67% c.
No. 1 northern, 6 cars, 67% c.
No. 2 northern, 8 cars. 64% c.
No. 2 northern, 18 cars, 64%0.
No. 2 northern, 11 cars, 65c.
No. 2 northern, 2 cars, 66% c.
No. 2 northern. 3 cars, 65% c.
STATE GRAIN INSPECTION.
_ Northern No
Roads. N0.1hd.N0.1.N02.N0.3.R1d. Gd.
Gt. Northern.-. 11 42 86 14 15 8
C M. & St. P.. 30 51 19 3 5
M. & St. L 9 17 i 1
Soo LJne 25 20 2 4 2
North Pacific. 4 8 11 2 1 6
C.,St.P.,M& O. .. 19 86 83 3 7
Totals 15 183 171 74 27 27
Other Grains— Winter wheat, 7; No. 3
corn, 4; No. 4 corn 2; No. 3 oats, 17; no
rrade oats, 1; No. 2 rye, 2; No. 3 barley,
; No. 4 barley, 15; No. 5 barley, 4; No 1
flax, 46; rejected flax, 9; no grade flax -f.
Cars Inspected Out— Wheat. No. 1 hard'
4; No. 1 northern, 48; No. 2 northern, 8:
No. 3, 4; rejected, 2; no grade, 2; No. 3
oats, 11; No. 3 barley, 18; No. 4 barley,
17- No. 1 flax, 5.
Receipts — Wheat, 483 cars, 396,050 bu;
corn, 4,250 bu ; oats, 23,760 bu ; barley, 18,05<5
bu; rye, 650 bu; flax, 19,400 bu; oil cake
182,092 lbs; flour. 611 bbls; millstuffs 15
tons; hay, 60 tons; fruit, 814,680 lbs; mer
chandise, 2,349.720 lbs; lumber, 8 cars;
posts and piling, 1 car; machinery 237,
-000 lbs; coal, 1.481 tons; wood, 323 cords
brick, 10,000; cement, 100 bbls; household
goods, 24,000 lbs: ties, 1 car; stone and
marble, 1 car; railroad Iron, 4 cars; live
stock, 4 cars; dressed meats, 24,500 lbs;
hides, pelts, etc.. 20,000 lbs; railroad ma
terials, 6 cars; sundries. 49 cars; car lots,
Shipments— Wheat 81 cars, 68,040 bu;
corn, 770 bu; oats, 26,410 bu; barley 2 820
bu; rye, 2,460 bu; flax. 920 bu; flouf, 57
--5G4 bbls; millstuffs. 2,577 tons; fruit 319 -
750 lbs; merchandise, 2,024,040 lbs; lum
ber. 142 cars; machinery, 106,500 lbs; bfick
<,000; cement, 200 bbls; household goods
20,000 lbe; ties, 16 cars; stone and maN
ble, 1 car; live stock, 5 cars; linseed oil.
92,470 lbs; railroad materials. 15 cars;
sundries, 25 cars; car lots, 1,008.
DULUTH.
DULUTH, Minn., Nov. I.— Market dull
and weaker; December opened %c off at
67% c, sold up to 66% c at 11:30, up to 67c at
12:20, and closed %c off at 66% c. Cash
-150,000 bu at December price. Cash Sales
—No. 1 northern, 5,000 bu, 67% c; 6 cars
67% c; 60,000 bu, 67% c; 25,000 bu, 67c- No £
northern, 12,000 bu, [email protected]%c; No. 3 spring
2 cars, 63c; rye, 10,000 bu, 52% c; flax, 25,000
£, u *on $ l_ 3Vi ® 1 - a4; mllls last week made
30.(80 bbls, shipped 32,620 bbls, have 69 160
bbls. Railroads received 146,566 bu shlDDed
21,795 bu, have 172,165 bu. Wheat— No ]
hard, cash, 67% c; No. 1 northern, cash
66% c; December, 66% c; May, 70% c; No 2
northern. 63% c; No. 3 spring", 60% c. To ar
rive, No. 1 hard, 67% c; No. 1 northern
66% c; oats, 23%<§23%c; rye, 52c; barley 37
®42c. Flax to arrive, $1.24; cash. $124-
November, $1.23; December, $1.21%; May!
$1.24%; corn, 29c. Receipts— Wheat, 249 694
£. U ,_, oa _ 8 ' 11841 bu: r $ e < 10 - 558 bu : barley
HO6O bu; flax, 137,425 bu. Shipments-
Wheat, 235,458 bu; barley, 162,941 bu- flax
41,703 bu. '
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS.
GR AIN GOSSIP-<Jossip by private wire
to C. HF. Smith & Co., St. Paul, mem
bers of the New York stock exchange and
Chicago board of trade. rPrlme says-
Corn reports from along the Illinois
Central railroad in Illinois show that
about one-third of the corn has been
gathered. Rains recently have stopped
husking. Some corn has spoiled in cribs
owing to mild weather. Corn is not turn
ing out as well as was expected Dry
weather caught the corn in August and
September frost the late corn. Seventv
flve per cent less corn than year ago at
this date. Corn will not move early un
less prices advance decidedly. Winter
wheat reports from Southwestern Mis
souri show that the late rains have bene
rited greatly. Wheat there was seeded fif
teen days earlier than last year Fifty
per cent of "M crop sold. Corn crop light
and will have to ship in to supply local
wants. Farmers very uneasy as to Hes
sian fly in growing wheat. Spring whe?t
l? po *u ts TN f f rom, om th^ sout heast portion of
North Dakota show that farmers have
sold the late crop very largely. Old wheat
is all gone some time ago. Spring wheat
is about about all threshed and the shock
wheat about one grade off." Broom
hall cables: "The opening this afternoon
was Inactive and unchanged from last
night s close. During the early part of the
session the market was lifeless, traders
exhibiting little or no interest, but to
wards noon sentiment turned rather bear
ish owing to the eufficiency of present
supplies and the large amount In sight for
future needs, prices easing off V 8 to _
Corn oppnod dull and unchanged! declin
ng later In the morning on the Increase
in Liverpool stocks
NEW YORK, Nov. 1.-Flour-Recelpts
30,889: export*, 30.242; sales, 9,500 pkgsj
market ruled moderately active and
easier. In sympathy with the weaker rul
ing of wheat and closed dull and heavy at
nominally unchanged prices. Rye flour
dull. Buckwheat flour steady Buck
wheat steady. Wheat— Receipts 74 noo
pxports, 88.687: sales, 2,525,000 bu; futures'
200.000 bu ppot; spot steady; No. 2 red'
(5i4,c f. o. b. afloat spot; No. 1 northern'
Duluth, 78% c f. o. b. afloat to arrive- No'
2 red, 73V t c elevator; options weak 'at a
net decline of %<7?%c; May closed at 78Uc-
December, 74%(fi:74%0. closing at 74% c'
Corn-Receipts. 92.150; exports, 318,848 :
spot weaker; No. 2. 40% c f. o. b. afloat and
39Hc elevator; options stpady at Me net
(iprline; May closed at 3«Vic: December
3Wip. Oats— Receipts, 68.600; exports'
15.000; spot dull; No. 3, 30% c; options nom^
Inal.
MILWAUKEE, Wis.. Nov. I —Flour
steady. Wheat lower; No. 1 northern, Wft
/Oc; No. 2 northern, 6fi%c. Oats steady 25
®26c. Rye steady; No. 1, 56% c. Barley
easier; No. 2, [email protected]; sample, [email protected]%c.
THE ST. PAUI, GLOBE, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1899.
STOCKS WERE SPOTTY
RAILROADS AGAIN PELL INTO THE
BACKGROUND AND WERB NEG
LECTED THROUGHOUT
CAMPAIGN AGAINST SHORTS
Vltforoim Efforts Were Made to Con
tinue It, With Some Suect'fti.- Some
of the Railroad* Received a Lit
tle Attention Before the Clone-
Money Was Raster, Tliourli the
Rate for a Time Was at 20.
Prey.
Close. Day.
Bar silver. New York 58% PBV4
Call money, New York 20 [email protected]
NEW YORK, Nov. 1.-Today's stock
market developed a decidedly spotty
character. The railroads fell Into the
background again, and the highly specu
lative industrial* were brought forward
Into activity. An effort was made to
continue the campaign against the shorts
in the Iron and steel stocks, but the
higher prices in this group brought out
nuch large sales that the efforts to ad
vance prices had to be abandoned. The
whole group, with the exception of Ten
nessee Coal, shows net losses. The lat
ter stock, after dropping to 116%, rose
strongly to 119, and held there. When the
movement In the iron and steel stocks
proved abortive, the bulls turned their
attention to Brooklyn Transit, which was
a favorite In speculation for the rest of
the day. The movement in this stock was
again directed against the very heavy
short Interest believed to exist in it, and
the rapid advance induced large covering.
When the rise had extended to above 90,
enormous blocks were brought out, which
made It difficult to sustain the price.
The stock rose to 90%, yielded a point,
rallied again, and again yielded a small
fraction. The New York traction group
was strong in sympathy. The Leather
stocks were also taken up for further ag
gressive advances, the common touching
32, and the preferred 33%. Sugar was
active nnd irregular, but shows a net
gain. The Tobacco stocks were weak
early, but rallied later.
There were isolated movements in Mis
souri, Kansas & Texas, Cleveland, Cin
cinnati, Chicago & St. Louis, the Pacific
coast stocks, Wisconsin Central, New
York Air Brake, and Standard Rope,
which were all strong. Malting preferred
re se 3 points. Otherwise the trading was
not very active, and the movement of
prices Was narrow, net changes being
small and mixed. Owing to the holiday
in London pressure from that point was
relaxed.
The call money market worked appre
ciably lower late in the afternoon, after
having ruted at 20. Large amounts were
loaned at 6 during the afternoon, and
the close was at 5. The ease in money
did not Induce any large ventures on the
long stocks, but bears were manifestly
uneasy and anxious to cover. Today's
advance in sterling exchange is believed
to be evidence of a real relaxation in
the money stringency, and New _ork ex
change at Chicago and St. Louis was
strong today, showing a cessation of
Pressure from those points. At Boston,
on the contrary, there was a sharp de
cline in New York exchange. ■ Money con
tinues to move from New York to the
South, and the subtreasury is making
drafts on local banks.
The bond market was quiet, aside from
an active demand for Standard Rope in
comes and Kansas & Texas second-
Total sales, par value, $2,070,000. United
States new 4s and oM 4s, registered, ad
vanced Vfe in bid price.
STOCK QUOTATIONS.
oiosins: prices are bid: ______
■ ~ -Closing-
B'l'e|HlghlLow| 1 I 31
Am Malt T-"..| 13 I 12% i 12 U^
do' Dfd 4 aV- 4ti%| 46 4j }a
as & w . . • iiiw so 47%! «% «%
A d 0 %fd ...::: i i*%m m g
A. Mining Co 1 1 « 15L
££: Tobago ::::.. iuooi_%*2o%g m
Am. xin Fiat;: :::::: i'.t^T^' m 2jt.
Am. Cotton bii":: "2661 "45%! "45% 4514 45
dopfd * ™7f
Am. Spirits * ■**
do pfd ™ .J2
Adams Express .. ...V. .- .. •-•• "» "°
a v, )OD 1100 43% 4d 4<» 10
dopfd •■ »«Jb 821/481%
A T &S F 84W 22% 22% 22% I 22V.
do Pfd .... 10400 66% Wtf 60% | 66%
Am. Unseed Oil 11%! U%| 12 j 11%
A V f T -I- -I »\ ™
b. &o new::::::: "m &% &2% 62% 53
do Pfd new I I 72V* 72 72V* 72%
B Rapid TransitimOOi 90% 85 90%j Btf
Brook Union Gas.} ..... 140 140
Bag & Paper 26% 26% 26% 24%
do pfd [' ™
8., R. & P 41 41
<J O pfd OS 88
§ ru _ s I lc s . Co ::::: : i«m*&'' 55
gan^fan SO pSc:: 'ioOO «" W% 8% 8*
Car & Foundry 17% 17 16% 1<
do?fd ..... 63% 62% 63 |62%
C C C. & St. L.. 1000 60 59V_! 59% l 59%
dopfd 105 100 101%|100
C & H V IS I 18
C" Tobacco C 0.... 4300 42% 41% 41%| 42%
flo pfd 800 93 92% 92% 92%
Chesa. & Ohio 1400 27% 27% 27V4 27
C. & E. 11l 3SP3&
do pfd 126 120
Central Pacific 60 59%
Colorado Southern 5 4%
do Ist pfd 45 45%
do 2d pfd 16 16
Cd. Mid 6% 6%
dopfd 21% 21%
E & T H 1000 43 43 43 43
do pfd 90 90
Col. F. & 1 56 54% 65% 55%
do pfd H9 120
Chi. G. W 700 14% 14% 14% 14%
do deb. 4p. c... 900 90% 90 90 90%
do pfd A 100 83 83 82% 83
do pfd B 400 41% 40% 40 41%
Chi., Ind. & L 11% 11%
do pfd 43 , 43
Chicago Terminal .- 12% 11%
do pfd 41 40
Con. Ice j» 3o
do pfd 81 81
Del. & Hudson.... 1500 123 122% 122 122%
Con. Gas 188% 189
Diamond Match 129 129
Del., L. & W 1900|192% 191% 191% 191%
Den. & Rio G 200 21% 21%
do pfd 76% 76% 76% 7C%
D., S. S. & A. pfd 15% 15% 15% 14%
D. M. & Ft. D 18 18
Erie 13 13
do Ist pfd 37% 37% 37% 37%
do 2d pfd 19 19
Federal Steel 47300 60% 58% 58% 59%
do pfd 3200 81 79% 79% 80%
F. W. & R. G 22 22
Gen. Elec. Co 122 121%
Gt. Nor. pfd 175 174 171 173%
Glucose 53 50% 53 51%
do pfd 101 99
Hock. Valley Ry 35 35
do pfd 64 64
Illinois Central ... 900 115% 114% 1 115% 115
Int. Paper 26% 25% 1 26 26%
dopfd 70 (V% 70 70
lowa Central 14 13% 13% 13%
do pfd 59% 59% 59% 59%
Jersey Central .... 4400 125% 125 125% 124%
K. C. P. & G 7%l 7%
Knickerbocker Ice 38 I 38
do pfd 168 68
Laclede Gas 200 78% 77%] 78 78
do pfd 102 102
Lake Erie & W 19 18y,
dopfd 80 SO"
Lake Shore 207 207
Long Tsland j 54V>I 54%
Louis. & Nash 3900 87% 86% 86% j 86%
Lead 400 28% 28% 28% I 28 %
do pfd Hf >Ry.|ios i l
Leather 69800 32 27 ! Sltf 27
do pfd 7200 83% 82 I 83% 81%
Manhattan Con... 13600 111% 109%!110%nioi£
M.,St.P. & S.St.M j 23%| 23U
do pfd ! 1 64 63%
Met. Traction 12001198 [196 |1!>8 190
M. C. Ry ! 13% 13% 13%| h%
Mobile & Ohio ! 47%| 47 46% 47
Minn. & St. L 300! 72%! 72 71 |72
do 2d pfd ! | | 9434] 94.V
M.. K. & T I ! ! _ffi m \
dopfd 140OJ 40% 35% 39% I 88%
Missouri Pacific ..! 89001 49% ,„*
Northern Pacific. . I 23001 55 54% 54%Uk'
do nfd 200! 76% 76 | 7«tf 7«
N. Y. Central 17001138 1137^1137^137%
Nat. Steel Co 60% 1 48%! «%| 50%
do pfd I I 193 1 gs 78
National Biscuit I | 40341 •tasu
do pfd I ! 95* 9P
Norfolk & West ! 27% 1 26% 27 4m
do pfd 13001 71% l 71%| 71 70%
N. Y. Air Brake 145 [145 |146 141
W. M. CAMPBELL
co/n/nissioN company,
Live Stock Commission Merchants,
Union » took Yards,
SOUTH ST. PAUL,
■ Consignments and correspondence 80-
Hclted. Market reports furnished on ap
plication, t \a
We do a strictly commission business.
No live stock bought or sold on our own
account.
References— Stbchf Yards bank, South
a m aul; Secur 'ty/ bank, Zumbrota; Hon.
A. T. Koerner, Btate treasurer, Capitol
building, St. Paul; A, C. Anderson, cash
ier, St. Paul National bank. St. Paul.
b
NY C. & St. L 14% 13
do Ist pfd 80 80^
XT d o 2d pfd 35 31&
Northwestern 100171 171 170V4 171
do pfd '..... 200 200
North American , 12% 12%
Omaha .«.'; 120 120
do pfd . 169 169
Ontario & West.;.'.'i66i 26»4 25% 25% 25%
Or. Ry. & Nay 43 43
r^car-co-:::- :::::::::: 1%%%
do pfd gg flpS
Pennsylvania Ry! 'ifiOO i 33% m% 133% 132%
» C £° aJI 900 40% 40 39% 39^
p acinc Coast Co 64 62 54 52
do 2d pfd 68 67*4
• P p e uT,in a 8 n Ga . S 100 ° li4 * }}§* gj*
do pfd %t#- 89 89
R Wf y- "600 22' "2i% 21% 21%
do . \*t Pf<3 5700 61% 61 61 61i§
Pn?ir 2 T? fd V 33^l 32% 33%
S n n r d 1800 115^ 114% 115 115
K. It. & W 35 35
Southern Ry 2 300 is% "is% 13% 13%
Southern Pacific. 13300 39V 4 38% 38% 88%
St i L -* SW 13% 13 13% 13
st\ pt i s:f:: 32 31% g» g*
do Ist pfd ii?? iiw
do 2d pfd.. 37 aZ i*" ofig A«af
U " PIU -J/V-. -ly.
do a nf^ Cflnery • •• : !^™ 152% 1KT41183
c,s°t? q , , I I 1n7V,1117%
St do P D^ 52001127% 126%1126%!m
TOR T 172 ! 171
QO Prd * jgy j-_
R d ™/ Steel....| 1000! P^V^il 2RU! 2f5%
I^___ i^joo^7o%| 70_J_69%| 70
•Kx-divldend. Pullman, 2 per cent '
Total sales, 644,191.
BONDS.
*do new4s,cou P l29^ N. C. 6s ilt' 3
do niH 4 ?' re^- ii i% XT d ° *.. .!!*/. :::5S
2° 5 HO do een. 65.... 135
do c 103 Or. Nay. lsts lis
do currency... 100 do 4s iJ«tf
A *chison fß ren. 4s 98% O. S. L. 6s i«P*
ol° « dJt - 4s - • • • 83i '* do Is : : ■ ■ ■ iff
c d d & °^con:-7 S :^ I^:4^Xl
r do % F - deb. 55106y 4 St. Paul con. . 169
c. r V e & n D 4s c , s t 5 % ? en & n > n - a*
Gen. Elec. 55.... 119^ do 2nds. .. V.V. 65
GH. & 5., A.65..110. 65.. 110 Union Pac. 4s 104
do 2nds 10!>1 '5 *Wabash lsts.'. '. iIHU
H & T. C. 55.. ..110%! do 2nds 100
do con. 6s 110 'West Shore 45".113
lowa Cent, lsts.lfr '"Wis. Cent, lsts 76%
X.C..P. & G.lsts 7fl4Ta. centuries .i «%
La, new con. 45. 106 i do deferred. 6
E jb-N; an£ 4b. <8% Cal. Sou. 4s 85
♦Except interest.
NEW YORK MINING STOCKS.
Cholor JO 22, Ontario $7 75
Crown Point.... 10 Ophir 60
Con. Cal. & Va. 1 40 Plymouth 10
Deadwood 70 Quicksilver .... 175
Gould & Curry.. 27 1 do pfd 700
Hale & Nor 28 Sierra Nevada.. 40
Homestake 65 00 Standard 2 75
Iron Silver -. 52 Union Con 25
Mexican 20 Yellow Jacket-. 15
WALL STREET GOSSIP— New Tor*
stock gossip, reported by H. Hobart &
Son, bankers and brokers, 341 Robert
street, National German-American bank
building, St. Paul— Strong, Sturgis & Co.
wire us: "We have had a much better
market today for stocks than the condi
tions of the money market and the news
from the Transvaal would seem to have
warranted. We fear for the result of
the South African campaign upon the
gold situation and we also feel that no
material aid can come to the relief of the
banks here for some time and that they
have no power to expand their loans ot
help those who would be otherwise pur
chasers of securities. There is no ques
tion as to the very great earning oower
of railroads, as well as industrials, but
the cost of operating the former must
be steadily increased while many of the
latter are over capitalized. Still leaving
the stock market' to itself on an easy
condition of money a general and sub
stantial advance would be in order The
.question is one that one must decide
for himself. Ig the. upward tendency
enough to overcome the otherwise de
pressing influences surrounding us?"
Bartlett, Frazier & Co., Chicago tele
graphed the following to Edwards &
Bedell, stock brokers and commission
merchants, 110 Endlcott arcade, St Paul
Minn: Hooper— "Buying In B R t'
looks very good." '
Bartle;t, Frazier & Co.— "lt is an
nounced that the Louisville & Nashville
railroad will form an express company
of its own to operate over all its lines
beginning Jan. 1. The Adams Express
company now handles the business *'
r™. re TT e^,, To iS bu y' n S all round
room, looks like Wormser plan to nut
market higher. Little stock forsae, ex
cept m steel issues."
NEW YORK MONEY-New York, Nov
I.— Money on call firm at [email protected] per cent!
last loan. 5; ruling rate, 20. Prime mer
cantile paper, [email protected]% Per cent. Sterling
exchange firm, with actual business In
Mexican dollars, 47iic "°m.,
TREASURY STATEMENT- Washing
ton N ov . I—Today's statement of the
condition of the treasury shows: Avail
6 ' $2S9 ' 391 ' 540: S°* --
BANK CLEARINGS.
St. Paul— $1.092.2(14. -16.
Minneapolis— s2,s23 923
Chicago— s22,osß,23o.'
New Y0rk— 5240,927,580
805t0n— 527,503,253.
MISCELLANEOUS.
1 B L TT J ER AND EGGS-New York Nov
L-Butter receipts, 1,599 packages;' flrm^
Wes.ern creamery. 17<S24c; June cream
cry. n<fc23c; factory, t 14^1«?c eX^I
li cepts 5,418 pa-knges; steady; Western
ungraded at mark, 14<frl8c western
SEKD MARKETS— Chicago Nov 1 —
The i flaxse-d market opened fairly steady
Wednesday mocfting,- but shortly proved
to be a surprise tn.jrmny. First nrlr£«
were at $1.27 p-^r bushel* and in P 8 hor?
order U2> was .bid. The market shows
that the trade has not yet got over th«
tr-übl. s inuug^ated.oin September Re
ceipts hete weraififl rai-s, fis cars at D-ilnth
and 36 car. at Minneapolis. Cash 'fla?^
$1.29. < Nt $1.28, Decemhpr nt
$1.25% per bu. Cash timothy seed cloJii
at $145. clover seed closed at $7 75 n^
NEW YORK COFFEE— New York
Nov. I— Coffee optfftns opened stpnilv
with prices unchansed to 5 points hie-hpr
ruled (lrmrr arid closed firm at a net
gain of 5 to 10 bolntit Sales. 12,250 ba^s
lnrludfnjr JanuAry, J5.25-:: March, 5 40c'
M^ y> 5^ sc i Ju i2 r - 5B ?t ; Sj P^mber, 6.6"®
5.70 c. Spot coffe* Rio, firm; mild firm
Sugar.raw, steadyjfair refining, 3 13-i6c!
BEAUTIFUL SNOW
Broke Into Michigan "With a North
easterly BlOfT.
MARQUETTE, Mich., Nov. I.— There
was a light fall of snow here today.with a
temperature below freezing all day, and a
heavy northeastern on Lake Superior.
LIVE STOCK MARKETS
HOCJ RECEIPTS WERE FAIR, WITH
PRICKS TEN CENTS
LOWER
GOOD CATTLE IN DEMAND
Run Wn* Heavy and Mostly Na
tive*—No Change in the Market,
Kxf«-I»t That liu >■«•!■* Sorted ClOMer
—Prices Fully Steady on Best
Stuff— Fat Sheep and Lambs Sold
Lower.
SOUTH ST. PAUL. Nov. 1. -The re
ceipts at the Union stock yards today
(estimated) were: Cattle, 1,100; calves,
bOO; hogs, 2,300; sheep, 4,600; horses, none;
cars, 100.
The official receipts Tuesday were: Cat
tle, 2,338; calves, 632; ho^s, 3,882; sheep,
8,910; horses, none; cars, 196.
The following table shows the roads
over which Tuesday's receipts came in
and the number of loads hauled by each:
Cattle.Hogs.Sheep.Mixtd.
C. G. W 1 3 .. i
Great* Northern ... 48 1 20 9
Northern Pacific ... 17 .. 16 3
C, St. P., M. & 0.. 1 12 2 6
C, M. & St. P H 2 8
C, B. & Q 2 2
M. & St. L 6 .. I
St. P. & D 4 .... 4
Wisconsin Central.. 1 1 ..
Soo Line ....: 6 .. .. 3
Totals 77 86 39 43
The total receipts for the month of
October, compared with October, IS9B,
show a decrease of 3,497 cattle, an increase
of 143 calves, an increase of 3,088 hogs,
a decrease of 56,460 sheep, an increase of
798 horses, a decrease of 330 cars.
The total receipts for the year, not in
cluding today, compared with the same
period last year, are as follows: •
1899. 1898. Gain.
Cattle 135,848 152,452 ♦16.&54
Calves 41,226 36,589 1.657
Hogs 293,698 266,101 27 £97
Sheep 322,747 362,484 *39,737
Horses 4,480 1,311 8,169
Cars t 11,398 11,810 *412
♦Loss.
HOGS.
Comparative receipts:
Total for today, estimated) 2,300
A week ago i 354
A year ago 2/034
Quotations: Mixed, |[email protected]'90:" "heavy
packing, [email protected]; prime light and
choice, [email protected] 95; prime heavy, $3.80©
er^huTd^d^aS $Tfc SffV^S
oent r^°- PHces p / id aye ra«ed a flat 10
£?, 1 w W h er °v ROOd to P rlm « Usht. mixed
and butcher hogs, and 5 to 10 cents lower
84 hnt aY n y i hoerS - £ he top for was
S4 but only one bunch of choice, sorted
fhpVh 1 ? 111^ K hls ngure - The bulk of
PrtmL XK h tS and ü but chers sold at ».90®8.n5
Prime heavy hogs sold at [email protected], and
the heavy ends sold mostly at ?3 75^
3- ?;, Representative sales: #>-io&
Mixed and Butchers—
No. Wt.Dkg-. Price. No. Wt.t>kg Price"
g g° 4? $3 !)5 46 256 *80«8s
S;::::::iS • W : 5 fifSß
*■••""*» 2 j *?* S::::::::S-?-Jg
Good to Prime Llght^
5-:;:::::;S:;iM ::::::::« *«j 8
Good to Prime Heavy^"
QO ~ ■
88 • " '-" • -29S .. S3 05
Heavy Packing— "
" 412 " 80 $3 8047 868 80 J3ffi
348 40 3x5 7 .... 402 s|
li^.^. l^a7s_Bo__3Ssl2 3 22 40 3 I
Rough—
H fg g^S I ••••••-874 40*3^5
J *§5 *0 3 75 5 376 SO 3 EO
8 072 240 3 75 5 400 8 75
4 452 80 375 3 257 " n
9 356 80 375 " 7
Pigs-
10 .....^.105 .. $3 75137 87 .. $3 60
Stags and Boars—
i:::;:::::S ::lg'r- 540 ' r *~*
CATTLE.
Comparative receipts:
Total for today (estimated) I GOO
A week ago 2*332
A year ago j'oq*
Quotations: Native: Choice butcher
cows and heifers. [email protected]; fair to rood
[email protected]; thin cows and canners, $2^2 75 •'
choice butcher steers, $4. 75(35 25- fair < A
good. [email protected]; fat bulls, *[email protected] 50- l/o'o
gna bulls, [email protected]; veal calves '$4 50?M~
choice stock cowa and heifers, $3 KKS3SS
-fair to good, , [email protected]; common and tail-
Ings, $2.60(32.90; heifer calves. [email protected] !iO
-choice Btockers and feeders, [email protected] fair
£?«£2? d> 5 3 [email protected]; common and taiiings
$2.2503; steer calves, $4(5!4.50- stock anA
ir4 [ A%n bull Si»[email protected]|l stags and oxe*
$2.<[email protected]; milkers and sprinffers 825(545
Western: Choice butcher cows and heif
ers, $3.75(3)4.25; fair to good, [email protected] 75- iliin
cows and canners, [email protected]; choice butcher
Bteers. $4.so<gS : fat*- to erood. $4.23(^4 50
--stock cows and heifers, [email protected]; common
and tailings. [email protected]; stockers and feed
@3 8 25 O<S4 ' s ° : common and filings. $2.75
dattle receipts were fair, running about
300 more than the same day last year
There was little change in the market"
with the possible exception that buyers
sorted more closely and drew a wider
\\T R etW r n the . ? ood and common cat
tle Butcher cattle of all kinds were
fully steady and in fair demand. In tht
stock cattle alleys calves were in good
demand and yearlings and medium
Representative Sales— Natives-
Butcher Cows and Heifers-
No. Wt.Prlce.|No.” Wt Prlc^
a 957 3 00 4 1 oort ? "k
1 lion 325 1 To 2i§
2 915 300 1 ;;;;•• qfo
3 1020 3 00 1 070 0 i
j„„.... _.n46 300 1 :::::: 670 110
Butcher Steers—
2 •••■•'•••• 920 $4 00
Fat and Bologna Bulls—
1 ....1110 $2 HH'l ......... 1330 *•? no
4 1122 2 85! * °
Veal Calves— " "
1 ............ 160 $6 PO' 4 1M $5 fil
•I 120 4 00 1 230 X t\i\
1 i3o eco 1 ::;;; 1 2 9 3 S |g
Stock Cows and Heifers—
W 679 3 16 ~1 ~ 710 12 M
a 900 3 15 1 4% q 9
' 6 524 3 00 1 ' " 7^o q in
11 473 325 5 \ i"; g{ 3f 0
4 810 3 10 2 670 3 00
} 920 300 1 Jg 3 3 00
1 570 S £~> 1 700 oAn
_ Heifer Calves —
"f ............ JB $3 »| 15 ............ 289 $3 35
2 325 3 25: 5 328 3 40
4 275 325 3 280 3 25
8 287 3 25 6 302 3 25
.? ■ • • :. : •••••• 22 ° 3 : ' 5 _ 3 _ •_ _307_3 00
Common and Tailings — Heifers —
2 $ 2 60| 2T77::n^r745T2~60
2 700 2 75 ! 4 795 2 60
1 SSO 260 2 720 2SO
Stockers and Feeders—
7 7 814 $3 75 14 .77777777! bP« -,o
10 785 3 75 6 "1030 3 "sk
8 59fi 350 1 6 fio 340
3 653 390 3 w] \ fiO
8 565 3 50 5 ""■ q« \^
14 616 3 50 1 1"" R2O S W
2 455 3 50 2 400
3 653 3fio 5 883 875
1 960 3 75 3 870 3 75
20 fiso 350 4 "545 ' ™
■,:::::::::::: gift' -™ *»
Steer Calves—
3 320 $4 50 15 320 J4 ™
14 282 4 60 3 470 4 S
2nJ> 4 50 3 Qf?7 j ca
5 268 450 2 "I; I "^ 1% 4 4 ™
15 286 4 40 26 278 4 on
8 !;.....!.... FBI 450 s 4 °°
Common and Tailings— Steers^ '■
1 520 $3 00 2 4801* A*
2 615 320 1 600 2^
2 390 3 20 1 '• 430 o^
2 220 250 4 MW q k
1 290 300 1 ;;••• f. 2 *
1 880 3 05 2 005 S 2£
2 545 2CO 885 3 50
"Stock and Feeding Bulls^ ~ ~
1 . 830 $3 00 1 720 »EA
1 1270 310 1 760 2 7R
1 9-^0 3rO 3 610 300
2 730 300 1 980 27R
1 870 3 no 1
2 680 2 25 2 635 2 £
3 837 2 75 2 1155 2 85
6 535 2 60. 3 1065 800
7W. Doran Sc Co., S&J^
The oldest firm la the North weat doin? a
BANKINQ AND BROKE RAPE BU3ISE3*.
Stocki, Bonds, Gr«ln and Proylßlons. Dlreot private wires to all Isadlng marktt*
Bave remored from ihelr old qaariers. a 1 Jackaon St. to the northeast corner of taj
Gfirmflliifl llffi !n« Rlritf ground Floor. Fourth&Miaaeaota^t*.
HQllllania l»ISC lllSi DlUgs Correspondence Solicited.
Thin Cows and Canners—
2 636 I 2 55T5 1058 $2l§
i 940 2 60! I 890 2 65
? 1100 285 1 820 225
1 900 250 I 1000 2 75
1 1070 2170 2 1045 250
8 910 2 50' 1 1020 2 50
4 950 280 7 1007 250
_4 600 2 35 1 950 2 S5
_Jstagg and Oxen— _
1 800 $3 40, 2 141052 80
1 1780 3 00, 2 1465 2 75
3 1063 2 80|
Milkers and Springers—-
No. Price. ] No. Price.
1 cow and 1 c..537 00 : 2 cows $75 10
2 cows and 1 c. 70 00 1 cow 42 00
2 cows and 1 c. 80 00 1 cow 45 0J
1 cow and 1 c. . 50 00
Representative Sales— Westerns:
Butcher Cows and Heifers— _
1 ■■•■ ..::... ...... "840 $3 40
_ Stockers and Feeders—
~4 .712 $3 50 6~ 7 918 $3 65
2 835 8 63 4 920 3 93
3 ....1007 4 15 13 1140 8 90
Common and Tailings— Steers—
3 .7917 $3 00
Thin Cows and Canner*^
4 1045~?2 65| 1 ~7113Q $275
SHEEP.
Comparative receipts:
Total for today (estimated) 4,600
A week ago 2,638
A year ago 407
Quotations: Fat sheep, [email protected]; stock
sheep, t2.7:<§3.25; feeders, $3.50ix3.t5; fat
lambs [email protected]: stock lambs, [email protected];
buck lambs, $3; bucks, $2.25^2.75.
Sheep receipts ran about 4,000 more
than the same day a year ago. The de
mand was fairly good for everything but
stock lambs, which were slow sale. Fat
sheep and lamb 3 sold about 15 to 25c
lower and stock stuff was also off,
although the decline was not so notice
able. Representative sales:
No! ~~Wt.Pric«L~NcT WtPrioeT
10 fat lambs.. 65 $4 75 57 feed, sheep 93 $3 B0
4 fat sheep.. loo 3 63 1 buck 160 2:0
2 fat sheep.. lls 3 ,0 43 fat lambs.. 76 4 75
45 fat lambs.. 69 4 70 5 fat sheep.. llo 3 75
14 fat ewes.. 86 360 11 fat lambs.. 73 46)
15 fat lambs.. 60 4 75 8 stk sheep.,loß 3 15
25 fat sheep.. 98 3 75 33 fat lambs.. 80 4 80
14 fat sheep.. loß 375 46 fat lambs.. 76 4 80
23 fat lambs.. 77 4 (5 £6 fat sheep.. l2o 8 75
13 fat lambs.. 80 4 75 49 stk lambs. 65 4 10
44 feed, sheep 93 3 E0
Milch Cow Exchange — Good cows were
in demand at fully steady prices. The
supply was fair and common cows sold
as canners. Representative sales:
No,. ~~ Price. | No."~ ~~ PrlceT
4 cows $170 0)i 1 cow $35 00
_3_ cows^.^.^.. 120 CO. 1 cow. . . . .._... . 80 00
The sales of live stock for the twenty
four hours ending at 3 o'clock, the clos
ing hour for the butcher market, each
buyer purchasing the number of head in
indicated, were as follows:
Cattle. Hops. Sheep.
Swift & Co 236 1,920 250
W. E.- McCormtck.... 6 23 67
L. Gottfried 7 ... 70
Staples estate 16 82 13
Slimmer & Thomas.. 191
Hankey Bros 50
J. B. Fitzgerald 61
Wentworth & Co 26 ... ...
City butchers 10 49
Country buyers 1,201 500 1,654
Totals 1,804 2,524 2 054
Among the shippers on the market
were: E. Ostenieher, Durar.d, Wis., 2
loads cattle and sheep; B. O. Wester
man, Aneta, N. D., cattle; J. J. Button,
Argyle, sheep; Stovers & Co., Mclntosh,
cattle; P. C. Keeley, Euclid, cattle; J.
Stewart, Warren, 2 loads cattle; MaTtln
Hoag, Warren, cattle; J. J. Button,
Arg:ylej 5 loads cattle; Thomas Sander
son, Stephen, cattle; B. E. Sundburg,
Hallock, sheep; Lyke & McVey, Hamp
ton, cattle and hogs; E. W. Richer,
Ellsworth, 2 loads sheep; Long Bros.,
Great Falls, Mont., 8 loads sheep; Long
& Jamison, Benton, 9 loads sheep; W. A.
Shaw, Clear water, cattle; C. W. Ring
linger, Web3ter, hogs; E. Marks, Prince
ton, 2 loads cattle and hogs; R. J. Hart
ley, Brainerd, 2 loads cattle; Lyke & Mc-
Vey, West Concord and Kenyon, 2 loads
cattle and hogs; Gilbert & Gibbons, West
Concord, cattle and hogs; J. Bartly,
Osage, 10., 2 loads hogs; Ormsoth & Co.,
Farwell, cattle and hogs; Forsburg &
Hakanson, Farwell, mixed; P. Wartman,
Watkins, mixed; A. Cofleld, Maple Lake,
cattle and hogs; Bank of Maple Lake,
cattle and hogs; F. A. Stewart, Manta
clor, N. D., cattle and hogs; James
Askno, Menahga, cattle; J. Schmidt, Mel
rose, mixed; F. C. Raitor, Alexandria, 2
loads cattle; A. E. Hawkins, Long
Prairie, mixed; J. G. Johnson, Perley,
cattle; Haggett Bros., Ashby, mixed;
Thomas Symes, Blooming Prntrie, hogs;
S. R Albee, New Richmond, 2 loads cattle
and hogs; Goodrich & Harkness, Durand,
hogs and sheep; G. Nold, Nelson, hogs
and sheep; Spading & Fuller, Maiden
Rock, 5 loads cattle and hogs; C, Hublr,
Cochrane, hogs: F. Schneider & S^n,
Alma, cattle and hogs; H. Huber, Coch
rane, cattle and hogs: W. Jantz, East
Henderson, hogs; C. Strube, New Ulm,
hogs; H. C. Mundall, Madelia, hogs; D.
A. Carpenter, Janesville, hogs; Cogswell
& Co., Lake City, hogs; George Schaub,
Wabasha, hogs; .J. W. Newbauer, Fin
lay son, cattle; E. Ekblad, Evansville,
cattle; George Clair, Wood Lake, hogs;
Hans Johnson, Dawson, hoga; Thomas
Lyons, Montgomery, hogs; Slitti & Had
lum, Manchester, hogs and sheep; An
derson & Berg, Hartland, hogs; J. P.
Snipps, Leland, 2 loads hogs; J. Thelson,
Norman, hogs; Pierson & Johnson,
Montevido, mixed; Hawley Bros., Grey
Eagle, cattle and hogs; T. t.. Schumacher,
Huron Lake, R. E. Peterson. Atwater, 2
loads mixed; Hans Hanson, Twin Lakes,
cattle; Miller & Co., Howard Lake, hogs;
L. Ransch, Howard Lake, cattle and
hogs.
MIDWAY HORSE MARKET—Minneso
ta Transfer, St. Paul— Barrett & Zimmer
man's report: The characteristic feature
of the market is the enormous large sup
plies of horses which have accummulated
the last four days. The extreme dullness
that has prevailed in the trade of late is due
to the non-support by lumbermen who are
entirely depended on for the trade. The
lull in buying by them is laid to the warm
and summeflike weather prevailing.
Horses sold today were certainly cut out
at sacrificing prices "and a loss to the
owners. Quotations:
Drafters, choice 1 $115 to $150
Drafters, common to good 80 to 115
Farm horses, chofce — SO to 105
Farm horses, common to good.. 50 to SO
Delivery horses 40 to 50
CHICAGO, Nov. I.— There was a good
demand for cattlfe today of a superior
quality at firm prices, but the general run
of fair to middling grades moved off
slowly at a decline of 10c in values; good
to fancy grades brought $5.50ft6.65; com
mon to medium, $4.20(7?5.45; cows, heifers
and bulls, $2<t/ i r>:"10; stockers and feeders,
$2.7504.75; Texans, $3.50(54.70; calves, $4®
7.90. The supply of hogs exceeded the de
mand and a further reduction in prices
of SffflOc W!lb scored; fair to prime grades,
$4:[email protected] 1 * : heavy packers, $375f:4.10;
mixed, - butchers, $4.05'a4.L > :v
lierht weights. $3.^4.25; pigs, $3.50(54.1?i.
There was a brisk ■demand in sheep at ad
vancing price?, the recent diminished re
ceipts enabling sellers to dictate terms-;
inferior to prime sheep sold at $2.25(5)4.50:
Western ransrers bringing, $3.85(9>4.50, and
yearlings, $4.50®4.80, the best selling 5c
nieher than heretofore: lambs sold at $4®
5.55 for inferior to choice; Western rang
ers bringing.- $4.s<>?*f>.r>rt. Receipts— Cattle,
16 W0; ho«r= rw.OOO: shppn. Irt.noo.
ST. L©riS, Nov. l.^Cattle— Receipts.
4 000; stf-idv, strong; native steers. $* 40
(7?6.15; atockers and feeders, $2.50!5>L65
--cows and heifers, $25f4.50; Texas and In
dian steers. J3.40fT4.05. Hogs— Receipts
9.000; market 5c lower; piss and lights
$4?f4.30; packers. $4(<?4.lF>; butchers, $4 10
(0!4.20. Sheep— Receipts, 1.700; steady un
changed.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Nov. 1 —Cattle—
Receipts, 14,000; pteady to 10c lower; na
tive steers, $4.25<7?6; Texas steers. $3.40^5:
cows and heifers, $2.505T5: stockers and
feeders, $S(Q> '.50. Hogs— Rece'pts, 13,000;
weak to 5c lower; bulk of sales, $4.02%®
4.07^.. Sheep— Receipts, 2.010; strong;
lambs, $3.65^5; muttons. $3.25#3.90.
SOUTH OMAHA, Nov. I.—Cattle—Re
ceipts. 3,600; active, strong; native steers,
[email protected]; Western steers. $4.60<£M.80; cows
and heifers, $2.70® 4. 75; stockers and
feeders, ?8 [email protected],60. Hogs— Receipts, 8.0 CO;
shade lower; heavy. [email protected] 1 >; mixed, $-1®
4.05; light, [email protected]%; pigs,' $3.80<7M; bu'k
of sales. [email protected]^. Sheep— Receipts,
2,503; steady; muttons, $3.75(3)4; lambs,
$4.75(^.15.
SIOUX CITY. 10., Nov. I.— Cattle— Re
ceipts, 2,000; Tuesday, 3,095; shipments,
1,482; market slow, about steady. Sales
-2 cows, ay 1.010, $2.50; 12 cows, ay 980, $3 80
--10 stock heifers, ay 865. $3.25; 10 stock belt
era, ay 405, $3.70; 2 bulls, ay 1,090, $2 90- 3
bulls, ay 1,670, $3; 4 bulls, ay 967, $3.25* 24
stockers and feeders, ay 787. $3 55* ?,<?
stockers and feeders, ay 930, $4.25' 12
calves, ay 300, $4.50; 6 calves, ay 340 $4 70
--8 yearlings, ay 583, $3.25; 16 yearlings ay
636. $4. Hogs— Receipts, 3.000; Tuesday
1,818; market 5c lower; selling, $3 86<54.06:
bulk of sales, [email protected]
FINANCIAL.
O'Connor & Van Bergen
BROKERS
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and Provision!
202-2 OS QHRMANIA LIPB BUILDI V<l
Fourth and Minnesota Strati.
ST. PAUL
tW Direct Private Wirtm
J
BROKERS.
BROKER.
Stocks, Bonds, Grains
Provisions.
The best service In the Twin Cities.
327 Jackson St., St. Paul.
ANTHONY YOERQ & 00.
BROKERS.
Oraln, Provision*, Stocks and Bonds.
201 German!* Life Bldg., Sy, PAUL. Ml MM
LongDluaooa Telephone 751^*
"Will go on Your Bond"—
THE AMERICAN BONOINQ
& TRUST COMPANY,
of Baltimore City.
(Business confined co Surety Bonding.)
Capital and Surplus over $1,103,300.
JAMES A. NOWELL,
202-4-5 Globe
O. H. F. SMITH Sl 00.
Mocks, Bonds, Grain, Provisions and Cotton.
££!»"?,/' tvlrea to Aeic York an ' 1 Chicago.
4OZ Pioneer i retts Building, St. Paul, Minn,
EDWARDS & a£O£LL,
Stock Broksrs *
Commission Ntarchaitfi,
noEndicott Arcade, St. Paul, ninn.
Correspondents: Bartlett. Fraaler & Co.
Chicago.
H. HOLBERT & SON,'
Bankers and Brokers,
413 Robert St. St. Paul,
JtiTT & WOODS,
Produce Commission Merchants
89 East Third airaat, St. Paul.
Dealers in J utter, Hygs, Fruits, Berries, tit.
We get hit/heat Market Price*.
MR. HOBAHT IN POLITICS.
Power in the Senate nnd a Cleve*
Party Worker.
WASHINGTON, Nov I.— lt was left
for Air. Hobart to break down precedents,
and this he did in a way which astonish
ed the politicians. He had been a mem
ber of the Republican national committee
for nearly a dozen years, affiliating with.
Platt, Quay, Clarkson, Fessenden and
the others who were In control from year
to year. He thus acquired an acquaint
anceship with men from all Btctio:i3 of
the country and a grasp of the national
political situation which he made Imme
diate use of.
Mr. Hobart was practically at the head
of the Eastern section of the Republican
campaign in 1896. He was in constant
consultation with McKinley and Hanna,
and his advice was generally followed.
He had a large acquaintance with the
moneyed men of the Eastern states and
was associated with many large corpora,
tions, owing to the fact that his practice
of law was largely in the direction of
such organizations, and he generally took
stock in them as a whole or part return
for his legal services. In scouring con-,
tributions, therefore, from the East foi
a distinctly financial campaign. Mr. ilo
baxt was a constant source of strength to
the national committee.
When he came to Washington in March,
1597, the relations between the vice pres
ident and the president T.ere. therefore,
of the most cordial character. Mr. Ho
bart had gained legislative experfenee
and learned the ordinary duties of a par
liamentary presiding officer as speaker of
the house and president of the senate in.
New Jersey, and It was not a difficult
matter for him to handle the gavel in
the United States senate.
For many years the senate had to a cer.
tain extent resented the interference of
the vice president with its business, but
Mr. Hobart was taken into the inner
council from the start, and t-xercised m -re
power In the senate itself than any -.<..■©
president for a generation. Hi* r.lationa
with the president being so cordial It
was natural that he should become the
mouthpiece of the White house at the
capitol. and many quiet Intimation* of
the wishes of the executive wore convey
ed to influential senators and representa
tives through the vice president.
This meant much during the time when
the country was on the brink of war with
Spain. Hot heads in the senate and house
were frequently called in for a quiet con
sultation in the vice president's room,
and many incendiary resolutions were
held back at his request, and on hi? as
surance that the president fully recog
nized the sentiment of the country, and
would at the proper time nnd in his <.\rn
way take steps to put a stop to the Cu
ban injustices.
Mr. Hobart was neither a jingo nor a
l>eaoe-at-any-price man, but hts leanings
were unquestionably toward rigorous ao.
tion. and he foresaw the war almost
from the beginning of the admifdstra
tlon.
Technically, the death of Vice President
Hebart could not embarrass th-> govern
meat, but practically his removal from
active participation in affair* here meatu
much. The death of a vice president, ac
cording to present laws, means a vacan
cy in the office the remainder of Urn ad
ministration. There is no provision fol
a new vice president. Th/> president pro
tempore of the senate becomes the per
manent presiding officer of that body.
but no more so than if the vice president
had merely left town or was 111. The
secretary of state advances a step near
er the presidency, but he does not becom*
vice president.
l.iinil In Demand.
DEVIL'S LAKE, N. D.. Nov. 1.-(Sp>
cial.)— During the month ending Oct. 31
there were made, at the ITfrfted Statoi
land office located in this city 462 home
stead entries, embracing nearly 75,000
acres of land, eighty-one caah proofs* and
excess receipts, five timber culture proofs
and forty contests were instituted. Dur
ing 1 the same time the cash receipts at
this office have been over $13,00(1. This is
without doubt more business than was
done in any office of this character 10
the whole United States during the sam«
period.

xml | txt