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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, January 05, 1901, Image 1

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OFFICIAL PAPER
—OF THE
| CITY OF ST. PAUL.
VOL. XXIV.-NO. 5.
111 fill 1
SENATE PUT IX FIVE HOURS DE
BATING THE REORGANIZA
TION MEASURE
KB. CARTER HAD HIS TROUBLES
SENATOR WELLINGTON WANTED
TO KNOW A LARGE NUM
BER OF THINGS
PETTIGREW WAS ALSO ACTIVE
But His Resolutions Received Scant
l'onr;c«> From His Brother Mem
bers—Senator Hoar Has a
Resolution.
"WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.—For five
liours today the senate discussed the
army reorganization bill. The debate
took a wide range at times, but was
confined principally to the question of
the necessity for the increase in the reg
ular army provided for in the pending
measure.
The Philippine question was threshed
over at great length, but few really new
points were advanced. It was urged by
the supporters of the army bill that the
situation in the Philippines demanded
the increase of the army proposed. This
was controverted by the opposition sen
ators who, while they were willing in
a general way to provide for such tem
porary force as might be needful, were
vigorously opposed to the creation of a
permanent standing army of 100,000 men.
PETTIGREW WANTED TO KNOW.
The resolution offered yesterday by Mr.
Pettigrew was referred to the committee
on the Philippines, after a speech by
Mr. Pettigrew, who said the president
maintained there was no war in the Phil
ippines. The military committee declared
that war exists there and that at least
60.000 men would be required to suppress
the rebellion. "As the president anu the
military committee disagree," said Mr.
Pettigrew, "it eeems to me we ought to
have the facts before we create an army
of 100,000 men." He hoped the resolution
would not be sent to that graveyard, the
Philippine committee, but it was also re
ferred.
Another of Mr. Pettigrew" s resolutions
calling upon the president for informa
tion as to the necessity for aw in
crease in the strength of the army was
referred to the committee on' military
affairs. The army bill was then taken
up, and Mr. Carter asked unanimous con-
Bent that the unobjet ted committee
amendments be .considered and passed
upon.
Mr. Pettigrew objected, declaring that
as his efforts to obta!n information from
the regular channels had been thwarted
he proposed to have time to obtain it
in some other way.
HFJkTED DEBATE.
Mr. ' Wellington (Md.) demanded to |
know the intention of the administration
■with reference to the Philippine islands.
If it was to force an annexation of the
Philippines, then a large army would
be necessary. He declared the country
had been assured at the beginning of the
Philippines' trouble that it could be put
down in four or five weeks, yet the situa
tion was worse than ever.
"Those people cannot be put down,"
declared Mr. Wellington. "Is it the pur
poae of the administration to try to de
prive them of self-government? If so,
1 am opposed to any increase of the
army."
In reply Mr. Carter said the pith of Mr.
"Wellington's question way that the ad
ministration, to satisfy him, must de
clare its present and future policy with
respect to the Philippines.
"The senator can consult the record of
congress for an answer to his Question,"
Eaid Mr. Carter.
"Tin president has no authority to de
cide what shall be done with the Philip
pines."
The moment the treaty of peace was
ratified," said Mr. Carter, "that moment
it became the supreme law of the land.
If the president had refused to maintain
the sovereignty of the United States
there he would have laid himself liable
to impeachment."
"Has he not already given up sove
reignty over a portion of Alaska?" in
quired Mr. Wellington.
GAVE UP ALASKAN TERRITORY.
Mr. Carter replied what the president
had done a? to the Alaskan boundary
had been accomplished through a modus
Vivendi, a purely temporary arrange
ment.
"It ip, 'nevertheless, a fact," declared
Mr. Wellington, "that territory ove.r
■which we had undisputed sovereignty
has been abandoned. The British flag
hag been raised over it and it Is controll
ed by British constabulary. That is tha
fact."
:Ur. Carter—That is the alleged fact,
only.
Mr. Wellington, continuing, said the
Alaskan boundary was distinctly marked
by stones, and the territory acquired by
the United States from Russia was clear.
ly the property of the United States.
"If the president should be impeached
If he relinquished territory in the Philip
pines, he should likewise be impeached
for relinquishing sovereignty In Alaska."
"Do you approve of the relinquishment
of territory in Alaska?" inquired Mr
Carter.
"I do not," replied Mr. Wellington.
Mr. Carter—Then do you approve of
c relinquishment of the Philippines?
Mr. "Wellington—That b quite a d'ffer
ent matter.
Mr. Carter declared it was the inten
tion of ihe United States to maintain the
laws in the Philippines, to restore order
and to protect property. Beyond that
point congress would determine what the
ultimate disposition of the Islands would
be.
Mr. Teller (Col.) sharply criticised the
jm mline- measure as the entering wedge
for a large standing army. "You'll want
not KiO.OOO men," he declared, "but you'll
want 200.000, and yen will want them for
n hundred years. This measure is not
intended merely to meet an emereency,
but to fix upon me country a great
standing army."
MR. HOAR'S RESOLUTION.
Mr. Hoar Buggsted a genernl amend
ment to the bill looking to the concilia
tion of the Filipinos, and expressed the
opinion that in time of pence we BhiuM
have one soldier to each 1,000 of oar pop
ulation. He did not, therefore, ho said,
oppose the bill on the score of increase,
but he did oppose it Because of the
avowed policy of military occupation of
the Philippines. "It Is idle," he said? "to
tell us that these people are not rit for
pelf-government." He quoted the presi
dent and naval officers to show tuat the
Filipinos are an intelligent people, and
added: 'The way to prepare them for
liberty is to set them free."
T\!r. Hoar said that if the fact could
be known, there would be no two opin
ions as to what we should do in the Phil
ippines, for h«» believed that X the peo
ple were generally convinced that the
Filipinos were as capable of self-govc-rn
*nent as they are they would make no
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
effort to continue the subjugation of
those people in the Interest of trade.
Mr. Hoar urged that it would be most
desirable to have appointed a committee
representing all phases of political life,
men of the highest character and stand
ing, to ascertain the facts as to the Phil
ippines and make them known to con
gress and to the people. He hoped such
a commission would be appointed before
the close of the present session. We
should give the Filipinos a hearing.
He said: "Let them state their case.
They can come and go in peace and hon
or. If we say to the Filipinos that until
they go down on their knee?, lay their
hands upon their hips and their lips in
the dust this war will go on, if there is
a spark of spirit and principle in their
breasts, until every Filipino of one- sex
is exterminated, and until the -women
among them take up the light and are
exterminated also."
PHILIPPINE WAR
GOES MERRILY ON
BUNCH OP INSURGENTS CAPTURED
BY AMERICAN TROOPS AT
OLD CAVITE.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.—The following
dispatch was received at the navy de
partment this afternoon from Admiral
"Manila, Jan. 4.—Bureau Navigation,
Washington: Attack on the morning of
the Sd by the Fourth infantry, marines
and navy at Cavite, Viejo, resulted in
the capture of one lieutenant colonel, two
majors, five captains, one lieutenant,
forty-eight private insurrectos and four
ladrones. —"Remey."
MANILA, Jan. 4.—Gens. Wheaton and
Bates report many small captures, the
destruction of insurgent camps and the
seizure of supplies, animals and other
necessities. Among the captures, in
Smith's district was Col. Tchon and in
significant government of Tarlac. Gen.
Grant is personally in command of a
mounted expedition ih the mountains of
Southern Papangas, which, he says, is
the only locality wTiere the insurgents
arc in force in his district.
Insurgents entered Gapan and San
Isadro, in Gen. Fuhston's district, during
the 9th and burned a score of houses.
Their firing was ineffective.
Gen. Mac Arthur has commuted several
death sentences of military courts to im
prisonment.
Judge Taft's written opinion of the San
Jcse college case was considered and in
dorsed by the Philippine commission this
afternoon. It will be made public to
morrow.
The enactment of the school bill has
been deferred on account of the desire
of the Filipinos to be heard on the bill,
as completed:. \t differs radically from
the one prepared by Supt. Atkinson and
indorsed by Gen. Mac Arthur. The latter
appropriated $1,650,000 outright to be dis
bursed through Mr. Atkinson under the
supervision of Gen. Mac Arthur. The
completed bill directly appropriates only
$40,0C0, and reserves to the commission
authority over plans for school houses,
and also requires Mr. Atkinson to report
to both Gen. Mac Arthur and the com
mission.
JEFFERSON'S PAINTINGS.
A Collection of Fifty-Five Shown in
Washington.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.— A collection of
fifty-five paintings by Joseph Jefferson
has been viewed recently by friends of
the artist in the Fischer galleries. The
exhibit was the second display in this
city of landscape istudies by the widely -
known and beloved actor-painter. Mr.
Jefferson was present in the gallery
whenever possible,..and joined frankly in
the criticisms of" those who were fortu
nate enough to attend on the opening
day. His evident pleasure in intelligent
compliment and the eagerne?s with which
he argued for the mood of a particular
painting indicated unmistakably the spir
it of earnestness and affection out of
which the pictures had grown. Those of
Mr. Jefferson's critics who have seen him
as Caleb Plummet- or Rip Van Winkle
unconsciously perhaps insisted on regard
ing hte paintings as the "aside" of a
great man of the stage or the t-tudies
of a dilettante. They viewed Mr. Jeffer
son, the landscape painter, in the cos
tume of Bob Acres or through the atmos
phere of "Lend Me Five Shillings." This
is not entirely a misfortune. A rare de
gree of sympathy, a mood of kindliness,
gentleness and seriousness are all requi
site to a proper understanding of sincere
landscape painting. A distinctive charac
ter pervades the display. Despite the
variety of scenes, the pictures have
enough of their maker's personality to
mark them as one man's work. But there
are in them suggestions of the land
scape painters Mr. Jefferson admires
most—Constable, Corct, Daub'gny, Mauve
and Ruysdael. Several are done broadly,
as Mauve would have painted them—"On
the Island of Naushon," a monochrome
of sepia brown, for example; several sug
gest Rousseau, as "The King of the For
est," a painting filled with the Barbizon
character; "The Mill Dam," and two or
three others smack of Constable; there
is even one view, a study of the White
mountains in poetic colors, which sug
gests Moran. On the whole, however, the
pictures are not imitative.
THANKS FROM CURZON.
Grntitade for Americr.a Contribu
tions to Indian Famine Sufferers.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.—The consul at
Bombay has forwarded to the state de
partment the following letter from Lord
Curzon, viceroy of India, in which he ex
p:e.sses 1 is appreciation of the. contribu
tions made by the American people for
the famine sufferers in India:
Viceroy's Camp, Nov. 3, 1900.—Dear Sir:
The viceroy has the greatest pleasure
iT adding his testimony to that which
he understands you are sending to tha
American people as to the immense Value
of the contributions that have beeii made
by the American public to the relief of
the recent Indian famine. Whether these
contributions have taken the fovm of
money, or clothing, or grain, they have
sprung from the two noblest of human
sentiments, viz.:~ The feeling for" suf
fering manhood, and the recognition of
a common aid between the two great
branches of the English-speaking race,
r>nd they have exercised U positive and
material influence in the mitigation of the
greatest calamity with which India has
been afflicted for many years.
"I am, dear sir, yours faithfully,
—"Walter Lawrence,
"Private Secretary to the Viceroy.
"The Hon. Mr. William T. Feo. United.
States Consul, in Charge of the Amer
ico-Indlan Famine Relief."
HE WON'T EXPLAIN.
One United Stwtfs Consul Is Apt to
Find Himself in Tronble.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.—The audit
ing officers of the treasury have been en
gaged for some time in an effort to se
cure from United States Consul RadcJiffe
H. Ford, at Yarmouth, N. S., a satisfac
tory explanation of- certain disbursements
made txy him on account of the relief of
distressed American sailors?, but so far
without result. The office has been in
vestigated by the nearest consul general,
and unless some accounting is rendered
for the items referred to the case will be
reported to the state department as ens
requiring drastic action. Consul Ford is
a native of Maine.
SATURDAY MORNING, JANUARY 5, 1901.—TEN PAGES.
DEJHHI 111 U
IS NOW HEING PROBED BY COM
MITTEE FROM HOUSE OF
REPR EiSENTATI YES
HE SAID CADETS WERE BULLIES
TOLD HIS PARENTS WEST POINT
WAS NO PLACE FOR A GOOD
YOUNG MAN
TOO MUCH TABASCO SAUCE
Three Times, He Said, Was It Forced
Down His Throat by Upper
Class Men at Hie
Academy.
BRISTOL, Pa., Jan. 4.-The house com
mittee of five congressmen, appointed by
Speaker• Henderson to investigate • the
case of Oscar L. Booz, formerly a West
Point cadet, who, it is alleged, died from
injuries received from being hazed by
the upper class two years ago, began its
inquiry -here today." The committee,
which consists of Charles Dick, Ohio
chairman; Edmund H. Driggs, New
York; Irving P. WanSer, • Pennslyvania;
Walter M. Smith, lowa, and B. F Clay
ton, New York, arrived here from Phila
delphia at 9 o'clock this morning and Im
mediately went into session at Pythian
hall, which place had been selected for
the committee by the borough authori
*M" HA. Casson } of Ohio, was select
ed by the committee for sergeant-at-
Chairman Dick called the session to
order. A number of witnesses were pres
ent, but the commiittee decided to hear
the members of the Booz family first.'
William H. Booz. father of the dead
cadet was the first called. He was asked
by Chairman Dick to tell the story of
his boy's life while ■ at the military
academy, as far as he knew.
Mr. Booz then went over the same story
he told before the war department in
quiry several weeks ago.
He said Oscar did not complain of
eagling," but spoke more of the fight
and the tabasco sauce incident. Oscar
told him he had black and. blue marks
on his body as a result of an encounter
with an upper class man. Oscar reluc
tantly told his father that the hot sauce
had been poured down his throat three
times and that force was used.
"Mr. Booz," asked Congressman Wan
[V, was your son absolutely truth
ful?"
''Yes, sir, absolutely," was the reply
Oscar said he was getting along very
well until he received a heart blow which
knocked him out." ' ;
Oscar, the father said, never had any
throat or pulmonary troubles previous to
going to West Point. Oscar's eyes did
not trouble him before he went to the
academy. .■; ■ ,
Chairman Dick asked numerous ques
tions of Mr. Booz as to his son's educa
tion. He said that his boy was up to
the average in his studies and that he
was proficient In mathematics.
FEARED TO MAKE IT WORSE. -
Chairman Dick then asked: "Why did
you not make official complaint to the •
superintendent of the academy of your-
Eon s treatment." - . *.. .
• "I was really afraid to do so because
of the upper class men." • i •.: ■■ ■■■■:■:
"Do you believe that you son died as a
result of hazing at West Point?" Mr
Booz was asked. : . * -
"I do firmly," he replied.
co'mpi eaint^" y dm>ou not make offlciar
i]l did not wish to have any publicity "
coiXn??" y °U "^ aS a Citi2en ma*e
"I did not know at that time the se
riousness of the case, and also did not
know there was any redress."
Mrs. Sarah E. Booz, mother of Oscar
sa.d her son was in rugged health when
he went to- the academy, but when he
left he was broken in health and never
was in good physical condition after
wards. Mrs. Booz wept as she detailed
the sufferings of her son. She called
the West Point cadets bullies. Mrs.
Booz said Oscar's health was good be
fore he went to West Point She said
Oscar sent a letter home each week. In
the fourth latter Oscar began to com
plain of ill-treatment. He resigned, she
said, because of -his ill-treatment, but in
his resignation paper he gave the weak
condition of his eyes as the reason for
his quitting the academy.
Miss Nellie Booz, a sister of Oscar,
said she saw in a newspaper a year
ago that two cadets named Lane and
Bender were expelled from the academy
for tampering with the records. She
told Oscar about it and he said the acad
emy was well rid of them, as they had
held his hands on a galvanic battery.
Miss Booz submitted several letters
and extracts of letters sent to members
of the family from Oscar, five exh bits
in all.- The committee decided to with
hold the . letters from the public until
it could consider them in executive ses
sion. This was done at the request of
the family, as . they contained some per
sonal matters which in on way relate!
to the investigation. ,
The sister said Oscar had told her he
would not again undergo the treatment
he had received at West Point for $100,
--000. •
At all other schools Oscar had attend
ed, she said, he had got along: very
well and was popular with the students.
At West Point all was different. After
he was called out to fight he was called
"coward" and "goody-goody." He L was
always annoyed by the upper class ! men.
Oscar characterized the upper class men
as "brutes, "bullies" and "tyrants.".
LUNGS WERE BAD.
Dr. William H. Martin, of Bristdl, who
examined Oscar Booz's physical condi
tion preparatory to the young man go
ing to West. Point, said he found him
a fair specimen of manhood. He no
ticed, however, his lung expansion was
slightly deficient.
Dr. Joseph Abbott, of Bristol, testified
that Oscar Booz had, primarily, tuber
culocis, with a secondary extension into
the throat. He was of the opinion that
tabasco sauce could not affect tha lungs.
Dr. Willis P. Weaver, the family phy
sician, differed in opinion from the pre
vious witnesses as to where the boy's
affection started. He was of the be
lief that it started in the throat. He
also believed that the abuse, humiliation
and fear he was subjected to was suf
ficient to lower the vitality of the boy.
Oscar never told him that he swal
lowed the tabasco sauce, but If he did
it would excoriate his throat in resisting
its swallowing, which would create a
vulnerable spot for the lodgment of
a colony of tuberculosis baccilll.
The committee then adjourned to Mo
lin Park, Philadelphia, tonight.
Dr. O. L. Solis Cohen, a throat special
ist of this city, was the first witness
called at the night session held in this
city. He testified to Booz coming to
him on Aug. 4, 1900, with a well developed
case of tuberculosis. He did not think
of the swallowing of tabasco could pro-
duce tuberculosis, but might injure the
throat.
Dr. James Wallace, of Philadelphia, an
eye specialist, who treated Booz for the
eyes after he, left the academy, sad
Booz told him he resigned becauss his
eyes troubled himy; The ailment prove 4
insignificant.
GEN. BATCHELDER DEAD
DISTINGUISHED TETEIRAX OP THE
WAR OP THE REBELLION.
WASHINGTON, J^n. 4.—Gen. Batcheld
er, former quartermaster general of the
army, died here this afternoon at 2:25
o'clock. ■ '
Gen. Batchelder had. been in delicate
health for several years past, but his
Illness did not assume a critical phase
until just before the holidays, when he
suffered from an attack of angina pec
torls.
Interment will be made at Arlington
cemetery Monday, after service in A'l
Souls' Unitarian church, at 10:30 in the
morningl.
Gen. Batchelder served with distinction
during the war, and was awarded a
medal of honor for "most distinguished
gallantry In action against Mosby's guer
rillas." He received the brevet ranks
of major, lieutenant colonel and colonel,
U. S. A., and of major, lieutenant colonel,
colonel and brigadier general of volun
teers, the latter brevet being awarded
on March 13, 1865, for "faithful and meri
torious services during the war.". .
In 1890 he was promoted to brigadier
general in the regular army, and entered
Upon his duties as quartermaster general
of the army. He retired in 1596. Gen.
Batchelder saw considerable service in the
quartermaster's department on the Paci
fic Coast, doing duty as chief quarter
master at Portland, Or., and depot
quartermaster at San Francisco.
THE LAW'S DELAYS.
GEN. MOL.INEIX WANTS HIS SOX'S
j";:-.--;-. CASE HURRIED UP. •,;.:
NEW YORK, Jan. The World to
morrow will say: Gen. Edward Molineux
has decided to appeal to the legislature
to ascertain the cause *of the delay In
settling the case of his son, Roland, con
victed of murder in \he s first . degree. He
will ask if necessary tliat a committee
be appointed to conduct an investigation
and that a bill be enacted limiting the
time given to a trial judge within which
he must pass on a case where the con
viction was ; one of murder in the first'
degree.. Molineux Was ,convicted on Feb.
10, 1900. Counsel for j Molineux completed
serving their papers, on ; appeal to the
district attorney on. May 4, of last year.
On July 25, the district. attorney com
pleted his case. The following day the
papers were submitted to Recorder Goff.
Shortly after that the recorder went on
a three months' vacation. He returned
to benth on Nov. 1, but it was not until
Dec. 8 that he took up the Molineux
papers.. : -'■ '' - ; ;f-vi' _'.''-""*,'
Gen.; Molineux said.: „ ; .'^v ■
. "Every man who '- is accused of hav
ing committed crime.' under our laws is
entitled to a. trial. The .trial of my son is
not completed until the court of appeals
has passed .upon his ■ case..: There • seems
to be no fixed time in the law on which
a trial judge must settle a case. It nas
been suggested to Jpe by professional
friends that there is. no limitation -by
law to the time a trial 1 judge can take
to settle a case. If such •• is absolutely
the case 1 will certainly appeal ;to the
legislature or to the judges of the i court
of appeals if there is no -ttm« limit. Tftte
spirit moves me, not .only as a father
of the defendant, bur* as a citizen to
make public to the p^aple of Jjbic. state
of New York, : yes, 'Ur-. the .whole 11.world,'
in what position a criminal or alleged
; criminal is . placed to get his papers be
; fore the court of appeals." .: ..:.
GOT AN INFERNAL MACHINE.
But It Fulled to f Explode When
Opened by Us Recipient.
ST. LOUIS, Mo., Jan. 4.—A special to
the Post-Dispatch from Paris, 111., says:
Thomas J. Coffman, an attorney anl
collecting nr^it, residing at Hums, near
rowly escaped b?ing blown to atoms with
an infernal machine received through the
mail today. The box was of wood, witTi
a sliding lid. It contained a pound stick
of dynamite and several match heads,
which, however, failed; to ignite when
the" box was opened. Two thicknesses of
heavy brown paper covered the box,
which was addressed to. Dr. Sylve3ter
Coffman, the attorney's brother. It Is
thought the jolting of the box in the mail
disarranged the mechanism. An indis
tinct postmark seejned to Indicate that
the box was mailed at Logansport, Ind.
-~ • HI? VFt/LLLY ivilJJ? 15E1? FQ
MARIETTA, 0., Jan. 4-—One of the
most brutal of crimes was committed this
evening at Hackney, Morgan county, by
which Miss Nellie Morris, aged nineteen,
handsome and accomplished;'lost her life.
As Miss Morris was returning home from
the postoffice, by way, of a path through
the fields, she was accqsted by Walter A.
Weinstock, a young man eighteen years
of age, who lived near her home. He
made indecent proposals to her and she
immediately started to run. He grabbed
her and threw her to the ground. She
screamed and fought hard, finally getting
to her feet. Weinsteck drew a razor
from his pocket and cut her across the
neck, severing the neck muscles and lay-
Ing bare the jugular vein. Miss Morris
grabbed the razox with her hands, and
they were cut to pieces in her mad at
tempt to rescue herself from' the man.
CUBA—THE IDEA IS ALL EIGHT, BUT I DON'T LIKE THE
WAY IT IS OFFERED.
■ —Philadelphiaj:imes.
10111 IK
REJNFOIRCEMENTS OF FIVE THOU
SAND TROOPS WANTED AT
THE RAND
DE WET REPORTED ON THE GO
AT LAST ACCOUNTS HIS PURSUERS
WERE JUST BEHIND THE
MONEY
HAVE DESERTED FICKSBURG
British Get Out Before the Advanc
- ing Boers, Who Help Them*
■elves'to Everything:
iV-V^V' -. in SlKht.
LONDON, Jan. s.—Earl Roberts is al
ready immersed in his arduous new du
ties at the war office. He will take no
holiday.
There is no further news from Lord
Kitchener, who, according to a Cape
Town dispatch, is caling for 5,000 men to
guard the Rand mines. Enlisting in Cape
Colony continues active, and 500 men will
leave Cape Town for the north within
the next few days.
Informantion regarding the invasion is
scanty. Col. Williams attacked the east
ern invaders, near Middleburg, but failed
to dislodge them. He has since been
joined by Lieut. Col. Grenfel, and the
Boers have retired.
STILL CHASING DE WET.
Gen. Brabant has arrived at Graaf
Reinet. Advices from Maseru, dated
yesterday, say that three seperate
colums are still pursuing Gen. De Wet,
but with no success beyond taking twen
ty-edg-ht prisoners. Cannon firing is con
tinually heard.
All the English have deserted Ficks
burg, taking their stocks of grain across
the border, and the Boers have looted the
town.
According to the Daily Mail's corres
pondent at The Hague the directorate of
the Netherlands South Africa republic
has applied to the Amsterdam courts for
suspension of payments.
The Daily Chronicle advises that fa
vorable attention should be given to a
movement, reported by its Montreal
correspondent, to induce Sir Wilfred
Laurier, the Dominion premier, provided
the colonial office consents, to proceed to
South Africa as a commissioner empow
ered to intervene with a view to restora
tion of peace.
Lord Roberts, in a communication to
the public, expressing his thanks for the
reception tendered him, eulogizes the sol
diers in South Africa, and appeals for
contributions to the Soldiers' and Sailors'
association, seconding the efforts of the
Prince of Wales to take care of the
families of the men who are fighting.
CAPE TOWN, Jan. 4.-Two hundred
Boers have recrossed the Orange river,
going north.
The Russian commandants, Petrowsk
and Duplooy, were killed In the fighting
at Utrecht, Dec. 25.
A quantity of ammunition has been
captured from sympathizers with the
Boer invaders in the neighborhood of
Paal.
NAMED BY THE CROWN
GOVERNORS APPOINTED FOR BRIT
AIN'S TROUBLED COLONIES.
LONDON, Jan. 4.—The following colo
nial appointments were announced this
evening: Sir Alfred Milner, to be gov
ernor of the Transvaal and British high
commissioner. M
The Hon. Sir Walter Francis Hely-
Hutchinson (governor of Natal and Zulu
land since 1893), to be governor of Cape
Colony.
Lieut. Col. Sir Henry Edward McCal
lum (governor of Newfoundland since
ISPS, and aide-de-camp to the queen since
1900), to be governor of Natal.
Maj. Hamilton John Goold-Adams (resi
dent commissioner of the Bechuanaland
protectorate), to be lieutenant governor
of the Orange River Colony.
Her fingers were cut off and her wrist
badly cut, as well as her entire right
arms and left arm badly disfigured. Her
dress was torn from her in shreds, arid
when people arrived she was almost
naked. She died from the effects of her
wounds shortly after the assault. She
was the daughter of Benjamin Morris,
a business man of this city. Weinstock
was grabbed by a crowd of men who
bound him with ropes hand and foot,
and removed him to a building, where
more than 1,500 men watched over him.
A telephone message was sent to McCon
nellsville for officers to come and get
him. The people of Hackney are greatly
excited and a mob is being organized to
hang Weinstock. Weinstock recently re
turned from the reformatory, where he
served a term for attempting to kill his
father, Jacob Weinstock, a rich farmer
of Morgan county.
PRICE TWO CENTS—{ PTi .
■;_:.---'----'---; BULLETIN OF
IMPORTANT NEWS OF THE DAY
27* or- .Weather Forecast for St. Fault . i
■\■ '■ - ■ -'.'■■ Fair; Colder. "
; I—Talked on Army Bill. -
•' Investigating; Book's Death.
ARuinnido Still Lives, f^if'.
"Doings of "the Boers* . ■
2—Gift (or Got. LUnl. \
- Protest of Dr. Ohage.
; , News of Minneapolis.
| 3—Northwest News"
Year in Black Hill*.
Editorial Page. .-. . •
'„'•■'. ■■•-.,
s—Sporting News.
I Minnesota Senatorial Fight.
6—Negro's Right to Vote. J
For and Against 01 eo-.
... - +■■- < v
7—ln the Local Courts. "" _
Supreme Court Decision*.
Prison Commission Report.
B—NewH of the , Railroads.
Weekly Financial Reviews. ' {
Popular Wants. ....'.
9—Market* of the World. / .
; Chicago May Wheat, 77 l-20.
Bar. Silver, 03 3-Bc.
Stock* Active; Higher.
•"<
Find, Temporary Jail. .. : '
In Local Labor Field. .I', •;': %
TALE IS DENIED.
ST. PAUL'S PRESIDENT SAYS AB
: SORPTION STORY IS UNTRUE.
CHICAGO, Jan. 4.—A. J. Earling, pres
ident of the St. Paul, who arrived homo
in Chicago late tonight, said the report
of any report involving the absorption of
his road was not true. -«
AMENDED IN COMMITTEE.
Legislative Appropriation Bill Is
Reported to the Senate.
• "WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.— The legisla
tive executive and judicial appropriation
bill was reported to the senate today,
making the first regular appropriation
bill to be reported. The only amend
ment of a legislative character adopted
by the committee is one providing that
"temporary clerks who have been in the
service of the government for two years
and who have demonstrated their effi
ciency may in the discretion of the secre
tary of the department in-which they are
employed be appointed to fill vacancies
in the classified service whenever such
vacancies occur."
i The net increase in the total appropria
tion recommended by the committee Is
$218,759, bringing the aggregate up to $24,
--723,307. ;.. ; _ „.-. ■,■ '..
! The principal increase is $91,101, for the
congressional library, and of this amount
$50,000 is for the purchase of books, mak
ing the total for that purpose $100,000.
There is also a provision for keeping the
library open Sundays j from 2 p. m. to 10
p. m., and for -this purpose $10,000 is ap
propriated. _
L1: THE GOEBEL CASES
"Will Be cii' l']t in Frankfort, Ky..
iW*ti «-, -»■•"=' Monday. ■■■"?:J.\*"":*M%q
FRANKFORT, Ky., Jan. ,4,—The Janu
; ary term of the Franklin circuit court,
at which the case of ex-Gov. Taylor, ex
; Secretary of State Flnley;,W. H. CoultOn
and others, charged with complicity in
the murder of William Goebel, will be
. called, will convene Monday. There is
little; probability that any of the cases
will be tried at this term, however, and
. chief interest will,: be as to whether any
additional indictments in connection with
the . assassination are returned. > . ■
' Robert Noakes, Upon whose*" testimony,
.corroborated .. by Culton and Whafton
Golden, mainly, ex-Secretary, of State
Caleb Powers was'convicted. and given a
life sentence," Is supposed -to have left
the country. He is under bond to ap
pear- as a witness next week, and his
bondsmen are. searching for him in var
ious parts of the.United States and Can
ada. Noakes is alleged to have.made a
statement, . when he left Kentucky, ad
mitting perjury ;on ; his part, but his
friends deny this. On the same day the
■ court of appeals will reorganize . with
Judge Orear (Rep.) on . the bench, and a
decision in the Powers case is expected
some time this month. - .. .
BISHOP NINDE'S FUNERAL
Will Be Held In Detroit Monday Aft
ernoon.
DETROIT,* Jan. 4.—Funeral services
over the remains of Bishop W. X. Ninde,
whose death occurred yesterday, wi'.l be
he.3d Monday afternoon in the Central
Methodist church here. The services -will
be the moat impressive find elaborate
ever held in the Methodist church in thi3
state and they will b? in keeping v.ith
the exalted position the deceased held
in the church. Many Methodist church
dignitaries from Michigan ar'd other
states are expected to be present.
AFTER EIGHT YEARS.
Missing Mayor of Moncton, \. 8.,
Tarns Up in Florida.
MONCTON, N. 8., Jan. 4.—After an
absence of more than eight years James
McCready Snow, mayor of this city, who
disappeared in July, 1592, leaving no trace
behind him, has been heard trcm.
Through a letter received from him it
is !earned that he has been living at Key
West, Fla. Besides being mayor of
Moncton, Mr.Snaw was prominent in the
insurance business and soon after he
went away it was found that his affairs
were involved, the Bank of Nova Scotia
holding about $15,000 of his paper. An
effort made to locate him was without
success. It is understood that none of
Snow's relatives knew what became of
him until the receipt of the letter from
Florida.
TO SUPPRESS CONSUMPTION.
Snxoii Physician* Report Cases
Tnl»ctrc n 8.
BERLIN, Jan. The Saxon mini" try
has issued a decree requiring physicians,
.' hospital.. managers and boarding .: house
keepers, as ■well as undertakers, to re
port all v tuberculosis cases. The ile~ree
directs' also the T disinfection of rooms In
■ which persons from tuberculosis die. -..,,
• The German j physicians are preparing a
petition ■ asking the ■ government to per
mit cremation. "■''•_:■" :: ■ . -. ■
J. F. E. FOSS, OF MINNEAPOLIS,
Appointed to the Xaval Academy
"oard of Visitors.
WASHINGTON, Jan. 4.—lt was an
nounced at the navy department today
that the president has appointed the fol
lowing board of visitors to the naval
academy at Annapolis:
Rear Admiral S. B. Luce, retired, New
port; Gen. E. S. Bragg, Wisc-onjin; Mr.
Henry A. Marsh, Worcester, Mass.; Mr.
Park Benjamin, New York; Mr. J. F. R.
Foss, Minneapolis, Minn.; Mr. John P.
Swazey, Canton. Me., and Mr. W. Q.
Shacklord, South Orange, N. J.
OFFICIAL PAPER
OF THE
CITY OF ST. PAUL.
soil Bum
SIXTO LOPEZ EMPHATICALLY DEv
XIES THAT AGUINALDO HAS
BEEN KILLED
DERIDES TALE OF BUENCAMINO
'WHO, HE CLAIMS, HAS BEEN GUIL*
TV OF DOUBLE DEALING
THROUGHOUT
WAR WOULD KEEP EIGHT OK
Anyhow, Regardless of Whether tho
Filipinos Were Led by Agui- '
naido Himself or Some' :"•."■'
One 101»e.
CHICAGO, Jan. 4.—"This is about th*
fortieth time Aguinaldo has been killed,"
laughed Senor Slxto Lopez, the Fillplno f
when he was shown the report today that
the insurgent leader was dead, which
had come through President Wheeler, of
the University of California, and was
based upon the statements of Filipino
students in his charge.
"I think it would be very foolish to at
tach any importance to the prat lie of.
these students,'' continued Mr. Lopez.
"I know the Buencamino family in Ma
nila, and I am certain they are not in a
position to be intrusted with great se
crets by the Filipinos. Before the Amer
icans came Buencamino was very loyal
to the Spanish. Then he became a Fili
pino leader for a short time, and now ha
is an American. • •
"Do you think it is lkely he could get
information of this kind so long before it
came to the ears of Gen. MacArihur?
"All thta I can say definitely about U»
matter is that Aguinaldo was alive when
I received my last advices.
WAR WILL, GO ON.
"But the death of Aguinaldo would
really not make so very much difference
in carrying on the campaign. There aie
other generals in the field who are just
as capable as Aguinaldo, and if he was
killed the war would go right on just
the same.
"Indeed, there is a very strong ele
ment among the aristocracy of the Fili
pinos who would prefer to have a leader
of their own class. Aguinaldo was cot a
member of the aristocracy, hut his serv
ices have beeen so great that no very
strong opposition has been made to him
on that account. If he could be succeed
ed by a member of the aristocracy, how
ever, it would give satisfaction in a great
many quarters."
Mr. Lopez thought the war likely to
continue indefinitely uuless some terms
of settlement could be agreed upon. He
described the organization of the Fili
pinos as very strong, and their deter
mination to win independence as un^
changeable.
"BOYS" BEBELLED.
Bloody Battle Between Beira Police
and African Laborers.
BEIRA, Portuguese East Africa, Jan.
4—On the arrival of the German steamer
Hertzogr at Beira, with 13<! Abysinmans
and. Somals for the fthoilenian Mines, tho
"boys," as they ;;re n.illc.l, wore inform
ed by the fireman that they would be
compelled to work in chains. Therefore
they refused to i;o. Portuguese police
and 1 troops wsre summoned and a bis?
fight ensued, the "boys"' barricading the
loredeck. Victory rested with the police
after ar. hour's lighting.
One Somali w;io kiltoJ and twenty-six
were wounded. Nino of tne police force
v<re wounded.
Subsequently it was found that th«rg
■were only fifty ''boys'' on the steamer,
the remainder having jumped over
board.
POPULATION DECREASING.
Clirlstiiinin. Norway, Ha« Fewer Lit«
ixem Xow Than a Year Ago.
CHRISTIANIA, Jan. 4.—The new yeai
found the total public debt of Norway tc
be 231,000,000 kroner. The population oi
Christiania is decreasing, taking i2J,72t,
against 226,423 on Jan. 1, ISOO. Emigration
is partly responsible for this, 16,725 per
sons emigrating from Norway in 1900.
W. W. Thomas, the United States min
ister, with his family, is staying at Vox
enkollen, a sanitarium near here.
SUSPENDED A NURSE.
Reftuted to Ti-mlfy a( Coroner's In
pnest Into Death of Hilliard.
NEW YORK, Jan. 4.—Charities Com
missioner John W. Dellcr suspended
Richard Donnelly, night nurse In the in
sane pavilion of Bell?\ue hospital, this af
ternoon. Donnelly was employed in the
ingane pavilion at the time Liuis Mil
liard died, supposedly from maltreatment,
and he was subpoenaed to k'ivo testi
mony at the coroner's inquest at which
Day and Marshall were held responsible
for Hilliard's death. Donnelly refused to
give any testimony or answer any ques
tions on the ground that it ivouH tend
to degrade or incriminate him.
"RED LIGHT" TRIAL.
Witnesses Tell of Open Solicitation,
uy Allen Street Women.
NEW YORK, Jan. 4.—The trial of Po
lice Captain Holihy on charge of insult
ing Rev. Mr. Paddock and neglect of duty
in the Red Light precinct when he com
manded it, was continued today.
John Becker was ciuestioned in regard
to the character of the houses at Nos. 38
and 50 Allen street. He hud seen disor
derly women soliciting from windows.
Mrs. Rebecca Goodman told of women
in the Allen street places. She said they
spoke to men.
TO RESTORE HANGING.
Denver Salon* Prefer Legal Execn-
tioiifl to ' Lynching*.
DENVER, Jan. 4.—Among the bills in
troduced in the legislature were one for
ihe restoration cf capital punishment.
This is a result of the recent lynching
in the state. Three men have been sum
marily executed within a year.
Another bill requests congress to c\H
a convention to frame a constitutional
amendment making the election of sena
tors by popular vote.
LONDON & GLOBE FINANCE.
Director* Not Yet Able to Announce
tire Company's Liabilities.
LONDON, Jan. 4.—The directors of the
London and Globe Finance Corporation,
limited, met today and drew'up a circu
lar, to be sent to the shareholders, re
questing proxies, and saying they are un
able to announce the liabilities, "owins
to the innumerable dealings and ramifica
tions on the stock exchange," until the
meeting of Jan. 1. Negotiations are go
ing on to get funds to satisfy the claims
or allow a gradual realization.

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