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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 19, 1901, Image 1

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OFFICIAL PAPER
OF THE
CITY OF ST. PAUL.
VOL. XXIV.-NO. 50.
Minn
DISCUSSED SHIPS, POSTAL appro-
PRIATiOXS AXD THE MILITARY
ACADEMY BILL
SENATOR DANIEL HAS HIS SAY
PROVISION IX THE LATTER BILL
AGAIXST HAZIXG WORSE THAN
HAZING ITSELF
DAYS WORK IN THE HOUSE
Bill Passed Appropriating; $T>,000,
-000 to Aid the St. Lout* Lonisi
inin I'niflinse Centennial - .
Exposition In 1003..
WASHINGTON; Feb. 19.—Only a few
ci nators being in the chamber when the
senate convened today, Mr. T'tttigrew
BUKgvsted the absence of a quorum. For
ty-live senators, a quorum, responded.
In pursuance of previous notice, Mr.
Pettus (Ala.) then addressed the senate
In opposition to the ship subsidy bill.
Referring to former Senator Edmunds.
reputed to be the author of the original
subsidy bill, Mr. Pettus said that the dis
tinguished Vermonter had demonstrated
nis ability to cipher .-.round the truth.
He thought the provisions of the measure
justified him in saying that Mr. Edmunds
"as a senator of the I'nited States, could
never have written this bill." Mr. Pett.is
urged that the bill ought not to be pa-_<s
ed, not only because of the millions it
would draw from the treasury, but also
because of the principles involved. H«
made a constitutional argument against
x' 1 c measure.
Mr. Pett.is l.icened the beneficiaries un
der the subsidy bill to two attorneys who
had won in the courts by question
able methods a noted ease involving a
large amount of cotton. As the f*o were
dividing the $",000 fee, one of them re
marked gravely:
"We are not in danger of going to the
1 r house, but are we not rubbing up
against the w.ills of the penitentiary?"
"The beneficiaries of this bill,"' s.iid Mr.
Pettus, "will never be in clanger of the
poor house." (Laughter.)
POSTAL BILL.
The postal appropriation bill then waa
taken up, on motion of Mr. Woleott,
chairman of the committee on postofficei,
ami post roads. As reported by tj:e sen
ate committee, the bill carried $124,308 088.
Explaining the committee amendment ap
propriating $400,000 for the extontion of
the transportation of mail by the pneu
matic tube By stem, Mr. Woleott said the
provision was practically the same as
that proposed in the last session of con.
grets. except that it provided for the
continuation of contracts for pneumatic
tube service, which, by limitation expires
on July 1 next. Personally, he was op
posed to the provision and lie asked,
therefore, that one of the advocates of
tin provision take charge of it.
Mr. Allison made a point of order
against the provision, that it was st-ncral
legislation on an appropriation bill.
The chair (.Mr. Beveridge) lulJ the Pjint
veil taken.
Mr. Mason made an appeal to Mr. Alli
eoii to withdraw his point of order
against it.
Mr. Allison replied that he had had op
portunity to investigate the subject and
he was satisfied the time was not ripe
for pneumatic tube legislation.
Mr. Mason contended that the point of
order was unjust and unfair. Its immed
iate effect, he said, would be to deprive
Chicago of the same mail facilities as are
enjoyed by the people of New York,
Philadelphia and Boston.
Mr. Chandler. Mr. Mason and Mr.Cullom
advocated the amendment, while Mr. A ii.
pon and Mr. Pettigrew antagonize! it.
Finally by unanimous consent the entire
questio.n, including the point of order,
went ..vtr until tomorrow.
Mr. Butler (N. C.) offered an amend
ment reducing the sum appropriation for
inland transportation of mail, by railroad
routes from $31,700,000 to $32,000,000, and
authorizing the postmaster general to re
adjust the cost of carrying the mails over
railroad routes and reduce it at least 5
per cent below the figures i.aid at present.
rI he- bill was then laid aside for the
day.
The Louisiana purchase exposition bill,
• 1 by the house, was laid befo:f the
s< nate and referred.
DANIEL. ON WEST POINT.
Mr. SeweU (N. J.) called up the confer
ence report on the military academy ap
propriation bill. Mr. Daniel (Va.) in
qulred if the measure, as agreed upon
by the conferees, provided that a cadet
convicted of hazing should be debarred
from holding a commission in the United
States army, navy or marine corps.
Mr. Bewell replied tiiat such a provis
ion )'■■•<] been embodied in the bill as it
passed the senate, and it was in ttio
measure as agreed upon in conference.
Mr. Daniel protested against such ac*
t;.>n by congress, declaring that to enact
"such an extreme and cruel provision"'
would be worse than the offense of haz
• ing itself.
"II is an extreme and gross invasion of
personal rights," said he, "to which I
could never give my assent."
JI *- said It would cause the good sens;*
of the country to revolt and would be a
Btain upon the statute books. He would
not vote for any bill, or for any confer
ence report that meted out so cruel and
life-long a punishment for an offense
thai might be committed in the thought
lessness of youth. He declared his in
tention of insisting that the provision
should be stricken from the report. The
report went over until tomorrow.
At 5:50, on motion of Mr. Wolcott, the
senate went into executive session, and
tit U o'clock adjourned.
IN THE HOUSE.
This was suspension day in the house.
The local committee from St. Louis who
are lure pushing the St. Louis exposi
tion bill were in the gallery in anticipa
tion of action upon the hill in the courss
of the day. A delegation from the \V.
«'. T. U., who are interested in having
thi» bill amended so as to provide for the
closing of the exposition on Sunday and
to prohibit the sale of liquors on the
grounds, also were in the gallery watch
ing the light. Immediately after the
reading of the journal, Mr. Tawney
(Mir.n.), chairman of the special com
mittee on the Louisiana purchase expo
sition, moved the passage, under sus
pension of ilk- rules, of the bill appro
priating $5,0o;>,000 for the exposition.
The biH passed the hou.se under sus
pension of the rules by a vote of 191 to
4i. The opposition was hopelessly in the
minority ami the struggle upon the bill
v.as brief. The question of closing the
exposition on Sunday was not mentioned
during the debate. The bill to define the
word "conspiracy." in the Sherman anti
trust law to avoid the possibility of its
b( Ing held applicable to labor organiza
tions, was defeated by a two-thirds vote
on account of two amendments which
the judiciary committee placed upon the
toiil and which were opposed by the labor
organizations. The sundry civil bill was
under consideration late in ihe day, and
Mr. Cannon, chairman of the appropria-
Contiuoed on Sixth I'age.
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
FEELING IN RUSSIA.
I'RESS DOBS NOT IXDORSE M. DE
WITTE'S STAND.
ST. PKTERSBI'RG, Feb. 18.—The cor
resp' ndent here of the Associated Press
is informed that the Americans of St.
Petersburg regard the attitude, of tho
Russian people and press as extremely
gratifying and as a prognostication of a
speedy settlement of the commercial dif
ferences, or at all events a guarantee
against worse results. The press is en
tirely dispassionate, evidently regard
ing the reprisal as not proportioned to
the injury Russia sustained. There are
some who think M. De Witte struck
overhastily and angrily and believe a
reaction or a modification is possible.
The Americans emphasize the necessity
for patience since the matter must ad
just itself mutually and in a tolerant
manner when he supreme court decides,
no matter how the decision falls.
An article in the Boersen Zeitung is
practically gratifying, as an indication
that commercial circles would welcome
a settlement not disturbing to American
commerce. It says: "German intrigue
is responbile. Secretary Gage could not
have done otherwise."
The Rossiya thinks Secretary Gage is
taking revenge for the closure of the
open port of Vladovistock.
No papers positively approve of repris
als. The St. Petersburg bourse is un
usually depressed and anxious over the
financial situation.
Mr. H. J. Hagerman, second secretary
of the United States embassy, has sent
in his resignation on account of personal
affairs. He is popular and has tilled his
post satisfactorily for nearly three years.
SHOT HER SWEETHEART
LOVELORN KANSAS MAIDEN USES
A REVOLVER.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Feb. 18.—Katli
erine Davis, a comely looking woman,
twenty-two years .of age, went to Dr. J.
F. Doyle's drug store, in East Fifteenth
street, today and shot . Fay Doyle, the
proprietor's son, causing a dangerous
wound. At the police station Miss Davis
said:
"I wanted to kill myself, and I went
there to say that 1 did not care to live,
but the revolver caught in my pocket and
he got the bitljet 1 intended for myself.
1 hope he is not badly hurt."
The relatives of the wounded man pay
that the woman attempted to shoot Doyle
about a week ago, and that they will
prosecute her. They had been keeping
conyiany and quarreled.
Miss Da\is was born in California.
She came to Kansas* City four years ago,
and has worked in a wholesale drug
house here. She says she is a profes
sional nurse. Doyle is twenty-eight
years of age and prominent.
ENVOYS ARE INSISTENT
CHINESE REPLY IS NOT SATISFAC
TORY TO MINISTERS AT PEKIN.
PEKIN, Feb. 18.—The foreign envoys
have had a conference regarding the
Chinese reply concerning the punishment
of the guilty persons named by the pow
ers. The reply was considered unsatis
factory, and the envoys decided to in
sist upon a compliance with their orig
inal demands.
SHANGHAI,, Feb. IS.—The Shanghai
Mercury asserts that "the allies are pie
paring a move that will astonish China
and quickly bring here to terms."
According to the North China Daily
News the Germans are planning an ex
pedition on the Yang Tse Kiang.
BERLIN, Feb. 18.—The war office has
received the following from Count yon
Waldersee:
"Pekin, Feb. IS.— Maj. Gen. yon Kette
ler has dispatched an expedition, under
the command of Col. Hoffmeister, from
Pao Ting Fu to Ino Ma Kwan, eighty
live kilometers northwest of Pao Ting
Fu."
STOLE CHICAGO WATER
SI PEKIXTEXDEXT OF A PACKING
COMPANY IS CONVICTED.
CHICAGO, Feb. 18.—Harry Boore, su
perintendent of the Continental Packing
and Provision company, was found guil
ty today oi" stealing- 187,0Qp gallons of wa
ter from the city mains in tne stock
yards for the use of Cln* packing com
pany with which he is connected. The
value of the water was fixed at $14.£t>,
and Boore therefore will be given a sen
tence for petit larceny, the punishment
for which is a line not to exceed $1,(00,
and imprisonment not to exceed one
year. Boore's trial and conviction was
the fust resulting from a recent ex
amination of the city water mains in the
stock yards district, on which it was dis
covered that the mains had been illicitly
tapped in many places and millions of
gallons of water stolen.
WEYLER AND MS ORDERS
MADRID NEWSPAPERS MAY PRINT
AXYTHIXG BIT SEWS,
MADRID, Feb. 18.—Gen. Weyler as
sembled the newspaper editors today and
informed them that as quiet was main
tained hQ had decided to remove the
censorship. He told them, however, that
they must refrain from writing regard-
I ing the troops, the marriage of the
| Princess of the Asturlas, or the visit of
! the count and Countess Caserta to Mad-
I rid. -VTvi/''
LIE FROM WHOLE CLOTH
SEVEN STUDENTS ARE NOT TO BE
HANGED AT KIEFF.
ST. PETERSBURG, Feb. IS.—There is
no foundation for the report circulate 1
in the United States that seven students
would be publicly hanged in Kieff as a
warning to others not to participate in
political agitation.
The nearest recent approach to a whole
sale execution was when seven gypsies,
convicted of murder, were sentenced to
be hanged at Kiarffov. All of them,
however, were pardoned.
WINTRY IN FRANCE.
SEVERAL DEATHS ARE REPORTED
FRO3I THE SEVERE COLD.
PARTS, Feb. 18.—The weather is less
cold and in this vicinity today, though
several deaths were recorded during the
night, but rigorous cold continues in the
provinces, the rivers in the extreme
south being frozen, while several feet of
snow has fallen in the department of the
Vosges and in the Dauphin. Fifteen de
grees below zero has been recorded at
Grenoble, capital of the department of
Iscre.
Switzerland is also suffering from the
severe weather, and snow covers the
northern part of Italy. A dispatch from
Rome reports an unprecedented snow
fall here today.
Santiago de Chile— Th^ Liberal candi
date at the next presidential election
will be decided upon at a convention to
be held March 3,_at which past and pies
ent congressmen will participate.
TUESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 19, 1901.—TEN PAGES.
NO 1 IS ill
BRITISn FOREIGN OFFICE DENIES
TALE OF HUGE GERHAS EX-
PEDITIOX IN CHINA
WHOLE SUBJECT IS DISCUSSED
LORD CHAMWIJiM: GIVES THE HI -
MANS A BETTER NAME THAN
THEY HAVE HAD
BRITISH INTEREST IN CHINA
Her Only Object, Says the Under
Secretary for Foreign Aftalrs,
Is to Conserve Her Vast
Commercial Interests.
LONDON, Feb. 18.—The under secretary
of state for foreign affairs, replying to
a question in the house of commons to
day, said that so far as the government
was aware, no power was contemplating
an expedition into the interior of China.
If so, the British command would re
quire fresh instructions.
The refusal of Lord Cranborne, the. un
der secretary of state for foreign affairs,
to answer questions concerning which
notice had not previously given, gave
Mr. John Dillon, Irish Nationalist, the
chance to move an adjournment of the
house in order to debate the subject.
Mr. Dillon declared that the under sec
retary for the foreign office had been
muzzled and that his refusal was a
breach of privilege.
Sir William Vernon Harcourt, Liberal;
Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman, the
Liberal leader, and John Redmond and
others supported Mr. Dillon.
Mr. Balfour, in defending the course of
Lord Cranborne, said It had been initiat
ed by the government after careful con
sideration.
The practice of cross-examining the
under foreign secretary was dangerous
and would preclude the carrying on of
delicate negotiations and might endanger
the interests of nations, and, possibly,'
the peace of Europe. No other nafon
would have allowed the» latitude in for
eign affairs permitted in this country. A
foreign ambassador had congratulated
the late under secretary, Mr. Broderick,
on his refusal to reply to questions not
placed upon paper.
The house then divided as follows:
For adjournment, 204; against, 249.
BRITAIN IN CHINA.
Lord Cranborne, when the debate on
the address in reply to the king's speech
from the throne, at the opening of par
liament, was resumed, said commercial
interest was Great Britain's principal in
terest in China. There had been delay in
the settlement of affairs in China, but
such delay must be expected in dealing
with the Chinese. As to the question of
indemnity, Lord Cranborne said the Brit
ish minister at Pekin, Sir Ernest Satow,
had been Instructed to gather together
the claims that were to be made.
Referring to the railroad dispute, Lord
Cranborne said Russia had assured the
government that the occupation of the
Pekin-Shan Hal Kuan railroad was only
temporary and that the railroad and ma
terials would be restored at the end of
occupation.
Russia's assurance respecting the rail
roads were most categorical. The occu
pation was purely temporary. Lord
Cranborne added: "I am bound to say
that in all our dealings with the Rus
sian government in this matter we have
been received in the most friendly way.
We have no complaint whatever to
make against the government of the
czar. One cannot help wishing that the
undoubtedly benevolent intentions of the
Russian government are not carried out
more rapidly by their officers in distant
provinces. I do not doubt their inten
tions in this matter towards this coun
try."
DEALINGS WITH RUSSIA.
Continuing, Lord Cranborne said Rus
sia had assured the government that any
agreement between Russia and China
respecting the occupation of Manchuria
was in the nature of a modus Vivendi to
prevent disturbances along the frontiers
and railroads. It was purely temporary,
iind although a guarantee was expected
MlJl|PE!£ Af4p siJicipE
EWp OF LOVESTO^Y.
ATLANTA, Ga., Feb. 18.—The dead
bodies of Mrs. H. M. Wilson, a young
widow, and Wm, Hamilton, a student in
pharmacy, who disappeared from .rvtlan
ta one week ago today, were found last
night one mile from the end of the
Chattahoochee car line. The surround
ings indicated that Hamilton had killed
Mrs. Wilson, set fire to the woods near
her body and then ended his own life.
Mrs. Wilson was lying beside a fallen
sapling. There was a bullet hole through
her right hand and another in the right
temple. The left foot was burned en
tirely off, the flames had destroyed her
hair and her left hand was burned, save
--:■•---•••'-•■•■'--:•-•■•••■•••■• ■ -•■ " -•■:•■■: •' ■■■:-..-■■ -■:> ■ .-- _ "-; . - ; ;.: . ■ . . -.
WHEN TEDDY CAME TO TOWN.
by Russia that these disturbances would
not break out again, that guarantee
would not take the form of territorial
acquisition or a virtual protectorate. Jn
New Chwang?, although nominally under
Russian military law, the private rights
of the foreign communities did not ap
pear to have been interfered with. The
policy of his majesty's government was
neither aggressive nor ostentatious. ••-.
Sir William Vernon Harcourt asked:
"Is it true that an expedition into the
interior of China has been ordered by
Count yon Waldersee? If so, how ..does
the order affect our troops? At the end
of such an operation we might find our
selves in ij-nother guerrilla war among a
population far greater than the' Boers."
Lord Cranborne replied that so far as
the government was aware no power was
contemplating an expedition into the in
terior of China.
Lord Cranborne -also observed that the
sovernment did not consider suicide a
proper alternative for the death, penalty
(in the case of the Chinese implicated in
the Boxer outrages)..
FOUR FIREMEN KILLED.*!
BRAVE MEN WE'RIE 111 l(il<:i) UNDER
FALLING WALL.
NEW HAVEN, Conn., Feb. 19.—Four
men were killed and one fatally Injured in
a fire which destroyed an unoccupied fac
tory on Winchester avenue this morning
The Dead—
CAPT. JOSEPH CONDREN
FIREMAN EDWARD HALE
FIREMAN WILLIAM RILEY
FIREMAN FRANK WILLIAMS
Injured—
Henry Powell, fearfully burned
a he hre was discovered at 1:30 and as
the building is situated over a mile from
the center of the city, had gained con
siderable headway before the department
reached the scene. Before the men had
been at work live minut. s. the front wall
iell, burying a number of them in the
ruins.
Willing hands set about the reso.ue
and succeeded in reaching Powell who
was mar the edge of the wreck.' The
four dead men were next found -
The fire itself, while totally destroying
the building in which it originated "was
prevented from spreading to the ad
jacent structures. The loss has not been
determined.
CLOSE CALL FOR LIFE.?
&
J*LA\T OP THE MXLWAI KEE HER-
OX,D DIRYEB OUT.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Feb. 18—Fire
tonight damaged the Milwaukee Herold
newspaper plant to the extent of about
560.000, fully covered by insurance.
The blaze started in the basement
where a quantity of paper was stored
In an instant the flames shot up the
c-lcvator shaft to the fourth or top floor
and before the fire department got down
to -work the top of the building was a
mass of ruins. The third and fourth
floors and basement were gutted and
everything on the other floors was badly
damaged by water.
Many of the Herold employes got cnt
oJ the building barely in time to avoid suf
focation. The greater part of the loss
tails upon the linotype machines in the
composing room and the presses in the
basement.
The Sentinel building, adjoining the
Herald, sustained a loss of about ■31 000
on the third and fourth floors chiefly
trom water. .The lire was under con
trol at 1 a. m. The binned portion of the
Herald building will ft* rebuilt at once
DEWET ON THE RUN.
BRITISH FORCES KEEP BOER COM-
MANDER HARD PRESSED.
J.OISDON, Feb. 18.—A^ correspondent of
the Daily Mail, who is with the British
column pursuing Gen. Dewet, says:
"Gen. Dewet has failed to reach his
objective point, having been headed off in
turn from Strydensburg and Hopetown
respectively thirty-eight and fifty-five
miles from the scene of Friday's fight.
"Last night a meeting of burghers was
held in Gen. Dewefs camp to protest
against the indiscriminate flogging of
men, and half the force threatened to
surrender. Eventually the malcontents
decided to fight independently."
The Pretoria correspondent of the
Daily Mail hints that Lord Kitchener is
planning a campaign in the Northern
Transvaal, especially in the neighbor
hood of Pietersburg and in the other dis
tricts not heretofore Visited by British
troops.
for one finger, which bore a wedding
ring. By the side of Hamilton was
found a revolver and an empty cigarette
box. There was a hole in Hamilton's
left temple and a few inches from his
left hand lay a small mirror, evidently
used to direct the bullet.
Hamilton came to Atlanta from Mo
bile. His tuition and expenses at col
lege here have been paid by Mrs. H. M.
Goodam, o& that city, acording to a
recent letter from her to Mrs. "Wilson.
It is known that Hamilton has been
devoted to Mrs. Wilson for some time,
but her parents assert that she gave
film no encouragement.
n it i n
SOME DETAILS OF THE HUGE
MERGER ENGINEERED BY
J. P. MORGAN
THE FIGURES ARE ENORMOUS
CAPITALIZATION OF THE NEW
TRUST PLACED AT A TOTAL OF
$1,100,000,000
FRICK IS TO BE CHAIRMAN
And According to the Latest Slate
Sir. Siim ali Will Be the ** '
President of the New
Company.
NEW YORK, Feb. 18.-The Mail and
Express says:
It was reported In Wall street today
that the final papers in the new steei
consolidation would be signed at a meet
ing at the Metropolitan club this even
ing at which J. Pierpont Morgan would
be present. The capital will consist of
$400,000,000 7 per cent preferred stock, and
$400,000,000 common stock, besides which
$300,000,000 5 per cent first mortgage bonds
will be issued. All the present stock and
bonds of the constituent companies are
to be canceled if the plans now in pros
pect are carried through. This depends
upon the stockholders of the constituent
companies. If they should oppose the
consolidation the plans first broached
for a company of relatively, small capi
tal to absorb the Carnegie company will
be carried out. Bondholders of the Car
negie company are to receive bonds of
the new company, bond for bond, as Mr.
Carnegie himself is to receive bonds in
exchange for $i>3,000,000 stock at 150, giv
ing him $124,500,000, and leaving about
$15,000,0(10 of bonds to be used for organi
zation and bankers' commissions. Mr.
Carnegie will have no stock in the new
company, but will hold $207,500,000 worth
of bonds. Those minority stockholders,
who have not been paid cash, are to
receive $150 for their holdings in the
preferred stock of the company and a
bonus of an equal amount of common
stock. This would take $150,500,000 pre
ferred stock and an equal amount of
common stock of the new company, leav
ing $289,500,000 preferred and $291,500,000
common to be divided among the other
companies. It is 4.he apportionment of
this division that" has taken so much
time.
WHAT'S IN A NAME.
It is still a question whether the new
company can be called the United Steel
company, because a concern of that
name has just been incorporated under
that name in Maine 'oy Boston parties.
The earnings of the "constituent com
panies last year amounted to $98,000,000.
The interest on the new issue of bonds
will be $15,000,000, other charges will
increase this to JiS,COO,OOO. Add this to
the $40,000,000 due per annum on the pre
ferred stock and there remains ]5 par
cent possible to be paid as dividends on
the common stock, if last year's earnings
should be maintained.
The following paragraph in the .charter
of the new corporation has never been
used before in the charter of any similar
corporation and is arousing the interest
Of lawyers:
"The title of any property or business
may be acquired or remain in the na'Tie
of any individual or any other company
or manager for this company, or the
company may take over and carry on the
business of any other company,'without
thereby acquiring shares of stock or any
security controlled T>y mortgage or oth
erwise and exercise all the powers of
holders of shares of stock thereof man
age its affairs, elect its officers and hold
its control and as well receive and dis
tribute as profits the dividends or inter
est, as the ease may be on such stock
or security, or distribute them as divi
dends on the stock of this company "
FRICK FOR CHAIRMAN.
PTTTSBURG. Feb. 18.-It was Inti
mated that Mr. Frick has been offered
the chairmanship of the big concern ana
will work in harmony with President
Schwab, should he accept.
This office, it is said, has been offered
to him, and if he accepts, he will be
almost identically in the same position
he was before his resignation was hand
ed to Mr. Carnegie. Former Secretary
Iyovejoy's interests are being cared for
by Mr. Frick and botli have been re
quested to accept places in the giant
corporation. J. Pierpont Morgan has
held several conferences with Mr. Frick
and it is said that he has informed Mr.
Frick that his assistance is necessary in
operating the combine. Mr. Lovejoy will
probably go to New York between now
and Wednesday if the announcement is
not made, but as to there being any
dissension among the minority stock
holders, this i 3 denied. All are anxious
tG know where they are going to land
and v.'ill look after their interests until
the matter is finally settled upon. A
financial man stated today that he had
advices from New York to the effect that
J. Pierpont Morgan had postponed his
vacation for several weeks. This is
taken to mean that there have appeared
obstructions that are regarded as prob
able. The same advices indicated that
one or two of the companies proposed
to be included, may be finally omitted
because of the fact that the'"directors
proffered. They may be included later.

FATAL WRECK.
Derailed Freight Oar Thrown in
Front of Pa*senj?eT Loeomotiv?.
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., Feb. 18—The
south-bound express train on the Phila
delphia, Wilmington & Baltimore rail
road, which left here at 12:20 thi3 morn
ing, was wrecked a short distance below
Northeast, Md., at 1:45 this morning by
crashing into a derailed freight car.
Engineer Edward W. Meade, aged forty
three years, of Wilmington, was instant
ly killed, and Fireman George W. Myera,
of Ridgley Park, Pa., had both feet
crushed and sustained a fracture of the
leg. None of the passengers were in
jured.
The baggage car, mall car and three
passenger coaches were thrown from the
track, and traffic was impeded for sev
eral hours.
As the express train was passing the
freight, the latter being on the north
bound train, an axle of one of the fr<iglu
cars broke throwing the car in front of
the passenger train, causing the acci
dent.
WHOLE FAMILY JAILED.
Ailhert Prince Locked Vw in Connec-
tion With Kennedy Murder.
KANSAS CITY, Feb. IS.—Albert Prince,
the mandolin player, surrendered today
to the county marshal and was looked up
with his father and bvothrw, all of whom
are being held for complicity with Mrs.
Lulu Prince-Kennedy in the murder of
Philip H Kennedy. Later the three male
mombeis of the family were arraigned,
waived the formal reading of tbe infor
mation against them, pleader! not guilty
a.nd asked for f*n early preliminary hear
ing. This was set for Saturday next,
when attorneys lor the prisoners will ask
that they be released on baiL
PRICE TWO CEXTS-f^^-^v "V
ZSW^iA BULLETIN OP
IMPORTANT .NEWS OF THE DA"2
."Weather Forecast for St. Pauli
Pair; Continued Cold. ...._L
D«y's Work in CoKpros*, .."V
No Raid In Planned.
Steel Deal Closed. '
Butternmkcirs Arriving. *^»
£—Tributes to Davis* Memory.
War on Fred SchlffnLann. "
Sirs. Nation in .Jail.
B—Sporting; New*.
Awes Roasts Van Sanf.
Gossip of Ball Players. '
Hamilton Jury Out.
■4—Editorial Page. ,
The Golden Idol.
6—Business Announcement.
;'/.-- : ., v . ;j/,.-, v . •_- > . . ■;■-■
6—Northwest Legislature*. .
Minnesota After Railroads. , <
In the Two Dakota*. „..Ctl
Orders to Gen. CbalTee. \':'
- News of the Northwest.
Seirtbes in Gun i'i^lit.
Olvll Rale In Philippine*. "
B—News of Railroads.
Popular "Wants.
t>—Markets of the World.
Chicago »la.y' Wheat, 75 I-Sc.
Bar Sliver, Oil I-Bc. ,
Stock* "Weaker. '
lO—NeWs of the Courts.
State Growing Richer.
WEATHER FOa TODAY.
Minnesota and North Dakota—Fair and
continued cold Tuesday. Wednesday
fair; northwesterly winds.
Wisconsin—Fair Tuesday, with colder
m eastern portion. Wednesday fair;
brisk northwesterly winds.
South Dakota—Fair Tuesday anil Wed
nesday; colder in western portion Tues
day; northerly winds, becoming variable.
Montana—Fair Tuesday; warmer In
western and central portions. Wednesday
fair; southwesterly winds.
St. Paul — Yesterday's observations,
taken by the United States weather bu
reau, St. Paul, P. F. Lyons, observer, for
the twenty-four hours ended at 7 o'clock
last night.—Barometer corrected for tem
perature and elevation. Highest temper
ature, 20; lowest temperature, 10; average
temperature, 15; daily range, 10; barome
ter, 30.03; humidity, 12; precipitation, 0- 7
p. m., temperature, 1-1; 7 p. m., weather
cli-ar; wind northwest.
Yesterday's temperatures—
•., - , *BpmHigli| *SpmHigh
wattleford . 0 0» hioago . . vs 32
.Bismarck .. 4 12fCineinnati .."38 42
Calgary .... —2 ....80 31
Wnluth 14 2! Gnlveston ....66 72
Edmonton .— t 2'Jacksonvilla .B4 72
•Havre .. (J inlMarquette ...20 26
Heler.:i 18 22 Montgomery .G2 62
,'luron 14 20Montreal 24 28
Med. Hat.... 4 4| Nashville 46 52
Minnedosa . 2 6!New Orleans.72 SO
Pr. Albert.. 2 4 New York ...36 40
Qu'Appelle .—8 —6 Philadelphia .:',s 42
S. Current.. —6 2 Pittsburg 3G 38
Williston ... 2 6'l-'risco 50 50
Winnipeg- .. 4 18 3t. Louis 40 42
Buffalo 30 30 Salt Laks ...34 38
Cheyenne ....22 265. Ste. Mane.24 28
■ *AVashington time (7 p. m. St. Paul).
—Below zero.
OCEAN LINERS.
New York—Arrived: Servia, Liverpool;
Furnessia, Glasgow. Sailed: Menomi
nne. London.
Dover—Passed: Kambyses, Antwerp
for San Francisco.
Nice—Arrived: Auevste Victoria, New
York, via ports oh Orient cruise.
London—Arrived: Numidian, Portland.
Glasgow— Arrived: Anchoria, New»
York.
AROUND THE HOTELS.
At the Ryan—George Sampson, Fargo,
N. D.; W. G. Haskell, Cedar Rapid!--;
Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Ball, Farso, N. D.;
James Robinson, Grand Forks; S. H.
Bates, Minlffcapolis: M. D. Smith, Mason
City; J. C. Ragsdale, Milwaukee; J. H.
Low, La Crossc; Mr. and Mrs. F. C. Mur
ray, Marshall; 11. J. Reborst, Monticfcllo,
Io.; A. J. Sfohc-e. Elwood, To.; W D.
Tower, Cedar Rapids; \V. E. Bell. Spring
ville; D. A. Palmer, Monticello; M. A.
Hatch, Central City; Charles H. Little,
Codar Rapids.
At the Clarendon—J. D. Johnson, Spring
Grove; T. O'Donnoll, West Superior; C.
H. Foley, Franklin; M. C. Brice,
William Henry, West Superior, Wis.;
J. M. Bowler. BlrdTsland; Geor?eL"nn
aid Porter, Fort Atkinson, Wis.; John
Cornell, Pine Island; James A. Harris,
Owatonna; Mrs. P. M. Tully and daugo
ter. Duluth; George P.ueklin, Nort.nfleld;
T. B. Secor, Blue Earth; H. G. Schulz,
"\\ aterville; Bertholdi Schmidt, Corne
lius C. Wiens, Peter C. Wiens, Windoni;
William Eberlin, Blue Earth; Hugh Mc-
Gregor. George Fisher, Willmar: A. W.
Fuhrmann, Winona; John Kjomme,
Spring Grove.
At the Windsor—E. H. Lower, Duluth;
W. J. Kimball. Josephine Kimba.ll, Wen
Superior; H. T. Swart. Duluth; S. D.
Wilson, Maoikato; R. B. Watrous, Mil
waukee; H. A. Harvig. Mankato: Nathan
Kingsley, Austin; F. H. Buelow, Sleepy
Eye; F. B. Doe, Ashland, S. J. Mendell,
Luverne; C. W. Mead, Redwood FalH;
J. P. Johnson, Duluth; Mr. and Mrs. W.
J. Noyes, Owatonna; B. M. Lamb, P.
J. Ryan, Frank Lilly, Lilly, 10.
At the Merchants—V. E. Parker, Pine
Island; J. F. Cummings, Cedar Sipids;
S. J. Warner, Elk Creek: G. \V. Tc-nx
pie, Blue Earth; J. G. Herbert,'Mt. Lake.
Minn.; E. M. Swift. Crookston; C, C.
Eastman, Wadena: C A. Reane. James
town; W. E. Nichols, Dubuque; E. E.
Herman, Devils Lake; Wm. Christian
son, Montevideo; G. A. Erieson, Will
mar; Daniel Hyland, Rainy River; A. C.
Stevens, Rochester; W. A. Smith, Nor
way, la.; E. D. Ballard, Rojhester; Mr.
and Mrs. R. Bird, Mason City; John S.
Anderson, O. Y. Anfc?rson, George Ben
son, Minneota; K» C. Gaplemi, Osage,
Io.; C. P. Ambrose, Cedar Fall-s, io.; VV.
H. Schuler, T:einbeck, Io.; J. H. Grom
mon, Manchester, Io.; Robert Anderson,
Valley City, N. D.;' George F. McClin
tock, Washburn, Wis.; VVm. Hay ward,
Spirit Lake, Io.; John L. Green, Pipe
stone; C. F. Mosk, Lake Beaton; George
Christenson, Tyler; B. H. Albrecht. Mor
gan; Mr. and Mrs. H. Rhodes, Eather
viile, Io.; P. J. Murphy, Bratnerd; C. J.
Stark, Ortonville; Thomas Simpson,
Winona.
INDUSTRIAL COMMISSION
Sits in Xciv York to [uvr^tiiraie An-
tliraclte Coal Roads.
NBW YORK, Feb. 18.—The sub-commit
tee on transportation of the Industrial
commission met he"re today. The fol
lowing were present: Ex-Congressman
Thcrnas W. Phillips, of Pennsylvania;
Charles J. Harris, of North Carolina;
John L. Kennedy, of New Jersey; Eugene
Conger, editor of the Grand Rapids Her
ald. Mr. Phillips presided. The other
members are Senator Mallory, of Florida
and Oongrt-s&inan W. Dorimer.
The purpose of the sessions to be held
In this city is to make inquiry into tho
present combinations between railroad*
entering- the anthracite coal region of
Pennsylvania. The first witness today
was James E. Childs, general rftnager
of the New York, Ontario & Western ruil
road.
Questions v/ere put to Mr. Childs to
show that the railroads own and operate
coal mines, and in other cases buy the
coal they carry to tide water Instead of
acting simply as carriers.
Mr. ChiMs said that along his lined
about 20 per cent .>f the coal shippers
| were independent operators.
-QEEIgfAL PAPER
■ —OF THE ::;
omr or &r. PAUL.
11 IN 111
NATIONAL BITTERMAKERS' CON
VENTION FORMALLY CON
-OJ7O. VENES TODAY ,-. ■"
DETAILS OF THE BIG PARADE
GOV. VAN SAXT AXD MANY DIS-.
TINGIISHED CITIZENS WILL
TAKE PART
JUDGING OF BUTTEB IS OVEB
Rennets Will Not Be Announced Un«
til Thursdny EvenlnK-lln
chlnery; Ha.ll I* Ready
for Visitors.
Delegates to the National Buttermak
ers' convention, which formally com
mences today, kept pouring In all day
yesterday, and although none of the
special excursions have yet arrive:!, ther«
are no fewer than 1,500 in the city now,
Today as many more will arrive, and
the gathering bids fair to eclipse all pre
vious records in the matter of attend
ance.
In machinery hall everything is in read
iness, although many of the * xhibitora
were compelled to work until a late hour
last night before they were through.
Nothing of a formal nature tra!:s,iricl
yesterday. The delegates came into the
city, registered at their hotels, and the.i
spent the remainder of the day in get
ting acquainted with one another and in
taking in the sights of the city.
This morning the reception committee
will be around early to meet the biff
! t % f
GEORGE E. HASKKLL,
President National Creamery liuttermak
ers' Association.
special from the East, which is sched
uled to arrive at 8:30. This train is com
posed of thirteen Pullman sleepers, and
has on board the delegations from New
York, Philadelphia, Boston and Chicago.
Shortly after noon another train will ar
rive over the Great Western,- bringing
delegates from Kansas, Missouri arid
lowa. They will also be met at the depot
and escorted to the Ryan. The South
Dakota contingent reached the city last
night on different evening trains.
The morning will be spent In social in
tercourse, and in the afternoon at 2
o'clock the monster parade begins. This
Will be the principal event of the day,
and no pains have been spared to make
it a success. The citizens' reception < om
mittee held a special- meeting yesterday
afternoon at which the final arrange
ments were completed.
The parade will be headed by v pla
toon of mounted police ami the Minne
sota State band. The chief marshal, ac
companied by his aids and the prominent
citizens of the state, including G >v. Van
Sant,. Lieut. Goy. Lyndon Smith, ex-
Gov. Ramsey. Mayor Smith and the pres
idents of the Commercial club, Jobbers!
union, Chamber of Commerce and North
western Manufacturers' association, will
make up the second division. The third
f
E. SUDENDORF,
Secretary National BuLtermakers' Con
vention.
division will be headed by the chief mar
shal of the Buttermskftrs' assoi iation,
followed by the various state organiza
tions.
The different states have been request
ed to form as follows: Illinois' associa
tion, on Market, south of Fifth; Minne
sota delegation, on Market, north <f
Fifth; lowa, on Washington, south of
Fifth, and Wisconsin, north of Fifth;
New England and Pennsylvania, on
Franklin, south of Fifth; Kansas, Ne
braska and North Dakota on Franklin,
north of Fifth.
judTSKs finish their work.
The judges yesterday completed their
arduous task, and all of the S3i tuba
have been scored. The secretary, how-i
ever, has to go over and arrange the fig
ures, and this will take a day or more.
The announcement of the prize winners
will be made Thursday evening, at which
time the medals, cups and banner will
be presented to the successful exhibitors;
It is hinted that the tub winning ths
first premium was awarded Vt points out
of a possible 100. The two next were sep
arated by only half a point, ami the third
prize therefore goes to a tub with %.
There are several" tubs that were entered
only to be scored, and not for competi
tion purposes. One of these is under
stood to have scored a phenomenally
high mark.
Supt. Brown spent all day yesterday
in machinery hall supervising the plac-
ing of exhibits. He also saw to it that
Continued on Second I'hbi 1.

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