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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 28, 1901, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1901-02-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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MORE MONEY IN
OIL
THAN IN GOLD.
THK GREAT OIL FIELDS OF
CALIFORNIA CONTINUE TO
VI ELD PHBNOM EN A L DIVI
DEXDS TO THOSE FORTUNATE
STOCKHOLDERS WHO WERE
• FAR-SEEING ENOUGH TO IN
VEST WHEN STOCKS WERE
LOW.
Another opportunity, however, la
offered in the
GLOVER LEAF
GIL COMPANY
which has a large holding of land in
the Antioch Oil District, Contra Costa
county, within 10 miles of San Fran
cisco.
This company is now drilling tli^lr
i first well, and offer a limited amount
of stock ;*t $1.50 per snare. JP.ir value
being $!0. this is equal to 13 cmb
' for SI shares.
' MIXING FOR OIL IS A SURE
THING AS COMPARED WITH THE
FEW SUCCESSFUL GOLD MINES,
: AND IF YOU WOULD BE ONE OK
THE LUCKY ONES INVEST NOW
IN THE CLOVER LEAF OIL- COM
rPANY BEFORE PRICE OF STOCK
SHOOTS UPWARD.
Gold has made many millionaires in
California, yot oil is destin< <i to make
still more. Many oil stocks that first
sola at $1.00 per share have since sold
at t'^. some at $95. some at $200, and
in one case at $1,500.
■ ■ Profits or oil beat any gold ' propo
sition. . Note the following: On gold
production of $78,000,000 diWi«>n<t:;
were i>mhl of $13,000,000; on copper pro
duction of $100,000,000 between $25,000,
--000. and $30,000,000 wwe paid in divi
dends, while ON OIL PRODUCTION
OF $75,000,000 DIVIDENDS WERE
PAID OF NEARLY $60,000,000.
THE. BOSTON FINANCIAL REC
ORD SAYS: "HUNDREDS OF PEO
PLE HAYS MADE MORE MONEY
THE PAST YEAR IN CALIFORNIA
OIL FIELDS THAN THEY EVER
DREAMED THEY WOULD BE
WORTH. AND YOU MAY BE IN
THE SAME HAPPY CONDITION
WITHIN A YEAR FROM NOW IF
YOU INVEST TN THE CLOVER
LEAF OIL COMPANY..,
There are only a limited number
of shares for sale at $1.50 per share,
and right is reserved to advance prici
without further notice.
Application for stock and remit
tances should be made to
#?. W. CLARK, Agent,
Hudson, Wis.
Reference: First National Bank,
Hudson.
CITY NEWS.
Warmer weather Is predicted for the
rest of the week. . "■ •
John Meyer has been sent to. the wock- '
house fifteen days for loitering.
John A. Logan regiment, U. V. -U,
will muster in a -class tomorrow evening,
''sheriff Justus has ' appointed G. A. •La
Dow, of the Ninth ward, a deputy,' vice
Moriarty, resigned.
A false alarm called the department
to Sixth and Sibtey streets, at 2:85 ©-'clock
yesterday afternoon. ■ •....■'
The Royal Arch lodge has rented
Pfeifer's hall in conjunction "wllh the 10-:
cal eyrie of Eagles. ■■■"';"- ■'■■ -> •>• ' ■
The Crusaders' Dramatic club will give
a..ipins.trel]jshow" tonight at its, nail,';
Bixtli.and. Fort streets. v -„,! ..-.,-■■'r»- ;
The board of water commissioners, at
a meeting this afternoon, will open bids
ror $S.eo^wortn v'"of'*suptiiie^'' -& / ~y
r-/Cltitbn'- Mifiw'n. ■ 71 Eleventh street,-is
connnecl t<> ffp home with;a7 svrious, at- ■
tack of grip. : His cohd.fcl.iou'" was worse
last evening-. '■ '_ V?' "''"'':'
The county treasurer's office will be
kept-open this evening to 9. o'clock to ac
commodate those who desire to pay their
personal taxes.
ferey Young, arrested for vagrancy, a .
v ■■•o;-. ago, was yesterday ordered to leave :
the city. Young likes St. Paul and will.
make fin attempt to stay. .: .. . T-.■•
Miss Julia Donovan, the contralto solo-"
Ist of the Cathedral, has gone, to .Chica
go. Her place In the choir will be filled'
by .Mrs.,.Vina Avery Smith.
Patrick McDonough, arrested on com
plaint of his wife and charged with dis
orderly, conduct, signed bonds to keep
the peace in police court, yesterday.
The Maccabee Temple association will
meet this 1 evening in the hall. 377 Robert
street. Permanent organization will be
YERXA
A lettuce treat for our customers. A
large lot of fancy head lettuce ship
ped direct from Louisiana gardens. It's
most perfect lettuce and worth sc. Our
jii-U-<\ per head, only 2c and 3c.
6 pTiunds Evaporated Peaches for 2"o"
8 pounds French Cured Prunes for .. 25c
Best Rrend, per loaf 2c
Email Riverside Navels, per dozen l?c
Larger Riverside Navels, per dozen.. 16c
Good Sized Riverside Navels, per doz. 18c
Medium Sized Riverside Navels, per
dozen 20c
Large Sized Riverside Navels, per
dozen 22c
Very Large Sized Riverside Navels,
per dozen 25c
Kxtra Large Sized Riverside Navels,
per dozen 30c
The Largest Grown Riverside Navels,
per dozen 40c
Fancy Riverside Navels, per box $2.-t0
2 larg«s packages W-ashiug Powder for 5c
25-11) boxes fancy Peaches, per 1b.... 7^c
Good Sugar Corn, per can Sc
Fine quality Sugar Corn, per can Cc
Flour, the very best, per sack $2.00
Flour, the very best, per \i sack $1.00
Flour, th« very best, *4 sack cOc
2-lb cans Green Gage plums 9c
Rioh Brick Cheese, per lb 10c
Good Limburgr&r, per lb 0c
Starch, Laundry Gloss, per lb 4c
Rye Bread, loaf 5c
Pure Fruit Jellies, p«r glass 10c
Lea & Perrins' Sauce, pints, each CSc
Argand Lamp Chimneys, each 3c
Cotton Mops, each, only 7c
Boiled Cider, the beat, per quart 10c
2-lb wood boxes fancy Table Salt,
worth 15c; for 6c
Fancy Washington Apples, per bushal
box $1.25
Good Swiss Cheese, per lb 10c
Pure Crabapple Jam, 4 lbs for 2oc
New California Prunes, per lb 2O
Very beat Bread, per loaf 2c
Strawberries and Raspberries, Pre
served, 1-lb cans 8c
MEAT mAHKET.
Round Steak, per lb 10c
Shoulder Steaks, per lb Pc
Sirloin Steaks, per lb n^c
Good Coined Beef, per 1b 4c
Hamburg Steaks, per 1b 10c
We sell the butter that was awarded the
first prize at Paris Exposition.
YERXA BROS, & 8$
SEVENTH AKD CEDAB STS:
"effected, officers elected and a board of
directors chosen.-' ■
Pupils :of thje^Madis.gn^j^oJ^ill give
entertainments at the assembly room of
the . high sohnoL - Kxiday,» ailcmoon - and -
evening. "Old Glory, or the ; Boys of
.'76,". will be presented.- •-■* •* ' . v
About 700 incandescent gasoline lamps
will shortly be located by the board of
public works, in accordance with the pro
vision of the city council. Each of the
new lights will snpptant two" old-style
lamps. ■'.■•*. ■_; -
A petition is being circulated among th«
members of the--©«mnhircial club to have
the future home committee of the club
arrange to set aside part of the club
room, in the new home, for two shuffle
boards. ""!". ""7
'■ The directors of* the recreation depart
ment of the Y. M. C. A. have readjusted
the plans for that department. /The prin
cipal feature of the readjustment was the
increase In the. bathing facilities, from
three to six shower baths. *■•.
J. 11. Howland, a member of the com
pany performing at the"" Metropolitan '
theater, fell on the sidewalk at 319 Jack
son street, yesterday afternoon. He was
removed to his rooms- Metropolitan
in a carriage here it was found that he
had sustained no serious injuries.
The State Historical society has added
two portraits to its collection of early
settlers of this state. One portrait of
life size is of Thompson Simpson, of Wi
nona, who came to th!s state in 1555. The
other is of Daniel .Bassett, ojie of the
ounders of Minneapolis.
John Match, arrested for obstructing
James street, near Pleasant avenue, by
constructing a water course which car
ried the water across the sidewalk, was
discharged by Judge Hine, the latter
maintaining that there was no element
of criminality to the offense.
Michael Oillen, an old offender, wa9
charged with being -drunk. He toltl
Judge Hine that he had received a ticket
to .Montana an the-previous day and was
so elated that he took occasion to cele
brate. His trip will be delayed ten days
by an enforced sojourn at the workhouse.
PBEMIDMS FOR FARMERS i
STATE FAIR COMMITTEE DECIDES
OX IMPORT AXT INNOVATIONS.
Several Important changes were decided
upon at a meeting of the state fair com
mittee on revision" of "premiums held at
the Merchants" yesterday. The depart
ments dealt with were those of agricul
ture, horticulture; dairy, - poultry,l honey
and women's. All the changes were for
the purpose' of stlmnlating»interest in the
competitions, and' provoking keener ri
valry. ■i-:r .r.(.-Tr ■;•..-. .... ..
In the agriculture department the pro
rata premiums were increased from $1,200
to $1,500, and in addition six <*ash prizes
were added to be given to the six coun
ties making the highest"'s'cofe's. The
prizes will be: $200, $150, $100, $75, $:0, $25.
These are over and above the pro rata
awards and the-, couaty winning the first
added premium will therefore take down
a comfortable' %uftf^rf castr: * *•."■.*<
Another innovation, was the establish
ment of cash prizes for the buttormakera
of the county. ;scoringr«£\je* highest aver
age. There 1' will be the usual $000 to be
distributed pro.»rata among -exhibits
securing a- high, enough score,, but the
buttermakers of the county carrying off
the highest average wUI have 150 divided
among them. '.*• . ■ ,
' The committee will meet again in. a few
day's when" the" revision • the premiums
In the live St6oK" de-p&TthWtftr "Wttt^be be
gun. •::-... :i'^
. _^^k- .
ft n rw
MMf\ SBMBRICH .REACHES ST.
,; PAUL IX A STATE OF SEU- .
,'• ROTIC FRiOSTRATIOX
. ■-. ;^.^.j-^v ;x .£v* /r a .;; :-t;;:.-..': :
* Continue* from Tint Pa««. <{"r
fire broke out In a "heater" close to" her
state room, .and this" greatly excited her. :
In the end she 'arrived: in St. Paul 'at
1 o'clock in the mttrnMi*; ■ tWree hours : |
later than she had' expected, 'and after- j
passing a sleepless' night/felt Wholly un- j
able to sing in the evening. Th is is the i
whole story. All ' .talk 'of the slimnesa
of the box office receipts' Wing - respon
sible for the.cancellation^ of the date is
false." ; ' ,"..;•. s^"-,, "'_,. J".'.**^ ;-v' \ "'. ',"'
NO OTHER DATE POSSIBLE. 'i
Questioned as to the possibility of an
other date in this "city. Mr. Graff said
it was impossible,; on- the present tour.
"Mdme Sembrich.-has >sung.. thirty-five
times since the beginning of the tour,
In December" 'he* said,"»?and»this is a re
markable • record for a prima donna. Be
fore the tour Is Over'she will have sung:
over sixty times. ■As she appears only
three times a week I have been com
pelled to dates 'accordingly,
and once an engagement is cancelled it
is impossible to. retutn." Sembrich sings
in" Minneapolis on Saturday, ■ and there
fore you see that she cannot ping here
and get the requisite rest before her next |
appearance."
Asked whether Ire had intimated to the
officials of the railroad on which the ac
cident had occurred; that he would de
mand damages, Mr. Graff replied that
though this was a private matter ho
would say that he had taken no- steps in
this direction.
SIDE OF THE RAILROAD. I
At the offices of the Omaha yesterday
It was learned that a slight accident had
befallen the train on which the diva
was ridir.sr, a few-.miles.east..of Kirov,
Tuesday afternoon. The train had just
started from a station, when- the driving,
rod became disconnected, and. a delay
had ensued. Carelessness in placing a
Baker heater, in its place without ' first
ad.l '..sting the zinc sheet by which the
wood work is protected, had i resulted in '
the wood being slightly scorched, but
there was no fire on the train sufficient
to cause the slightest alarm. The of
ficials did not know that an accident had
taken place until .a. . communication had
been received from Mr. Graff, announc
ing that the St.- .Paul date had been
cancelled in consequence of one, and
that" he would expect damages. Inquiry
it the eastern end of, the road failed to
elicit any information of an "accident,"
and the incident is regarded as one of
those unavoidable occurrences which
sometimes, delay a train.
: SMITH IS RETICENT.
Rev. Dr. "Samuel G. Smith, at whose
church the .concert was to 'have' been
given, flatly declined, to discuss the mat
ter when seen at his residence , last
night, further than to say that the ad
vance sale of.seats was good. Asked as
to the amount of sale.-* he "declared it
was an impertinent^ question and refused
to give any information on that point.
■Ho was reminded of the fact. that In
some quarters it was rumored that the
sale of seats had not been large enough
and for this reason Mine; Sembrich had
refused to sing. ...o. -...-: ■ •
"That is not so," _ said the pastor.
"The sale of "seats was good, but that
has nothing to do with the matter. The
natural supposition is that Mmc Sem
brich was too til to sing.. I have nothing
more to say. . If you want more informa
tion you had best see I'Manager Graff.
Ii he chooses to talk, well and good, but
I. am not the proper "person to give you
information;-besides it is ■■ against my
principles." "'.;
Itrrti'Mtroiii Appointed luupcrtor.
O. O. Bergßlrora, of Pennock, Kandi
yolil county, has been appointed inspeccor
of steam vessels a.nd steam boilers for the
Seventh district.
Bears the a™ 9 Kjnd You Have Always Bought
Signature fjr , S/ Vrt T^^
"On the road to Omaha." There Is
much lo admire along the M. & St. I*
THE ST. PAUI, GLOBE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 1901.
K1 ft! 111
RETIRrXG; BUILDING INSPECTOR
- DISMISSES EVERY MEMBER. -
OF HIS STAFF
EMPLOYES GET SEVEEE SHOCK
Office Turned Over to the City Eu
grineer Without Any String*
Attached — Hurried Con
ferences Held.
Building Inspector Haas Is all that ia
Row left of the building department. He
dismissed every member of his staff yes
terday. Today will close his own con
nection with the office. It is, therefore,
up to the city engineer to reorganize this
branch of the city service today or as
scon as he feels disposed to do so.
It had been the intention of Mr. Haas
to allow the office force to remain un
disturbed, putting it up to the city en
gineer to make such- changes as he de
sired at such future time as he deemed
sdvisable. But after deliberation Mr.
Haas thought it would be more consid
erate to turn the office over to the city
engineer without any strings attached to
it. Those dismissed were:
Henry Smith, clerk.
ME. THOMAS ft. SEABROOKE,
— -!=■■--■.*■ . "-*•»•• ft « ■ ■
Who Appears In "The Rounders," at rtt.% Metjopolftan^Sunday jfji|^t.
John Heinline, inspector. .. , ■■■
H. E. Warner, inspector.
John Fitzgibbons, plumbing, inspector, i
- James Silk.
Al Kittson, biUbQard. inspector.
H\ EJ. I-laas, stenographer. . ,•
Mr. Haas also formally notified Comp->
troller McCardy, Mayor- Smith and Cits 1
Engineer Claussen of his dismissal of thi
office force.
The action of Mr. Haas came as,a,
shock to some of his staff. Henry Smith
at once made a rush for Corporation At-,',
tcrney Griggs and the two went into ex
ecutive session. Mr. Smith has said that
Griggs had the city engineer's assurance
that Smith would be retained, but that
! was on the supposition that the office
force was to be gradually changed by Mr.
Claussen. Whether Griggs' pull Is strong
enough to secure Smith's "reappointment
was something the latteT began to worry
about as soon, as he had been formally'
dismissed."
H. E. Warner is the father of As
semblyman Warner. He is likely to be
reappointed.
There are others in the number, who,
leaving out of the question of political
pull, are entitled, It is said, to be given,
their old positions again on their merits
and length of service.
The department will now be run '
under the direction of the city engineer,
who has designated F. -W. Stoeg as tha
man to have immediate supervision of
the work. He is at present a street com
missioner and if he keeps up those dut
ies will have little time for office work,
in which case it would seem that some
man familiar with the plans of building
would have to be appointed fur inside
work. Such a man would probably be
asked to do what little bookkeeping there
is to do, in which case Mr. Smith may be
left in the cold. He Is a Jeweler, can
.keep books all right,*but unfortunately
is not skilled in the construction of build
ings. Still Frank Griggs says he is all
right and Griggs is the Dar Reese of
the city hall.
JUSTiCE kZJfi
Is portrayed as a woman, \y/7{ II
yet her sex might complain 111 ((I jj\
that they get scant benefit k 1 Uhjwg
of her 'powers. There is i^^L/^
little justice, it would seem, BT / VT^J
in the suffering that many I; ' ]U 1/
women undergo month, after WIL ; $*% -
Justice acts upon the I I I J\\Jj
legal maxim that iguor- ifMijKssSgi
ance of the law cannot be |J2g|s|pS
pleaded . in mitigation of ijg|s|E|K
punishment. It is ignorance j^^^a^r
which causes so much |pHg|i?«?i
womanly suffering. Ignor- I' ''wfs<
ance of the requirements of •= I! 1 Ha §
womanly health; ignorance 11 1 m /J
on the part of those who i 1/ 7/ m
attempt to cure and fail, 11/ /r (I
and ignorance of the fact > § J!J I
that' Dr. Pierces Favorite 2 1111 I
Prescription cures womanly 'I j
diseases. It establishes |p |© fi
regularity, dries weakening P||^i|ff (ti |
drains, heals inflammation" s^M ''h 'i
and ulceration and cures KiS^^am
female weakness. HO^Hf|jJH
"When I first wrote to Doctor |(jmfwisijv
Pierce I concerning ' my \ health," " ■
says Mrs. Moilie E. Carpenter, of
Linaria, Cumberland Co., Term., "I was so weak
I could only -write- a few words until I would
have to rest; was so weak I could hardly
walk. Words cannot express my suffering's :
dimness -of sight, palpitation, shortness of
breath, black spots or else shining lights before ;
my eyes, terrible headache, numbness in my
arms and hands , and tongue, also -my jaws
would get numb; constipation, falling of the
uterus, disagreeable drains, soreness through
. my bowels ; in fact I was diseased from head to
foot. > Now I can do my owa washing and cook
ing.' I can take a ten quart pail in one hand
■ and a six quart pail in the other (full of water),
and carry both one-fourth of a mile and never
stop to rest. lam as heavy as I was at 19 years
(125 pounds). I used thirty bottles of 'Favorite
: Prescription ' and 'Golden Medical Discovery'
. and twenty-five vials of ' Pleasant Pellets.' "
Dr. Pierces Common Sense Medical
Adviser, paper covers, is sent free on
receipt or 21 one-cent stamps to pay
expense of mailing only. v ~ Address Dr.
R. V. Pierce, Bu2alb»N.Y.
■ • :. . " ' ■
11l KB WII
. EX-G OVERNOR, FORMS A PARTNER
: SHIP WITH JUDGE 11ILAXU,
i : . : OF MINNEAPOLIS "
;■£■ .aJLZH *rr..* ■
I' ■■■•■■ .'■■ . • ' •■ ■ * ■ ■'
QUESTION OF WHICH city.
gi-L ' i
After Considering Opportunities
f oiThat Presetited. f*Them»elve« *Lb.'>^
J, Each, He Dciided to Go
. • Up the''River. ■ 'i
" " iutttn'- ••'.'.-■.
Former Gov. John liind has entered
into a law partnership with Judge A. Uh
land of Minneapolis, and the offices of
the firm will be located in the New York
Life building in -that city. " They will
commence - business "with the beginning
of the coming memtti,: but Mr. Lind will I
not jj remove his Camily ' to • Minneapolis ■
for ■ some weeks -or - until about May 1. -
For several weeks - Mr. Lihd, who at
present is making his home in St. Paul,
has been looking over the two cities and
had received advantageous ! offers to 10- ;
cate in both.' It will be : a surprise to
many that Minneapolis has been selected
■by him. lj-' - ■ J ■■'-' '■"-'. -■' ■
Judge E. IThland is one of the ablest
attorneys in Minneapolis and his acquisl-
}tiorv in the person of the former governor
twill place the firm in the front rank.
Mr. Lind will receive a cordial we.come
from the legal fraternity in the Mill
City. ■ - ' - ■■
LOSS IS FIVE THOUSAND
»FIXE IX LODGIStf HOISK CRJEATKS
MUCH EXCITEMENT.
Fire in a three-story lodging house, oc-:
cupied by John Lowe,- 1 at 197 East Ninth i
street, caused considerable consterna
tion among the forty-seven boarders who
lived at the housed and entailed a loss of
$5,000, at 9:10 o'clock last night.
i. The fire was discovered on the third
?°°«:>J*s9- 4?i WPPQscd to have . been
'caused by an overheated stove.. The
£*me,SkSCread rapidly, and the 'occupants*
did not have time to carry r out.-their be
iangrtigs;.'"Mt: E/o^e.' has been confined to
his bed for. several weeks by,; a . dan
gerous' attack of brain fever. He was.
pbliged to dress as hurriedly "as possible.
Very little of the .contents was ■ saved..
The loss on ; clotumgf,, and furniture la
estimated at $3,000. , On. the furniture
there is $1,500 insurance,, ....'.'. ".
Loss on ,the building 'which. Is the old
Perkins residence, is now owned by
the St. Paul Trust, company, is estimated
at $2,000, covered" by' insurance..
;''' _: i
SCHOOL BOARD MUST PAY.
"Water Used by Schools Cannot Be
Charged ;tS City.
Corporation, ,Atj#rney : Markham has
submitted" to the bjiai^of >water commis
si.v.ura, an opinion,-a-i to the liability of
the ?-oard of scho«g, inspectors for. water
furnished the- public ssfthools. The school
board maintained .jtb.at bills should be.
paid by the city o«t-of the general fund,
but. the attorney .holds that under the j
charter all bills. v for maintenance of
schools must be paid out of the school
fund. . - . '„ „: ...
As for the back bills due, he states,
that it is now out of the power of the
school board to pay' them, and thai the
water board must wait until provision
can be made in the next annual budget
for the raising of . the sum needed by
taxation. .. - ... --.-.-.
«k»
ESTIMATES FOB, PUBLIC WORKS.
City Engineer Submitsi Figures for
Street 7 Paving. '
City Engineer Claussen has submitted
the folio wing estimates -to the board of
public works:• ,', , ■.'. ■.
For paving Eighth street, from Broad
way to Kittson street, and I Third street,
from the bridge to Broadway. The cost
of the Eighth street; work is estimate!
as follows: Brick, $17,718.16, or $6.26 per
foot; sandstone or, granite, $21,847.0, or
17.72 ,per foot, and asphalt,. $22,280.65 or
$7.86 per foot. . .":-,.'. .. "
For paving Third street, sandstone or
granite are the only suitable . materials,
and the cost is estimated at $12,030. Should
the railway companies' accede to the as
sessments against their property, the
cost will be $4.92 per foot. . •_.■-. I",
IS SAFE FOR ROBELNS.
He Will Get Di s» i «—Warner for
Pi ' ,'■ v
- : .President Dix, oi r vie assembly, • has
called a special mqetiiiK of that body for
2 o'clock this afternoon, for the pur-'
pose of accepting, Ms .^resignation, ; elect
ing a successor to: himself, and also a
president .of the .-assembly. Yesterday
five of the members of the assembly met
in the office of Assemblyman F. G. War
;ner, and decided &i elect R. L. Robbins
to' succeed Mr. T>ik Those present also.
decided to vote forl Assembly man Warner
' for president. - " bLiovr . ■ •:: .:-■■■_ ■ ■
„,,.■ „ .:- - i ■■'- .•• -.: ■
. Two Coot.l jStoien.
: Attaches :of the' Merchants' hotel are
trying .to figure ;>out" how : two coats,"
valued at $30, disappearedr from the ho- -
: tel office. yesterday s.f«jrnoon. •• There are
always two clerks,in. the office and most
of. the time three, yet the coats which
hung •in ; the office are j gone and there is ■
no trace of the offender. ' ■ - ■ ■. .
t -■ '. .'■ ~~t —~— __j—i _. —: — '■ —;. ■•; :•-;-: ••
v TO CtHK A. COLO IX OXB DAY „:
Take Laxative Eromo Quinine 1 Tablets.
Ail .drußgistsi. refund trie money if It falls -■
to euie E. W. Grove's signature on each
box. 26a -,
El IN 11HBERS
DECISION AUTHORIZING WORK ON
■ R.ICE, FROM OOMO TO FRONT,
'-. '.'. ' . IS DEFECTIVE}
CURBING WAS OVERLOOKED
Assistant Corporation Attorney- Dls
: covers the Mistake and Board
of Works Hold* Executive
■: • Session' Immediately.'. •
';' As the result of an opinion given to
City Engineer Claussen yesterday after
noon by the assistant corporation attor
ney, the board of public works will un
doubtedly have to amend the final order
for paving Rice . street, from Como to
Front streets, which passed both branch
es of the council last week, and the fun
of passing it will have to be gone all
i over again. ;
The final orders for the paving of Rica
street only provides that the curbing on
Rice street should be repaired with gran
ite where it was necessary, and when
the matter was investigated. It waa
found that Rice street, from Como to
Front streets, is only partly curbed, and
that part has been curbed with old lime
stone.
It is understood that this somewhat
puzzled the board of public works, and
they accordingly asked the corporation
as to whether they could legally let the
contract for paving and curbing this sec
tion. In his opinion, the assistant cor
poration attorney states that the final
orders for the paving of Rice street,
from College to University avenue, and
from University to Corao, are all right,
but that the final order for paving Rice
street, from Como to Front streets, is
fatally defective, on account of the pro
visions as to curbing, and will have to
be amended and passed by both bodies
of the council.
As soon as the opinion of the attorney
became known to the board of public
works a cdftsultation was Immediately
held. All the members of the board,
with the exception of Mr. Pottgieser,
were present, and City Engineer Claus
sen was immediately sent for. An execu
tive session of the board was held, at
which the attorney explained the situa
tion, and the matter was discussed be
hind closed doors until nearly 6 o'clock.
A peculiar feature of this secret session
was the fact that Mr. Robbins, superin
tendent for the Barber Asphalt com
pany, was present during the entire dis
cussion of this matter.
Had the board of public works gone
ahead without consulting the corpora
tion attorney and advertised for and
awarded the bids for this paving, it is
likely that more trouble would have
arisen. From the wording of the opinion
it looks very much as if the contract for
the paving of Rice street, from Como to
Front, had it been let. would have
been void, owing to the so-called defect
in the wording of the final order.
BELL'S HOPES BLASTED
JUDGE- JAGG van <..... ADM.IMSTISHS
DEATH- BLOW TO QUO. WAR
■ v RASTO PROCEEDINGS.
Judge Jaggard yesterday afternoon filed
with the clerk* of the district court his
'findings and memorandum In the quo
warranto proceedings -brought by M. J.
Bell to oust Michael J. Morlarty from
his seat In the«board" of ■ aldermen. -■ >■
i The findings, which practically dispose
of the j defective' charter theory, are ac
companied : by ■' ■ a length memorandum; ■
in which Judge Jaggard "holds: that Bell, ■■
by his prompt delivery to Moriarty of the
office now desired", r relinquished all claim
to It. He assisted in Mr. Mori;»-ty's in
auguration,' gave "him his desk and the
"keys to the'same,; and went before'the
[body to plead that he ,be allowed to have
it. . Bell, Judge -Jaggard- says; until the
present time, has not contested the seat
held Jby his successor, or. even made an
effort to prevent, the payment "of salary
accruing from the office.
: While not exactly an argument." Judge
Jaggard says it is not proper • that the ■
court should " set aside the legally express
i ed will of the people. The new charter did
i not repeal the old charter to the extent
; claimed. The re-enacted portions of the
Charter have never ceased to be laws.
When the new.charter was framed It was
hot the intention to antagonize the old.
There was no desire to cause friction that
would conflict with past established- cus
toms. The police department. 1 says the
court, was the only department of the
city that suffered radical changes.
CONLEY IS A CANDIDATE.
Will Take City and Connty Assessor-
sliip If Ottered to Him.
Patrick ConJey, formerly alderman of
the Third ward, and for some years past
a prominent Democratic politician, has
announced that he is a candidate for the
position of city and county assessor.
So far, Mr. Coiiley says, he lias had no
conferences with Mayor Smith or any
of th£ other officials with whom the ap
pointment lies, but he is willing to take
the- place if it is offered to him.
THE GRIP CURE THAT UOFJS CXRE
Laxative Bromo-Quinine removes tha
cause.
Free to the
Ruptured
Dr. W. S. Rice, the Well Known Authority,
Sends a Trial of His Famous Method
Free o AH.
Dr. W. S. Rice, 569 W. Main street.
Adams, N. V., will semi free to anyone
who is ruptured or knows of any person
ruptured, whether a man, woman or
child, a frae trial of his famous home
.
MR. Y. W. YOUREX.
cure. It is a marvelous method, curing
cases that defied hospitals, doctors,
trusses, electricity and all else. Merely
send your name and address and the free
trial will be sent without any cost to you
whatever. R. W. Yourex, a well known
commercial traveler, was ruptured ten
years, tried every truss on the market,
partly made up his mind to undergo the
clanger of an operation, when by the
greatest of good luck he tried the Dr.
Rice method. He is now cured.
Mr. Yourex says: "I tried Dr. Rice' 3
method and it cured me. I did not lose
a day on the road. Hundreds of mer
chants and friends in Illinois, Wisconsin,
Minnesota and lowa know the wonderful
fact that this remarkable method cured
me, and I certainly feel thankful enough
•to tell other ruptured people how they
may profit by my experience." Mr. You
rex lives in Cedar Rapids, 10., at 322 Vi
First avenue.
Every ruptured person ought to send at
once arid make a trial of W- method
that cures without pain, dai
t4on or an .hour's loss of time. Bugin
now, and in a short time you will never
know you had been ruptured. Write to
day sure. ;
field, Scblick $ £o«
A\m :^ « Heavy price reductions on a lot
tl VC*i%£* dCSi^ii fl of hlhe3t Erade Pure wool dress goods.•
. A** V Jr .oW"r Th« west Vigoureaux. Surahs, Twills
C A«« tj' A* : nd Silk and Wool Fancies at about
' tp6j[&§€&Cl.OO ' half ths heretofore Prices. All are im
— ..' '»* Ja „ \\ , "•.'■' ''' ' ' ported goods made by makers of high
est reputation and sold at 1.50 and 1.75—0n sale today at
W:M W''« 89c a yard. -
The least desirable piece in the lot would be a bargain at 1.00. Some of the fancies
were carried over from last season, but they're as stylish as you'll find this season. It's '
the best dress goods bargain we have offered this year.
r— —: — !r = — «-. 4 „ ■ ■
.*— :- If • ' * 1• ' i Seventy-five common sensa
WfrllClTl©' walking skirts—strictly tailor-made
yfoiikmg aim t5 and absolutely corre * in styls an 4
■.■■.•■ ■. v;-..-'-- . ',:i- ■..:-■-r . : ~ hang. Materials are bs;>t quality
plaid-back golfing cloths—The quality that is retailed all ovar Amsrica at 2.50 and 2.75'
per yard. The skirts are positive 10.75 values, but as an introductory lsader W3 price
them
I /■;;lVVr';r:X^ 6.7s each. . : ./:;.;.
Colors includs" light and medium grays, oxfords, bluss, browns and tans. If alterations
are necessary a small charge will be made to cover cost of labor.
Fall and winter jackets—Forty-five of them, being the odds and ends of
lines sold the past season at prlcss double, treble and more than we now offer "*% en
them at —choice for... ,; '.. 3
AGAINST CBILTON BILL
MEAT PACKER^ AND SHIPPERS IN
ARMS AGAINST IT.
Senator Ohilton's meat inspection bilL
has brought down upon itself the con
demnation of South St. Paul packers and
shippers, and also local butchers. The
St. Paul Union Stock Yards company has
drafted a petition to the legislature
which has been circulated over the state
for signatures, and will soon be present
ed, urging the defeat of the bill.
In the reasons set forth to establish
the pernicious effects of the bill, the pe
titioners relate that It would levy a total
charge for inspection fees' in this city of
$145,000 annually. r It states that the two
classes maltreated in this" way would be
the farmers, who .raise the live stock,
and the butcher and manufacturer who
buy and sell the : meat. It is claimed by
the petitioners ajso.that the bill, instead
of being a Step in tlie interest of state
health regulation would be the means of
creating offices for office seekers, some
of which would pay as much as $15,01)0 an
nually. It is a further menace in that
it Imposes a ruinous tax iipon farmers
and butchers, 0
. M. D. Flow.e'r, president of the St.
Paul Un4on Ji S^ock...y,ai^l3 company, sr.ya
that if. the legislators persist in the at
tempt to. : fpster r -su^h laws...it will bank
rupt the tradesmen to,.oppose them and
result fin-ally in driving them out of the
industry which tljey ,a^e endeavoring to
build up in this locality. As. a. matter
of fact,, Gg9. .ftaj-S: the United
States inspection- laws are binding upon
the. manu£actur,eraand'other dealers, and
this inspection, which Is free of cost, is
the standard, whereas if the state inspec
tion, which th.c bdJ.l contemplates, were
maintained, cattle and other live stook
inspected und«;r it alone could not be ex
ported. The federal law would have to
be resorted to before any exportation
could be .carried, on, find this would, of
course, render the state Inspection ab
solutely useless.
■ In discussing the Chiltori bill, which is
openly held to be an attempt to create
fat . fee ; ' positions,,, attention . ' .has. been 7,
called to the apparent trend of senti
ment in the •legislature' adverse '.'■ to ,tha
present>; existence of such ■ positions and
the perceptible influence at work to abol
ish soniip "9f, lI l,heseL.pfric€s. > ■_; .^J . • '
~ : ;- - "^^^r , „.,. : ji
.„-. jr Rival IJ.rve. Houses . Clash. '„
!~-A temporary- restraining order his been*
made by- 1 Judge ;lrdehr"e!»! in the case of
Taft 'Bros. Medicine ; company against
John W. i: Owens, doing: business as th«;
Northwest Drug company. A , drug
known 1 as '-"Asthnialihe-'T^ls the bone of
contention; it being claimed that- Owens
is putting- -up' and selling a drug similar
In name and sty The damages claim
ed up to date are '■■ $3,000. -• ■< ,-^ ;
IIII!111
ARMY .APPROPRIATION BILL, pass-
ED WITH i: rtttl.ltPPTYE AND
cußAie+AangNrarßixTis.
Continuedj from«ii*ltr«t- Page.
eel containing the antl-hazing legislation.
The naval appropriation bill was sent
back to cQnfer.enqetatter;the; defeat of- a
motion to concur in the senate's provision
for three more submarine torperdo boats.
The Louisiana purchase exposition bill,
which has been" in"a precarious prelimin
ary state, wa»> finally sent to conference
for an adjustment of differences. The
revenue cutter bill received a reverse, the
house adjourning., when.: an effort was
made to take .it up. ' '
Early session begins in the house to
morrow.
WAR REVENUE' BlLl,.
The Republican conferees on the rev
enue reduction - bill have reported an
agreement on many of the items in con
troversy, in addition to thp.se on beer,
tobacco, bank check and medicines here
tofore given. The house provision re
pealing the tax on insurance policies, life
and fire, are retained. The senate pro
vision regarding conveyances of r«aj es
tate, etc.. is preferred over that of the
house, which made a complete repeal of
all taxes on conveyances. The senate
provision exempt? conveyances under ?2,
--500 and imposes a tax of 23 cents for each
$500 over 52,500. The numerous special
taxes on theaters, circuses and exhibi
tions are taken off as provided by th«!
house. Beside the compromise of U. 60
cents on tobacco, the cigarettes come in
for much discussion. But owing to some
question as to the rights of the con
ferees over this item, the rate on cigars
probably will remain at $3 per thousand.
The understanding thus far reached is
looked upon as likely to be final, al
though the conferees themselves say
that no formal agreement has yet been
arrived at, and it will not be until the
Democratic conferees are called in that
a final agreement can be made. In the
meantime the Republican members are
continuing their meetings on the various
Items still open, with this respect, that
the complete adjustment Is not far off.
The $3 rate on cigars is that fixed by
the house, and is a repeal of the entire
6C cents added for war purposes. The
senate proposition was to take oft* half
of the 50 cents, making the rate $3.30.
A new proposition has been agreed
upon as to steamship tickets, the tax be
ing fixed at 50 cents on each $50, and 25
cents on each additional 150. There will
be no tax on tickets under'|so.
VETERANS WON'T MARCH.
Veteran organizations of the Civil and
Spanish wars have officially declined to
participate in the Inaugural parade ou
March 4. The decision affects organiza
tions in the G. A. 8., the Union Vet
erans' union and the Spanish war vet
erans. The dissatisfaction of the vet
erans with the place assigned them in
the parade is responsible for today's ac
tion. It was their wish to act as the
personal escort to the president. Grand
Marshal Francis V. Greene assigned
them, however, to a position in the line
ahead of the civic organizations and fol
lowing 1 the national guard.
Gen. Daniel Sickles today notified Gen.
Greene that the veterans had declined to
participate in the parade, and tendered
his resignation aa marshal of the vet
eran division.
Minneapolis News,
HARDWARE MEN MEET.
.Matter of Interest to the Trade Giv
. . en. Consideration... „ „,,.,'^.
The annual convention of the Minne
sota Retail Hardware association- opened
yesterday in Century hall, with about 200
members present. The meeting will last
three days, closing Friday afternoon,
when the delegates will visit the local
jobbing houses and points of Interest In
the city. ; ; • ~-
At 11 o'clock yesterday morning a meet
ing of the executive committee was "held,
and the. private affairs of the organiza
tion were considered. President James
E. O'Brien delivered the opening address,
reviewing the work accomplished during
the past year, also pointing out- a bright *
future for the association. ■ 1; :'r
The insurance branch in connection with
the association, known as the Retail-
Hardware- Dealers' - Mutual Fire -■ Insur- •
ance company, is growing rapidly and
is receiving hearty support by the dealers.*
There is a desire to: extend its operations
to other states in the Northwest,' aha;
raise the maximum policy limit above
$3,000. ■ _ ' * " ;'.■;'■;*!
The association is composed of 324 mem
bers, all prominent hardware dealers' In
the state. Thursday evening the visiting
members . will." gather at the Kicollet.
hotel In a body, where a banquet will be
held and a number of speeches made, „.'.
iiIXXERS' STRIKE* IMMINKXT.
blaster Abmim-Iu lion ' Insists That
i:nf»n)lii*t Leave Building; Trade*. *,
Trouble is imminent between the local
Tinners" union. and; : the Master : Tinners',
association. At the last meeting of,the^,-
Tinners" union a communication was re-...
ceived, ;■ from ; the . employers . containing
the • working j agreement ■ •formulated by :
the association _for. the year com/tencr- •
Ing May.. 1. This agreement < demands,
among other thing's, that- toe- : -Tinners' '
! union , sever it»i , jtonri.ectiop. with, the
huildinj? ..trafk-s coiiu.eH .before the-com- ri -
mencement of the v: orking year. . ; .. .»■:.
The-tinuers themselves-are. divided on
the ((.ut'Stion. Their contract as formu
la ted for the coming year, provides for
an Increase; of .wages from ; 25 to 30 per
hour and the shortening of the workday
from nine to -eight hours. .The. employ-. ■,;
ers have offered to accede to these terms,..
if the union-will separate from the. coun- ..
cil, . but .they.refuse, absolutely to con- . ■
sider any agreement until their demand.
in regard to the separation has been
complied with.-' .' : ." ',"
..■ > . -. ■-•■ * - - ■ .-■ - ..-.-. v .:• •i«.-r.-
Painters ;Want More Waj(«*. "•-•?"■
A committee of seven from the Paint
era' ■ union ' conferred yesterday afternoon ■'
with a similar committee from the Mas'- 1
tr-r Painters' association at the office of
Harry Cramer at 213 Sixth street. 'The
meeting lasted, the greater part of the
afternoon, but no agreement was effect-,
cd. The painters several weeks ago an-;.■
nounced that they wanted' 35 cents per ■
hour during the coming year and tho .
employers refused to pay more than X
cents, the wage paid last year. • It-' is -*
thought that the. painters' committee'
submitted their final. proposition yester- :
day afternoon arid that the price asked
pel hour Is somewhat lower than the
original demand of 35 cents.
--■ Confidential.
Loans to salaried people. Only security.",
your name. 317 Pioneer Press building. ' '".
Soldier* Going to Rnffalii. '
There has been considerable activity,
among the militia of Minneapolis since '
Company t$ decided to attend the '■ Pan-
American exposition at Buffalo. If pres
ent plans carry the whole Minneapolis
battalion will go. The exposition board
of directors has announced'a series of
competitive drills and shooting contests, ■
some of which the Minneapolis compa
nies hope to win. .. ■ -• -..^yl-
CroKSinan >ot flurried.
Charles F. Grossman, the manufactur
ing druggist, whom It was feared hal
lost his 11 Cc in the Windom block fire
Tuosday night, tamed up alive yester
day morning. Mr. Crossman had a hard
time of it, however, and only managed
to make his way out of the building af
ter a hard battle with smoke.
You
Look Old
It's impossible for you not
to, with the color of seventy
years in your hair! Perhaps
you are seventy, and you like
your gray hair. And perhaps
not!
Dark hair for youth and
vigor; gray hair for old age
and decline.
If you will use Ayer's Hair
Vigor, in less than a month
there won't be a gray hair in
your head.
It keeps the scalp free from
dandruff, stops falling of the
hair, and makes it grow thick
and long.
One dollar a bottle.
If your druggist cannot supply you, send
us $i.oo and we will express n bottle to you, ■
all charges prepaid. Be sure and give us
your nearest expresa office.
J. C. Ayer Co., Lowell, Mass.
Send for our handsome book on The Hair.

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