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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, March 21, 1901, Image 1

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OFFiCtAL PAPER
— or the —
GiTY OF ST. PAUL.
VOL. XXIV.-ISO. 80.
111 l
PRESIDENT M'KINLEY LISTENED
TO ORDERS YESTERDAY FROM
RINGMASTER* HANNA
ORDINARY PEOPLE SHUT OUT
SECRETARIES ROOT AND GAGE
WERE IXABLE TO OBTAIN
AN AUDIENCE
OHIO SLATE IS COMPLETED
And Stamped With Mark Hanna'*
Official Seal—Prediction of Two
Coming Changes In the
' . Cabinet.
WASHINGTON. March 20.-The presi
dent was fairly besieged with callers to
•iay. Senator Burrows and McMillan, of
Michigan, called to file a caveat on the
vacancy in the civil service commission
created* by the death of Mr. Brewer.
They have not yet selected a candidate,
but believed the place should go to Michi
gan. Within a short time they expect to
recommend a candidate.
Representatives Hitt, Fester, Foss and
J. R. Williams, of Illinois; Rucker and
Benton, of Missouri; Jones, of Washing
ton, and Minor of Wisconsin, saw the
president on behalf of ex-Representative
Rodenhnrg's candidacy for a place on the
St. Louis exposition commission. The
contest is understood to have narrowed
down to a choice between Mr. Rodeii
burg and Cyrus Northrop, of Minnesota
]t is understood the commission will be
named during the present week.
Senator Hanna and Representatives
Grosvenor and Dick, of Ohio, had a very
extended conversation wltn tne president.
They were closeted wth him for almost
t\\<> hoars. Senator Foiaker called dur
ing the progress of the conference, but
remained only a short time. The impor
tance of the consultation may be judged
by the fact that Secretaries Root and
Gage, who had business with President
McKlnley, after waiting for some time,
returned to their respective departments.
THE OHIO SLATE COMPLETED.
The consultation between the Ohio Re
publican leaders and the president cov
ered a number of questions, national as
veil as state, but was largely confined,
ii is understood, to the political situa
tion in Ohio. At the conference a num
ber of Ohio army appointments and sev
eral other appointments were discussed.
The president's trip to the Pacitic coast
also was talked about. The Ohio delega
tion In congress is to gi to San Fran?isco
to be present at the launching of the bat
tleship Ohio, and Gen. Grosvenor is go
ing to New York tonight to make ar
rangements.
It was decided today that Gov. Nash
and most of the present officials of the
state should be renominated this autumn,
and also that Senator Foraker should he
indorsed by the state convention for re
election.
TWO CABINET PLACES.
It is understood on high authority that
the president has decided to appoint Mr.
P.- C. Knox, of Pitts-burg, to till the va
cancy in his cabinet that will be caused
by the retirement of Attorney General
Griggs on April 1.
The Daily Chieftan, of PueMo, will say
tomorrow, says a special dispatch:
"It is definitely known here that ex-
Benator Edward O. Wolcott, of Colorado,
•will in a few days be appointed by the
president to be secretary of the interior,
to succeed Ethan A. Hitchcock, of Mis
smri.
"The news has been received by a
friend of Mr. Wolcott in this city, the
statement being made unequivocally, «n
--dicating that the announcement will he
made in Washington tomorrow."
APPOINTMENTS MADE.
The following presidential appointments
vere announced today:
George Schlosser. to be postmaster, at
S S" Rodie. to be supervising in
spector of steam vessels for the Second
Henry F Sohoenborn, to be a first as
sistant' engineer in the revenue cutter
B Gteorge P Bennett, to be register of the
land office, at Rapid City. S *>•
To be surgeon, with the rank of major,
V. S. A., George D. Deshon.
WORST OF THE WINTER
RURAL ROADS IMPASSABLE AND
TRAIN SERVICE HAMPERED.
EASTON, Minn., March 20.—(Special.)—
1A severe snow storm prevailed here all
last night and today, although the
weather is not cold. All trains from the
Kast are from two to four hours late.
CALEDONIA, Minn., March 20.—(Spe
cial.)—The worst storm of the winter has
prevailed since Tuesday morning, snow
ing continuously for twenty-four hours,
f.ikl blowing a gale from the northeast.
Look for zero temperature in the morn
ing. Roads blockaded and trains late.
BLACK RIVER FALLS, "Wis., March
20.—(Special.)—The severest snow storm
of the season, at times a veritable bliz
zard, has raged over this section of the
state for the past twenty-four hours.
Over a foot of snow has fallen and all
business in the county is^ suspended.
Drifts ten feet high along the rural free
delivery routes are reported.
OSHKOBH, WiP., March 20.—The sleet
Btorm of last night and the snow storm
of today have practically isolated Osh
kosh from the rest of the world as far
as wire communication is concerned.
Traffic on the Citizens' Traction was sus-
I^nded several hours. The loss in the
City will reach many thousands of dol
lar?, which will probably be augmented
by the driving blizzard that Is now in
progress and bids fair to last all night.
SIOUX CITY, 10., March 20.—Train
service on all railways between here and
Chicago was badly crippled today as a
result of the blizzard south and east of
Sioux City. The wind attained a veloc
ity of sixty miles an hour.
BELOIT, Wis., March 20.—Rock river
reached high water mark this afternoon.
Tonight the water is receding. Damage
was done by the, flooding of basements.
' GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., March 20.—
All trains on the Grand Rapids & Indi
ana, Pere Marquelte and Michigan Cen
tral railways north of Cadillac to the
Straits of Mackinac, are again at a com
plete standstill. The sleet storm and a
heavy wind which prevailed in that ter
ritory yesterday and last night not only
as.;in Mocked the wheels by drifting the
snow and freezing it, but •'severed all
communication as well with the weight
of ice which formed on the telegraph
wires, breaking them in a number of
places.
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
CORNWALL AT GIBRALTAR
DUKE AND DICHESS INSPECTED
THE ROCK YESTERDAY.
GIBRALTAR, March 20. -The steamer
Ophir, with the Duke and Duchess of
Cornwall and York on board, entered the
harbor about 9 o'clock. All the ships in
port had previously been dressed, and
the royal yacht approached through the
fleet, fully manned and with guards of
honor, and bands paraded amidst salutes
of guns, the tiring of a royal salute and
the strains of the national anthem.
The Ophir reports a fair passage. All
on board are in good health.
The royal party landed at the dock
yard at noon. They were received by Gen.
Sir Henry White, the governor.
The duke and duchess then drove to the
Chamber of Commerce, where they were
presented with an address of welome.
"We % regard," said the duke, --this
hearty greeting at our first place of land
ing as a happy augury for that great
mission with which we have been in
trusted by my father—the king—in ful
fillment of the wishes of our late beloved
sovereign, whose loss the whole world
mourns."
The duke and duchess spent the day
in visiting the docks and other points of
interest, after which they dined at Gov
ernor's house, where the dinner pat -
numbered 150. They held a reception in
the ball room, at which the duchess was
presented, with a magnificent Spanish
mantilla, the gift of the inhabitants.
At 11 p. m. their royal highnesses drove
through the town to view the illumina
tions, returning to the Ophir shortly be
fore midnight. All through the evening
the warships in the harbor were brilliant
ly lighted.
AT THE BOILING POINT
CHARGES OP CORRUPTION HANDED
ABOUT IN GERMAN REICHSTAG.
BERLIN, March 20.-During the debate
today in the reichstag over the home of
fice estimates, there arose a heated pas
sage at arms between Herr Bebel the
Socialist leader, and other Social Demo
crats, on one side, and Dr. Stoeker Con
servative, and others, on the other side
Kerr Rebel's attack was occasioned by
criticism yesterday on vne part of Dr.
Stoecker. The discussion continued for
several hours and was very heated and
Uiu'oarous.
Altogether the sitting was the liveliest
of the whole session, members being call
ed to order by the score. This was not
only the case during the long tussle be
tween Dr. Stoecker and the Socialists,
but also when the question of armor plate
was again discussed. Count yon Kardoff
assumed that the Stumm works had
never furnished American armor plate.
The Krupps, he admitted, did sell cheaper
to the United States than to Germany,
but only because the United States order
ed 7,500 tons as against 2,700 ordered by
Germany. Moreover, it is possible that
the United States plates were inferior.
Herr yon Singer charged Count yon
Kardoff with being a Krupp agent, and
went so far as»to suggest that the count
might be netting 4 per cent.
RUSSIAN SUGAR BOUNTY
TEST CASE ON SIR. GaGE'S COIX-
TERVAILIXG DUTY.
NEW YORK, March £o.—The protest of
Gustav A. Jahn & Co. against the as
sessment of countervailing duty on a lot
of Russian sugar imported by them, was
sent from the custom, ho L>se to the board
of United States general appraisers in
the public stores toduy, and the next
thing in order will be a hearing before
the board of classification of the general
appraisers. The sugar in question was
produced and refined in Russia, although
it was shipped via Hamburg. There were
3,088 bags in the lot. and the invoice value
was $15,359, the regular, that is ordinary
duty, as determined by polarlscopic tests,
was $13,016. The countervailing duty as
sessed was $4,827. The regular and extra
duty together thus excred the invoice
value of the sugar.
The question to be passed upon by tne
beard of classification is as to whether
the payment made by the Russian gov
ernment when the sugar was exported
was in reality a bounty as coming within
the meaning, of the act, or was merely a
rebate of taxes formerly paid.
HIS CASE CONTINUED.
TECHNICAL FLAW IN COMPLAINT
AGAINST JAMES C'ALLAHAN.
OMAHA, Neb., March 20.—0n motion of
the county attorney', the trial of James
Callahan, in connection of the abduction
of young Cudahy, was postponed until
April 1. No reasons were given by the
prosecution for its motion.
Later it was announced that the prose
cution had asked for a continuance be
cause of a technical flaw' in the com
plaint, which it was claimed was tiled
irregularly. This may prove fatal to the
prosecution. New compfatnts are to tee
filed at once, but this will require the
rearraignment of Callahan in both the
county and district courts, which will
take considerable time, probably several
weeks, and may secure his dismissal.
That Callahan is preparing for a vigorous
defense is shown by a list of witnesses
his attorneys filed this morning, on whom
he asks summons. There are a dozen of
them, including Pat Crowe and John
Crowe, his brother, and the attorneys
for the defense say there are several
others to be secured before the trial
comes up again.
IN THE BIG STEEL TRUST
NINETY PER CENT OF STOCK OF
CONSTITUENT COMPANIES
;.-.'.' ...TURNED IN.
NEW YORK, March 20.— J. P. Morgan
& Co., the syndicate managers of the
United States steel corporation, have, un
der date of March 21, sent a letter to
the stockholders of the constituent com
panies informing them that the ft.?je for
depositing the common and preferred
stocks, which expired by limitation to
day, had been extended until and includ
ing April 1 -next.
In the circular It is declared that over
90 per cent of each of the issues of the
various stocks has thus far been deposit
ed in accordance with the terms of the
managers. The extension is granted b*.
cause it was found physically impossible
by many of the shareholders to deposit
their certificates within the time origin**
ly named.
IN MINNESOTA, TOO.
WINONA KIDNAPING THREATENED
UNLESS Sf?SOO IS FORTHCOMING .
WINONA, Minn.. March 20.—(Special.)—
Barney Olson this evening received a
letter signed "Dirty Dozen of Kansas
City", demanding $500 cash by Saturday
if he does not wish his brother George
kidnapped. Directions are given for plac
ing the money in a barrel behind a cigar
store. The fact that the letter bears a
Winano postmark seems to indicate it is
a iosh, but Olson has reported the mat
ter to the police.
THURSDAY MORNING, MARCH 21, 1901.
a ■ in i
J. L. GREATSINGER, OF DI'LDTH,
MADE PRESIDENT OF BROOK
LYN RAPID TRANSIT
HE SUCCEEDS C. L. ROSSITER
LATTER'S INPOFI I.ARITY WITH
THE COMPANY'S EMPLOYES
CAISED THE CHANGE
HAS WORKED HIS OWN WAY UP
In Also President of Dulnth & Iron
Rangre and Minnesota Iron Com
panies—Started as a Loco
motive Fireman.
NEW YORK, March 20.—At a special
meeting of the board of directors of the
Brooklyn Rapid Transit and the Brook
lyn Heights Railway companies today.
Clinton L. Rossiter, presented his resig
nation as president and director of the
two companies. The resignation was ac
cepted and J. L. Greatsinger, president
of the Duluth & Iron Range railway,
was elected president and director to
fill the vacancies caused by Mr. Ros
siter's resignation.
Mr. Greatsinger, the new president, was
born in Elmira, N. Y. He began ra I
road life on the Erie, fring switch en
gines. Later he served in almost every
capacity up to manager of the various
railroad properties composing the o!d
I'tica, Ithaca and Elmira road. In ISfifi
he went west and accepted the place of
master mechanic of what is now the
Chicago & Eastern lliinois Railway com
pany. Two years later lie became master
mechanic of the Duluth & Iron Range
railroad and was soon promoted to the
post of general superintendent. In 18&3
he was elected president of the railway
which position he has since occupied.
In December last he succeeded D. if."
Bacon as president of the Minnesota Iron
company and of its constituent com
panies.
ASSOCIATED WITH H. H. PORTER.
TrTrhueh of his railroad experience Mr.
Greatsinger has been identified with H,
H. Porter, chairman of the executive
committee and board of directors of the
Federal Steel company.
Mr. Porter, who is an old railroad an.l
traction man, recently became more
actively ielentified with the Brooklyn
Rapid Transit company, although he has
been active in its affairs ever since the
late Roswell p. Flower consolidated tho
various roads.
According to gossip in Wall sti'eet, Mr.
Porter recently became convinced that
Mr. Rossiter's withdrawal would be for
the best Interests of the stockholders. At
the same time it was declared that Mr.
Rossiter's ability had never been ques
tioned. The fault, it was said, lay in the
fact that Mr. Rossiter had, by his course,
created a hostile sentiment among the
employes anel this feeling, it was further
declared, could best be obliterated by the
appointment of another man. Further
more, Mr. Rossiter on several occasions
had asked the directors to be relieved of
the presidency, saying that he was in
need of a rest. All these facts are said
to have been potent in bringing about
the change.
WRECK AT STILLWATER
MILWAUKEE TRAIN DERAILED,
HUT NO ONE INJURED.
STILLWATER, Minn., March 20.-(Spe
cial.) —One of the most fortunate railroad
wrecks ever occurring in this vicinity
happened on the Chicago, Milwaukee &
St. Paul road at South Stillwater tonight.
The passenger train leaving here in
charge of Engineer Gale and Conductor
Royce was derailed by a broken flange
and both coaches and the tender left the
track. Part of the locomotive ran to
the South Stillwater depot before being
stopped. ..The train carried a .large num
ber of passengers, but no one was in
jured. The coaches were slightly injur
ed, but were not lifted from the trucks.
The wrecking crew arrived at 11:30.
ARMING FOR THE FRAY
WEST VIRGIXIA KILLING IS LIKE-
LV TO START A FEUD.
ELKINS, Va., March 20.—A feud, it is
feared, will arise over the shooting anJ
killing yesterday of Benj Ilaldeman at
the lumber camp at Weaver, five miles
west of here, by Payton Stopes, a boy of
twenty. Haldeman had the reputation of
being the terror of Weaver and of Uur
bin, at both of which settlements he was
said to have run "Speak-easies." Me is
also credited with having whipped a
dozen men in as many encounters so
severely that they nearly died. Men on
both sides, it is reported, began arming
immediately after the tragedy, and a
bloody clash between the factions is fear,
cd.
• '' ■ .' ■ ■■ ■...- - . ■ . - ■*"*""" , -■■"• ■ f*H-: --T-■•.'■".'.■-.!" .'.■-■-.>■ ■ - "-r*" . , - :"'"^ ._."".-
NO BREAK IN THE
NEBRASKA DEADLOCK
CAUCUS NOMINATION OF D. E.
THOMPSON TI ESRAY NIGHT
AVAS NOT RATIFIED.
LINCOLN, Neb., March 20.-Eighteen
ballots were taken without a nomination
at the Republican long term senatorial
caucus tonight. The caucus shortly be
fore 11 o'clock adjourned lintil tomorrow
night. The final ballot resulted: Rose
water, 32; Meiklejohii, 15; ♦Ourrie, 8.
The attendance varied from lifty to
fifty-five, the fourteen members who re
mained out last night being again ab
sent. The contest, apparently has settled
down to a test of strength! between Ed
ward Kosewater and George D. Meikle
jchn. a devoted few clinging to state
Senator Frank M. Currie, who has not
however, the balance of power under
rules requiring forty-five to nominate.
The supporters of D. .E. Thompson,
nominated last night for the short term,
are believed to be about equally divided
between Rosewater and Meiklejohn.
Friends of Mr. Rosewater assert that
under, the agreement which made last
night's caucus possible, Mr. Thompson
cannot claim an election in the legis
lature even if that should happen until
both senators are named. Part of Mr.
Thompson's following "will not concur in
this opinion, but they soy they are will
ing to allow a reasonable length of time
for the long term deadlock to end before
pressing the election of Thompson In
joint convention.
D. E. Thompson, of Lincoln, who was
last night nominated for United States
senator for the short term, by the Re
publican caucus, failed of election by
the joint session of the house and senate
today.
The Wilkinson caucus, under the rules
of which Thompson was nominated,
adjourned without nominating a candi
date for the long term, thereby invali
dating the nomination it already ha>l
made. The caucus call provided that
both senators should be nomttiated at the
same session. Failing to do this, the
whole work of the caucus was without
effect. Another caucus has been called"
for 8:20 this evening.
Today's ballot shows much change
from those recently taken. Rosewatar
secured nearly twice the number of votes
he has at any time polled, while D. E.
Thompson reached his high mark. The
ballot: Allen, 54; W. K. Thompson, 42;
Hitchcock, 14; Hinshaw, 4; D. E. Thomp
son, 56; Rosewater, 29; Meiklejohn, 20;
Crouse, 10; Currie 9; Martin', 9; scattering,
3; necessary to choice, 6s.
BAD FOR NEGRO VOTERS
MARYLAND'S NEW ELECTION LAW
SHUTS OIT ILLITERATES.
ANNAPOLIS, Md., March 20.—The new
election bill, having for }ts object the
practical disfranchisement of most of the
50,000 illiterate voters of tlie state, passed
the senate shortly after midday. It was
immediately sent to the house where all
the amendments made by the senate
were concurred in and the bill passed.
It is now ready for the governor's sig
nature.
The most important change in existing
methods accomplished by the enactment
of.the new law, lies In depriving illiterate
voters of the assistance of ballot clerks
in preparing their ballot's.
Under the previous practice these
clerks accompanied such voters into the
bojoth and marked their ballot forms for
them, or showed them how to do it.
The Democrats claim .that this practice
utterly destroyed the' secrecy of the bal
lot and made it possible for corruption
ists to learn whether bargains made with
corrupt voters had been carried out..
The effect of the law is, of course, large
ly a matter of conjecture and one upon
which the party leaders widely differ.
The Democrats expect that it will dis
franchise about 32,000 negroes and per
haps 16,000 white Voters. Of these, it is
claimed all the negroes and about 50 per
cent of the whites votes the Republican
ticket. With these out of the way, it is
held, the state will be safely Democratic
for many years to come and the imme
diate result would be a Democratic,
legislature next fall aQtl the election of
s Democrat to succeed United States
Senator Wellington in ISO 2.
FIXED BY TBE TRUST.
HOW PRICE OF 1RO!« OJ*E IS TO BE
ADJUSTED.
PITTSBURG, March 20.—A large and
representative meeting of iron manufact
urers will- take place at Cleveland next
Wednesday for the purpose of adjusting
the prices on ore for the next twelve
months. All the largest manufacturers
in the country will be represented. This
meeting will be the first at which rep
resentatives of the United States Steel
company will be present. Most of the
prominent independents will also attend
the gathering. It is expected to have the
base price of iron ore settled before ad
journment.
The base price, aeaording to the best
information on "old range 1' bessemer
ore, which takes in the Marquette, Ale
nominee, Gogebie and Vermillion ranges,
will be between $5 50 and $5.75. This Is an
advance over last year's price of about
25 cents per ton.
A TAIL OF WHOA.
U1 111
FRENCH TROOPS AT MARSEILLES
HAD THEIR HANDS FULL
} YEISTERDAY
CAVALRY CHARGED RIOTERS
SEVERAL. SOLDIERS WERE IN
JURED BY STONES THROWN
BY r THE MOB
TRADE IS LEAVING THE PORT
Merchants Fear the Commercial Im
portance of MarseilleM Will Be
Destroyed If Strike of Dock:
Laborers Continue**.
MARSEILLES, March 20.—The situa
tion here is very disquieting owing to
the increasingly aggressive attitude of
the strikers. During the disorders today
the panic spread to the towns
people and stores, restaurants
and cafes were hurriedly closed.
The Rue de La Cannebiere and
the other leading thoroughfares of the
city were deserted. It was feared that
the mob, which was charged by mounted
gendarmes and hussars, would attempt
to pillage. A crowd numbering 2,000 bu:*st
through a cordon of inrantry along the
dock side. The cavalry charged ami
drove the strikers back. A volley of
stones was then thrown in all directions,
and a brigadier, two gendarmes,' a hus
sar and several infantrymen were injur
ed. One gendarme was stunned, thrown
from his horse and trampled upon by the
cavalry. He was removed to a hospital,
where he lies in a critical condition.
The soldiers were greatly exasperated,
but their officers succeeded In controlling
them.
The strikers are irritated at the refusal
of the premier, M. Waldeck-Rousseau. to
receive the Socialist mayor of Marseilles,
,M. Flassieres, who sought to obtain gov
ernment pressure to force the masters to
negotiate, the masters having declined to
do so on the ground that the strike was
unjustif.able and a breach of previous
agreement.
MAYOR SIDES WITH STRIKERS.
M. Flassieres threatened that the So
cialists will make reprisals for this in
sult from the government, and he points
out that he stood aloof from the pro-
Kruger demonstration at a moment when,
as he puts it, by entering Mr. Kruger's
carriage, he might have won a popular
triumph.
Two hundred women, several witft
babies in arms, took part in today's dem
onstration in spite of the rain. With the
exception of the Socialist organs, the
press shows little sympathy with the
strikers. The public generally recognizes
that the strike has already done an im
mense amount of injury, and may com
pletely ruin the port.
The government is in an extremely em
barrassing position, especially M. Mil
lerand, the minister of commerce, as the
Socialists demand that the government
should intervene in favor of the strikers,
and are disgruntled at the employment of
troops. On the other hand, the govern
ment is urged" to take vigorous measures
to secure the freedom of labor, especial
ly In view of the fact that the foreign
element, chiefly Italian, which prepon
derates among the striking dock laborers,
is utterly indifferent to the fate of Mar
seilles.
The strike committee has informed the
prefect that the strikers will resume
work if the co-operative system without
contractors, is adopted. As the shipping
companies are bound by existing con
tracts there is little chance of this pro
posal being accepted.
Mayor Flassieres reports the population
to be calm.
FOR RICHARDSON MURDER
TALE OF SECRET INDICTMENTS
AGAINST TWO BESIDES THE
* "WIFE
SAVANNAH, Mo., March 20.—A story
is in circulation here to the effect tnat
sealed indictments were returned by the
special grand jury against two men for
the murder of Millionaire Frank Rich
ardson, who was killed at the door of his
wife's bed room on «the night of Dec. 24.
It is said that the indictments will not
be made public until after Mrs. Addle i-t.
Richardson, who was recently indicted
for murder in the first degree, has been
tried for the crime.
It is alleged that Mrs. Richardson will
give evidence against the two men if she
is acquitted of the charge on which she
has been indicted. Had the indictments
been made public, and the two men ar
rested when Mrs. Richardson was In
dicted, she could not, it is argued, have
testified against them without turning
state's evidence and sharing in their pun
ishment. Mrs. Richardson is to be tried
on May 27.
>—Detroit Tribunew '
PRICE TWO GENTS-) BVSTft*
BULLETIN OF
IMPORTANT NEWS OF THE DAY.
;£ Weather Forecast for St. Paul:
Fair; Warmer.
I—With the Bis Bonn.
I Diil 11 Hi Man for B. R. T.
Clash With Strikers.
: Lion and the Bear.
2—Barry's Assailants Walk In.
Markkain's Friend Plans Revenge.
Death of Rev. W. W. Lewis.
Good Luck of Waitress.
Legislative Doings.
Gross Earn ings Tax Fight. /JiV-
Objects to Party Whip.
j Senate Gets Tangled lTp.
4—Editorial Page.
The Golden Idol. - V
6—Snorting; News.
Around the Northwest.
o—News of Railroads.- '
* Test of Assessment Law.
Popular Wants.
Markets of the World.
Chicago May Wheat, 76 7-Bc.
Bar Silver, GO 7-Be.
Stocks Active.
S—Kansas .Keeps Banner.
Boers Still Have Hope.
' Aniline Found In Jams. .
WEATHER FOR TODAY.
Minnesota. lowa, North and South Da
kota- I-air; warmer Thursday; southerly
win.ls; Fnday fair.
Montana-Fair Thursday; warmer in
southern portion; southerly %\inds;" Fri-
Wisconsin -Fair, except clearing on the
lake Thursday; rising temperature in
west portion; brisk to high northwester
ly winds, becoming variable; Friday
fair; v.armer.
St. Paul _ Yesterday's observations,
taken by the United States weather bu
reau, St. Paul, P. F. Lyon, observer for
the twenty lour hours ended at 7 o'clock
las! mght.—Barometer corrected for tem
perature and elevation: Highest temper
ature, IS; lowest temperature, 12; average
u-mporature, 1"S; daily range, 6; bardme
ter, P9.71; humidity, 89; precipitation, .39
--7 p. m., temperature. 17; 7 p. m., weather'
cloudy wind, north.
Yesterday's Temperatures—
t> «., * *Bpmllighi *SpmHigh
Battleford ...28 /8 Chicago 22 -'4
Bismarck ....22 24 Cincinnati ..34 J8
Calgary 4,0 52 Cleveland ...36 60
•Duluth 10 18 Galveston ...60 04
Edmonton ...42 46 Jacksonville .68 72
■Huron 52 st> .vlarquette ...26 28
Helena 48 54 .Montgomery .54 60
Havre 24 ao Montreal ....36 36
Med. Hat 40 58 Xashville ....38 44
Minnedosa ..10 Zi S. Orleans...6o 64
Pr. Albert ..24 28 New York ..36 40
Qu'Appelie ..20 24; Philadelphia .48 4S
S. Current ..32 4J Pittsburg ...40 €2
Williston ....38 42|S. Francisco.s6 62
Winnipeg ....14 24! St. Louis ...28 30
Buffalo ......42 60',3a1t Lake ..54 58
Cheyenne ...44 46 Ste. Marie ..32 3i
♦Washington time (7 p. m. St. Paul).
OCEAN LINERS.
New York—Arrived: Lahn, Bremen and
Southampton; Noordland, Antwerp;
Oceanic, Liverpool. Sailed: Majestic,
Liverpool; Kensington, Antwerp, via
Southampton.
Liverpool—Arrived: Lusitania, St. John,
N. 8., and Halifax.
Brow Head—Passed; Germanic, Ntw
xoik for Queeristown and Liverpool;
Commonwealth, Boston for Queenstown
and Liverpool.
Southampton-Arrived: St. Louis New
York.
Bremen—Arrived: Karlsruhe. New York
Plymouth—Arrived: Patricia, New York
for Hamburg
Boulogne—Sailed: Bulgaria, Hamburg
for New York.
Glasgow—Arrived: Assyrian, Portland,
Me.
Portland, Me.—Salied: Norwegian,
Glasgow; Ottoman, Liverpool.
Cherbourgh—Sailed: Kaiser Wilhehr
der Grosse (from Bremen and Southamp
ton), New York.
AROUND THE HOTELS.
At the Windsor—G. F. Stevens, Duluth-
O. Cass, W. A. Briggs, T. F. Robinson,'
Pip€ stone; G. D Bow, Detroit- A T
Benard, Cass Lake; J. C. Mills. Preston-
Luke L. Concord Taylor's Falls- L D
Baird, Austin; Edward Donaldson, Owa
toi-na: E. E. Locherty, Preston; Geo B
Doty, Rochester, Minn.'; D. D. Forbes'
Marshall; Charles Ryan wife, Eau
Claire.
At the Clarendon—W . P St John
Ilurd Lake; P. H. Rahilly, Lake Cityi
S. M. Damon, Waapaca; Mrs. W \
Hosher, Stillwater; T. ODonald, West
Superior.
At the Ryan—M. Hector, Fargo- A
Nathan, Great Falls; F. G. Bell, Win'ona!
AAtri hC oMcrchants'-' r- H Ross. J- Gray.
£• H- Schrccden. H. Roberts, A. Otto
DM. Sabin J D. Wade, T. J. Davis and
wife. E. L. Chalmer, Duluth; R. H. Mc-
Coy Grand Forks; J. w. Hoverstad
Crookston; A. Zeh. Great Lake Falls-
John Gleason, E. D. Childs, Crookston:
J. Dietrich Bismaick; J. W. Chllders
Fargo; \V. Danforth, C. B. Crandall, Red
Wins; P. B. Scholles, Ellsworth; J
Knesler, Casselton; G. Adams E W
Wbinney A. W. Heald, Frank Bunvicki,'
Marsh-alltown; H. F. Stretlow, Cassel
town. N. D.; D. Bartlen, Cooperstown
N. D.; S. D. Ntwcomb, Benson; J
Clrarlson, Ethel Ruth, Rush City A I,"
Willightby, La Cross; P. H. Klick Tav
lor, N. D.; C. J. Campbell, Fargo- J
Rempel, Butterfitld, Minn.
At the Metropolitan—J. H Hower
Brainerd- R. A. Jarkson, Detroit, Minn.;
Willi-im Wilson and wife, Wincna: S E
Lnngrdon, Dultuh; O. M. McPherson'
Billings, Mont.
CHARITY BEGGARS.
HORDE OF THEM AWAIT ANDREW
CARNEGIE'S ARRIVAL AT
SOI'THAMPTON.
SOUTHAMPTON, March 20.-The ar
rival here of Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Car
negie, who sailed from New York on the
American line steamer St. Louis, March
33, is awaited by delegations frortl various
eleemosynary Institutions, who want
checks. These include representatives of
Woolston, Reading and other cities, seek
ing libraries, and agents of various insti
tutions desiring aid. Hartley college,
Southampton, a technical school, has a
deputation of sixty awaiting the steam
er's arrival.
The officers of the steams'/lip company
and the American consulate were crowd
ed this morning with people inquiring
when the St. Louis was likely to arrive
She is not expected at her deck before
1 a. m. tomorrow.
The local agent of the American line,
who has 160 letters and telegrams from
all parts of the kingdom for the philan
trophist, says the envelopes indicate they
are from all sorts and conditions of peo
ple from university presidents to mendi
cants. He will try to get the Carnegie
party off to London without meeting the
delegations.
SOUTHAMPTON, March ZI.-Tho St.
Louis docked at 2 o'clock this morning.
Only a few passengers embarked. Mr.
and Mrs. Carnegie had given strict or
ders that they should not be awakened
until 6 o'clock. The-liner had a misera
ble tr^p, but no serious weather. Mr. Car
negie was on deck every day and in good
Ikealth. He was up until 11 o'clock last
night and congratulated the captain on
his successful trip.
OFFICIAL PAPER
OfTHB- —
OITY OF ST. PAUL.
I I I ill
THE BRITISH AND RUSSIANS ARE
WATCHING EACH OTHER AT
TIEN TSIN
MAY BE TROUBLE IN KOREA
JAPAN AND RUSSIA MAY CLASH IV
LAND OF THE MORNING
CALM
ENVOYS PAR APAET AS EVEB

Small Prospect at Present of the
Powers Reaching an Agreement
in the' Matter of In
demnities. #
LONDON, March 21.—Gen Wogaek has
refused accept Count yon Wald™ "
arbitration at Tien Tsin, says the Pekfn
correspondent of the Daily Mail, wiring
yesterday and demands that the British
not only withdraw but apologize for re
moving the Russian flag
Gen. Barrow rUSeS to do either and
BrHiVl SmS haS the SU!>port of the
British government. British reinforce
ments are being sent.
"Russia's proceedings in Korea," says
the Kobe correspondent of the Daily
MaU are now openly aggressive and it
is believed that she is about to make
San plo ■mandS in ccnnec «on with Ma
The Shanghai correspondent of the
Standard mentions a report that it la
the intention of the allies in thr^ event
of Emperor Kwang Su's failure to return
rh.fn proclafm hls brother, Prince
Chun, as regent of China.
CLEARING FOR ACTION
t h SHn^TrTH^ TI March 20-A dispatch to
j!, C}:l™ Gf, Zet, te from ToWo^ March 20,
says that all the Russian warships in
Japanese waters have sailed for Korea
and that the Japanese squadron is mob
liking for an immediate departure to the
•Korean coast.
TROOPS UNDER "ARMS
PEKIN, March 20.-The British rein
forcements consisting of ninety marines
which arrived at: Tien Tsin last
night from the Taku forts to replac, the
Indian guards on the disputed land
are explained as due to a fear lest any
incident arising out of the Russo-British
land question should cause the French
troops, whose conduct has given much
Sh?£k PreciPitate a collision. The
British commanders desire to have
rvrWS tr^ Ops ln Tkn Tsin to P^enre
cider in the streets.
Gen. Bailloud left here this morning
to inquire into the French troops at Tien
i sin.
At today's conference of foreign min
isters general matters cnly were dis
cussed and no conclusion was arrived at
In addition I to the Russian outposts at
Tien Tsin, lines of communication are
in readiness in case of . necessity Th*
s?t£m- T ***** arms to Prevent the
settlement being:, rushed, but they do
not anticipate such extremes.
RUSSIAN PRESS CONSERVATIVE.
ST. PETERSBURG, March 20.-The
Russian press is not alarmed about the
Tien Tsin affair. There is no mentlo i of
it in the official agencies' dispatches but
the London correspondent of the Novoe
\remya characterizes the dispute as un
important.
Another London correspondent quotes a
French diplomat as siaying that an Anglo-
Russian war is impossibl?, and Russia
need only threaten to support the Boers
to bring Great Britain to her knees.
The Novosti advocates a Russ (-Jap
anese alliance which will assure Jnpan
her present possessions and a large mar
ket for her industrial products in Russian
territory, where they will be protected
against Anglo-German competition. In
conclusion the article declares this al
liance is as important in the Orient as
the Franco-Russian alliance is in the
Occident.
The Novosti apparently does not men
tion American competition In Russian
territory* which is stronger than the An
gle-German competition.
THINK ENGLAND MUST YIELD.
BERLIN, March 20.—in German official
circles it is asserted that British ani Rus
sian guards still occupy the land in con
troversy at Tien Tsin. and that a satis
factory adjustment of the matter may
be expected.
The press does not consider the Tien
Tsin incident vital. All the papers ex
press a belief that Great Britain will
yield. The Vossische Zeitung says that
England cannot now afford to engage in
a serious conflict with Russia.
The Kreuz Zeitung, which takes a simi
lar view, adds: "It would tetieed be de
plorable, if from a mere local controversy
there Should grow up Bcrtoua diftculties,
because that would induce the Chinese :o
show greater powe;s of resistance."
In an able weekly review the Kreuz
Zeitung mentions a series of Russian ad
vances in the far East, ir.clud ng the ac
quisition of territory at Hankow, by
means of which Russia invaded the Yang
Tse district, adding: "All this England
has had to endure because the South
African war paralyzes her aggressive
powers."
CAN'T AGREE ON INDEMNITIES.
WASHINGTON, March 20.—Another
communication was received today from
Special Commissioner Rockhill, touching
the complications that have resulted at
Pekin from the efforts of various powers
to reach a uniform basis for their in
demnity claims, but there is nothing to
indicate that an agreement is any near
er than it was when this subject was
first taken up by the ministers.
It is stated that the sum total of the
indemnities claimed by all nations can
not be calculated at this moment, be
cause of the lack of agreement among
the powers on the basis of settlement.
But assuming that the other powers aro
willing to accept the scheme of a judg
ment proposed by the United States al
lowing a certain amount for each mis
sionary killed or Injured, and another
allowance for property destroyed, the
sum total of the claim would be con
siderably less than $250,000,000. It is not
doubted that under economical adminis
tration with order completely restored
and with free access to the interior of
China, the Chinese revenues would be
able to meet this charge against them
within a reasonable time.
But-it appears almost hopeless now to
expect the other powers to accept the
same basis of compensation that would
satisfy the United States government.
Not only is there a bast difference in the
scale of these demands based on^mill
tary experiences, »but there also is a
radical difference of opinion as to the
treatment of the native Christians, who
have suffered in person and property by
the Boxers and it is iJt-lieved that if
this element is to be treated with the
liberality* proposed by some of the
European nations, the-indemnities claim
ed would be nearly $£00,000,000 in the tig- .
gresrate, aft amount, it is declared, Quite
beyond the ability of China to meet.

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