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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, March 27, 1901, Image 1

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■'OFFICIAL PAPER
■ '-"■ \ .-■•■.-... .'■
—OF THE
GffTY OF ST. PAUL.
VOL. XXIV.-NO. 86.
II 1 ill ft iff
THREATENED KIDNAPING OF KAN
SAS CITY JEWELER'S SOX
AX INVENTION
CIERK STOLE DIAMOND RINGS
rTHEX TIMED TO MAKE HIS EM
PLOYERS REDEEM THEM IX
HARD CASH
HAS CONFESSED HIS CRIME
Now Tiventy-Year-Olil Willie Dear
duff Will Hiivo an Opportunity
to Repent His Folly Be
liinrt Iron Bars.
KANSAS CITY. M 0... March 26.— Twen
ty-year-old William Dearduff, a clerk,
irrested today charged with steal
ing $3,100 worth of diamond rings from
his employers, Edwards & Sloan, whole-
Bale jewelers. I ater, when confronted
with the rings which had boon found
hidden in the basement of the firm's
building, Dearduff broke down and con
onfessed to hav
,r. Edwards, the senior mem
ber of the linn, a letter threatening to
kidnap the jeweler's son if he did not
immediately produce $1,
"1 admit the whole thing,' 1 said the
youthful prisoner ta a reporter at the
station this afternoon after he had signed
a written confession presented by the
prosecuting attorney.
"No use to deny it any more. I am
up against it.''
Dearduff says he planned the robbery
by himself, and had taken no one Into
his confidence. His idea was simply to
steal the tray of diamonds. He accom
plish* d this, he said, during the after
noon of March 11, and hid the rings' in
the basement. It then occurred to him
that he could not immediately negotiate
a eale of the diamonds, and the scheme
to extort money from Mr. Edwards was
conceived. The following is a copy of
the letter sent to Mr. Edwards:
WAS A FAKE THREAT.
'Sir: We are the men that relieved
you of your diamonds the other day.
Finding that we are short of funds, we
iisk you to oblige us with the sum of
in twenty-dollar bills; give it to
the clerk, Dearduff, and at the hour of
12 tonight have him meet us at the cor
ner of Forty-third and Magee alone. We
ask you to send him, for we know him
when we see him. Show this to the po
lice, or fail in any way to obey orders,
and' your son George will pay the pen
alty." We mean business, as you have
learned heretofore. —"R. B. J. C."
Edwards had his son guarded while he
made up a package of waste paper and
s*-nt it by Dearduff to the place indicated
in the letter. Dearduff reported that he
was met by two men who took the pack
age from him. Later he reported finding
the empty tray in the basement, and
asserted that some one had stabbed him.
Dearduff today admitted having inflict
ed the wound himself. He has been em
ployed by the firm for eighteen months.
IJe will be prosecuted for grand larceny.
DEADLOCK UNBROKEN.
NO PROSPECTS OF A SENATORIAL
ELECTION IN NEBRASKA.
LINCOLN, Neb., March 26.— Fifty-thiee
Republican members of the legislature
tonight went into what is believed to the
the last senatorial caucus on the long
vacancy. From S until 11 o'clock
balloting was steadily maintained without
a. nomination. There was a /ailing off
in the vote for Edward Rosewater and a
gala for George D. Meiklejohn, the 11
o'clock ballot resulting: Rosewater, 27;
Meiklejohn, 20; Currie, 7; Baldridge, 1.
During the balloting a communication
was received from nine men who re
fused to enter the caucus. In effect the
bolters agreed to abide by the decision
of the caucus if it would undo the work
of a week ago and nominate any two,
eliminating the nams of D. E. Thompson.
There were other propositions which were
not disclosed. The caucus at 11 o'clock
took a recess to consider the communica
tion. The prospect tonight is regarded as
unfavorable to any sort of an agreement
or the election of either senator before
the expiiation of the legislative session
at midnight Thursday night. During the
day, a number of conferences were held,
the most into resting being that in Gov.
Dietrich's onice between the caucus bolt
ers, the governor and a number of party
leaders. It was without effect, as were
all ilie other conferences.
Today's joint legislative ballot on United
States senator was as follows: Allen. 55;
W. H. Thompson. 59, Berge, 4; D. R.
Thompson. 59; Crounse, 6: Currie, 8;
Meiklejohn, 27; Rosewater, 29. Necessary
to elect. '5.
TO PAY HAWAIIAN DEBT
COLONIES COME HIGH, BIT WE
MUST HAVE 'EH.
\* WASHINGTON, March —W.F. Me
Lenran, chief of the warrant division,
and W. W. Ludlow, one of the officials
in the auditors office, treasury depart
ment, will sail for Honolulu about the
middle of April for the purpose of pay
ing the bonded debt of the island, which
payment was authorized by the resolu
tion of annexation and provided for Ly
an appropriation made by the last con
gress. V.'V.'
The present debt amounts to about
$3,200,000, of which 1800,000 is held in Lon
don. TV.c Hawaiian holders will rece'.ve
thirty days notice of the contemplated
payment, and the London holders about
three months, at the expiration of which
time the interest will cease.
TRAINING NAVY CADETS
MILL HAVE A BATTLESHIP FOR
PRACTICE CRUISE.
WASHINGTON, March 26.-The r.avy
di partment has entered on an entirely
new policy by designating a first-class
battleship, the Indiana, for the service
of the cadets at the United States naval
academy. The Indiana Is now at 41 c
Philadelphia, navy yard, where she is
to be put in shape for the cadets |r go
Aboard her the hitter pr.rt> of Ma;\
HUNDREDS OF ARRESTS
RUSSIA!* I'Ol/TCK ARE ACTIVE IX
MANY CITIES.
BERLIN, March ?(>.—Dispatches^ from
Russia to several Berlin papers, in
cl.iding; the 'J'ageblatt and the- Deutsche
Tascs Zeitung, tell of "the "spread' of dis
affection, especially at Odessa, where a
hundred arrests have been made at Riga,
where three hundred . persons. are In cus
tody, hi Kicff, KhaikofT, Dorpat, Tomsk
:id, Moscow, where high officials are in
volved.V • .
t jfl iit .^aKftv Jl. —k ■IIC^TODIO AI ~
i : * * ■"'■-■• «..•-.-. a • .....-.• . . .._"■- - '•■ . ■ - . . " -. . .
CHICAGO PAPERS
TO BE CONSOLIDATED
RECORD AM) TIMJSS-HBftAXD BE-
COME RECOUD-HERALD-DAILV
XEVVS TO CiO IT ALONE.
CHICAGO, March 26.—The Record to
morrow will print over the signature of
Victor F. Lawson the following an
nouncement:
To the Readers of the Record: The
Chicago Record was established twenty
years ago in connection with tho Chicago
Daily News, which latter publication h is
recently completed its twenty-fifth year
of issue. For the last thirteen, years I
have conducted both the Record and the
Daily News as sole editor, txitm---!*!' and
owner. During these years American
jcurnalißm has so developed that the
publication of a single metropolitan
newspaper now composes such responsi
bilities as stem to fairly and wisely
measure the activities of one man. as
their successful discharge should certain
ly fully satisfy his every proper ambi
tion. A generous public has placed the
seal of its approval on both newspapers.
The Chicago Record has today the larg
est circulation of any newspaper pub
lished in the United States, sold at Its
price. The Chicago Daily News has the
largest paid circulation of any newspa
lt r. morning or evening, published in the
United States. In view of these condi
tions it seems wise that I should now
recognize those reasonable limitations of
business activity to which the years en
title me and content myself with the la
bors and responsibilities of one newspa
per. Acting upon this conviction, I have
sold the Chicago Record to Mr. Herman
H. Kohlsaat, who will hereafter issue it
in conjunction with the Chicago Tirrn's-
H* raid, under the title of the Chicago
Record-Herald. It is a distinct satisfac
tion to be able to commit the Record and
the interests of its readers into such wor
thy hands. Mr. Kohlsaat and his excel
lent newspaper have long since achiev
ed a national reputation, which gives to
the readers of the Record, ample assur
ance that the Chicago Record-Herald will
fully maintain that standard of enter
prising, non-partisan and independent
journalism to which they have been ac
customed. It may be added that the nu
merous original features and character
istics which bave given the Record its
peculiar individuality among American
newspapers will be continued unchanged
in the Record-Herald. Americai
journalism is impersonal and I rec
ognize that public interest con
cerns itself with the newspaper
rather than with any individual, and yet
in view of a twenty years' relationship,
it seems fitting that I should make this
personal statement to the readers of the
Record and gratefully acknowledge my
indebtedness for their generous confi
dence and support during these many
years. I commend the Chicago Record-
Herald, under its new management, to
their equal favor. —Victor F. Lavrson.
The Times-Herald on Thursday morn
ing will become the Record-Herald.
Frank B. Noyes, publisher of the Wash
ington Star and President of the Asso
ciated Fress, has acquired an interest in
the Record-Herald and will be its pub
lisher, H. H. Kohlsaat devoting his en
tire time to the editorial conduct of the
Record-Herald.
ENGLISH BUY HORSES.
MONDAY'S RECEIPTS AT CHICAGO
BREAK THE RECORD.
CHICAGO. March 26.—The Chicago
horse market broke the record of re
ceipts yesterday, there having arrived at
the Dexter park amphitheater. Union
stockyards, during the day, 1,697 horses
in 144 cars, constituting the largest num
ber ever received in one day. The hTgh
est previous record was June 13, 189S,
when 1,608 head arrived. The receipts
for the month of March thus for show
a gain of 2,657 over the corresponding
period of last year, and the month of I
February showed a gain of 2,030 over
February, 1900. Over 100,000 horses are
sold on this market yearly.
A large number of the horses now be
ing purchased in this market are for the
English army. A great fact is that a
large proportion of this consignment
consists of horses bought specially for
English army officers, many of the
mounts having been already selected es
pecially for certain officers who prefer
the American horse to any other.
WRECKED IN MONTANA
PASSENGER TRAIN DERAILED AND
A MMBER HIRT.
HELENA, Mont., March 26.—The south
bound passenger train on the Great Falls
& Canada road, narrow gauge, connect
ing Lethbridge, N. W. T., and Great
Falls, was wrecked near Steel, twenty
five miles north of Great Falls, by the
trucks of /the baggage car leaving the
rails. The sleeping car, containing eight
passengers, and the day coach, contain
ing twelve, were turned entirely over and
rolled down the embankment.
The passengers injured are: Mrs. Phil
McGovern, San Francisco, cut on head;
John Conroy, soldier returning from the
Philippines, hands and wrists broken;
Mrs. A. Devine, Pondera, cut on head;
her two children were injured. Mrs. De
vine was accompanying the body of her
husband to Great Falls for burial; Mrs.
Fowler, Steel, jaw broker and hurt in
ternally; Gamble, traveling man from
San Francisco, hurt about back and hips.
The injured were taken to Great Falls.
CHANCE FOR SETTLERS.
LARGE TRACT TO BE DETACHED
FROM FOREST RESERVE.
WASHINGTON, March 26.-About
twenty-four whole and fractional tcvn
ships embraced in what is knov/n os
the Methow A-alley, Washington, and
within the Washington torest reserve
probably will be detached from that
reserve and opened to settlement iv. a
few months. The . commissioner of the
general land office has recommended 10
the secretary of the interior the elimina
tion of this area of about 160,840 acres
from the reserve. These lands have
been carefully examined by the g-ovt-n>
ment forestry oihelais rrd found to be
more suitable for agriculture than for
forestry reserve purposes.
OFFERED TO P. C. KNOX
PRESIDENT HAS TENDERED HIM
THE ATTORNEY GENERALSHIP.
WASHINGTON, March 26.—The presi
dent has sent for Mr. P. C. Knox, the
Pittsburg attorney. He is expected nere
Thursday, when the attorney generalship
will be offered him.
PITTSBUIiG, March 20.—P. C. Knox,
whom President McKinley has asked to
join his official family as attorney general,
is in the city, but denies himself to all
callers and nothing can be learned to
night as to whether or not he will ac
cept the offer.
M."Jf. Borv ling to Snenlc.
FARMING TON, March"; 26.-(Special )—
The Dakota County Educational associa
tion will be tendered a banquet by the
citizens of Farmington Friday " night.
Gov. B. R. Van Sant and Hon. M. J
Dowling will speak. .
"The/ Burlington" surveying pai-ty ar
rived ;in Farmington j Monday.- night, and
have commenced .-operations : from this
place on the proposed; road from Fari
-Lauit tc St; Paul. ■ - . • :.
WEDNESDAY MORNING, MARCH 27, 1901.
-~T '—11 H 1 |l " Khttjt'l i" U m ' ■;-]—>
BUSY TIMES FOR A BIG BEAR.
—Chicago Tribune.
ii inn
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH., FACTORY
SHIT DOWX BECAUSE OP
THE FLOOD
RAILROADS SUFFER DAMAGE
Grand Rapids & Indiana and Pere
Marynette Lines Have Troubles
of Their Own—Wet in
Wisconsin, Too.
GRAND RAPIDS, Mich., March 2t>.—
Grand river tonight reached the high
water mark of 1893. 12 feet 6 inches, and
is rising an inch an hour. The Rouge,
Flat and Thornapple, three big tribu
taries are pouring a swollen iiood into
the Grand.
All the factories along the canals in
this city have been shut down and their
basements are flooded. A portion of tha
Ninth ward is flooded. The Pere Mar
qu&tte railroad bridge is in danger, the
water being nearly level with the string
ers. Hundreds of acres of low lands
along the river, north and east of the
city are flooded, but as yet no buildings
are reported carried away from founda
tions, though many are partially sub
merged. Crockery Hook, a tributary of
the Grand, north of the city, is out of
its banks and the big dam owned by
the Foster-Winchester company at
Slocum behind which was stored more
than 1,009,000 gallons of water, gave way
and the road bed, ties and track were
torn out for a considerable distance. The
water flooded the* camp, and did great
damage along the course of the creek.
The Grand Rapids and Indiana railroad
men are watching Cedar river at Cedar
Springs very closely.
The stream is very high and is report
ed to be rising, but tfie bridge Is still
above the water. Near Kinney, on the
Grand Rapids & Indiana, the water is
up even with the tics, and much uneasi
ness is felt about the situation there.
IONIA, Mich., March 26.—The Grand
river here has risen twenty inches since
morning and is still going higher. All
the railroad bridges are being watched
carefully. Portions of the city are four
feet under water. Three dams along
Maple river went out today and the dam
at Kidderville also gave way, doing greiH
damage to farmers.
ST. JOE RIVER RAGING.
MILES, Mich., March 26.—The St. Jo
seph river is higher than it has been for
several seasons and the water is dashing
over the clam in torrents. In consequence
of the high water, mills No, 1 and 2, of
the Niles Board and Paper company, and
French's pulp mill have been obliged to
close down arid 200 people are temporarily
out of employment.
Weaver's island is entirely inundated
and the house on it is standing in water.
The lower South bend road, just above
the mills, is overflowed to the depth of
several feet and it is impassable. Tlfe
home of Frank Johnson, a big Four
section foreman, is surrounded by water
to the depth of four feet and the cellars
of many other houses in that vicinity
are filled with water. If the river con
tinues to rise the water will soon reach
the Big Four tracks near the station.
IN WISCONSIN.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., March 26.—A
small patch of the ice gorge at Saukville
gave way this forenoon, partially reliev
ing the village. The water which cov
ered the sidewalks last night has disap
peared, but the river has swollen and
there is yet considerable danger to
bridges and property along the Mil
waukee river between Saukville and this
city. Fear is felt for Grafton and Thiens
ville, which will be in tbe path of th.>
flood when the gorge gives away.
A small ice gorge in the Milwaukee
river north of North avenue, broke loose
about noon and carried away the foot
bridge over the dam south of North ave
nue.
The bridge was converted 'nto a tangled
mass of iron and boards at the foot of
the dam. The loss will be about $10,000.
A Journal special from Sheboygan,
Wis., says: Reports from the Pigeon
river in this county tell of Arndt's im
mense dam being washed out, doing large
damage. The Bliss briige on the lake
shore road was carried away and another
bridge between there and Plymouth is
gone.
A special to the Sentinel from Baraboo,
Wis., says: „ "
The Wisconsin river has overflowed its
banks and the low lands between liere
and Fortage are flooded. Traffic between
these two points has been suspended.
William J. Bell, manager of the Bara
boo Telephone company, had a narrow
escape from being drowned. He drove
from Portage last night and was caught
in a washout and had to swim his horses
several rods.
MUST FIGHT 1011
PEACE NEGOTIATIONS WITH THE
BOERS HAVE PROVEN WORSE
THAN USESLESS
MOKE TROOPS' ARE NEEDED
Unless the British War Office Cau
Give Kitchener Ample Reinforce
ments, -Guerrilla Warfare Will
Continue Indefinitely.
LONDON, March 27.—The Pretoria and
Bloemfontein correspondents of the
Times send long dispatches declaring
that Lord Kitchener's policy and opera
tions have failed to 'achieve the object
hoped for and point oat that the British
public must demand the original policy
of occupying districts and establishing
military posts as the only means of
pacification.
This process, the correspondents say,
will occupy much time and necessitate
a constant supply of fresh troops. The
strain on both officers and men has been
and will be immense and arrangements
must be made to send absolutely fresh
troops to the front in order to enable
the others to be sent home.
"Unless this aspect of the case is
grasped by the authorities," say the ad
vices to the Times, "there is a possibility
of the war lasting for years. It is quite
useless to renew peace negotiations.
Nothing approaching 'terms' as the word
is generally used will be politic or even
of service with the Boers."
The Cape Town correspondent of the
Daily Express reports the capture of
100 Boers and ISO coionials in a rocky
defile near Richmond, last Thursday. He
asserts that the colonials lost thirteen
men before they surrendered, adding that
they were all liberated after having
been stripped of their
VRYHEID, Monday, Jtfarch 25.—Gen.
French, with Dartnal's and Pulteneys
columns, arrived here today, having
killed, wounded or captured 1,200 Boers.
He has also taken several cannon, 1,000
rirlfs, I.SOO wagons and 226,000 head of
horses, cattle and sheep.
LONDON, March 27.—The dispatch
from Vryheid is regarded as giving the
total of Gen. French's captures through
out his operations. It indicates, there
fore, the capture of one additional gun
and of additional Boers and war ma<
terial.
MILNER DISSATISFIED.
LONDON, March 27.—The Daily Ex
press prints a rumor that Sir Alfred
iVJilncr is dissatisfied with his qualified
authority and has asked the government
to give him "either a free hand or no
hand." Mr. Chamberlain is said to have
replied that it would not be. advisable to
disassociate the authority of Sir Alfred
Milner from that of Lord Kitchener and
the rumor goes that Sir Alfred con
templates resigning.
•It is an open secret," says the Dally
Express, "that Sir Alfred Milner has
long chafed at having Lord Kitchener
at his elbow to check or modify his pro
posals."
OTTAWA, Ont., March 26.—The first
train bearing repruii.s for the South
African constabulary left for Halifax
this afternoon. There was a noticeable
absence of the enthusiasm incident to
the departure of Jha first contingent a
few months ago.
LINERS FOi=BOUND
BIG OCEAN STEAMERS CAX>T
REACH NEW YORK CITY.
NEW YORK, March 20.-The dense fog !
which has hung over this, section of the |
Atlantic coast for the last few days has
upset the calculations, of the agents of
the various steamship lines, and has !
caused delay in the landing of ocean
travelers at this port. It took the Cu
narder Etruria a full day to grope her
way from Sandy Hook to her dock, and i
two of the big liners, the Kaiser Wil- j
helm der Grosse and the Friedand, were
at quarantine this evening, afraid to ven
ture up to the city, md sought a sale
anchorage in the uprv c bay.
The Vaderland made her dock a little
after 10 o'clock.
The Ward liner Ward Castle, from
Havana, with 180 passeners aboard, also
succeeded in reaching her pier. The Pan
ama steamer Finance, and the Atlas liner
Eno, from Central American ports, were
also reported at quarantine.
A large vessel, supposed to be the At
lantic liner Ma¥quette,was reported from
Sandy Hook in the early evening, but
she had not made quarantine up to a late
hour.
BULLETIN OF
IMPORTANT NEWS OF THE DAY
Weather Forecast for St. Paul:
Fair; Northerly Winds,
I— Thief Untie a Bluff.
Rivers Over Their Hank*.
Japan Will Fight Russia,
Iloer AVmr Draff* On.
2—Dr. Aiieker'.s Hard Fight.
Five Hurt in Wreck.
Mrs. PillMlmry's Will.
News of tlie Conrts.
,3—Legislative Doings.
No Ran on Cigarettes.
News of Northwest.
4—Editorial Page.
The Golden Idol.
— Sporting: New*.
Say They Are Lotteries.
■ Teaeli "by Stereopticon.
6—Nevis of Railroad*.
Popular Wants.
7—Markets "of the World.
Cliie-ngo May Wheat, 75 I-2c.
Bar Silver, «O I-4e.
Slocks Closed Strong-.
—Swagger Spring:. Bonnets.
Pioneers Meet in May.
WEATHER FOR TODAY.
Minnesota. Wisconsin and lowa—Gener
ally fair Wednesday, fi esh northerly
winds. Thursday probably fair.
North Dakota and South Dakota—Fair
Wednesday with rising temperature;
southerly winds. Thursday rain or snow
and colder.
Montana—Cloudy with occasional snew
Wednesday; colder in northern portion,
winds becoming northerly. Thursday
For Montana—Cloudiness with occasion
al snow Wednesday; colder in northern
portion, winds becoming northerly.
Thursday fair.
St. Paul — Yesterday's observations,
taken by the United States weather bu
reau, St. Paul, P. F. Lyons observer, for
the twenty-four hours ended at 7 o'clock
last night.— Barometer corrected for tem
perature and elevation: Highest temper
ature, 30; lowest temperature, 27; average
temperature, 28; daily range, 16; barome
ter, 29.74; humidity, SO; precipitation, .05; 7
p. it-, temperature, 28; 7 p. m., weather
cloudy; wind, north.
Yesterday's temperatures—
*SpmHigh< *Spml-ligii
Battleford ...22 2-4 Detroit 42 14
Bismarck ....30 34, Edmcnton . 3% 40
Calgary 38 40 Galveston ....62 6i>
Duluth 20 18 Grand Haven 32 42
Edmcnton ...38 40 Green Bay . ..32 36
Havre <12 52 Jacksonville .70 76
Helena 34 40 Kansas City..4o 10
Huron 34 40 Marquette ...26 26
Medicine Hati4 50 Montgomery .62 68
Mmnedosa ...24 32 Montreal 36 40
Prince Albert 22 £5 Nashville ....54 5S
Qu'Appelle ...20 26 New Orleans.64 t>B
Swift Current3B 44 New York . 44 46
Williston 34 36 Norfolk ......60 70
"Winnipeg ....22 28 North Platte.4o 46
Alpena 30 42 Omaha 38 88
Buffalo 3G 40 Philadelphia .58 58
Boston 40 40 Pittsburg ....42 50
Cheyenne ....38 S. Francisco..s4 56
Chicago 32 42 St. Louis ....41 41
Cincinnati ...12 52 Salt Lake ...34 S6
Cleveland ....44 44 Ste. Marie ...26 30
Davenpart ...38 40 Washington ..50 64
Dcs Mcines...3l 40
■Washington time (7 p. m. St. Paul).
OCEAN LINERS.
New York.—Arrived: Furnessia, Glas
gow; La Gascogne, Havre; Kaiser Wil
helm der Grosse, Bremen, etc.; Friesland,
Antwerp; Vaterland, Southampton, etc.
Sailed: Cymric, Liverpool; Lahn. Brem
en, via Southampton.
Gibraltar — Arrived: Kaiserin Maria
Theresa from New York for Naples and
Genoa.
Plymouth—Sailed: Pretoria, from Ham
turg and Boulogne, New York.
Auckland—Arrived: Sierre, San Fran
cisco, via Honolulu, for Sydney, N. S. W.
Bremen—Sailed: Rhein, New York.
Sydney. N. S. W.—Sailed: Aoranga.
Vancouver.
Liverpool—Sailed: Lake Ontario, Hali
fax and St. John, N. B.
Portland, Me.—Arrived: Arcadian, Glas
gow.
AT NEW YORK HOTELS.
From St. Paul—R. A. Hauser, Noi*
mandie; Thomas Cochran. Hollands-
From Minneapolis—Sid Raymond, W. T.
Watkins, Holland: Stanley Washburn,
Fifth, A\enue; D. Simon, T. Byrnes, Hoff
man.
From Duluth—G. A. Weiland, Grar.d
Union.
From Winona—F. E. Gotlieb. Grand.
From La Crosse—D. A. McDonald, Im
perial.
AROUND THE HOTELS.
At the Windsor—Dr. W. C. Mooro,
Eveleth; W. 11. Mayie. Duluth; F. Olcott
and wife, St. Croix, Wis.; Mr. and Mrs.
C. G. Pound, Owatonna; F. F. Smith,
Minneapolis: George W. Benedict, Sank
Rapids: C. H. Wall. Faribault; Joseph
Tysen, Redwood Falls: F. E. Pulmont.
Blue Earth; O. F. Wetzroth, St. Cloud;
G. F. Barr, Mankato.
At the Clarendon—P. J. Lappin, West
Superior, Wis.; John Shortall, Kilkenny;
E. E. Larson, M. Larson, Stockholm,
Wis.; W. A. Horlor, Stillwater; J. H.
Quist, Goodhue: J. Hoffmann, Owatonna;
Edmund P. Neill, Red Wing; J. J. Salfer,
Mankato; Charles Pfohl, Livingstone,
Mont.; W. H. McDonald, Miles City, io.;
W. V. Chase, Winona.
At the Ryan—Mrs. H. S. Youman, Wi
nona: Johr. A. Gregg. Burlington, Io.;
W. B. Silvey, Duluth; Mrs. H. E. Scriver,
Seattle, Wash.; J. Semhcta, Kasson.
At the Merchants'—E. Adams. West
Superior, Wis.; J. D. Porter, Duluth; A
T. Peterson, Bismarck; Robert Carr Ma
son City, Io.; E. J. Whitney, Grand'Han
ids, Wis.; N. M. Watson, Red Lake
Falls; T. C. Power, Helena. Mont.; T.
Johnston. Graceville: H. E. Heath.
Omaha, Neb.; E. J. Rochon. Fort Wil
liams; J. C. Koehn, Mount Lake; James
London, * Fort Dodge, Io.; A. W. Gates,
Helena, Mont.; W. E. Minor, Daven
port, Io.; E. R. Day, Detroit: J. C. Mor
rison, Mora; John G. "Walsh. Richland
Center; J. A. Tawney, Winona; A T
Stebbing, C. C. Willson, Rochester; E. A.
Carpenter, Plainview; C. J. Grove Owa.
tenna; Mrs. G. A. Barker. Shell Lake,
Wis.; S. Sansburg. Cooperstown, N. D.•
C. J. Campbell, Fargo, N. D.; John Palm,
Litchfield; H. W. Stone, Benson; C. S.
Benson. St. Cloud; B. F. Hartohn. Walk
er; L. J. Brown, Alexandria; Mrs. N D
Barker, Sauk Center; H. Ragland, Ben
ten; A. T. Patterson, Bismarck, N D.;
M. A. Hansen. G. Chan-Iler. F. P. French
Osage, Io.; W. Breen and wif<-, Fort
Dodge, Io.; Frances Enright. Mankato;
N. Bartholomew, Dcs Molnes, Jo.; H. C.
Akers, M'efikatQ; W. N. Fuller, Cumber
land, Wis.
At the Metropolitan—P. J. Martin and
Wife, Fond dv Lac; Albert Steinhauser,
Newi'lm; 11. Raymond. West Superior;
John F. Stone, Pine C ty; M. E. Gallagher
Braintrd; H. Swcnson, Duluth; A. G. Har
rington, Saginaw; T. O. Austin, Mar
quette.
WON'T INSURE IN NEVADA
STANDARD COMPANIES ODJECT TO
VAUED POLICY LAW.
SAN FRANCISCO, March 26.—The
" Evening Post says:
Owing to the passage by the legislature
of Nevada of a valued policy law over
the governor's veto, the coast represent
atives of nearly all the standard insur
ance companies have decided to write no
new risks in the state of Nevada. Exist
ing policies will be allowed to expire.
PKICE TWO eENTS-f %£&»*: \
SAYS WAR IS INEVITABLE
Japanese General Predicts Armed
Conflict at no Distant Date Be-
tween Japan and Russia.
THE STRUGGLE WILL BE OVER KOREA
Island Nation Keeps Close Watch on i
the Bear, and Is Ready and
Anxious to Fight.
PTTTSBURG. March 26—X. Yatsuma.
a g.eneral of the Japanese imperial army.
accompanied by Captains N. Kayamoi and
L. Matusi. passed through Pittsburg to
day, en route to California.
They have been in this country for the
past three weeks securing data for the
benefits of the imperial army, and in
tended remaining for three or more
months, but were called home.
Gen. Yatsuma said:
''According to the communications I
'nave received from my government, I
think that a conflict between my country
and Russia is inevitable. While I have
rot been officially notified I think the ob
ject of my superiors in calling me home
is for the purpose of making prepara
tions for a war with Russia.
"Japan and Russia are bound to come
together sooner or later as a result of
the contention over Korea. This fact
seems to nave become more evident since
the outbreak of hostilities in China, and
if such an engagement must occur,
Japan is better equipped at present arid
will doubtless hasten a termination of
this long-standing dispute. Russia's ulti
mate intention is to seize Corea, but we
shall never give up the land without a
struggle."
ultimate intentio is to seize Korea, but
we shall ever gi,ve up the land without
a struggle."
JAPANESE NAVY WATCHFUL.
NEW YORK. March 2-16.—The Rev. 3.
L. Baldwin, recording secretary of the
Met'nodist Episcopal Missionary society
in this city, who was in Korea in the
early part of IS9B, while on a tour devoted
to the inspection of missions, said today
of the Korean situation:
"When I was in Korea it was just it
the time relations between Russia and
Japan were very much strained as they*
are today, Russia's efforts then to oust
McLeavy Brown were the <^ause of t'hfi
crisis, as at the present. At every port
where I was if there happened to be a
Russian man-of-war, there was sure to
be a Japanese war vessel also. If the
Russian Jeft the port, the Japanese ves
sel Immediately got up her anchor ani
steamed away in fne same direction.
The Japanese evidently were keening
very close watch upon the Russians
everywhere. Several times also an
American gunboat dropped around and
seemed to be keeping very well posted.
"If the present situation should de
velop into war. Japan should certainly
have tlje moral support of the United
States, Great Britain and Germany. If
she does not have the moral support—
whic'n some times counts for something
—it will be because the three govern
ments in question are blind to their own
interests and indifferent to the demands
of humanity. The Tnited States in par
ticular should be willing to assume a
proper share of the responsibility. We
have too often in the past let England
do Tne whole work, and then come in
ourselves for a full share of the bene
fits afterwards."
LATEST SHANGHAI RUMOR,
LONDN, March 27.—The Shanghai cor
respondent of the Times, wiring yester
day, said: "I am informed on the best
authority that the Chinese court has in
structed Li Hung Chang to inform the
ministers of the powers that China has
refused to sign the Manchurian conven
tion and has also notified all viceroys to
the same effect. Tt is further asserted
that the court seriously contemplates a
removal of the capital from Pekin."
NOT FAVORED AT BERUH.
Sir Robert Hart's Plan in Matter of
Chinese Indemnity.
BERLIN, March 28.—Sir Robert Harts
proposal to settle Chinas liability by in
ternal taxes does not meet with favor
here either officially or in the press.
Count yon Buelow is sttil of the opinion
that an increase in sea tolls woald be
the best method and Dr. Steubels mis
sion to London is partly intended to re
move England's objections to such a
course.
"The doubling of sea tolls will in no
way interfere with European trade with
China,'" says the Vossische Zeitirng, and
it would aiso assure steady repayments
which internal taxes would not Insure.''
The view said to be held in Washing
ton that the United States should receive
$25,000,000 as indemnity and Germany $GO,
--000,000 is ridiculed by the German press
of every shade as unfair and not cor
responding with the sacrifices made by
Germany.
"If the United Stales with their 1,660
troops in China claims $25,000,000,"' says
the Kreuz Zeitung, "Germany, with al
most 25,000 men there ought to get 5400,-
OC6.000."
The reports that the United
States government will protest
against the removal of Mr. McLeavy
Brown, as Korean collector of customs,
Is not credited here. "Such a protest."
said the Lokal-Anzeiger, "would have no
effect when America is withdrawing her
few forces from China and Russia is
strengthening hers, for the benefit of
Korea."
The Vossiche says: "Korea has an un
der* ted right not to renew the contract
regarding Mr. McLcavy Brown, particu
larly in view of the fact that three year 3
ago she promised not to appoint any
more Europeans."
Mr. Brown's dismissal is interpreted 'n
the press generally as showing Great
Britain and Japanese influence is declifir
in? in Korea.
The press claim that America is not
COWARPLY ASSAtILT
OM AGEp JOWA COUPLS
-FORT DODGE, fo., March 26 -Mr. ana
Mrs. Edward Dineen, ar. aged couple liv
ing a few mile 3 from this city, ar* lying
at the point of death as the result of an
assault made upon them by two unknown
men tonight. Mr. Dineen answered a
knock at the door, and on opening was
thrown and clubbed over the head. Mrs.
Dineen went to her husband's rescue,
OFFICIAL PAPER
OF THE
CITY OF ST. PAUL.
interested in Korean affairs and will not'
ir terfere.
A dispatch from Field Marshal Walderxj
sec, dated Pekin, March J5, .says: Majj
yon Mulemann'.s detachment which start*
ed a fe-w days ago on a punitive expedfc
tion from Pao-Ting-Fu encountered rob-»
ber iiand^ eastward of Tao-Ma-Kuan,
Mfirch 22 and .4, and dispersed them with,
slight resistance.
RIDICLLE UNCLE SAM
London Press Comment on Idle fro*
teat at Mnnehurlan Agreement. ■•
LONDON, March 27.—The Morning Post
in the course of a sarcastic editorial deal
ing with the memorandum of the United:
States government on the \Manchurlan,
convention, says: --^
'"The only thing that can bring the
powers together in support of China -
against Russia is the initiative of tha
, British government, of which, however !
: there is no sign."
The Daily Chronicle discussing the
same subject, says: "The United Slates :
government objects, yet declines to light..
It is not a very dignified attitude, but it'
is at least clearly defined and intel
ligible. i.. : %:
"Owing to the South African complies-'
tions, the British government apparently
does not see its way to repeat the tour
de force of Fashoda and has made up
its mind to swallow the snub as best it
may."
— -^
BACKED BY A WARSHIP
COXSIL. GE\EHAI, 6EMHKRE WILL?
ASK MOROCCO TO SETTLE.
WASHINGTON, March 26.—Admiral
Rogers cables from Tangier, «\lorocc<\ to
the navy department, that he arrived At
that port this morning on the- Now York;
He is to take the United States Ceusu)
General Gummere to Mazargan.
Upon being advised by the navy depart*
rcent that the New York had arrived at
Tangier, the state department Immedi
ately sent a cablegram to Consul Gen
eral Gummere directing him to beard tha
New York at once and go forward ori
his special mission. Something is left to
Mr. Gummere's discretion as to the exe
cution of the details and it is for him
to say whether he will be satisfied if the
sultan and coart meet him half way to
Mazargan, or whether he will proceed
according to the original programme,
directly to Morocco City. It probably will
make no difference in principle, provide d
the necessary explanations arc afforded
of the treatment our consul has received;
and provision be made for settling the
claims. These are- not very large, fa
the aggregate probably $60,000 will cover
thorn all, or less than half an indemnity
that was summarily collected by Ger
many a short time ago of a precisely sim
ilar class of claims. But it can be stated
that if the court dors not appear at
Mazargan by the third Week in April,
then Consul General Gummere will go to '
Morocco City.
WHOLESALE SWINDLER
LOUIS ADAMS WORKED CIHKITA-
BLY I.VCI,I\KO IV MANY CITIBS.
BOSTON, March 26.—The police depart
rrient, which has been busy for some
days, following the movements of Louis
V. R. Adams, who was arrested here
two weeks ago charged with swindling;
have found out that the nan has carried
on operations in many of the prim i: 1
cities of the country and that in most
ol them the authorities would like to
get hold of him. His alleged method in
this city was to obtain contributions for
charitable institutions which he claimed
ti> represent. The advi< cs received by the
police indicate that lie Invariably has
pursued this plan at other points. He is
hfcld here under $4,006 bail for the grand
jury. After the arrest of Adams, Chief
Inspector Watts sent letters to various
police officials giving a description and
a photograph of the prisoner and asking
for identification, if possible. Replies re
ccuntlng operations of the man have
come from New York, Buffalo, Chatta
nooga. Milwaukee, Toledo, Ovid, Mlcb.|
Fort Wayne and Indianapolis.
NEW ARMY RATION.
JIMMY GRBBT-CAIH EAT MOKC SU-
GAR HERBAFTBS.
WASHINGTON, March 26.—President
McKinley today approved the new army
ration prepared under the direction of
Gen. Weston, chief commissary. Ttia
principal change is in the Increase ; of
the sugar ration, being 20 pouml.i to each
100 rations instead of 15 pounds ac hero
tofore. The vinegar component, which
was 8-25 of a gill, is changed by allow
ing half of that amount In c.uoiimber
pickles when desired. Tn the fruit com
ponent 12-5 ounces of jam is allow, for
the field ration in place of 13- r > ounces
of dried or evaporated fruit, which Is
the allowance for the garrison ration. A
change, is made in the travel ration by
allowing the canned tomatoes to: be
served on the first day instead of the
fourth as heretofore.
and was struck in the face aixS badly
beaten. When their, work was finished
the men disappeared. Nothing was tak
en from the house., so :it is thought the
assault was prompted by a desire' for
revenge. The - victims are more than.
■ eighty ■; years of age. The : surrounding?
country: is being scoured for the assail**
ants.

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