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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, May 29, 1901, Image 5

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1901-05-29/ed-1/seq-5/

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IiOCAIS BREAK EVEX \^TH KA5>
SAS CITY IV YESTiSR
DAY'S GAMES
FIELDING ERRORS LOSli FIRST
"Weinn-r for Yixitorn and K«GtU for
Home Team Prove Piiz/.lcs
for the Stick
ers.
Western League.
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Kansis City £5 18 --T . .70
St. Joseph 24 ll 30 .353
St. Paul ■ 24 13 11 .542
Minneapolis 23 12 11 .522
Colorado Springs ..22 10 12 .455
Omaha 23 10 13 .435
Denver 22 9 13 .40J
Dcs Moines 23 7 16 .204
St. Paul and Kansas City bioke iven
In the double header played at Lexington
yesterday; and the series, the scceni of
the season that Ryan's men have lest,
goes to Kansas City. In the opening
game Weimer \v.:.s in the box for the
visitors, and he had the Saints complete
ly at his mercy from start to finish, al
lowing but three hits and ke ping these
at least three innings apart, In the sec
ond inning Andrews got a in on the
ball and put it over Miller's h a.l in left
field for three hags. Th!s gave the fans
some hope thai Weimer mis'r.t net be 3^>
hard a rij osition as he has teen tout
<d, but they were mistaken. Not again
I'.y.i'A the sixth inning did he allow any
thing that approached a ht. In th s
inning Werden put the ball through the
diamond for a clean single, Mi: there
were two out ahe^ad of him, and Brain,
who followed, fanned. In the ninth Ryan
drove the ball through the short field for
a base, and reached third en the varioU3
plays that followed, but he cou'.d not get
in.
Thon Wilson were at the ; oints
for the Saints, and "Pop" sufie-el his
iirsi defeat this season. In spfte Of the
fact that the locals k>Bt, Thomas pltch
good same of ball. He allowed but
eight hit-- and ki-i t them well sjattsrel,
but live fielding errors behind him tell 3
the tale, and it is made Bi.*rongir when
it is known t;;.:t not one of the four runs
I !iv the visitors was e;:rn d.
TABLES TURNED IX SECOND.
In the second game the tables were
turned. MeGill and Holmes were called on
to niak>- pood for the Saints, and they
won out hands down. Willie n liv/f.l
beau's men but three hits, and. none
of them figured in ihe one run scored by
the visitors. This came through Dillard's
muff of Robinson's lung' fly in center.
Before Pat could get the ball aek, Rob-
Inson had reached third, and Messaer al
lowed him to score on the ihr >\vu-ln.
It was the general impression of many in
the grand stand that Robinson ki: ke 1 the
ball when it was thrown to Bra!n In the
effort to cut him off at third, but M-s-mer
refused to see it, and Robinson trott'efl
home. Tt was in this second gama that
Brain won . v. rlasting glory for himself
by putting the ball far out in the left
liold for the llrst home run that has been
made on the Lexington grounds thi3 sea
son. And lluggins got into the game
with his stick by planting the tall in
left center for three bags. In the sec
ond nning of this game Crocks received
a hurt hand from a high fly off Seville's
bat, and Holly was railed int > thtgame,
taking the short field, whi'e Huggins
went to second. In this game Dillard
also replaced 'ogan in center. He had
but one chance in the field and he missed
that, but his batting eye has evidently
returnpd, for he landed on the ball for
three safe drives. Wolfe did the twirling
for the visitors in the second game, and
pitched the easiest bnll that Ins locals
have scon this year. Every one hut Rya n
connected safely with the ball at least
oncp.
The Saints scored their enly run in the
first sume in the second inning. Brain
was first up and flew out to Hardesty
Andrews put the ball in deep left for
three hags find came in on Huggins' hit
to the infield, Huggins landed safely on
first base owing to the fact that an ef
fort was made to cut Andrews off at the
plate. Wilson and Thomas followed and
both fanned. The visitors tied the score
in thelrr half on Seville's three-bagger
and O'Bricn's long fly to the outfield
Their next two scorea came in the
fourth. Hardcsty went out on a line fly
to Huggins. Beville reached first on
Cogan's mutt and went half way ro.ind
the circuit before the ball was' fielded
in. O'Brien flew out to Huggins. Rob>
lnson also hit to Huggins and the
youngster made a, bad fumble and before
he coi!ld recover Robinson was on first
nnd Ueville on third. Both scored on
Messett's hit. Weimer drew a base on
balls, but Ketchum retired the side with
a strike out. The final sccre for the
visitors c&mc In the seventh. Hartman
reached first on Ryan's muff and went
to second on the play Miller flew out to
Crooks. Hardesty hit to center for a
base. «>gan made a bad mess of the
throw-fn nnd ilartman scored. Hardesty
was cuupht In an effort to steal second
Seville hit iafely, but OBri.-n sent a
line drive to Brain, which the latten
caughl and the side was cut. The score-
Kirsi Game,
„Sl• IMii!- AB. R. 11. PO. A. E.
Crooks, 2b 4 0 0 3 2 0
£ogan, ef 4 0 0 0 0 2
Ryan. If 4 0 12 0 2
Viii: tl<n- lb 4 0 17 10
Brain. 3b 4 0 0 2 1 0
Andrews, rf r? 1 1 1 0 0
Huggins, ss 4 0 0 <*• 2 1
5L llaon - c SO 0 r. i 0
Thomas, p......... 2 0 0 12 0
Totals 32 1 1 27 9 ""5
Kansas City- AB. R. H. po. A. E
Ketchuni, cf 4 0 l 3 a 0
Hartman, rf 4 1 1 fi 0 0
Miller, It 5 0 0 0 0 l
Hardesty. ss 5 0 1 a 1 1
Beville. lb 4 2 3 9 0?
O'Brien, 2b .4 0 0 2 1 n
Robinson, 3b 8 10 10
iMessett, c 3 0 1 10 0 0
AY eimer, p 3 0 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 4 s 27 1 1
St- Paul 0 1000000 0-1
Ivansas City 0102 0010 o—4
Struck out, by Thomas 5. by Weimer
10; bases on balls, off Thomas 2 off
Weimer 1; hit by pitched ball, bv'Wei
mer Andrews; three-base hits. Andrews.
tsevme; first base on errors, St. Paul 1
Kansas City 4; stolen bas-es. Huggins'
Robinson; wild pitch, Weimer- left on
bases St. Paul 0, Kansas City of sac™
flea hits, Ketchum, Hartmann, Messett
umpire, Messnor; time, 1:40. -uiss>elt.
BEGAN EARLY IN GAME.
Tiie Saint started the run geUing in
the seccna game in the second inning
Brain ■■•■- the first man in the inning
to face VVtHfo and hit the ball a smash-
Jng drlvo to left field that cent him
around the circuit Andrews followed
With a safe drive, but was caught at
second on Huggins" attempted sacrifice
and Holmes and McGill both fouled out
Holly opened the third Inning with a
clean hit past first base and went to
third on Dillard's hit through the dia
imond. Ryan sacrificed, scoring Holly
pud sending Dillard to secend. Werden
l;it safely and scored Dillard. Brain flew
out. Andrews was hit and Mcssner sent
him to first and both he and Werden ad
vanced a bn*r> .n Messett's passed ball.
Hugging drew four wide ones, but with
three n ■:, on l;>»or, . the best Holraea
could tin u-;«i a grounder to Hardesty
that forced Huggins at second.
The Snints piled up four more in the
fifth. Brain drew four wide ones and
Went to second on Andrews' sacrifice
Huggina put the ball into right field for
three hags and scored Brain. Holmes
followed with .1 line drive through the
Hhort field that scored Hugg'ns. McGill
hit safely back of second but was forced
at second on Hoy's hit to Hardesty;
Holmes scored on the play. Holly «ttole
second i nd scored on Dillard's s-'ife hit
bctwe-?n first and second. That ended
tiio nai tine for tin. mrine and the
game for Ryan went out from Robinson
to Beville, making the. third out, and
after this inning Wolfe allowed but on©
hit. The score;
St. Paul- AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Crooks, 2b 10 0 0 0 1
Holly, ss 5 2 13 2 0
Diliard, cf 5 13 0 0 1
Ryan, If 3 0 0 2 0 0
WerO'n, lb 5 0 18 0 0
Brain, 3b 8 2 13 2 1
Andrews, rf 3 0 2 10 0
Muggins, ss 4 1118 1
Holmes, c 5 119 0 1
McGill, p 4 0 10 2 0
Totals 38 7 11 27 9 5
Kansas City— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Ketchum, cf 3 0 0 2 0 0
Hartman rf 3 0 0 10 2
Miller, If 4 0 2 0 0 0
Hardesty. ss 4 0 0 2 3 2
Beville, lb 4 0 0 10 1 0
O'Brien, 2b 4 0 0 6 2 0
Robinson, 3b 3 1 0 1 2 0
Messett, c .4 0 0 4 1 0
Wolfe, p 4 0 1 2 5 0
Totals 3?. 1 3 27 14 4
St. Paul 0 1 2 0 4 0 0 0 o—7
Kansas City 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 o—l
Earned tuns, St. Paul 4; struck out, by
McGill 9, by Wolfe 2; bases on balls, off
McQlll 2, off Wolfe 4; hit by pitched ball,
by Wolfe, Andrews; three-base hits. Hug
gins, Miller; home run. Brain; first base
on errors, St. Paul 3, Kansas City 4;
stolen bases, Diliard, Ryan, Huggins;
wild pitch, W rolfe; passed ball, Messed;
left on bases, St. Paul Tz, Kansas City 8;
sacrifice hits, Ryan. Brain, Andrews,
Hartman; umpire, Messner; attendance
1,000; thr.e, 1:30.
DIAMOND DUST.
"Pop" Thomas has lost his first game,
but it was not a disgraceful defeat, and
he is loss to blame than the rest of them.
With JL'iilard's three hits in the last
game, it would have been easy money,
and amsther series would have been add
<•;( to K\ ,-in's string.
H.i:. played a beautiful game at short
after Crooks left the game. He hai? liv
chances and accepted them all". Two !
wen- difficult flics that he gathered in in ;
a most sensational manner, after ha;-'!
runs. On one he turned a complete com- j
ersault, but hung onto the. ball. The !
other was a one-handed catch at the end
of a hard run and a jump Into the air.
McGill was in excellent form yesterday, j
If Ryan had only known it, he might i
have had him pitch both games, for Wil- |
lie is the boy that can do the trick when i
he is on his mettle.
Hardesty managed to land three more |
errors in yesterday's games. After hay- j
ing Huggins it would drive the local j
fans crazy to sec some one playing St. '■
Paul's short field after the manner in I
which it la covered by Hardesty.
Mr. Weimer is quite a pitcher—one of
the best that St. Paul has rubbed up
against. In aJdition to letting the Saints
down with t'aree hits, he made ten of
them fan.
Ryan anO ('norm had a bad time in the
outfield in t!ii' first game. Ryan let two
flics get away from him, one of which ;
should have been an easy out. Oogan ]
also landed a team of bad ones, and fail- i
ed to make good with the stick.
EVKN BREAK IX MINNEAPOLIS.
MINNEAPOLIS, May 28.—A close de
cision in the ninth of the second game j
this afternoon made the double-header '
an even break. With one out and Me- |
Creedlc on first, Congalton sent one to
the fence. McCreedie scored, but Bren
nan called t'ongalton out at third, and
the home team's chances we're gone.
Scores:
FIRST GAME.
r. I
Minneapolis— AB. R. 11. PO. A. E. |
Belden, If 3 2 2 3 0 0 i
McCreedie, rf 4 2 1 0 0 o!
Congalton, cf ..'.... 4 2 2 3 0 0
Brashear. 2b 3 10 4 11
Tannehlll, lb 4 0 1 9 0 0 i
Cockman, ss 3 0 l n 2 0 j
King, 3b 2 0 0 2 2 0'
Klienow, c 30 1 6 2 Oj
Swormstcdt, p 3 0 0 0 5 0
• ______!
Totals .....29 7 8 27 12 1 I
St. Joseph— AB. R. H. PO. A. E. j
Honeyman, cf 2 0 0 1 0 0:
Flood, 2b 3 0 0 3 3 0 !
Hall, 3b 3 0 2 3 2 0!
Schrall. rf 2 0 10 0 0 i
Davis, lb 3 0 1 10 0 1 |
Hulswitt. ss 4 0 115 1 I
Rebsamen, If 4 o f) 1 0 0
Dooln, c 4 0 0 5 2 0
Underwood, p 4 0 0 0 1 1
Totals 2D 0 5 24 13 3
Minneapolis 4 0000003 • — j
St. Joseph 0 0000000 o—o ]
Earned runs, Minneapolis 3; bases on |
balls, off Swormstedt 5. off Underwood I
3; hit by pitened ball. King, Honeyman;
struck out, by Swormstedt 6 by Under- i
wood 3; sacrinco hits. King. Flood; left j
on bases, Minneapolis 3, St. Joseph r>;
double play. Hulswitt to Flood to Davis;
time of game, 1:25; umpire, Brennan.
SECOND GAME,
Minneapolis— - AB. R. H. FO. A E.
Belden, If 4 0 1 2 0 0
McCr< edie, rf 4 l o 2 0 0
t'ongalton, cf 4 0 1 l l o
Brashear, 2b 4 114 5 0
Tannehlll, 1b 3 0 1 10 0 0 '
Cockman, ss 3 1 1 3 8 l !
Kinpr. 3b 3 0 12 3 0
Kleinow, c 3 0 0 1 0 0
Wadswerth, p 3 0 0 0 2 0
Totals 31 3 6 *25 19 ~l
St. Joseph— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Honeyman, cf 5 1 2 3 0 0
Flood, 2b 5 0 0 2 3 0
Hall, 3b 3 1 12 2 C
Schrall, rf 4 2 3 0 0 0
Davis, lb 3 0 1 11 i o
Hulswitt, ss 4 0 10 2 0
Rebsamen, If 4 o o 3 2 0
Doom, c 4 0 15 0 0
Maupin, p 4 0 0 15 (i
Totals 3G 4 9 27 15 "o
Minneapolis 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 I— i
St. Joseph 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0—
•Maupin and Flood out on bunt strikes
Earned runs, Minneapolis l. St. Joseph
o; two-base hits. Braabear. Tannehill
Congalton; three-base hit, Hulswitt; wild
pitch, VCadsworth: bases on halls off
Wadsworth 2, ofr! Maupin 1; struck out, by
\\adsworth ;!, by Maupin :;; left on bases.
Minneapolis 1. St. Josepn 7: time of game
1:&>; umpire, Brennan; attendance, 1,500.
SLUGGING AT DES MOINES.
I>BB MOINES, May Denver turned
defeat into victory today after the third
inning. Hard hitting coupled with loose
playing, did it. No game tomorrow.
Score:
Thfe?. Olnes- A3 R fH- PO. A. E.
Thiel, 3b ; 3 1 3 2 1 0
Kennedy, S3 5 2 2 0 1 1
Warner, rf ..3 11 0 0
McVicker, cf 5 1 2 1 0 0
Hines, 2b 4-1232 1
O'Connel, lb 3 2 19 0°
Seisler, If 4 2 2 1 0 l
well, c 5 1 3 9 3 0
Morrison, p 3 0 10 5 0
Wiggs, p 1 0 0 0 6 1
Totals ....36 11 17 27 18 6
Denver— AB. R. H. PO. A. E
Mohler, 2b 3 2 4 2 G 0
Radcliffe, 3b . 5 2 1 2 0 1
Hickey. ss 6 1 3 3 2 0
Holland, cf & rf... 4 1 0 1 0 0
W. Sullivan, c 5 1 1 4 2 l
Bradley, rf 4 4 2 2 2 0
Preston, If 1 0 0 0 0 0
Brown, cf 4 3 3 10 0
J. Sullivan, lb 5 2 3 11 1 o
Butler, p 3 10 13 0
'McNeely, p 2 0 0 0 3 0
Totals 42 17 17 27 19 ~2
Dcs Moines 2 16 0 10 0 1 o—ll
Denver .... 0 1 0 1 3 2 6 2 2—17
Two-base hits, Thiel 2. Hines. Conwell
2, Seisler, Bradley, Hickey, J. Sullivan,
Mohler; double play, Morrison to Hines
to O'Connell; bases on balls, by Morrison
4. by Wiggs 5, by Butler 2, McNeely 1;
hit by pitched ball, by Morrison, Wiggs
Butler. McNeeley; struck out, by Mor
rison 2. Wiggs 3, McNeely 2; passed
ball, Conwell; time of game, 2:<jo; atten I
ance, '.000; umpire, Popkay.
ANOTHER FOR OMAHA.
OMAHA. May 2S.—Omaha took another
game from Colorado Springs today by
bunching hits hi the seventh and eighfh
ni.-kinp the first two victories in succes
sion thi.s s?ason. Score:
Omaim- AB. R. H. PO. A. E
Carter, If 3 0 1 l i i
Stewart, 2b 2 0 1 3 5 0
McAndrews, 3b 3 0 1 2 0 0
Lcu-her. rf 4 0 0 2 0 0
Calhoun, lb 4 1 o 7 2 0
Reid, cf 4 1 0 2 0 0
Toman, ss 4 2 3 2 0 0
Gonding, c -1 0 1 7 3 1
Graham, p 4 0 1 1 2 0
Totals 32 4 S 557 13 ~j>
Col. Springs— AB. R. 11. PO. A E
MoHale, ef 3 2 1 4 0 0
Hulen, rf 3 1; 2 2 0 1
Donahue, c 3 0 0 7 0 0
iirmpliiil. If .4 0 2 2 1 0
Law. lb 4 0 0 8 0 1
Shay, S3 2 0 0 0 0 0
Schaefer, :;b 3 0 0 1 2 0
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE, WEDNESDAY, JAY 29, 1901.
Holly, 2b S 0 0 0 * 0
Gasten, p 3 9 0 0 2 ft
Totals 28 8 6 24 8 2
Omaha 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 2 •— I
Colorado Springs..l 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 o—l
Earned runs, Omaha 1, Colorado Springs
1; two-base hit, Toman, three-base hit,
Gonding; sacifice hits, Stewart, Htjlen,
Donahue; stolen base. Shay 1; basea oil
balls, by Graham 6, by Gasten 3; hit by
pitched ball, Graham 1; struck out, by
Graham 6, by Gasten 6; time, 1:15; um
pire, Carruthers.
CO3IIXG CIiAMPI'OiXS.
The Floan & Leveroos baseball team
would like a game for Memorial day with
the Brown & Blgelows. Address George
Dunn, 209 West Third street, city.
The Birkhofers, Ole Olson, 644 Erie
street southeast, Minneapolis, manager,
challenge any team of nineteen-year-olds.
The Wilmots, through their manager,
A. Granberg, 2535 Thirtieth avenue south,
Minneapolis, challenge any ball team of
sixteen-year-olds in the state.
The Rapid Runners would like a game
with a twelve-and-a-half-year-oid team
for the championship. For games, call
at 903 Third street north, Minneapolis. '
Banners want games with Young Sham
rocks and the Whirlwinds for Memorial
day. Address 2S'J Cliff street.
Hart and Murphy team defeated Golden
Grain Belts at Minneapolis on Sunday.
Score, 10 to 2. Hart & Murphy want
games with any city seventeen-year-old
teams. F. Bossnard, manager, Eighth
and Jackson streets.
Joseph Kneip Stars defeated Black Dia
monds. Score, 2'i to 22. The Stars want
a game with any fourteen or fifteen-year
old team for any open date. Tom Carr,
manager, Gil Canada.
Young Crystals defeated Summit Stars.
Score; 18 to 16.
Quicksteps defeated ~ Weary Willies.
Score, 8 to 1. The. Quicksteps want a
game with the Ploan & Leveroos team
for Memorial day. •
University Stars are ready for a game
with any eighteen-year-old" team in the
city. They want to play a good team on
Decoration day. Adress Manager Grue,
611 Broadway.
The Comp Stars would like a game with
any eighteen-year-old club for Memorial
day. Address F. Swanson, 1026 Front
street.
The Crickets won their first game of
the season from the Gorman school Ri
vals, and also defeated the Young Cy
clones by score of 7 to 5. The feature
of the game was' the pitching and bat
ing of James Godette. For games with
the Crickets address Jack Lahifr, man
ager, 42. West Cook street.
GABRY HKHM.IN'S GOOD RACE.
Crack Turee-Yi-ar-Old iieut* 111 m
Field lv Handicap ut Huntliorae.
CHICAGO, May 28.—Garry Herman,
the king of Western three-year-olds,
made his first appearance of the season
today at Hawthorne and at last answer
ed the question as to whether he is to be
a i.m tor in the American derby. The
answer was in the affirmative. The colt
won a grand race from Boney Boy, at a
mile and a sixteenth. Boney Boy ran
vastly better than yesterday, when he
wan beaten by Strangest. Boney Boy and
Garry Herrman being the only starters.
Garry Herrman cut out the pace, with
Boney Boy right at his heels. Strangest
was unable te keep up and dropped out
of it at the half mile pole. Turning in
to the stretch Boney Boy made his chal
lenge, and it wa:s a strong one. x-lerr
man resisted vigorously, but despite his
efforts the four-year-old got a nock in
front. Woods drew his whip. At first
it made no effect on the Derby colt, but
at last the latter seemed to realize that
something more wns required, and with
bulldog courage he settled down, over
hauled Boney Boy, got his head to front
and kept it there to the finish. Garry
Herrman won the race on courage alone,
and is undoubtely one of the greatest
horses that, ever lived. He was un
questionably - .ort of condition, and to
day's race should do him a great deal of
good. He conceded Boney Boy 22 pounds,
but was a 7 10 10 favorite in the betting.
The weather was cool, with a small cy
blowin'g all afternoon.
First race, four and one-half furlongs.
selling—fiTßest Parham won, Hans "Wat*
ner second, Hat Mitchell third. Time,
Second race, mile—Operator won, Om
durman second, Wild.Pirate third. Time,
;.:r,.
Third race, five furlongs, selling—Magi
won, Dodie S second, The Esmond third.
Time, 1:02%.
Fourth race, free handicap, mile and
a sixteenth —Garry Herrman won, Boney
Boy second, Stranerest third. Time,
1:48%.
Fifth race, mile, Merito won, Livadia
second, Reseda third. Time. 1:11....
Sixth race, six furlongs—Alice Dough
erty won. Rival Dare second, Fireside-
third. Time, 1:1 G.
Entries for tomorrow:
First race, seven furlongs—Scarlet Lily,
97; Isaline, 100; Merito, 107; Lee King,
Charley Moore, 100.
Second race, five furlongs— Beck,
Blennenworth, 102; 'Legal Maxim, 104;
John A. Clark, 105; Red Hook, 107; South
Elkhorn, 112.
Third race, one mile, selling—Plead, S9;
Moses, 93; Uncle Tom. 94; Impromptu, 98;
Ida V, 99; Prestar, Senator Thompson,
106; Andes, li^r Knight Banneret, 116.
Fourth race, free handicap, seven fur-
Jckhnnie McC'arty, 98; Dyxonia, ICO;
Fancy wood, 102; Silurian, 106; Jiminez,
112.
Fifth race, mile and an eighth, selling—
Red Apple. 93; Little Eakin, 95; Trebor,
104: Espionage, 107; Ben Chance, 110.
Sixth race, five furlongs— Even
ing Star. Herz, Jennie Day, Wing Dance,
Chaminade, IC7; Nellie Waddell, 112.
Fluances for Athletic Meet.
OXFORD. May 2S.—No satisfactory ad
vices having yet come from the United
States Concerning the financial side of
the Oxford - Cambridge - Harvard - Vale
meeting, the athletic officials of the Eng
lish universities will have to base theilr
decision as to the ultimate feasibility of
the match on th;-> response to an official
appeal for publ'c subscriptions to a guar
antee fund. Thr treasuries of the ath
letic clubs of the universities are wholly
unequal to th<» expenses. Though they
will contribute thtiir share, they feel
they must have outside support In order
to prevent the meeting falling through.
Shamrock I < *<>m ins to Aiucrion.
GLASGOW, May 28.—After consultation
with Mr. Fife. Sir Thomas Lipton has
decided to send the Shamrock I. to
America with the challenger in order
! that lie may continue the trial races
1 right up to the date of. the cup races.
! This will cost an additional £4,000, but
: Sir Thomas is confident that the advan
. tage to be gained justifies the expense.
I ("apt. Wringe will command the Sham
| rock I. with the same crew as has sall
! Ed her here this season.
Ortiz Agulu lueaten.
NEW YORK. May 25.-The second
j same in the balk-line billiard match be
! tween Ora Morningstar and Jose Ortiz,
j the Spanish champion, was played to
; ni^rlit. It resulted In the defeat of Ortiz
! by a score of SCO to 65. The highest run
of Morningstar was 0). and his average
; was 21 ti-U. The highest run of Ortiz was
I 24, and his average 4 9-14. Three more
! games are to be played in the series.
, With two .sanies played the grand totals
i are: Morningstar, GOO! Ortiz, 337.
Crolter'a Horse* Win Tt»-o.
LONDON, May 2S—Richard Oroker's
Vipi r (J. Reiff) won the All-aged Maiden
plate at the Hurst Park club Whitsumide
meeting today.
Murray Griffith's Sim Grover (J. Reiff)
won the Holiday handicap. Blue Dia
mond was second, and A. M. Singer's
O'Donavan (Maher) finished third Thir
teen horses ran.
Mr. Croker's Minnie Dee (7. Reiff) beat
Air. EstCOtt'B Kccles in the race for the
Durham plate.
Trying: Otit Constitution.
Xl-:\VPORT, R. 1., May 2S.—The yacht
Constitute was out for about two hours
day to test sails and to drill the crew
The breeze was light, from the north
east, but the Constitutin footed fast with
only one mainsail, staysail and jib set
Capt. Rhodes was at the wheel and
tried the yacht on all the points the
sails setting well and the crew handling
them in good fashion.
Oin n Free Silver Hasls.
.D.EVnvS LAKE. N. D.. May 28.-fSp«
--rial.)—Devils Lake defeated Lakota t'nis
afternoon in a six-inning game of base
ball; score. It! to 1. Batteries: Devil's
Lake, Sessions and Gilmore; Lakota De
laTiey, Nelson and Hunt. Attendance
11 HINTS I!
<K*E TO XOTHIX6 CAME AT XEW
YORK LOST BECAUSE GIANTS
COO>I>NT BAT
QUAKERS WIN A HOT CONTEST
Only Run in Game 'With Cincim
Came In Eleventh. Inning-—
Pirates Lrose Close One
at Brooklyn.
National 'lie-Ague.
Player. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
New York ......—22 -'*■' H fc .<B(j
Cincinnati 26, 15 11 .577
Philadelphia 28 16 12 .571
"Pittsburg 27 -14 13 .519
Biooklyn ....26 "• : IS 13 .00*
Boston ....23 :: 10 13 .435
St. Louis 28 12 1G 429
Chicago 30 11 11) .367
NEW YORK. May 2S.—Matthewson
pitched splendidly agajnst St. Louis to
day, but the New Yorks could not bat
Powell, if anything, pitched a steadier
game than the college wonder. The win
ning run was made on a base on balls,
an out and Ryan's two-bagger. Score:
New York— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Van Haltren, cf ... 4 v 1 2 0 0
Selbach, If 4 0 0 2 0 0
Strang, 3b. 4 0 2 0 20
Hickman, rf 4 0 0 0 0 Q
Davis, ss 4 0 0 0 4 0
Ganzel. lb 2 ; v 1 14 0. 0
Smith, c .3 0 1 ,6 1 0
Nelson, 2b 3 0.0 2 2 0
Matthewson, p 3 0-1 1 5 0
Totals 31 0 6 27 Ti ~0
St. Louis— AB. R. H. PO A. E
Burkett, If 4 0 0 2 0 6
Heidrick, cf 4 0 1 4 0 0
McGann, lb 4 0 a 5 1 0
Donovan, rf 4.0 l 3 1 0
Padden, 2b 3 1 1 2 2 0
Wallace, ss 3 0 12 2 0
Krugerr3b 4 0 0 1 0 1
Ryan, c 1 .0 1 6 1 0
Powell, . p 4 0 1 2 2 0
Totals 34 1 8 27 9 ~1
New York 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
St Louis ...0 10 0 0 0 0 0 o—l
-First base by errors, New York 1; lef*
on bases, New York ti.St. Louis 9- two
base hit Van Haltren, Strang, Ryan
Heidrick; double play, Powell to Wallace
to McGann; hit by pitched ball Ganzel
Burkett; sacrifice hit. • Wallace; stolen
bases, Strang, Donovan; first base on
balls, off Matthewson '3, off Powell j
struck out, by Matthewaon t>, by Powoli
4; umpire, Dwyer; tinne, ,1:41; attendance
3,000. - _„.. , t
ERROR LOST THE GAME.
PHILADELPHIA, ilav 28.-CincinnaLi
was defeated in an el. yen-inning game
today by the locals, because of an error
Ihe pitchers were effective, but in the
eleventh Hahn weakened, and gave a
base on balls, which was followed by
two singles, filling the bases. Barry then
hit to Shortstop Alagpon, who fielded the
ball to the catcher to head off the run
ner, but Catcher Peitz dropped the ball
and the locals scored the needed run.'
Orth and McFarland were injured during
the game and were obliged to retire At
tendance, 1,420. Score:
Cincinnati— AB^ R. H. PO A E.
Mcßride, If 5' 0 2 10 0
Dobb3, cf 4 v 0 3 0 0
Berkley, lb 5 0 1 X) i 0
Crawford, rf 5 0 1 2 0 0
Steini. !dt, &> 5 0 2 1 0 (1
Irwin, 3b 5 0 1 1 0 1
Magoon, S s 8 0 0 2 :; i
Pfiitz. c 4 0 0 <7 0 l
Hahn, p 4 go t » 0
Totals 40 0 7 30 7 ~3
Philadelphia— AB. R. 11 FO A X
Barry, cf U o 2 2 <)' 0
Delehanty, lb 5 0 2 13 0 0
Flick, rf 5 0 1 2 o 0
Wolverton, 3b 3 o o 1 2 o
Slagle. If 4 0 0 4 0 0
J«cklitsch, c 3 0 0 4 0 0
McFarland, c 2 o 0 2 o o
Cross, S3 3 1 2 S 5 0
Hallmai), 2b >... 4 0 1 2 .", 0
Orth, p 1 o 0 0 3 0
Donohue, p 3 0 0 0 1 0
Totals 3ft 1 S 33 14 0
CSncinnaH ...0 o o o on o f> o 0 o—o
Philadelphia..o 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 I—l
Two-base hits. Mcßride, Steinfc-ldt; sac
rifice hit, Ilalhnan: stolen base, Barry;
left on bases, Cincinnati 8, Philadelphia
II; double play. Magoon to Beckley; first
base on balls, off Hahn 5, off Orth 2; hit
by pitcher, by Hahn 1; struck out. by
Hahn 7. by Orth 1, by Donohue 4; passed
ball.. Peitz; time, 2:25; umpire, EmSTiie.
GOOD STICK WORK WON.
BROOKLYN, May 23—Brooklyn won
today's game by bunching hits in the
: fifth and succeeding three innings. Pitts
burg knocked Kitson out of the box in
the fifth inning, and Brooklyn did the
same for Wiltse, batting in five runs
nnd tieing the score. Donovan did better
work than Phillppi in the windup, al
though an error by Dahlen very nearly
let the visitors tie thq score in ths ninth.
Attendance. 1,5C0. Score:;.
Pittsburg— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Leach, 3b 4-. 0 0 2 0 1
Beaumont, cf 3. 1 0 1 0 0
Clarke, If ... 5 1 : 1 2 0 0
Wagner, rf 4' 2 2 2 ] 0
liransfield, lb 4 L<2' 2 10 2 0
Ritchie, 2b 5-1 2 3 3 0
Zimmer, c 4-0 0 2 1 1
Kly. ss 3 " .0:; i 10 o
■\Vfltse. p 2,.0. r 10 4 0
PhUippi, p 2 0, 0 110
Totals ....36/.," 7 ; 9 24 12 2
Brooklyn— AB.; R. H. PO. A. E.
Sl.cekard, if 5»: •> 1 4 1 0 o
E>avi», rf 5 1' 2 2 ft o
Kelley, lb T5 o 2 7 0 1
i;i|y. -'»•> -••■ 4OJi O ? 1 4 5 0
Dahkn. ss s'^ <> l 3 5 •
McCreery, cf 3 ' 2 2 4 0 0
Gatins. 3b .4 1 1 2 if 1
Farreil, c 3 0 14 0 0
Kitson, p. ..21 0 0 3 1
Dcnovan, p 2 .10 0 0 0
Totals ....3S 8 1A 27 13 "i
Pittsburg 0 0 1 0 4 0 0 0 2—7
Brooklyn 0 0 0 0 5 1 1 1 »-8
Three-base hit, Bransileld; first base on
errors, Pittsburg 4. Brooklyn 1; left on
bases, Pittsburg: 12, Brooklyn 9: stolen
bases, Beaumont, Davis; double plays,
KtlJey to Daly to Dahlen to Kelley 2;
lust base on balls, by .Kitson 2. by Don
ovan 3, by Philippi sacrifice hits," Beau
mont. Ely; hit by pitched ball, by Kit,
son. 3, by Wiltse 1, by Philippi 1; strusk
out by Donovan 4, by Philippi 1; wiUl
pitch Donovan; time, 1:59; umpires, Nash
and Cunningham.
ONE GAME POSTPONED.
BOSTON, May 28.— Boston-Chicago
game postponed; rain.
Cannot Bluff Whitmore.
Manager Whitmore, of the Lennon &
Gibbons team, has signified his readiness
to accept the challenge of the Floan &
Leveroos team for a match for $50 a
side, and agrees to put Bartosh in the
box, as stipulated. He also says he will
play any team in the city for a similar
amount or more. June 9. at Lexington
park, is named as a date for the Floan
& Leveroos aggregation. The entire gate
receipts are to go with the game. |
C hiciigo Beats \ortliTrestern.
CHICAGO, May 28.—University of Chi
cago, 1; Northwestern, 2
Gi'Geevllle Heat* Herman.
At the driving park- at Graceville Sun
dny the GraceviUe team: defeated Her
man in a closelycontested game by 6 to 5.
lowa U Wins at Peoria.
At Peoria, 111-University of lowa, 11;
Bradley Polytechnic, 5.
"L" ROAD TRUST IN CHICAGO.
Vniun Elevated I.ooij People to Sell
for $123 Per Slmre.
CHICAGO, May 28.—At a meeting today
of the board of directors' 1 of the North,
western Elevated company and the Union
Elevated Loop ■ company, the Northwest
ern decided to offer ! the loop company
§125 cash per share for all the $5,0C0
loop stock. This offer was accepted, pend
ing its ratification • by the stockholders
on Aug. 1. . r .. _ - - _ .
No action was taken in the negotia
tions for the.purchaseof the Lake strett
or Metropolitan elevated roads.
It is announced that more than two
thirds of the loop stock has been pledged
for sale. The Illinois Trust and -Saving
Bank of Chicago and Blair & Co./of New
York, have been designated as deposi
tories of : the stock. , ,:
£ WtPF^ EDUCATE YOUR BOWELS
&/H I /'! /' ■ iP 0* I*1 '* nfglcct the slightest sign of irregularity but
WI I / / <?/ se* ttot Y°u nave at least one natural, easy movement
I 11, V ■/■*W&r ? y# ,' salts and black Naughts are dangerous
Lf^ 'irSr because they strain and weaken the bowels. What
f EDUCATE YOUR BOWELS
• Don't neglect the slightest sign of irregularity but
see that you have at least one natural, easy movement
a day. Pills, salts and black draughts are dangerous
because they strain and weaken the bowels. What
you want is a mild but sure tonic laxative, that tones and
JT ;| strengthens the bowels and stimulates their movem/its.
W | Such a laxative is CASCARETS, and when you
// f try them, you will find that it is the easiest thing in
i ,/j the world to make and keep your bowels dean and
W Vr-2^' regular, strong and healthy. Sample box 10c. Month's
treatment 50c. By keeping the bowels clean, all serious
>*^> disorders are
Js^lpjfk PREVENTED BY
fes»^. LIVER TOINIO -jih-—^
ALL DRUGGISTS " ■Hi ■ IH ■"■■ ■ ■ SOLD lin3ULK.
SOLD IN BULK.
UUEIiLi "toiac bloated boweU, foul GU»RAIfIIED,iISiI
P-insaft^eSlni b,' f 1 1 ?^ atll«?laa^ es"on, pimple*, UyflSlrlil S LLU ov«r •»* " i3ll «>° boxe. a
sS ?« ipr ca "n«', Hver troable, sallow comulexlon «.„.„ T . V^T t^T* creuter than any
and dizziness. When your bowels don't move reen- StSlV*!- tßf* llelni> *•» *»»* world. Thi. i» ab.oiate i.roof or
larly you are getting sick. Constipation kill, more l^if .Si CA«°2» n pr 'rba*V c", tlmonlal- W<s llavc fulth "nU
-nff-^i..™ ♦».«♦ chronle aliment* and long years of ft*'", honj.t trial, a. r»imp\ directioo», B nif if you "r"
■afferlng tliat come afterwards. No matter what ot B*"«si*d,aaerH«lusci.eSOcbox.retufntheantr«cci«Oc
ails you, start taking OASCAUKTS to-day, for you atho e"P ty bi>" to u» b^ mal1 ' or tho dmoht from
will never get well and be well all tbe tlmenntll whom you nnrchased It, anU get Jour money bact for both
«t;t^,V«»«^^^ to-day, under an absolute guar- yv"««t.tarte.itheu.eofrAS« vRETS. Booh.rrtebymutk
antee to cure or money refunded. Address: sTEHIJ.Nti BEMEDY to., IKW YOBii or tllltAtio"
IMS 1 IS IP
COMISKEVS SOVFHPAW TWIRIiEUS
WERE EASY FOR M'CRAW'S
IMPIHK BLIFFERS
BEATEN BY SCOB.E OF 14 TO 5
Closely Contested (ianie n( Milwau
kee la Won by the AtUletica
—Two UameN Were
l'(Mt|ioneil.
American League.
Played. Won. Lost. PerCt.
Chicago 21) 20 9 .(JJB
Detroit 29 18 11 .t,2L
Washington 23 14 9 .yj
Baltimore 21 12 9 .571
Boston 22 11 11 .500
Milwaukee 27 10 17 .370
Philadelphia 26 9 17 .:M3
Cleveland 27 8 10 .291
CHICAGO, May 28.—L,eft-handed pitch
ers jusL. •■:• ■■.' .'.lO Baltimoi-fes today.
They batted Skopec for eight bunched
hits and aev< n runs in the first two in
ning's, and found Harvey equally easy
during the remainder of the game. An
error, a gift and Isbell's drive over tho
right-field fence gave the Chicagos a
good start, but MeGinnity kept them
guessing thereafter. Attendance, 1,100.
Score: j
Chicago— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Hoy, cf 6 0 0 1 2 1
Jones, if 5 ,1 2 2 0 o
Mertes, 2b 4 1 2 2 B 1
Isbell, 1b 4 2 1 14 2 0
Hartman, 3b 4 0 1 2 6 1
Shugart, ss 4 0 0 110
McFarland, U" 3 1 1 1 0 C
Sullivan, c 5 0 14 12
Skopec. p 0 0 o 0 1 0
Harvey, p 4 0 2 0-2 0
Totals 39 5 10 27 19 1
Baltimore— AB. R. H. PO. A. B.
McGraw. 3b 5 2 1 1 2 0
Donlin, If 5 2 110 0
Williams, 2b ....... 5 3 8 2 6 0
K>ister, ss ..5 3 4 4 3 1
Seymour, rf 4 114 0 0
Jackson. cf . 3 1 2 4 0 C
Rohe, lb 4 1 1 10 0 2
Robinson, c 5 18 110
McGinnity, p ....... 5 0 10 2 0
Totals .41 14 17 27 13 3
Chicago *: 3 00001-100—S
Baltimore 5 2 2 10 o 2 2 o—l4
Left en bases, Chicago 12, Baltimore 6;
two-base hits, Jones, Hartman, Williamg,
Jackson 2, McGinnity; three-base hie,
Keister; homo run, Isbell; sacrifice hits,
Jackson, Seymour; stolen bas>?B, Donlin.
Jackson 2; struck out, by Harvey 1;
bas^.s on balls, off Skopec 2, off Ilarvev
2. off MoGinnity 6; hit with ball. Hart
inan; time, 1:55; umpire, rMannassau.
BREWERS LOSE CLOSK ONE.
; MILWAUKEE, May 28.—Garvin plcched
his lirst gam.- on the home grounds to
day s.:id lost it after a hard struggle, a
i fiuestionable decision giving the visitors
' the winning run in the ninth. The field
in# on both sides was brilliant through
out, and Geior and Hallman made several
sensational catches in th» outfield. Score:
Milwaukee— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Gilbert, 2b 4 0 1 3 4 0
Waldron, rf 2 2 2 1 0 0
Hallman, cf .. 3 12 3 0 l
Anderson, lb 4 0 0 13 0 0
! Conrov. S3 4 0 10 5 0
1 Friel. If 4 0 1 0 0 0
Burke, 3b 3 0 0 3 2 0
Leahy, c 3 0 14 2 0
. Garvin, p 3 0 0 0 3 0
Totals 30 3 8 27 1G 1
Philadelphia— AB. It. H. PO. A. Bl
Geier. if 4 0 I 4 0 0
Haydon, If ...,4 10 10 0
Cross, 3b 5 2 3 1 1 0
Lajoie, 2b 5 0 13 4 0
Fultz. cf 4 6 3 2 0 0
Davis, lb 4 0 0 11 0 0
Powers, c 3 0 15 4 0
Dolan, ss ...4 0 10 4 0
Fraser, p 3 12 0 11
Totals 36 4 12 27 It 1
Milwaukee 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 o—3
Philadelphia 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 I—4
Earned rims, Milwaukee 1, Philadelphia
2; three-base -hit, Conroy; stolen bases.
Powers 2, Waldron 2, Hallman, Fraser 2,
Cross 2, Fultz; bases on balls, off Gar
; vln 2, off Fraser 1; wild pitch. Garvin;
' struck out, by Garvin 5, by Fraser 2;
double plays. Gilbert to Anderson, Fraser
,to Powers to Davis; sacrifice hits, Wai-.
! dron, Fraser; left on bases, Milwaukee
3, Philadelphia 10; umpire, Haskell; time,
1:56; attendance, 1,000. I
RAIN AND WET GROUNDS.
CLEVELAND, May 28.—Clev<;land-Bos
ton game postponed, rain.
DETROIT, May 2&—Detroit-Washing
ton—no game, wet grounds.
OTJT OF JAIL AND IN AGAIN.
Jacob S. Hani9 Discharged Prom
Prison aii«l Promptly Rearrested.
PLATTSBURG, N. V.. May Jacob
S. Haas, alias Joseph Haas, who was re
leased from Clinton prison, at Danna
mcra. this morning, after serving a term
of five years, was immediately rearrested
on an order by Justice O'Gorman, of New
j York city. He was brought here and la
: now in jail under $7,000 bail. The crime
I for which he served time was; the mis
appropriation of gold valued at about
$5,000 from the Charles Room Parmalee
compar.y, manufacturers of drugs and
chemicals in Xew York city, by which,
company Haa3 was employed. The pres
ent arrest, waa made. undes a ctvll suit
instituted by the drug company to re
cover the money value of the gold stolen.
Haas tonight telegraphed his attorney In
New York city, and also his father, who
is said to be a wealthy resident of I'itts
burg, Pa., in relation to securing bail.
LOOKS DARK FOR DR. TJNGER.
More Evidence Dlacloaed on I). -nth
of Marie Defenbach.
CHICAGO, May 28.—A gold ring taken
from the body of Marie A. Defenbach
may prove the connecting link to a formal
charge of murder growing out of the case
of conspiracy to defraud fraternal or
ders and insurance companies, now on
trial here. The ring is in possession of
the state's attorney, it is said to have
been examined by expert chemists and
pronounced affected by a peculiar poison
which would trace its way through the
human system, causing death. Today'a
evidence in the case waa decidedly
against Dr. linger, who Is charged with
being the principal eonspi: at or.
NEW YORK TUNNEL STRIKE.
Contractor MeOonultl Sn>» Work
May De Resumed Todajr.
NEW YORK, May 28.—Chief Contrac
tor McDonald announced late this
noon that work may b» resuimd nil along
the rapid transit tunnel tomorrow. The
conditions on which the men will go
bark to work, according to Mr. McDon
ald, will bo practically tbe same, with
possibly one or two exceptioi i
obtaining before the men w.-nt ( >m!
The main point of the strike, however
lias not been settled, for the contractors 1
ment says nothing about !
side jobs whfch tunnel contra- ti
aim on whi<-h it la claimed by th<- men
that they are not paying union wages
or adhering to tho fight-hour system.
METAL TRADES IN SESSION.
HileU With. Mufbinlxt* May IU-sult
In Prolonged Strujjsle.
4.v.CHAGO> May Representatives of
the National Metal Trades association
are in session here today to decide what
action that association will take at the
conference with the International asso
ciation of machinists tomorrow. It ia
said the manufacturers take the ground
that the machinists violated the New
York agreement when the strike order
was sent out, and that notwithstanding
the fact that as a . whole the local m\
chJnists did not strike, they are not en
titled to the metal trades, consideration.
If this attitude is maintained at tomor
row s conference, say the machinists it
can result in no other action than a dec
laration on the part of the machinists to
make it a flcht to the finish.
PAN-AMERICAN EXPO IS WET.
Five Sik-c<>h.hlv<> Days of Rain
Dump on Knthu.sla.sns.
BUFFAIX), May ».-The fifth so
wye day df down-p(.nrl!ig rain depn
tne spirits of nearly everyone com ted
■with the Pan-American exposition The
landscape gardeners are the only cues
on the grounds who are satisfied with
the unusual conditions. SToung I
plants that would wilt under the hot
rays of the a m are adding to the beauty
of the rainbow city. The peony show
Which was to !>eg!n today, has I, en
postponed a week on account of the
backward condition.
The gold sword awarded by congress
to Admiral Dewey has been tendered for
exhihition on dedication day It will
occupy a case in the mner court of the
manufacturers and liberal arts' buildloK
Beside* it will be tho sword presented to
Gen. Miles by act of congress.
PORTO EICANS AT HONOLULU.
X'eed a Pew Sqnarc Meal* Hef'ire
Tliey Cub Go to Work.
HONOLULT T, May 16 (via San Fran
cisco, May 28).—Inspection of the Porto
Rican immigrants brought hero by the
steamer Colon shows that they are In such
a state from the need of food that they
must be held a,t the quarantine station
and fed until they gain strength sufficient
to enable them to bear the journey to
the other islands and plantations on
■which they will work.
A joint committee of the legislature
yesterday paid a visit to quarantine Isl
and to inspect the immigrants. The trio
is said to have ended in a disagreement
as to the condition of the lmmigranlfl
and their value as citizens of Hawaii
Over half the immigrants on the I
were women and children, ami
erable number of the men v,v:v mrirm,
while all were more or less emaciated.
This is attributed to lack of food In thetr
old home.
OrunU Decoration D»>- K\«uri>luii (v
i liUago Lakes and Taylors Falls.
On o Thursday, May 30. the S*rthern
Pacific railway will run a special train
leaving Minneapolis 8:25 a. m., St. P.iui
9:05 a. m. to Forest L.iko, Chisa^o Lak<>s
and Taylors Falls, returning leave Tay
lors Fails 7:05 p. m. Half rate . xcur
slon tickets. Fine opportunity to visit
Interstate park, Dalles of the St. Crolx.
FOR HONEST TREATMENT Ai!Xf^.
ys^H^. 24 Washington Avenue South, Minneapolis, Minn.
f~. ■■ . «gk - Hours: 0a.m.t05 p. m. and 7to o:3a p. m. Similars. 10 a. m. to ia:j>
/Lg. W^l P- m ' City pat>r3 will prove longest est;:l!ihod practice.
W"Hj3* ranf S*9 "umbsrs of The Globs; b» convinc*i
Us* W YOUNG MEN. MIDDLE-AGZD MEN. OLD (HEN.
vSy 7 NERVOUS DEBILITY. LOST MANHOOD, ner/r:.- dasponjsnt or unfit for
& Jrt« K. or marriage. result of errors. lO3t manhood. rrtUky urina, or;anic wsakrejs.
fSfc^SlNv yL»»«aV9rßsons- tc- power restored, a radical cure. WLOOD i>OLSoN. a!! 3ta^is cura i
SB|V/BK»or life, by safa means. URINARY and BLADUEK ailmonu quickly cureJ. Pain-
Hk^^^ UßSr^" pUflcuJt. Too Fra<;u»n» or Blooiy Urina: also prtvats urinary tnittsrs. '.'ILEa
vHI HHP'ar.d WtJCTAL dlasajes cured. Easy mear.3: r.o cultinj. Ssnd for blank.
HIS Al PRSTII I dPtf^l IT AND council
<uniNLrilCU L. a UULt OF physicians.
9
DEMAND ARBITRATION.
BQOBR I'(MIMIS.si(i\KKS VIM'KAI. TO
rin; ii.\<;i k court.
BERLIN, May 28. Special dispatches
from St. Petersburg assert that l>r.
Hendrik Mueller and i>r. Leyds, repre
senting th« Bot.-r republics, have appealed
formally to The Hague arbitration <:.>uri,
promising to abide by the decision of tha
tribunal regarding the issues involved ii»
the South African war, and pointing out
that several of tho paragraphs o£ the
constitution of the arbitration court,
signed by the powers represented at tha
ace conference, bear directly upon tha
South African case.
The Berlin papers tonight express tha
opinion that it ia quite possilbe Qreat
Britain would now submit Issues to tha
decision of the court.
PRETORIA. May 25.-The Boer Gen.
Sehoeman and his daughter have been
killed, and his wife and two others have
been badly injured by the explosion of a
shell. Gen. Bchoetnan, hla family and
friends, were examining a 4.7-inch lyd
dito shell, which they kept in the lioii.se
as a curiosity, when the- shell exploded,
killing the general on the spot, mortally
wounding his daughter and severely in-
Juring his wife and two othc-r persons
Gen, Schoeman was .i great Krugcr
ite. He led the commando of Colesburg
and Burrrendered or. il.c occupation of
Pretoria. li.- was aft< rwari captured
by the Boera and released when the Brit
ish occupied Barberton. The general
then was sent on a peace mission, was
retaken by the Boers, and was again
released when tho British took j'i.tt-r.s
burg. Since that time (Jen. Schoeman
had reside., in Pretoria.
■ CAPE TOWN, May 23.— The dash of
Kritzinger's Invaders of Cape Colony,
to tha south, waa checked at Vandoes
berg by the swift movement of (Jorrln,
ger a and anouier columr.. Tho invaders,
fin ling their way barred swerved to the
northeast toward Cloethe. The eonUr-V-l
capture of horses by the British l.s ap
parently appreciatingly Impairing tn«
Boers' mobility.
HOW TO STOP SMOKING.
Way Tliat .liicnb Hilt Ulil I<—An-
other and Uultc Different un-.
Listener in the Boston Transcript.
"One of the pleasrnte.st •■ mute vis
its I have lately enjoyed was with tho
man whom Roosevelt, with his contempt
for the via media even in words, calls
'the laost useful citizen In New York,'
Jacob Riis. His coming was liki a west
erly breeze, and in a mtr.ute we ha-1
left our deak nnd were laughing with him.
He had the most infectious of laughs—
the laugh of tho hojeful iran. He was
off la a moment on one of his lly littio
stories. 'Eurn your bridges; that's my
motto. Did Ii ■ •■:■ t'-n you how I (l uit
tobacco? Well, I just gave it up at one
blow.' 'Heroic,' someone n-marked,
doubi having memory of pucceaslvo
defeats in a siirila, 1 undeilalting. fifes,
rr.y wifo cays it Wi;s the must heroics
thing I ever did. I went up Inl the
woods 100 miles; wh< ■ i hei i wasn't any
tobacco sent my guldo off on an errand
v.ith the one means of traveling we ha-1—
a steam launch—and then 1 settled down
to finish r.-v tobacco hai It. In it week
I was cured.'
"Now, i h.ej c ore oi hei ways of curing
oneself of this hal it. but the mr-st orig-
Inal way was poii Li d out to me by a
poitly, good-naUred aiul healthy man of
sixty, who looked to be not over ilfty;
'Twenty years ago,' he said, 'I found
that i was using lot> mi eh tobacco, for
I was nol without seme- furm of nicotine
every hour ef the day. St one New
Year's eve I sat down and with a box
of cigars before ir.e. elded to smoke *.ha
old year out ai>d uUt. At five minutes
before- midnight I threw the sti;i. of i -..,
cigar in. the lire and arose to retire, re»
walking to my wife: '1 am nol going to
want to smoke any more.' She laughed
at me. but I meant it The noxt moan
ing before- storting for tho office I plac
ed three or four cigars in my pocket
as usual, and my wife tee-ing the act,
said triumphantly: 'I thought you were
not going 10 smoke any more.' I replied:
'I didn't say-th;-.t: I Bald I was not gt/ng
to wa>vt to smoke any mere. If ! want
to smoke I slia.ll frnoke.' Bui I have
never had the desire md have, never
smoked ■Im i thai tiir.o"
"That was certainly an odd s«.rt of
: niind-cu:e. end it k-ads me to an aiecdote
; of personal experience which I «hnil not
ask to be explained. One evening Hst
week i tirnod from a newspaper to a
book zl • If, thinking to read something
soothing and substantial beforo rottriiig.
Glancing ovc-r tho volumes I at la*t pick
ed up 'Plutarch's Lives/ and ipegan to
read of oi r sosm-what Cissirated So
cratic friend Alcibladea Uefcro 1 hal
lead a . asje a ft«-llng came ipor. mo that
an anniversary was connected, tometuiw
v.ith that book. ' rend on, but the <m
niversary thought haunud me r.nd spoil
ed my untV-rstandinK "f the text until I
turned at last In desperation to the )ly
leaf and saw that the book v/as bought
March 2.".. i«xi, Just twenty yeai before!
Now, one can cn<*crftand In a vague ?ort
of way hew ho can coi suddenly upon
a friend of whom ho had just b*< think
ir• tr. but hew a bit of writing posted on
tho flyleaf of a bcok can r> a< down
thvorgh twenty years of time BmS tan
) taliz-' one's bralr. is BOmethil beyond
my tlicrght, and I am not ii'.ekii.j," or. ex
j planat.'cn."

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