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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, June 10, 1901, Image 1

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OFFiGBAL PAPER
OF THE
GBTY OF ST. PAUL.
VCT,. XXIV.—NO. 161.
IBHHPES
CONTINUED IMPROVEMENT IN MRS.
IH'KIM.KV'S CONDITION or-
FERS ENCOURAGEMENT
PHYSICIANS CONSULT DAILY
MAINTENANCE OF STREXGTII IS
LARGELY DUO TO USE OF
STIMULANTS
PLANS TO GO TO CANTON
WASHINGTON, June 9.—The slight Im
provement In Mrs. McKinley which man
ifested itself the latter part of the week
continues, and hope begins to be felt that
.she may after all recover from the pres
ent attack. The Improvement, however,
is so slight as not to change materially
the extreme gravity of the case."
The usual consultation of the physicians
held this morning and, at its close,
the following bulletin was Issued:
"11:15 a. m.—Mrs. McKinley's physicians
5 a very comfortable
md continues to Impi
i': i-t that .Mrs. McKinley has more
than own and that no uhfavor
turn has occurred Is considered in
way encouraging, but as this re
sult . tly to the constant use of
powerful medicines the physicians
the effect of reducing the stimulants, and
llki wise have to cope with the effect on
her system by the constant administra
tion of them only prolonging her life and
making ultimate recovery at least a pos
sibility. These stimulants and the com
plaint from which she suffered in Cali
fornia, \Uii.'h is now under better control,
howi ver weakens her powers of resist
and apprehension is ever preseni
i sinking Bp< II may occur suddenly
from which she cannot, be rallied.
Dr. Kfxey regularly makes the visits
Mil evening, and there is a regular
I tat ion every morning. He called
again this afternoon and found Mrs. Mc-
Kinley comfortable and progressing as
favorably as possible. He and President
McKinley drove »<n.»for an hour tins
morning, both go.hg to the sick room im
mediately on returning. Subsequently
the doctor said there had been no change.
Relatives and personal friends of the
family continue to show their sympathy
by inquiring at the doors and leaving
their cards. Even members of the cab
inet merely leave their cards in order to
avoid disturbing the president. Mrs,
Charles Emory Smith, Secretary Long,
Lieut. Gen. and Mrs. Miles, Commander
Cowles, of the navy; Assistant Secretary
of War Sanger und Mrs. Hitchcock were
among those who thus expressed their
sympathy during- the day.
REPORTS ARW ENCOURAGING.
Te reports from the sick robin up to a
late hour tonight were riocidedly encour
aging. Dr. Rixey appeared much better
satisfied v.itii the patient's condition to
night than for some tim.r Mrs. Me Kin
ley sat up for a few minutiVs today. It
was tne second time sh-i has been able
lv-> do so in sor<e i:me. a irgcor. General
Sternberc remain, d longer than usual
this evening. Heretofore he has main
tained a sphynx-like silence about Mrs.
MeKlnley's condition, but when he left
tonight- he said:
"Mrs. McKinley is doing very well now.
There are no new developments."
Mia. Me"K!nlcy will be t ik-ii to Can
ton when she- is in condi: o:i to bear
the journey. Extensive preparations lvive
been Piade at the McKlnicy horn* in
Canicn, including the,build! v.? of a port©
COChero and the remodeling of portions
of the house, and it was p'annel last
nutumn that she and the president should
go to Canton about July 1 of this sum
mer. Tn case Mrs. McKinley recovers,
this plan will be carried out, but it is
rot expected she wJll be strong enough
to leave here the Ist of July even if im*
provernerit is steady. Dr. Rixey said to
night that he was unprepared to predict
whether she would be able to carry out
t -—» plans. It is believed considerable
benefit will accrue from removal to hr
old home, especially a-i it is cooler and
more breezy then? than here.
There is ni truth In the statement that
the dispatch boat Dolphin is being sent
here with a view to taking her out in
thai vessel later on.
Secretary of the Treasqry Gasre C >mp
troller and Mrs. Dawes and John P.
Blake, of Canton, an old friend of the
president, called during the evening, but
contented themselves with personal in
quiries. The president received no vis
itors during the day or n'grht.
Dr. Rixey alter bis visit to the White
house tonteht, said on leaving at 1020
o'clock:
"Mrs. Mclvinley ?.•? slowly improving:.
Sin is- resting- very comfortably now
nil.! is doing very nicely."
FRENCHMEN ARE CURIOUS
WANT TO KNOW IF FIRING CAN
KON PREVENTS FROST.
■WASHINGTON, June o.—The extensive
reports of United States consul Covert,
nt Lyons, France, relative to the effect of
cannon firing- as a protection 'fop orchards
and vineyards from hail storms, and also
for thfl purpose of mitigating or nullify
ing the effects of frost upon vegetation
have prompted numerous inquiries by
horticulturists in this country ps to when,
if nt all, our government would adopt
similar methods of protection.
. Prof. William Ivlorre, of the department
of agriculture, acting under the direction
of Secretary Wilson, therefore has issued
to the press the following statement:
"After an examination of all that has
passed during the last few years, my
opinion is that it is a popular Illusion
Similar to the belief in the moon weather.
The ignorant peasantry of Europe seem
to be looking for something miraculous.
They rather believe In cannonading as a
means of prelection against the weather,
•whereas, with a less amount of money,
they might mutually insure against in
evitable events. Such operations would
have to be carried on at too great a scale
to warrant any community or nation
adopting them.
The effects of a rain storm or tornado
exceeds all the cambative efforts of
mankind. On account of my experience
of the past ten years I am loth to believe
that a protection against hall storms will
ever be practical or ever attempted, in
the United States, much less encouraged
by the intelligent portion of the com
munity. Every on should be made t^.
counteract the .spread of the Italian de
lusion which has been imported into this
country by Consul Covert."
2JO MORE CHANCES TO GET HIGH
ISay« German Consul for Immigrant*
to America.
BERLIN, June Among the reports
recently published here of German con
suls in American cities is one trom the
consul in Cincinnati, who, treating of
the prospects of the German Immigrant
to the United State.?, says:
"The time is past when Immigrants to
the United States had a chance to ac
quire riohrs in this country, owing to
the density of the population anil the
overcrowded condition of all trades and
occupations."
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
BULLETIN OF
IMPORTANT NEWS OF THE DAY
Weather Forecast for St. 'Paul:
Fair.
I—Mrs. MoKiuley Is Better.
Woodmen Are Arriving.
Army Snrgcou - Sliooln Himself,
Boer Families Starving,
Murder Trial In a Grove.
New Residences Bui ins
Maccabees Celebrate Birthday.
Republic for Youths.
Swedes Hear King's Chaplain./
I — Oppose School Consolidation.
Boy Finds" Human Skeleton.
Five Killed in Railroad Wreck.
—Editorial Comment.
Lexington Derby Entries]
Ryan's Muff Loses the Game.
Games in Big* Lcagnc.
Henry Clews' Letter.
Dull Week in Berlin.
Markets of the World.
Globe Popular Wants.
B—A Social Explosion.
Mrs. Eddy Makes Statement.
WEATHER FOR TODAY.
nesota—Pair Monday and Tuesday;
fresh easterly, shifting to nothwesterly
winds.
Wisconsin—Local rains Monday and
lay; warmer in eastern portion
Monday; cooler in western portion Tues
day; fresh to brisk easterly winds.
lowa—Local rains Monday. Tuesday
fair; easterly shifting to northeasterly
winds.
North Dakota—Partly cloudy Monday
and Tuesday; northwesterly winds.
Montana—Fair Monday and Tuesday;
northwesterly winds.
St. Paul — Yesterday's observations,
taken by the United States weather bu
reau, St. Paul, P. F. Lyons, observer, for
the twenty-four hours ended at 7 o'clock
last night—Barometer corrected for tem
perature and elevation: Highest temper
ature, 66; lowest temperature, 49; average
temperature, 58; daily range, 17; barome
ter 89.94; humidity, 78; precipitation, 0;
7 p. m., temperature, 66; 7 p. m., wind,
south; weather, cloudy.
Yesterday's temperatures —
•SpmHlgh *BpmHigh
Alpena 54 54 Jacksonville ...78 88
Battleford 52 5G Kansas City ...88 96
Bismarck £6 GS Marquette 55 r>B
Buffalo 54 54 Minnedosa G8 C 8
Boston 60 66 Montgomery ...86 [)2
Calgary 44 54 Montreal ..^...52 54
Cheyenne G4 G8 Nashville 80 80
Chicago 56 5* New Orleans ..82 00
Cincinnati 72 74 New York 66 72
Cleveland 62 62 Norfolk 56 74
Davenport 70 74 North Platte...7O 74
Dcs Molnes ...64 64 Oklahoma 84 88
Detroit G4 00 Philadelphia ...66 72
Duluth 48 4S Qu'Appelle ....54 60
Edmonton 56 5S St. I*»uis 74 76
Grand Haven .60 68 Salt Lake 68 70
Green Bay CO 68 Ste. Marie 62 t$
Helena 56 5S Washington ...GG 74
Huron 66 68 Winnipeg 62 64
♦Washington time (7 p. in. St. Paul).
—Fall. *Rise.
OCEAN LIBERS.
New York—Arrived: Scotia, Genoa afd
Naples; Minneapolis, London; Furnessia,
Glasgow and Movllle; Tartar Prince, Leg
horn, Genoa and Naples.
Seilly—Passed: Minnehaha, New York
for London.
Qure.nstown—Arrived: Ivernia, Boston
for Liverpool and proceeded.
Southampton—Arrived: Barbarossa,
New York for Bremen (and proceeded.)
Moville—Arrived: City of Rome, New
York for Glasgow (and proceeded.)
Liverpool—Sailed: Carthagenian (from
Glasgow). St. John's, N. F., Halifax, N.
S.. and Philadelphia.
Glasgow—Sailed: Sarmatian, Quebec anj
Montreal.
Montreal—Sailed: Mesaba, New York.
Queenstown—Sailed: Umbria (from
Liverpool), New York.
Baltimore—Sailed: Meteor, San Fran
cisco.
San Francisco—Arrived: United States
transport Hancock, Honolulu.
Philadelphia—Arrived: Sicilian, Glas
gow and Liverpool via St. John, N. F.,
and Halifax, N. S.; Noordland, Liver
pool, via Queenstown.
SEVENTY-FIVE YEARS OLD
WESTERN RESERVE" UNIVERSITY
WILL CELEBRATE ANMVER
/. ' - SAItY THIS. WEEK.
CLEVELAND, Ohio, June 9.— We tern |
Reserve university celebrates its seventy
fifth anniversary this week. The celebra
tion began today with an address by
Prof. Arthur O. McGiffert on "The Re
ligious History of the College," in Beck
with Memorial" church.
This evening President Charles F. |
Thwing delivered' the baccalaureate ser
men, his subject .being "The Religious
Beliefs of the Educated Man of tfi?
Twentieth Century."
The exercises will continue until
Thursday, when exercises in commemora
tion of the seventy-fifth anniversary of I
the foundation of Western Reserve col- '
lege and of Adalbert college of Western
Reserve university will be Id, the ad
dress being by Rev. Josiah Strong, D. D.
Gov. Nash, of Ohio, and Senator Allison,
of lowa, and Senator Hanna are. among
the notables expected to attend the exer
ciises.
IP TO THE DOCTORS,
IF THEY CAN SHOW Mil. ROCKE
FELLER, HE WILL CONTRIBUTE.
CLEVELAND, Ohio, June 9.—Dr. H. F. I
Bigger, of this city, the family physician !
of Mr. John D. Rockefeller, in speaking j
of Mr. Rockefeller's recent gift of a
large sum of money for medical research,
safd tonight:
"Mr. Rockefeller has placed - his sug
gestion of medical research into the hands
of a number of famous medical scien
tists, among the representatives of Co
lumbia and Johns Hopkins universities,
the University of Pennsylvania, the Uni- |
versity of Chicago, and other institutions. j
These gentlemen will look, over the
ground and make such recommendations '
as they regard as practical. Until then !
I don't believe Mr. Rockefeller will form j
his plans." j
Dr. Blgg-ar then went into detail. in re- j
viewing the efforts of the English govern- I
ment in endeavoring to 'check tuberculo- J
sis, and the city of Buffalo in the matter i
of learning the origin" of cancer, and said
that the work would probably bo along
this line.
EMINENT PAINTER DEAD
EDWARD MORAN SUCCUMBED TO
UItAKMIC POISONiNG AT HIS
NEW YORK HOME.
NEW YORK, June Edward Moran,
the eminent marine and landscape pain
ter, died this afternoon in his apartments
and studio in Fifth avenue, from urae- ■
mio poisoning, superinduced by a com
plication of diseases from which he had
been suffering for about a year.
Edward Moran was born in England
in 1839. When he was twelve years old
the family came to America ~and_ settled
in Maryland, - Later they went to Phil
adelphia. Mo ran ;first- opened a studio
in. Philadelphia, bqt twenty-five - y«afA
ago he came to Nqw York, where he has
;v«uco made his home.
MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 10, 1901.
THE REPUBLICAN ADMINISTRATION OF NEBRASKA MAKES GOOD ITS PROMISES OF RE-
are mm
REPUBLICAN STATESMEN WAST
M'KIN-LEY TO HAVE AN-
Til 11 TERM
GROSVENOR GIVES APPROVAL
SAYS IT'S TIME TO ABOLISH NO
TION THAT THIRD TERMS
DON'T GO
WHY PRECEDENT WAS SET
CINCINNATI, Ohio, June 9. — "There
has been no time in our history when
conditions would so justify the election of
a president to a third term as in the case
of McKinley," remarked Congressman
Grosvenor, to a group of friends with
whom, he was chatting familiarly. "Mc-
Kinley is personally the most popular
president we have had in a long time,
and he has certainly most creditably per
formed the duties of his high office. I
think it is time, furthermore, to demolish
the fiction that there is an unwritten law,
established by Washington, that no presi
dent of the United States may accept a
third term. The facts are, as any stu
dent of the times may discover, that it
was fear of defeat which impelled Wash
ington to decline a third nomination. Be
ing a Federalist, he was the object of
very violent attacks on the part of the
Democrats of his day, and recognizing
the growing strength of his opponents, he
doubted, as I believe, his ability to again
secure an election if he should run."
EDITORS TO SEE SHOW
KEWSPAPER FOLKS WILL HE IN
HUFFALO WEDNESDAY.
BUFFALO, June 9.—On account of the
large number of visiting newspaper men
and womm expected at the Pan-American
exposition this week, Wednesday, June
12, is announced by Direc-tor General Bu-
I chanan as editors' and publishers' day.
The meeting of the National Editorial
association and several state associations
will bring to the exposition this week the
largest number of editors ever gathered
together in One place at the same time. It
I is estimated that a total of not less than
' 15,000 will be here. They will hold their
sessions at the Tempi*- of Music at the
exposition, and will be entertained by
Sousa's band, which has just arrived at
the exposition for a month's stay; the
Mexican Artillery band, sent by President
Diaz, of Mexico, as a compliment to the
American people, and other bands and
musicians. They will be given excur
i sions by the railways and steamship lines
and the freedom of the exposition and
the midway has been accorded them.
STORM RUINS WHEAT CROP
FOUR KIXDREU OKLAHOMA FARMS
DEVASTATED IJY FRIDAY'S
CYCLONE.
WICHITA, Kan., June 9.—A corre
spondent who arrived here tonight from
the scene of devastation In Kay county,
Oklahoma, says that the storm of Fri
day night ruined the wheat crop »f 40)
farms west and northwest of Blackwell.
These farms are all in one body of terri
tory. The farmers who had purchased
twiine and harvest machinery are asking
the local dealers to take them back, and
the dealers have referred the matter to
the factories. The loss of crops will cause
no distress as the farmers are in good
condition financially, owing to a succes
sion of good crops during the i ast live
seasons.
LIKELY TOJCCEPT.
CUBANS . "WILL PROBABLY AC
QXIE.SCI2 IX PL ATT AMEXD
MEiXT.
HAVANA, June The N conservative
members of the constitutional convention
are absolutely confident tonight that the
Platt amendment will be accepted, and'
that several Radicals will Join with the
fifteen delegates who have heretofore vot
ed in favor of acceptance. The last few
days seem to have brought about a de
cided change in the attitude of delegates
■who had been bitterly arraigning the
Washington government for changing the
correct interpretation of the amendment.
The strong pressure from the outside
brought to bear upon the convention to
finish its business and to place the coun
try on a settled business basis has had
an excellent effect* upon the Radicals, In
ducing them to accept the inevitable,
and some of them now argue that it will
be perhaps better to accept the amend
ment, hoping for some form of Independ
ence, than to prolong the military oc
cupation of the island. . .
The. convention will meet in secret ses
sion tomorrow, but It is ,expected sev
eral days will ■ elapse before a: vote is
taken.
FORM.
1! 11l SB
SIRGEON GENERAL. ON GEN. MILES'
STAFF AND STARTED "EMBALM
ED" BEEF INVESTIGATION
WAS FOUND BY SERVANT
Shut Himself in Right Temple—Deed
Thought to Jluvo Been
Prompted by In
tjoiiinht.
PITTSBURG, June Maj. W. H. Daly,
surgeon general on the staff of Maj. Gen.
Miles in Porto Rico, /committed suicide
at his home here today by shooting him
self in the right, temple.
The body of the doctor was'found-in
the bathroom by Miss Mary Short, the
housekeeper, lying in a pool of blood, a
82-callbre revolver lying- on the floor. Dr.
Foster, who was summoned at once,
found the bullet hole in the temple, and
announced that deaths-had taken place
several hours before.^.; Miss Short then
remembered hearing a sharp report about
7:30 a. m., but thought.it was the quick
closing of a window by some one. No
cause is known for Daly's deed unless
it be that insomnia drove him- to tem
porary insanity. For some time past he
has been unable to sleep regularly, and
it is thought that after a sleepless night
he concluded to end all. The doctor was'
a widower and leaves no immediate fam
ily. He was fifty-nine years old and
for many- years has been prominent in"
medical circles. He gained international
prominence during the' Cuban war, as it
was his report to the'commanding gen
eral of the army that started the "em
balmed beef" investigation.
MILKS IIS NOT SURPRISED.
Attributes* Dr. Daly's Suicide to 111
Health and Bereavement.
• WASHINGTON, June 9.—Lieut. Gen.
Miles said tonight that he was not sur
prised at the suicide of Dr.' Daly in view
of the great personal ' bereavement that
the doctor had suffered recently and the
undermining of his health by a severe
attack of the grip, last winter. Gen.
Miles esteemed Dr. Daly highly and the
two'were intimate friends. His death
came as a severe blow to the general.
Dr. Daly was in the city last March
at the second inauguration of President
McKinley. If Gen. * Miles can arrange
matters he will attend the funeral of his
old friend. Surgeon Daly was a deputy
to Assistant Surgeon; General Charles R.
Greenleaf, on the staff of the command
ing general, during the Spanish-American
war, and Gen. Miles testified tonight to
the thoroughness with which he perform
ed his duties i nattending to the wants
i of the sick, caring for-the wounded and
! establishing hospitals, It was through
Dr. Daly's allegations that the beef fur
nished to the army had been tampered
with and preserved 'by means of acids
which he alleged were detrimental to
the health of the soldiers that a board
of army inquiries conducted the celebrat
ed beef inquiry during the Spanish war.
KAN. CITY IN GALA ATTIRE
ELABORATE PREPARATIONS HAVE
BEEN MADE FOR E.NTERTAIN
MHBWT OF SHIiLVEES.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., June 9.—lt is ex
pected that 10,000 Shriners will be in the
city tomorrow at the opening of the sev
enth annual meeting; of the imperial 1
i council of the Mystic Shrine. Hundreds i
! are coming in on - every train. Great
preparations have ; beoh made for the 1.
--reception during the four days of the
gathering, and Kansas City has been at
tired accordingly, business houses, public
buildings and streets having been d c
orated for the occasion. The principal
events of the week fwlll be a reception
at the Kansas City club Monday night, j
two parades on Tuesday, with a grand
concert and drill in convention hall |In !
the evening: and an exhibition drill at
night In Convention hall. On Thursday
special entertainment will be provided ,
by the citizens. The chief business of i
the meeting will be the election ;of a
chief potentate and ; the selection of the
Mecca for the next annual session.. Philip
Shaffer, of Philadelphia,' probably will
be elected imperial potentate. .
HEADLESS BODY FOUND.
Remains Unidentified -" Reveal Hor
rible Murder. „. .'..,.
LOWELL, Mass., June 9.— The headless
and decomposed body of a young woman
was found under a < heap of brush In a
patch of woodland in: < Chelmsford this
afternoon. Murder had .been committed
In a horrible fashion, for the head had
been separated from the trunlj by a
series of slashes with, a dull weapon.. The
meager clothing affords no clue to the
identity of the unfortunate, and the cir
cumstances offer a case or Interest out
side rather than In the direct community,
as the theory quickly set up is that ihe
body had been taken into th« woods and
thrown in c. spot that offered . dome - se
clusion. ~-^ '•">; --' '*- ■■-_
IB Mil 1 GROVE
FATHER WITH DAUGHTER AND
TWO SONS EXAMINED IN
DER THE TREES.
ONLY FURNITURE WAS TABLE
Thou Hands' of Spectators, bat No
Scarcity of Space to Accommo
date Them Wai Ex
perienced. '
... GALENA, Mo., June 9.— unusual
scene is presented here at the prelim
inary hearing of Mrs. John Stallion, her
father, James Crabtree, and his two sons,
Frank and Charles Crabtree, for the
murder of Alice Stallion, the woman's
sixteen-year-old stepdaughter. The hear
ing is being held in a grove, the two
justices sitting at a table under a treo,
and 2.C00 people attracted from points
for miles around forming a circle about
•the court and defendants. Notwithstand
ing no overt act has yet been attempted,
threats have been made against th }
Crabtrees by many of th ■; strangers in
town, and the county officials are taking
all precautions at their command to pro
tect the prisoners. Galena Is off the rail
read, and the fact that the 2,<KO people
would care to come miles to attend the
hearing is considered significant.
It has been decided to exhume the
body of the girl that It may be exam
ined by the. doctors to Investigate a
theory of the county prosecutor that a
criminal assault was made upon her by
one or both of the Crabtreee boys, and
that they killed her to hide the crime,,
SIIIFIIiM
■IN CAMPS PROVIDED BY ENGLISH
FOR BOIER WOMEN AM) CHIL
DREN REFUGEES
CONDITIONS ARE APPALLING
Rev. Yon Brucklialnen and Brother
Have Come to America to
Invoke Aid for the
Sufferers.
NEW YORK, June 9.—The Rev. H. D.
yon Bruckhuisen, of Pretoria, South Af
rica, v the minister who closed the volks
raad with prayer after President Kru
ger's ultimatum had been read to that
body, is in this city. His brother, Dr.
H. J. ' yon Bruckhuisen, of the Orange
Free State, who served in the Boer ar
mies, accompanies him. Their mission
in this country is to raise money for
the Boer women and children now in
refugee camps. Rev. Dr. yon Bruckh4l
sen said in an interview:
"Our women and children, who are at
present concentrated in camps establish
ed by the British, are in a horrible con
dition. It was bad enough when I left
South Africa, but I know from a letter
that I have received— only the other
day from -my sister—that it is a hundred
times worse now."
When the doctor left South Africa h«
said he was virtually ' lished by order
of Gen. Maxwell, ir' ry governor of
Pretoria. Dr. yon .^ru. -uisen said fur
ther 'of the camp/, "in an official re
port made by Dr. -Donald P. * "cKenzie,
of the British army, on Feb. 18 of this
year, the British government is notified
that the conditions are horrible, the death
rate appalling, and the food furnished
wholly unfit to eat." .-"",<";
The Afrikanders, Rev. Dr. yon Bruck
huisen avers, will never be overcome, and
all reports to the contrary are false.
The Boer army numbers 15,000 to 17,000
men, and Is constantly being augmented
by Cape Colony Boers. The Boer forces
are now armed with. Lee Metford rifles,
he says, and they have tons of ammuni
tion buried which they can use at any
time against the British.
■* -
BIG SUNDAY CROWD.
FIFTEEN THOUSAND PEOPLE SAW
BUFFALO'S SHOW YESTERDAY.
BUFFALO, N. V., June 9.—A most en
couraging report on the financial pro
spects of the Pan-American ' exposition
has been Issued by the executive com
mittee of the committee on admissions.
Jt shows that the average expenditures
by the crowds within the grounds for
the month of May was 17 cents per capi
ta, compared with an average of 18 cents
during the first month of, the world's fair.
The largest Sunday crowd since the
opening of the exposition visited the
i ground today. The total admissions were
118.452. --..--. •V ..- v •-. ■ >>- - :
PRICE TWO GENTS—{JJvf^Ta.
GATES OF THE CITY
ARE THROWN OPEN
Saint Welcomes the Thousands of
Modern Woodmen Who Are
Entering.
From All Sections Delegates Arc
Coming—St. Paul Aglow With
Enthusiasm for Her Guests,
t «*^sw
I Programme lor the Week.
DAY.
Reception of delegate* and visitor* and sight-sceine.
Evening—Caucuses of the State delegations.
- . TICS DAY, •
Forenoon-Opening session of the Head Camp I addreM of uokMim«
and responses. A&aenibllnn; of niiiformed Forester teanm.
Afternoon—Parorta by Company C nml Fore*tei- team*
Evenins-Grand Historical Military Orlll of Ration* at the Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY,
Forenoon- Camp business it--, •.inn.
Afternoon—Buwlneas session will an upend nbor.t 4 o'clock, when the
delegates will be taken by Minneapolis neighbors in trolley cant to
Minnehaha Fall* and Lake Harriet for an outing.
Evening—Exemplification of the degree «ark before the Head ('amp
by Unity Camp ICC, St. Paul, nt Auditorium.
Evening—Reception to vlMltlug Royal Neighbors at Mm. Longacker'!,
174 Went Congress street.
THURSDAY.
Forenoon—Grand Parade, at 9 o'clock »bar V , of all Forester (rum*,
band/*. Royal »llibora In floats, vUltln^r ana local Woodmen.
Afternoon—Outing at State Fair (.round., nildvruy between »t. Paul
and Mlnneapolla. Automobile and motor cycle. rao«t| Forester and
band contests' for prizes. Balloon nHcenslon. '
Dvealßg-Wooflmen minstrel and vaudeville show.
FRIDAY.
All day linitlneM *t«tlon.
"Mi]in»louUn liny"— \\ l\ 1 be devoted by the looal Committee to
a personally conducted excursion for visitors to Lake Mlnnetonkjt,
This outing will include syacial trains from at. Paul, a steaniev
orotne of the lake, dinner at Hotel M. Luulh, muitc and duudiij|
Aurlnff the evening, returning to St. Paul about 11.80 o'clock.
BTenlaK-Pariul« of Foresters at Minneapolis
. SATURDAY.
Completion of Head Camp work. .
The Forester and band contests for prizes will take place during
Wednesday, Thursday and Friday.
When the citizens of St. Paul awoke
from their slumber this morning
found that the' Saintly City had be. n in
vaded during'the night by t!,o advanea
guard of the mighty host of Mod ni
Woodmen of America, whose coming
bec ; n bo long and well heralded, and who
■will httve possession of the town during
the ensuing week.
To employ a trlto adage, as In the days
of old. jii toads led to Rome, go ;iii
railroads from the four points <>; the
compass yesterday led to St. Paul, and
this state of affairs will continue until
the last delegate ami can p \*> tl ■• con
vention will have been Bafely landed in
the city of national conventions >;■ the
ytar 1901.
But grr-at Indies move slowfy, ad, i i
customary, there were the usual (!•
. JeflflH

A. E. SMITH, BROOKFEELD, MO.,
Candidate IV.r Head Bunker.
the result being that several of the trains
bearing delegates and visitors from dif
ferent sections of the country arrived
several hours behind schedule time. The
delay, of course, was very aggravating
to both the visitors and the commltteo
on reception, whose plans had to be re
arranged in many Instances to meet the
new conditions that confronted them.
SCORES YET TO COME.
Of the vast army of delegates, camps
and visitors that will invade the city
this week only a smell proportion have
arrived, and in moat cases the train* ar
riving laat night carried members from
distant points, It 1* expected that with
" OFFICIAL PAPER
- — OF THE
ofirr OF st. PAWL.
today's arrivals nearly, If not all, of th«
delegates v.in be in time for roll i all at
tonight's caucus.
As in the case of tii« national conven
tions of the conductors and the Amer
ican Medical association, whose sessions
closed Friday. St. Paul has exerted Its
best effort* to see that the visitors ar«
I>n>;)erly received and entertained, and
as there Is no limit to the hospitality
of the Saintly City, It is safe to say that
nothing had been omitted thai wouki f- it
cilitato their comfort or entertainment.
The finishing touches on the decorations
were completed laßt night, an I the pub
lic buildings, hotels, many of the busi
ness houses and private dwellings havo
been handsomely a lorned in honor of
•the guests. Miny of the buildings an*
decorated with handsome stivamors of
red, whit© and groeJi, the emblematic col
ors of the order, which somml: :-! with
the stars and atrlpea la a manner to
form a very pretty ccntmat. The Giobt
and Dispatch builuh.ir, on Newspaper
row, extends an o*rneit« front to the vis
itors, the facade of the edlfloe b* ::« taste
fully datoraed with flags and streamers.
The decorations on th« city hall ajvl
court house have been r&lu,{orc«'J by d«
sigrns composed of the odors it the
Woodmen, and th& ground* fronting oa
Wabaeha etr«et present an 9«pecLtlly at
tractive appearance. Bo\*er»l flo.al «m>
bleroa adorn th« lawn, ynortg the nmn*
" OontinneA on Pdnrth Pa**. '

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