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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 02, 1902, Image 1

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VOL. XXV.—NO. 33.
GOV. TAFT'S
STEWARDSHIP
HE REXDERS ACCOUNT THEREOF
TO SENATE COMMITTEE ON
THE PHILIPPINES
PACIFICATION IS INCOMPLETE
Governor of Nejv Island Possessions
Says Christian Filipinos Are
Trouble Breeders—Population
Estimates Unreliable
HOPE IS IN EDUCATED CLASSES
WASHINGTON, Feb. i.-gov. Taft to
day continued his statement concerning
conditions in the Philippines archipelago
before the senate committee on the Phil-,
ippines. He said that next to Manila
Cebu came nearer being a city in point
of population and manner of improve
ment than any other place in the archi
pelago. The island of Cebu is the most
densely settled of the group.
Speaking generally, Gov. Taft said
there were no ; roads in the Philippine
islands under the Spanish, but that since
the establishment of American control
•$1,0G0,000 had been appropriated for road
improvements both for strategic and
commercial purposes. Most of the towns
are on the seacoast and the greater part
of the travel tor any distance is by boat.
In most, if not all, the islands, Gov.
Taft said there is a mountain backbone
which is practically impassable, Gen.
Hall had succeeded in crossing the Luzon
mountains, but his men were almost dead
when they emerged.
Water Buffalo Are Scarce. -
In his tour Gov. Tuft had found indus
tries in progress, though much inter
rupted, largely on account of the destruc
tion of the water buffalo or cariboo, the
work cattle of the island. This animal
he described as "the beast of burden, the'
ramily friend, the wealth of the indi
vidual and the object of all the robber
bands of the mountain •districts." In the
last two years about 75 per cent of these
animals had been killed oft by a disease
called rinder pest and their price had in
creased from $30 to $140 per head. :
Agriculture also had been interrupted
by the insurrection, but in the vicinity
of Manila this was not true toaav. The
cariuoo moves £ o slowly as to block the
streets and he thought that mules mignt
be imported, also milk-producing animals,
there are line cattle ranges, but to his
knowledge no milk is produced on the
islands.
"Within the past ninety days-" sad
Senator Hale, "I have observed 'by the
newspapers that there were forty-one
amah fights within the space of thirty
days. Where did they occur?"
The reply was that most tit these en
counters had taken place in Batangas
Laguna, Mindero, Bohol, Samar, Cebu
and a few other places. Most of the
troops are in these provinces.
Christian Filipino* Mate Trouble.
Referring to the Maccabebes, Gov Taft
said they had always been at war wfth
their neighbors; that they had formerly
heen fnenas of the Spaniards and that
When the Americans took charge of the
country they had also transferred their
allegiance to the United States He
thought there were 8,000 or 10,000 of them
y'.,.Taft spoke frequently of the un
reliability of all estimates of the popula-
SS?,l— said there are probably 0,000,000
raipinos, or Christians; 1,K0,003 or 2,000,
--000 of non-Christians and probably 1,000,
--000 oi Moros. However, a census was
badly needed. The members of the com
mittee smiled when Gov. Taft said that
the Christians had made all the troubh-.
Ho explained that it is not necessary
to provide a more paternal government
for the lgorrot< - than for" the Filipinos
it was also impracticable to place Fili
pino governors over these people.
-In reply to Senator Patterson, Gov.
raft said that there probably were 2,000
rifles m the hands of the insurrectionists
In the islands, and there are some of
the latter who do not carry guns. He
could not, be said, tell where the rifles
and the ammunition came from.
Replying to Senator Dubois, the witness
said that Laguna and Samar are the
only considerable Philippine provinces
which have not been organized, and that
with those provinces organized, practical
ly all the Philippines capable of being tak
en in would be under civil government
Hope Is in Educated Classes.
1; "reply to other questions from Mr
Dubois, Gov. Taft said that the Filipinos
have a greater attachment for their coun
try than, for - isrance, the Chinese have
for theirs.
"The Filipino i.v he said, "attached
first to his town and second to his prov
ince, and he is, I think, now forming an
attachment for the name Filipino, tin
that pride of country and the Filipino's
"desire for education," he audi "I base
my hope for the success of what we are
doing in the - islands."
"You can't," he said, "appreciate the ig
norance and credulity of the natives who
do not have the advantage of a knowledge
of the Spanish language. The present dif
ficulty in the islands Is found in the ease
with which the educated Filipinos con
trol or oppress their own people. In the
province of Cagagan they have a system
of bossism, and these bosses have almost
the power of life and death."
fJkCES fHAT APE FAMPW f° ST. p>UL 'people
■"*"" ■ " '■*■
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JOHN JACKSON, :«6 >.
§be %l f wx\ (flube
A HALF MILLION PIGK-UP
MESABA MINING RIGHT BRINGS A
HIGH FIGURE.
Special to The Globe.
DULUTH, Minn., Feb. I.—An unusually
large mining deal was consummated to
day when what is known as the Kinney-
Hawkins-Crosby property, twelve miles
southwest of Hibbing, was leased to
Eastern parties" for $520,000. Identity of
the buyers cannot be ascertained, But
they are said to be independent of the
steel trust.
The property is situated in sections 31
and 32, township 67-22,. and is said to
have r*i£>wn up.35,000,000 tons of good ore,
the fourth largest on the Mesaba range.
It is yet undeveloped. The mining rights
were owned by Senator E. B. . Hawkins,
O. D. Kinney, George Crosby and Capt.
Pearce.
The terms of the lease provide for a
minimum ore output of 100,000 tons an
nually for thirty years, at 20 cents roy
alty. Hawkins et al get the $520,000 as
a bonus, and the fee owners receive the
royalty. \ -
GIVES HIS LIFE
FOR HIS LOVE
LA CROSSE. .YOUTH . DYING OF MA
LIGNANT SMALLPOX
Nelson Berry Insisted on Being Near
His Sweetheart in Dangerous .
illness — Will Die, but
Girl Recovers.
Special to The Globe.
LA CROSSE, Wis., Feb. I.—Nelson Ber
ry, a young man of twenty-ijur years,
lies probably fatally ill at his home m
this city with smallpox, contracted while
he watched at the bedside of Miss Julia
Jameson, his swe3 .In-art, who was dan
gerously, ill with the disea.se. A young
er brother ha.s also j contracted the dis
ease, but will recover.
Young Berry and Miss Jameson have
been friends since childhood, and as
years passed that friendship ripened into
love. A few weeks ago the girl was
taker! ill, and her case was pronounced
smallpox in malignant form. ... Unheed
ing all advice and caution, young Berry
went to her home, and ii was not until
she was entirely out of danger that he
relinquished his vigil. it was the day
after his return home that he was taken
ill. and physicians hold out no hopes of
his recovery. The girl is almost entirely
recovered.
GOD NOT THE
ONLY CREATOR
IF DR. TERRY, OF EVAXSTOX, IS
TO B.E BELIEVED
Member of Faculty of Garrett Bib
lical Institute Accentuates the
Turmoil Started by
Prof. Pearson.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, 111., Feb. 1.-Dr. Milton- S.
Terry, one of the members of the faculty
of the Garrett Biblical institute, the the
ological department of Northwestern uni
versity, stirred to.unusual depths because
of recent criticisms passed upon him,
issued a statement today replying to his
critics. In the statement he takes the
stand that God is -not the only creator,
and cites instances were the creation of
matter is due to other sources.
The statement is the outcome of a dis
cussion which Dr. Terry has had with
Edward A. Kimball, of Boston, a prom
inent member of the Christian Science
faith. In a recent lecture at Evanston
Mr. Kimball stated that God created sin,
sickness and deai... With this statement
Dr. Terry took issue so vigorously that
criticisms were made upon his ortho
doxy. This led to the publishing by the
doctor of his ideas on the matter.
In the statement he says, among other
things: "God is not the only creator,
nor has His omnipotence any necessary
logical or casual connection with sin. Sin
is the creation of a self-conscious free
person, made a little lower than God,
but just as real as he."
"I am surprised," said the doctor in
his statement, "to learn that an oppo
sition so inconsistent with obvious facts
should be accepted by the careful think
er."
F.J. SHEPARD PROMOTED
MADE SUPERINTENDENT OF "SANTA
FE COAST LINES.
Special to The Globe.
CHICAGO, Feb. 1.-F. J. Shepard, for
erly with the. Northern raeil'l2 in St.
Paul, who recently came to Chicago as
private secretary to Third Vice President
McKendrick, of the Santa Fe, has gained
a quick and substantial promotion. He
will leave tomorrow for Los Angeles to
become general superintendent of the
Santa Fe >. coast lines.
■IjgyM, »»..,J J 11 ml.. mi mil——i^——
- ■
JUDGE JOHN W. WILLIS. ' /
SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 2, 1902.—TWENTY-SIX PAGES.
A BONUS FOR
INFORMERS
ST. LOUIS GRAND JURY RECOM-
MENDS THAT SUCH A PLAN
: —~~ BE ADOPTED
MUNICIPAL CORRUPTION RIFE
Directors of Suburban Street Rail
way and Ex-City Councilmen In
dicted for Bribery and
for Perjury
STILL MORE ROTTENNESS
ST. LOUIS, Feb. 1.-The grand jury,
which has been investigating the facts
in connection with the attempt to pass
a bill through the municipal assembly
granting certain franchises to the Sub
urban Street Railway company by the
alleged use of a corruption fund of 5135,
--000, this evening returned its final report
and adjourned.
Two hours before the report of the
grand jury. was submitted a bench war
rant was issued for Henry Nicolaus,': a
director of the Suburban Street Railway
company, ordered by the retiring body,
which returned an indictment against
Nicolaus charging him with bribery in
connection with the Suburban case. Up
to a late hour Mr. Nicolaus had not been
arrested.
The other indictments which resulted
from the Suburban investigation were
a gainst "ex-Delegate John K. Murrell, ex-
Councilmen Charles Kratz and Emil A.
Meysenburg, and Ellis Wainwright, di
rector of the Suburban company, for brib
ery, and ex-Delegate Julius Lehmann and
-Delegate Harry Faulkner, for perjury.
The grand jury's report is brief, consid
ering the importance of the subject treat
ed. Referring to the subject of munici
pal corruption, the report says:
Municipal Corruption General.
"Investigation which we have made into
the corrupt methods by which franchises
have been obtained from tlte city, and
which have resulted in a number of in
dictments, have proved to us that this
form of corruption, is much more general
than -has-been" supposed, although the
resort to such practices with more or less
frequency has been known. . It has been
impossible for us to make a complete ex
amination of this kind of offenses within
the time appointed by law for our serv
ice, and the work which we have begun
must be taken up by the grand jury which
will immediately succeed us. * ■'.-
"We believe that all franchises for th©
use of the city's streets should be sold
to the highest and best bidder, after due
public notice has been given, and that thft
plundering of the city of its property,
under the name of 'granting franchises,*
should cease; yet, if the present system Is
to be continued, much can be done .to
improve conditions.
Bonus for Informers.
"As the first object of all criminal laws
is the prevention of crime, rather than
vengeance upon the criminal, and as it
seems that crime of this character can
not be eradicated until the conditions
which make it profitable are removed, we
suggest that laws be enacted which will
provide that where a municipal legisla
tor is bribed by the party or parties seek
ing the franchises, to aid in the grant
of the franchise, upon his or anyone else
turning informant and securing the con
viction of the person who has bribed
him, the ordinance granting the i- fran
chise shall be forfeited and the same
franchise, including all property used with
it and owned by the corporation owning
the franchise, shall be sold at public
auction upon due advisement, the inform
ant to receive 25 per cent of the pro
ceeds, the remainder to be paid into
the city treasury.
"Under such a law, to obtain a fran
chise by corruption would render it prac
tically valueless, and would be attended
by so much danger that few would en
gage in this sort of corruption, and none
without great risk of punishment and
loss of property."
ROCKEFELLER ANTES UP
OIL MAX COVERS MR. MORGAN'S
OFFER TO HARVARD. .
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Feb. I,—Follow
ing the announcement at Harvard com
mencement exercises last June that J. P.
Morgan had agreed to erect, at a cost
of over $1,000,000, three of the buildings
required for the accommodation of the
Harvard medical school, \ in carrying out
their new plans for medical education
and research. President Eliot announce
to the medical faculty tonight that J. D.
Rockefeller proposes to give $1,000,C00 in
furtherance of this great project provid
ed that other friends of the university
will raise a sum of money in the neigh
borhood of $500,000, toy be used
by the Harvard medical school for land,
buildings or endowments'.
A Fine Champagne.
Especially dry without heaviness, deli
cate, and breedy is G. H. Mumm's Extra
Dry now coming to market. Importations,
120,359 cases in 1901—nearly 00,000 cases
more than any other brand.
«*■ *<*.■ i -yy*'
«Bt|s - I
A. B. STICKXE.Y.
A GANG OF
RURAL THIEVES
alleged THAT five farmers in
MICHIGAN HAVE beesfreely
; indulging in the TRADE
OF ROBBERY.
Special to The Globe.
" ST. V JOSEPH; V Mich., Feb. 1.-Officers
have discovered what \ they \ believe \to be
a gang of thieves whose" operations have
extended over ten or twelve years. James
Hazzard, his son, . Honqre.Haz.zard,; Wil
liam Marble, of Coe township, and Martin
Hakes, of Porter township, have -been
arrested by -Sheriff Parrish | and .: taken
to -Ithaca'; on the charge of burglary.
Clinton Nelson, of Sumnertownship, has
also been arrested as an accessory after
the ■ fact/ . -•"".,"-»- ~;;:- : ''}:-; '-v^- : -'. -.'; ;,&* i
It is claimed that Hazzard, Hakes and
Marble robbed a store In Pleasant Valley
and stole a set of harness,^which was
token to the . Nelson place, where *it was
found.. The officers also claim that the
men have been stealing; stock and run
ning it into Nelson's possession.
- Nelson is estimated, to be \ worth $500, -:
OCO. .He gave bail and;'will be examined
in February. The; others Jwaived'exam
ination and will be tried at the next term
of court. ■ ""V
BRAVE ENGINEER
SAVES LIVES
PROBABLY' DISASTROUS EXPLOSION'
OF HOT TAR PREVENTED BY
PRESENCE OF MJXD AND
DARING ACTION.
Special to . The Glooe, .
LA CROSSE/. Wis., .; Feb. I.—To the
bravery "of the engine at the plant
of the La Crosse Gas and Electric com-
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CHARLES MAYER, THE MURDERED PATROLMAN.
pany is due credit of saving nearly a
dozen men from being burned probably
fatally in an explosion of hot tar.
Too much tar had been allowed in the
power tank where the gas" is generated,'
and the machinery had \ already, been set
in motion when the engineer saw that an
explosion which would '. wreck the ' build
ing and probably blow all of the em
ployes to atoms was | inevitable unless
the machinery was stopped before the
blade of the Austin car burner touched
the overflowing tar. With a cry of warn
ing to his fellows he jumped and caught
the blade of the machine just in time
to prevent the catastrophe.
A few minutes later the' tar caught fire,
but was quickly extinguished.
Castro Can't Find Jlerrera. -
PANAMA, Colombia. Feb,: The Co
lombian government fleet returned here
last night. The commander* reports that
the government forces held Aqua . Dulce,
but that Gen. Castro is endeavoring to
get in touch with. Gen." Herrera, the rev
olutionary commander. A vessel which
has just arrived here reports that every
thing is quiet in the provinces of Los
Santos and Chiriqui. ?' - -,: -ISB^
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HON. MICHAEL DORAN.
BURGLARS'
FOUL DEED
PATROLMAN CHARLES MAYER DIES
THREE HOURS AFTER BE
, ING SHOT :
MURDERERS STILL AT LARGE
The -Police" Are. Actively Engaged
in Working- Up Slender Clues
of the Unknown As
sassins ■ "
CHIEF "O'CONNOR HAS HOPES
-Patrolman Charles Mayer, who "was
shot by-burglars in the rear of Louis
Jessrang's saloon, corner of -University
and Farrington avenues, yesterday morn
ing at 2:30 o'clock, succumbed to \ his
wounds at 5:30, being but little over three
hours after being shot. An operation was
performed *on the wounded man at' St.
Joseph's "hospital by Dr.* Giln'llan^ but
nothing could save his life from the mur
derer's bullet. " *"'' "". .'
The bullet, 'which was of large calibre,
entered the body on the left "side • just
above the hip and after penetrating the
intestines lodged beneath the skin" oh the
opposite side. The. intestines were punc
turd in many places and as goon' ad the
physician saw their, condition he knew
that there was ho hope of the man's re
covery.. Chief O'Connor was notified that
the man was going to die and County At
torney Kane was taken by the central
patrol: wagon to the hospital to take an
ante-mortem statement.. Mayer never
regained consciousness after going under
the influence of the anaesthetic and could
make no statements.
- i The story of the • shooting •as • told by
Mayer to Sergeant jj Christian while being
taken to the hospital is as follows: He
was making his last rounds before being
relieved at 3 o'clock and went to the
rear of Jessrang's saloon to try the door.
The door is about ..twenty feet from Far
rington avenue and is in a comparatively
open space. ... A coal bin stands at the
left side of the door and it appears that
the men were in hiding behind It. As
Mayer walked past the bin the burglars,
who were attempting to enter the saloon,
opened fire on him, shooting two or three
times. One of these shots took effect as
stated above, and the wounded man fell
in his tracks. As soon as he fell the
desperadoes-made good their escape.
Wounded Man Fires Pistol.
About two minutes after the shots were
fired the -neighbors heard someong blow
ing a whistle and a minute laTer three
shots were fired in rapid succession. It
proved that the last shots were fired by
the wounded man to call ssmeone to his
assistance.. He then began to blow the
whistle again and continued until several
of the neighbors arrived on the scene.
Herman Boesel, 518 Farrington avenue,
was the first man to reach Officer Mayer.
He found the.wounded man lying on the
ground a few feet from the door and
__m *yJ_mWSA $m
Ifeffei^ *> ' ££•*
GEN. JOHN B. SANBORN.
--:■■■* ■-■■-■ ■ '-•; ■•- *. ■ ■ -:..' ..■■i:v!* ■ .
still blowing the whistle. Mayer gave the
key of the patrol box to Boesel, who ran
to -Western and University avenues and
telephoned' the Rondo station j that \ Mayer
had been . shot The patrol arrived • im
mediately and took the wounded man to
St. Joseph's hospital-'c -'; -
Paul C. Gerver, who lives at 496 Far
rington avenue, just across the street
from the scene of the shooting heard
shots, and , hastily dressing,. hurried to
the scene. As soon as he appeareed May
er, who knew him, said: "Oh, Paul, held
me, I'm hurt. Run for a doctor." Gerver
started to find a doctor, but was unsuc
cessful and returned just as the patrol
was ready to take the man to the hos
pital. " • " -;
At the hospital Mayer asked that Dr.
Whitcomb be called, but the physician
was out of the city and Capt.Hanft at
the central station was notified. He call
ed Dr. Gilfijlan and sent the patrol wagon
to take him to the hospital. He arrived
in a few minutes after the wounded man
and at once began to do what he could
to relieve his distress. Chief O'Connor
was also notified and superintended all
investigations personally. He ordered all
the detectives. called out to assist in
looking for the murderers.
Detectives on the Trail.
The only clue the detectives were able
to discover on the premises was a bott' >
which was supposed to have teen drop
ped by the burglars in their hasty flight
after firing the raial shot. The bottle
was taken to the chemist in the health
department and found to contain nitro
glycerine, 96 per cent explosive. There
was enough of the ' pow-vnil stuff in the
bottle to have blown the entire building
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. BACK DOOR OF J ESSRANG'S SALOON.
The- Cross Shows Where the Wood Was Cut by the Burglars to Effect an Entrance
down, to say nothing of Mowing out the
door of th*> small safe *« the"Jessrihg
saloon. - -".."."..;;.' " . • :
- The police are of the opinion that the
work was hot that " "»C experts' for. many
reasons. ■ In the first place they-{would
never have taken the risk of carrying
around so large a quantity of explosive
with them, when it was" entirely unneed
ed. That they did not /have any '•look
out" while they ; were ■ attempting ; to
blow the safe is considered to be anoth
er^ evidence of their lack of experience
in the burglar line. There was no ne
cessity on their part of killing any per
son, something which the burglar of ex
perience tries his best to avoid, and
lastly there was nothing to be gained by
blowing the safe, and had the plan been
successful and they had sec irod all there
was in it, there would not hava, been
hardly enough to pay them for their
trouble.
One fact that may perhaps lead to the
detection of the murderers is that they
used a peculiar revolver, and one that
is very rare. The bullet was a iS-calioer
and one that can be used only m j one
make of guns. Chief O'Connor, after
searching through the sporting goods
stores, was able to unearth only two
boxes of "these cartridges in the entire
city. The . chief has not divulged the;
make of the weapon, as he thinks that
it is possible that, owing to its rarity,
the person who • sold the men the
cartridges may remember those who
bought them. If this should be the case,
the police would have an important clue
to begin their work of running the crim
inals to the ground.
There is no question that Officer Mayer
frustrated a burglary when he gave up
his life, as an examination of the rear
premises of the saloon sQow that the
men had been at work there'• for . some
time, and also that they had taken pre
caution to learn exactly the wherea
bouts of the bolts, with which the rear
door of the saloon was fastened. The
door was of pine boards, one inch In
thickness, and through this the burglars
had cut with jack knives a semi-oval
hole, six inches long and three Inches
wide. - '
This hole was. located between the two
Continued on Sixth Page.

H. A. BOABDiLAN,
PRICE FIVE CENTS. V.
WEST WILL
NOT BE DENIED
REPRESENTATIVES OF THE ARID
AND SEMI-ARID SECTIONS IN
SIST ON IRRIGATION
HANSBROUGH BILL MUST PASS
No Immediate Appropriation of Gov
ernment Money Is Asked—Only
Proceeds From Sale of Lands
to Be Expended
PRESIDENT FAVORS PROTECT
FROM THE GLOBE BUREAU,
Washington, D. C.
WASHINGTON, Fob. 1.-In the mat
ter of irrigation it looks as if the gov
ernment is at last about to embark on
a new and stupendous undertaking. At
nearly every session of congress for the
last seventy-five years there have been
bills for the building of dams and reser
voirs, and efforts have been made to se
cure, their passage; but up to the present
time these - bills have all died, and the
government has consistently refused to
appropriate the public revenues for this
purpose. "...,-..---
But the chief reason the bills have died
a fairly easy death has been the pre
dominating influence in congress of tho
sections of the country which were not
interested in irrigation. Naturally the
fertile Eastern and Middle "Western
states had no desire to be taxed to build
works which would be of no local benefit
to them, and might bring into competition
with them new arable lands. Then It
was not until comparatively recent years
that the fertile watered lands of the
public domain were all taken up under
the homestead laws. But during the past
decade the population of the arid and
semi-arid states has been growings the
pressure for more land tributary to the
centers of population and on the lines
of transportation has been increasing.
Western Influence Growing.
The railroads have begun reaching out
for more territory to exploit, and -the
influence in congress of the senators and
representatives from the arid and semi
arid states has been growing. Seeing th 3
ease with which huge appropriations are
secured every year for "improvements"
of rivers which are such only in name,
and harbors which have no right to file
name, the people from these states have
demanded that they come in for their
share of the government's munificence.
The people of Dakota object to being tax
ed for improvements of the Caloosa
hatchee creek in Florida... All they get
from the public treasury is an occasional
sop in the shape of a public building;
in the meantime these river and harbor
outlays—notoriously public .steals—go on
growing greater every year.
So the subject of irrigation has been
pressing on the attention of congress,
each year with greater insistence, until
at this session it begins to look as if
the national legislature would no longer
be able to stand against it. There are
Continued on Sixth Page.
.. ■::'..,;,* .*.* :^ mmSg^" m--- :_ ". '."51
HENRY JOHNS.

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