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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 26, 1902, Image 9

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M. D. FLOWEJR, I'rM. H. B. CARROLL, Gen. Snpt.
ST. PAUL UNION STOCK YARDS,
South St. Pau! ; Minn.
Best Eqnfppcd and Most Advantageous Market for the Shippers tn Hie
Northwest-Connected With All the Railroads.
l; 000 BEEVES AND 5,000 HOGS WANTED DAILY.
CHAS.L. HAAS COMMISSION COMPANY
LIVE STOCK COMMISSION MERBHAMTS,
Room (9 Exchange Bldg-, Union Stock Yards, So- Bt, Paul, Minn
and Union Stock Yards, Chicago, II!.
Ell correspondence will receive prompt attention. Liberal advances made on con/
esgnments. References—Union Stock Yards or any Commercial Agency.
ROGERS & ROGERS,
LIVE STOCK COMMISSION MERCHANTS.
f^pom 21 Exchange Building, South St. Paul, Minnesota.
Highest market prices obtained for stock. Prompt attention given to all corr«
■pondene« and orders. References: Any commercial agency.
ILL. THUET. * 'PRANK THUET.
TUIIITT DDAC live stock
■ ilUt I Dnv9ay Commission Merchants.
X/Ocatcd in Chicago 111., So. Omaha, Keb.,Sloux City, la., So. St. Panl 3lii»n
_. SO. ST. PAtJI^-Cattle Salesmen—Frank Thuet. C. L. Kaye, B. B. Mosher.
Hog Salesman—P. J. Gibbons. Sheep Salesman, Fred Foxley. -
~- REFERENCES—NationaI Live Stock Bank, Union Stock Yards, Chicago;
Stock Yards Bank, So. St. Paul; St. Paul National Bank, St. Paul; U. S.
Yards National Bank, So. Omaha; Live Stock National Bank, Sioux City.
Kenneth Clark, Pres. J. J. Flanagan, Vice Pres. . W. B. Briggs, Secy, and Treas'
St. Paul Cattle Loan GO.
Exchange Hid? , foutk St. Paul, Minn.
WII-I. FIRXISH MOXEY OX LIBERAL TERMS to feeders of cattle and to
those In Minnesota and adjoining states wanting to get a start in raising cattle
or add to their present holdings. CORRESPONDENCE SOLICITED.
vjouth St. Paul <CiVe Stock
jfTnd Outside Cattle Markets.
SOUTH ST. PAUL, Feb. 25.—Receipts
at the Union Stock Yards today (esti
mated) were: Cattle, 1,550; calves, 450;
hogs, 3,200; sheep, 800; cars, 102.
Official receipts yesterday: Cattle, 637;
■ ; calves, 37; hogs, 1,296; sheep, 5,947; cars,
Heceipts thus far in February, compar
ed with the same period in 1901, are as
follows: i
-------- Feb., 1902. Feb., 1901. Gain.
•. Cattle 9,905 9,221 684
Calves ...." 1,283 1,919 *636
Hogs ............ 47,104 38,590 8,514
Sheep 39,612 9,048 30,564
Horses .. 124 143 *19
Cars :.... 1,138 897 241
:- Receipts thus far in 1902, compared
•with the same period in 1901, are as fol
lows:
: ■ „ - 1902. 1901. Gain.
Cattle*.... 21,631 20,853 825
Calve.- ...." 2,909 3,841 *932
Hogs :......: 121,110 • 101,287 19,823
Sheep 101,953 55,063 46,880
H0r5e5:...7..'....156 377 *221
Cars 2,808 2,365 443
♦Loss.
Hors.
. Comparative receipts:
Tctal for today (estimated) 3,£00
: A week ago 3,721
: A year ago .1.... 2,459
** -,« Quotations: weights and - light,
|$5.55i§13; mixed and butchers, [email protected];
heavy. [email protected]; boars. [email protected]; stags
$4.25<§-5.25; pigs, [email protected].
Receipts moderate for Tuesday. East
ern markets reported a decline of s@loc,
with trade slow at the drop, but South
St. Paul averaged a bare oc under Mon
day, with buying active at the prevail
ing quotations. Offerings included no
far.cy hogs, but the general average
■was fair to good. Prices ranged from
$5.65 to $6.15; bulk, [email protected]. The supply
of pigs and . underweights was limited,
and largely common in quality. Pigs
at '$4.85i&5.15, and the few underweights
on the market at [email protected]; stags and
bears steady. Representative sales:
. Lights— ■
No. Wt.Dkg.Price.lNo" Wt.Dkg.Price.
2a ......175 5055.75 |84 187 ..$5.85
97 ......187 40 5.90 51 194 80 5.80
-76 194 .. 5.85 GO 188 .. 5.80
43 : 163 .. 5.65 |
" Mixed and Butchers— "
9 202-.. $5.85 |11 222 .. $6.90 "
30 ......205 80 5.85 47 225 40 585
84 209 40 5.90 | 7 236 .. 5.90
5 .220 .. 5.85 30 215 80 5.85
59 226 .. 5.93 74 221 .. 5.90
«3 226 40 5.85 172 216 40 5.95
27- ......210. 40 5.70 76 200".. 5.95
3f 240 40 6.00 77 240 80 6.10
I ::::::i3 a 6.03 |72 :::;:S 80 6.00 '
7J 230 80 6.05 [90 217 .. 5.95
s -.Sffig a}" "-m m"■
■ Heavy— ~ " ~~
, 6 , 4.... .251 .. $5.85 17 306 .. $6.00
33 209 .. 6.00 50 258 .. 6.15
- - Stags and Boars— ~ ~~ '
1 430 SO $5.00 jl 370 SO $4.50"
,1 ......320 80 5.25 j 1 220 .. 3.50
Pigs and Underweights— " ~ "
11 140 ..$5.35 jl 110 .. $5.00 "
4 135 M 5.25 6 110 ..4 85
'• ' .6- """H8 .. 5.15 8 IQI .. 4.g5
Cattle.
Comparative receipts:
Total for today (estimated) .... 2 000
|A -week ago .-. ..*.".W»
, A year ago - "1353
' Quotations: Fancy butcher "steers,"?s.so
jfe.J»l»i. [email protected]; good to choice,
common to fair, $304.75; fancy
" butcher cows and heifers, $4.C0@5; prime
: i^ffi'r g %!%>&^° ice> [email protected]; common
tO'ftlr. [email protected]; canners andi cutters.
|J-f°@2.Sa; good to choice butcher bulls,
$2.7.7<y.i. <o; common and bologntu bulls $2
@2.70; good to choice veals, ' [email protected]
common to fair, $4rur,; good to choice
feeding steers, [email protected]; common to fair
A £2^o"; 401 sood t0 choice stock steers!
I-- $3523.W); common to fair, [email protected]; steer
calves, [email protected]; good to choice' stock
-cows and heifers, $2.75@3; common to
fair, [email protected]; stock and feeding bulls
$2.25^2.73; good to choice milch cows and
-springers,-$32@40; common to fair, $''5(5;30
t Receipts of butcher cattle were liberal
l)ut Included a large percentage of only
common to fair quality stuff. A few
small bunches of good to choice steers
were among the offerings, selling at $5@
5.50, but there was nothing fancy. Among
the cows and heifers were some good
cows, which sold up to $4, and one heifer
fancy, at $5. Best bulls were fully
steady, but the common and bologna
■bulls were weak. An unusually heavy
supply of veal calves sent the market
down 50c and best sold at $5.75. Canners
find cutter cows good sale at steady
prices. J
Offerings of stock and feeding cattle
Were: plentiful, but generally common in
Sn^ ( , y> JP™* 3 were steady on all kinds
#ix3lt he better grades moved out readily
Sfo^T. were some outside buyers on the
tnarket m addition to the local people
The common stuff was salable but at
ow prices, although this class of cattle
is bringing more money at South St Paul
than at any other Westernl marketfni
point. Good feeders sold up to l\ l and
W.H. CAMPBELL
COMMISSION COMPANY
live Stock Commission Merchants
Union Stock Yards,
SOUXH ST. PAUL.
JlStid Blg and correspondence so
' ilication reports furnished on ap.
* No Vflv Ost^r.t Ctly uCommlsslon busineaa.
iccoint. bo"Sht or sold on our own
.■ »er. bt. faul National bank. St. Paul.
SUMMER & THOMAS,
LIVE STOCK BROKERS.
Orders taken for all kinds of Jive stock
and time given to responsible parties. j
Correspondence solicited. -...,.
SOUTH ST, PAUL, SIOUX CITY,
Minnesota. lowa.
stock steers up to $3.75. Best stock heif
ers .sold at $3. Representative sales:
Good to Choice Butcher Steers— ~ - :
No. Wt.Price. I No. Wt.Price.
.1 1250 $5.0018 .1350 $5.50
2 1075 5.00 t
Common to Fair Butcher Steers—
3 1000 $4.25| 1 1060 $1.15
8 1090 4.50 2 1045 4.00
3 883 3.7510 1012 4.15
Butcher Cows and Heifers—
1 , .1130 $3.40 1 T. 1030 $3.00
1 1060 3.00 2 893 3.40
1 ► —1200 3.00 1 1180 3.10
6 .V 1053 3.40 1 ;:.... 900 3.40
1 930 3.50 1 1330 4.00
1 ............ 970 5.00 . . ■-- : .;. . ;
Cutters— - ~ :
2 :..940 $2.50 2 930 $2.50
1 1200 2.60 2 .905 260
_g_L- 935 2.75 1 1220 2.75
Oanners— ~ :
1 ..-• •■• 830 $1.75| 1 900 $2.23
1 720 2.001 3 900 2.00
1 ••• 1000-2.25 1 980 2.25
Veals—
3 I<*>s4.oo 1 - • 100 $5.50
12 143 5.75 3 130 5.50
2 125 5.50 1 170 5.75
ia_^. 105 5.5012 ............ 137 5.75
Stockers and Feeders—
32 88613:85117 518 $3.25
6 553 3.75 1 630 3.25
,* •..,. 492 3.50|2 ....670 3.00
(1 • 860 3.60 4 ............ 640 3.40
2 •■■• „..-■• 870 4.00! 2 610 3.40 !
Steer Calves— ~ —, ■■■ ~
2 400 $3.25! 5 350 $3.33
1_ ■■ ■ , 300300j2 380 3.25
Common Steers— *~ "
1 ••• ••• 570 $2.50! 2 <-. 625 $2.75
Stock Cows and Heifers— " ~"
\ ••• 523 $2.75| 1 440 $3 00
? V. 645 2.7513 ....666 3.00
1 660 2.90 9 ...570 2.70
4 545 2J35) 1 ............ 690 3 00
3. -^_580 3.00} 2 ....■...-::;:; 7SQ 3.00
■Heifer Calves— , . ~~ ~~
18 358 $3.00! 4 ............ 412 $2.85
Milch Cows and Springers— "
4 cows and 4 calves ..........'• $133 00
1 cow ...; 2300
5 cows and 2 calves '.'.'.'.'.'.'."" 13750
■2 cows 7600
1 cow ........ .• . . '"' \V i-XX
1 cow and 1 calf '.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'.'. 38 00
Sheep.
Comparative receipts: h: ■ ■
Total for today (estimated) &00
A week ago ..'..:.. «v
A year ago „< !!'.'." 316
Quotations: Fancy " "*5!75@6 25
grood to choice fat lambs, [email protected] fair
to good fat lambs, $4.75@5; feedTng lainbL,
$4@u, thin buck lambs, $%4; good to
choice yearling wethers, [email protected]; good
to choice heavy wethers, $4.25@4 fair
to good - wethers, [email protected]; good to choice
iat ewes, medmmweight, thin
heavyweights. [email protected]; fair to good fat
ewes, $3@3 25; common' killers, $2.?5@3l
f2»V?^C^ OlCe. stock and feeding ewes!
lo^'skaS-V^' *2@2-L>s: C°mmOn
Demand good for all kinds. ' Better qual
ir&*L n both killing and stock and feeding
kinds, are selling at steady to strong
prices t, Common stuff is slow, but is sal
able Representative sales:
Killing Sheep and Lambs—
*°ewes ............;.... 3& *j*\*
10 iamb ........ ■..::::::::: 69 " \'m
1 buck j™ 2-2
lbuck .....'.'.'.""■:' 190 ?"i«
S6 lambs ' re rc
-35 ewes , . . >?"'".v*. s"ln
18 lambs :.......;;.::::: 7? IIS
32 ewes ........;......... 13 s'fiS
Stock and Feeding Sheep and L,ambs
-28 lambs , go $4 fio
w4 m.° n?, *$* shippers on""the market
e-^. F> Schneider, Norwood: J. Tins
vail River Falls; Riley Bros., Ellsworth•
L. Rausch, Howard Lake; Brabec & Mal
sed, Waverly; M. Schuchart, T. A. Den
face- H£Ul^ >11:, J-. Hegerle, St. Boni
t T'tlf- f' l^^' Diamond Bluff; J.
1. Little & Son, Kasson; M. J. B Rich
mond Manchester; J. A. Rogers, T. Ol
%Z'- fr UmT-V rOt£: Wk Andrews! Hutchln
son. H Heinbockel, Norwood; H. Haas'
-5r erJ^ C xTlo, gn6; H> aye ' Maiden Rock; G.
Nold. Nelson; J. W. Peacock, Glen wood;
~;* Sn^u^ th¥r ,M- B - Ellingson, Bar!
tt; TJ^ Fllttl Madelia; W. R. Jeffers &
-Xo-re^t rs; AJ- JaDS New Richland;
C. OP. Christensen, Albert Lea; W Mc-
Guire Twin Lakes; A. Ruppert, Jordan;
A. D. Sackett, Janesville; Hed & Co La
fayette; F. Hipp, Arlington ;-J. C. Dodge
Monterey; F. Palmier & Co., Fairfax- H*
Nelson, Gibbon; J. *G. Gardner Ham
mond; C. Hanson, Bloomer; , C H Mid
dleton, Dwinnell & Co., Marshall; Urdahl
£ Co., Minneota; J. Hegrerle, Chaska H.
i^'t> E-^ J- G<>etze ' Carver; G. A. McCon
nell, P. Donovan, Belle Plaine; N. Ander
son, L a Iverson, Brooten A. Linderholm
Belgrade; G. Blaisdell, Painesville; Van
Son, & Co- Aim & Co.. Faribault; BehT
enfield Bros., Heron Lake: R. Erickson
rewster; C. W. Chamberlain. Amboy^a
is. Thurston, Judson; C. Black, New Ulnv
Nelson & Co.. Sleepy Eye; J. Arnold, V^
n£.V™L'. £' Kelson, Walnut Grove J H
Termath, F. A. Luhrs, Le Sueur.
Midway Horse Market.
Minnesota Transfer, St. Paul, Minn—
Barrett & Zimmerman report that owiiiff
to the strong demand for farm horses!
consignments concentrated <m the market
are larger than they have been for many
year which adds considerable strength
and life to the trade. Market opened «£
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE 7 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1902.
day wltlh. buyers from all over the North
west and Canada. Values: ; r
Drafters, extra ....;.... .:. ..........\5145@200
Drafters, choice ..................... 125@140
Drafters, common to good ........ 115#125
Farm mares, extra ;.....>.....;..;. 120@145
Farm mares, choice 100(g>120
Farm mares, common to good .... 75@10D
Chicago' Cattle Market.
CHICAGO, Feb. 25. — Cattle — Receipts,
5,000; steady; good, to prime steers nom
inal, [email protected]; poor to medium, [email protected];
Kstockers and feeders, [email protected]; cows,
[email protected]; heifers, [email protected]; eannera, $1.25
@2.30; bulls, [email protected]; ' calves, [email protected];
Texas fed steers, [email protected]. Hogs—Re
ceipts today, 30,000; tomorrow, 40,000; left
over, 7,000; 5c to 10c lower; close weak;
mixed and butchers, [email protected]; good to
choice Iheavy, [email protected]; rough heavy, $5.95
@6.20; light, $6.75@6; bulk of sales, $5.90@
20. ! Sheep—Receipts, 13,000; sheep active
and, steady; lambs strong and a shade
higher; good* to choice wethers, [email protected];
fair to choice mixed, [email protected]; Western
sheep and yearlings. $4.25@6; native lambs,
[email protected]; Western- lambs, $5.25®6.65.
Official yesterday: Receipts—Cattle, 24,
--545; hogs, 46,961; sheep, 8,957. Shipments-
Cattle, 4,025; (hogs, 11,718; sheep, 721.
; Chicago Stockyard's Report.
The annual report of the Union Stock
Yards company, just completed, show 3
that 1901 was a record-breaking year.
Tihe total receipts of live stock of all
classes amounted to 15,657,162 .head, the
aggregate value being $283,853,239, an in
crease of 1,034,847 head, and $20,540,516 In
value over the receipts in I£oo. This to- ;
tal of live stock received is the largest
in. the history of the yards, being 518,225
head larger than the numberv of head re
ceived in any former year.
OTHER LIVE STOCK MARKETS.
Kansas City—Cattle—Receipts, 6,000; 10c
higher; beef steers, [email protected]; Texans, $3.25
@6.50; cows and heifers, [email protected]; stockers
and feeders, [email protected]. Hags—Receipts;
11,000; slow to 5c lower; heavy, $6.2j@t>.25
--packers, [email protected]; medium, $5.90@6 20;
yorkers, $5.50@6; pigs, [email protected]. Sheep-
Receipts, 2,<M; 10c higher; sheep, $4, r t &a>
6.65; lambs, [email protected].
St. Louis, Mo.—Cattle—Receipts, 4,500;
steady; beef steers, [email protected]; Texans $3
#5.50; stockers and feeders, [email protected];
cows and heifers, [email protected]. Hogs—Receipts.
7,500; steady; pigs, [email protected]; packers, $5.90
@6,30; butchers. [email protected]. Sheep—Receipts
1,000; steady; sheep, $4.25<§>5.25; lambs, $5 50
@6.75.
South Omaha, Neb.—Cattle — Receipts,
3,200; strong to 10c higher; beef stee:s, $4
@6.60; Texans, $3.€[email protected]; cows and heif
ers, $3@5; canners, [email protected]; stockers and
feeders, [email protected]. Hogs—Receipts, 12,
--000; s@loc lower; heavy, $5.95(36.20; mixed,
$5.80@6; pigs, [email protected]. Sheep—Receipts,
4,500; strong to 10c higher; sheep, $J.53@
5.80; lambs, [email protected].
STOCKS, BONDS
* AND MONEY.
NEW. YORK, Feb. 25.—Today's stock
market was again largely devoted to ob
scure specialties, beth in railroad and
industrial list. Most of these showed ad
vances and the entire lack of explana
tion of tine movements pointed to manip
ulation by speculative pools. Some of
those which, have advanoed heretofore
were undergoing a process of profit-tak
ingl and the relapses thus caused 1 wers
sometimes exceedingly sharp.
Thus ar. advance of 2% in St. Joseph
& Grand Island was abruptly wiped out
by two or three sales at the last, which
carried the stock a fraction below last
night, and the first preferred, after ris
ing 114,. relapsed 3%. A similar abrupt dip
was made last night by Chicago, In- ;
dianapolis & Louisville, and that stock
moved up this morning 3%, but lost most
of it. The minor stocks which w&re
strong today included the Duluth, South
Shore & Atlantic stocks, the Ann Arbor
stocks, Port Worth & Denver City Stactnp
ed, the Chicago Terminal stocks, Chicago
Great Western, Kansas City Southern
preferred, the American Linseed stocks,
Glucose Rubber Goods, American Grass
Twine, Twin City.Rapid Transit, West
inghouse Electric common and first pre
ferred' and General Electric. Gains in
this group ran from 1 to 5 points. There
were losses of from 1 to 2 points on profit
taking in 'a number of similar stocks, and
National Salt down 7 pointsi from its last
sale. There was a t desultory speculation
here and there among the high-priced in
dustrials, and in one or two groups as a
whole, but the movements were of little
significance, and the tone of the market
was at all times mixed and irregular.
Amalgamated Copper and Sugar were
inclined to heaviness, the first on reports
that the purchase of a mine reported
yesterday had been given undue signifi
cance and. that later on the shading of
prices on refined sugar. Amalgamated
rose suddenly over last night at the last.
Brooklyn Transit was notably strong.
The short interest seemed to be intimi
dated by the large borrowing demand for
the stock, which has been supposed to be
for voting purposes at the coming meet
ing. The iron and steel industrials were
in good demand on the trade conditions,
but an abrupt reaction in Tennessee Coal
at the last which carried it below last
night affected the others in the r°uP-
The mosit notable movement of the
day was in Lackawanna. which was hft
ed 8 points as a result of the very strong
showing in the annual report. Other
coalers respond-ed. moderately. In the
Readings the speculative pool was buying
the second preferred while selling the
common. The basis of the speculation in
these stocks is the supposition that the
second preferred is to be converted one
half into the common and one-half into
1 the first preferred, which would hx the
! value of the second preferred midway be
tween those of the common,and first pre
ferred. The strength of the specialties
kent the general undertone firm, but tne
dealings in the stocks of the great rail
road companies reflected no convinced
opinion on the prospect of any great
changes in future conditions.
The bond market was fairly active and
firm' Total sales, par value, $2,445,000.
United States hew 4s advanced .Vs per
cent on the last Gall.
Stocks, _
ISTslHl'hlLowlL.B.
Atchison .... ...1 9400! 76%| 75% 75%
do pfd I 1600 97% l 96%| 96%
Baltimore & Ohio | 900jlO4%|103%!104 •
do pfd ................ I 100 94 I 94 I 93%
Canadian Pacific I 84001115%j114%|115% :
Canada Southern ..... I , 1001 86%] 86y 86 1
Chesapeake & 0hi0.... 500145% 45%j 45%
Chicago & Alton 1700 37y 36% 1 36%
do pfd .•*.......::..: ! 400 76%| 75% 75%
Chi. Ind. & Louis..... 1 76001 66 | 63%| 64
do pfd .........1 500180^(80 179%
Chi. & Eastern 111...... 400|142y 2 |142y 2
Chicago Great Western 5100 24% | 23%| 24%
do A pfd ............ 1 300186 j 84% 85%
do B pfd. ............ I 200 46% 45% 46%
Chicago & North-West I 1000)218% 217% 218
Chicago, I. I. & Pac... 300)160% 160% 160%
Chi. Term. & Trans...| 2800 17% 16 17 -
do pfd I 4800 33% 31% 32%
C, C, C. & St. Louis.i 1300102% 101 101% !
Colorado Southern .... I 8400 20/ 20%1 20% I
do Ist pfd .„... 2200, 69% CB%| 68%
do 2d pfd ............ 1600 367^1 36% 36%
Delaware & Hudson .. 3000 172% 174%
Del., Lack. & Western| 2700 1289 282 285 :
Denver & Rio Grande j ..... ..... | 43
do pfd ...........;;...- 100 92- 92 92%
Erie 4400| 38% 38 38y 8
do Ist pfd ............ 1400 68% 68 68%
do 2d pfd 200 56 56 56%
Great Northern pfd 300 186 186 185
Hocking Valley ........ ..... :.... ..... 67
do pfd .......:........ 100 84% 84% 84
Illinois Central 300 140% 139% 139%
lowa Central ...........* 300 48 48 48
do pfd" ................ 100 79% 79% i 79
Lake Erie & Western. ..... | ..... ..... j 67%
do pfd ..... I ..... l ..... 133
Louisville . & Nashville. [ 800 104% -. 104%
Manhattan L .......... j 6100 133 133%
'Metropolitan St. Ry....| 62(/0 169% 168 168%
Mexican Central | 1000 28% I 28%1 28%
'Mexican National .... 400| 16% I 16% 16%
Minn. & St. ■ Louis .... 400|109% 109 108%
Missouri Pacific ...... | 14C0| 102% 102% 102%
Missouri, K. & Tex... 200 25y 8 25%! 24%
do pfd ............... 600 55%1 55% 55%
New Jersey Central ... 200191 191 193
New York Central .... |. 800|163%|163 1163%
Norfolk & Western .. 500) 56%| 56% 56%
do pfd ................ j ..... 1 ..... ..... I £014
Ontario & Western .. 2000134 I 33% 33%
Pennsylvania ......... | 5400|150% j 149%1 150%
Reading i33400j 56% 56 | £6%
*do Ist pfd ............ ' 300 81 81% 81%
do 2d : p-M 31500 69% 68% 65%
St. l°st 1S M San; Fran. 200 l 60% 60% 60%
do Ist pfd ...V.....;.. .1...1, 83
do 2d »fd ............ 300 73 ' "72% 73
St. Louis Southwest. |. % 951/
c<% pfd ..........:..... ! 400 59 "57% 59
stdo Pa pu fd •:::::::::•■••••• ™°m- 163*s
sK;s^ y -:;;;; fs'ii'siif
T^| f Pa^-:::::: « ® ® £3
:r S!f do'M St;lj- & mst- m 21& 21% 21%
do pta «...i........... 200 S7-V S7i' C7i/
W* :-.::::£: Sill If p
Wisconsin Central .... 1000-20% 20% 26%
AdanS d "*-—""••• :'-«0 41% 41% -41S
AUiUIu tmitiMiic >am him .... . .V... 195
We special attention to out-of-town investment and
speculative accounts. Our private wires and our connections !
with all of the principal exchanges enable us to give prompt !
and accurate service. Correspondence invited.
JAMES DOBAN & GO. "SSSF" SI. Paul, Minn.
American ....:... ......1 1230
United States IWip U4
Wells Fargo 190
Amalgamated) Copper. «800 71% 69V, 71%
Am. Car & Foundry.. 1300 29% 28%1 28%
do pfd „..;... 200 88% 88% 88
Am. Linseed Oil ...... B*oo 25 23% 23%
do pfdl 3600 54 60 53%
Am. Smelt. & Refing.. 1000 47% 47^4 47%
do pfd 100 98 98 98
Anaconda Mm. Co 800 34% 33% 34
Brooklyn Rapid Tran. 36600' 65% 62' 64%
Col. Fuel & Iron 1300 87% 86% bt> /s
xConsolidated Gas .... 23001220% 219% 220%
Con. Tobacco pfd ..-.. 117
General Electric i«K)i294 291 293
Glucose Sugar 260 45 44% 44
Hocking Coal ." 1 I6?i
International Paper .. 1600 20% 20 20
do pfd 100 75% 75% 75
International Power 86
Laclede Gas 100 91 91 90
National Biscuit 1300 48 47% 47
National Lead j 100 17% 17% ny.
National Salt 200 23 23 j23
North American 1 92
Paoiflo Coast \ TlV°
Pacific Mall | 4001 47 | 47 | 46s.£'
People's Gas 7900101% 100%1100%
Pressed Steel Car 300 40 39%| 3!»
do pfd 100 83 83 j S^A
Pullman Palace Car j 1219
Republic Steel 1100 16%| 16% 16%
do pfd 400 70%1 70 70
Sugar I 9400|129 1127% 1128%
Term. Coal & Iron 12O2O0! 71%| 69%! 69%
IT. B. & P. Co 800 16% 16% i 16ft
do pfdl 77
U. S. Leather 2200 12% 11% 11%
do pfd 600 81% 81% BT^
U. S. Rubber 500 17%| 16% 16%
do pfd 200 59 |59 59
United States 5tee1....111600 44% 44 44%
do pfd !17100 95 94% 94%
Western Union ! 200| 90% 90%1 90%
.Am. Locomotive 1125001 32% 3iy,| 31%
do pfd I 400} 93 I 92%1 92%
xEx-dividerid.
Total sales for the day, 488,900 shares.
Sew York Bonds.
U. S. ref. 25,reg.109 bHock.Va.l. 4%5.109
do coup 109 -L. & N. uni.45.,10l 1,2
do 3s, reg ....108% b.Mex. Cent. 45.. 82^4
do coup 108% do Ist inc. ... 31^4
do new 4s, r..139 ]/4 bM. & St. L». 45.105
do coup 139V4 b>M., K. & 'T. 4s. 99%
do old 4s, reg.ll2Vs do 2ds 83%
do coup 112%' N. Y. C. 15t5..103"/s
do ss, reg 106V 2 | bdo gen. 3%5. .108
do coup 106% N. J. C. gen.55.139
Atch. gen. 45...101% N. P. 4s 74%
bdo adj. 4s .. 93% \ do 3s 105%
B. &. O. 4s ....104 iN. & W. c. 45..103%
do 3%s 96%! Beading gen. 4s. 99%
bdo cony. 45...107 S.L. & 1.M.c.55.118
bCanada S. 2d5.110 bS.L. & 5.F.45.. 98
C. of G. 5s 110% S. L. S. W. Ists9B%
do Ist inc. ... 79% do 2ds 79%
C. & O. 4%s ...109% S. A. & A.P.4s. 91%
C. & A. 3%s .... 84%5. Pac. 4s 95
C, B. & Q.n.4s. 96 South. Ry. 55..120V4
0., M. & 5.P.45..113 I,*1,* bT. & P. 15t5.,120 I
C. & N.-W.c.75..139% T., S. L. & W.4s 85
C..R. I. & P. 45.111 U. P. 4s 106*4
bC'CC& 5.L.g.45.103 do cony. 4s 106^4
Ohi. Term. 45... 87% Wabash lsts ..113%
C. & S. 4s 94^.2 do 2ds 111%
Cons. Tob. 45.. 65V. do deb. B ....73
WD. & R. G. 45..102>4 bWest Shore 4s. 112%
bßrie p. lien 4s. 99 W. & L. E, 4s. 93%
do gen. 4s 87% Wis. Cent. 4s .. 89%
F.W.& D.C.lsts.ll3
" bßid.
liondon Closing Stocks.
Anaconda 6% Norf. & West. 57%
Atchison 77% I do pfd 92%
do pfd 99M. Ontario & West 34^4
Baltimore & 0.106% Pennsylvania ...76%
Can. Pacific ..117 Reading 28?4
Ches. & Ohio 1 ..46% do Ist pfj .... 4°%
Chi. Gt. West.. 24V4 do 2d pfd .... 35
C, M. & St. P. 167% South. Ry 33%
D. & R. G 44i4 do pfd 97%
do pfd 94% South. Pacific . 66%
Erie ..39 Union Pacific... 104%
do Ist pfd .... 70 do pfd 90%
do 2d pfd 57 V.. S. Steel ... 404.
Illinois Cent. .143% do pfd .97
SL. & N 106% Wabashi 24
M., K. & T 25% do pfd 44
do pfd 57 .Spanish Fours.. 77%
N. Y. Cent. . .16614' __
Consols for money, 94 11-16; consols for
account, 94% c; bar "silver steady, 25 5-16 d
per ounce; money. 2%@3 per cent; Rand
Mines, 11%; De Beers, 46%. The rate of
discount in the open market for short
bills is 2%@2% per cent; for three months
bills, 2 11-16@2% per cent.
\ew York >lsniiijtr Stocks.
Adams Con $0.20 Little Chief $0.12
'Alice 450ntario 7.50
Breece 55Ophir 1.10
Bruns. Con, 07 Phoenix 06
Comstock Tun.. .OoPotosi 08
Con. Cal. &'Va. 1.40 Savage 07
Deadwood T. .. .50 Sierra Nevada.. .14
Horn Silver .... 1.40 Small Hopes ... .30
Iron Silver 65 Standard 3.20
Leadville Con... .05
Statement of the Treasury.
WASHINGTON, Feb; 25.—Today's state,
ment of the treasury.:balances in the gen
eral fund, exclusive of the $150,000,000 gold
reserve in the division \of redemption,
shows:
Available cash balance 1;...".:... 4172,740,282
Gold .......... ...:'.',:.': 87.673,819
Silver ;.:;.......:.'.:■.. .^-.'..:'.:'... v 21,924,643
United States notes' '?.■-;£..:;:... 12,113,323
Treasury notes of 1890,%,%..:..■.'.:,• 169,034
National bank notes ..*. 11,654,106
Total receipts this day " 1,077,74}
Total receipts this month .. 35,053,813
Total .receipts this year .......... 366,395,540
Total expenditures this day ..... 820,000
Total expenditures this .. 34.010,00)
Total expenditures this year — 314,723,174
Deposits In national banks ....'.. 114,441,732
:. Foreign StoeTc Markets. •*. [.;■
LONDON, Feb. 25.-The market was
cneerful today on rumors of fresh peace
negotiations, although later in the day
they were officially denied. Consols sold
<*VjH%- American opened around parity
arid Improved in the afternoon on New
York purchases of Southern Pacific and
United States Steel preferred. The ru
mored conversion of the latter into 5
per cent debentures Involves two-fifths
of the present amount. There is talk
of a fresh issue of Steel preferred to
$50,000,000. The general contango on
Americans were 4^ per cent, with Louis
ville & Nashville and Southern Pacific
lighter. Rio Tintos sold at 46%; copper
at $56 the ton. . ■ ' . .; ;- ■
\«-tv York Grain and Produce. ■ :
NEW YORK, Feb. 35.—Flour—Receipts,
29,225 bbls; j exports, 1,147 bbls; quiet but
steadier on the wheat rally. Minnesota
patents, [email protected]. '
Rye flour steady. \~ . : .
. Cornmeal quiet; . yellow. western, $1.29;
city, $1.27. \ ' ; "
Rye steady; No. 2 western, 64*4 c f. o. b.
afloat. , -; -
Barley. dull. .. .:.;■*. >.-
Wheat—Receipts, 71,250 bu; spot firm;
No. 2 red, 86% c f.o.b. afloat; No. 2 red,
88% c elevator; No. 1 northern Duluth,
84% c f. o.b. afloat; No. 1 hard Duluth,'
87% c f. o.b. afloat. The wheat market
was more stable today and less active^
trade consisting of light demand from
shorts, based on ; steady cables, export !
rumors, strength of I coarse grains and
a large decrease in world's stock. :" The
close was firm at %@V»c 9 net advance.
March closed at %c; May, 81 5-16@
82 3-16 c, closed 82% c; July, 81@81 13-16 c,"
closed 81% c; September, 80^4@81c, closed
80% c. / " ■■„ " ,-: :: '. :, :':■ i " 1' w-"' ':.:
Receipts. 19,000; exports, 17,392;
spot, firm; No. 2,' 6794 c elevator and 69c |
f. o. b. Being free i: from liquidation,
corn worked to a higher level today, and
was wanted by shorts, owing to cables
and prospects for sittalfer receipts. The
close was firm, %@%G''net advance. May,
65@e5%c, closed at 65% c P- July, 64%@«5V 8 c,
closed at 65% c; \ September, 63(5?64%c,
closed at 64% c. - ft:^>- v .-■ ~ ■•.''
Oats—Receipts, 109,500 bu; exports, 5,052
bu; spot firm; No. 2, 49% c; No. 3, 49c;
No. 2 white, 51c; No. 3 white. 50% c; track
mixed Western. 49@3flc) on track, white.
-sO'ffissc. Options quiet, but steadier, with
other markets, v; /.•3%
. t Hay dull. ; - Hops quiet. ' Hides quiet ■
Leather quiet. WooT"cfuiet.: Coal steady'
Beef quiet. Outmeats quiet. Lard
steady; Western steamed. [email protected]; re
fined steady; continent, $9.75; S. A., $10.35:
compoundl, 7%@Bc. " ; : '■•, .- 1 %
Pork dull . t amily^l $17(517.25; short
clears, . [email protected]; mess,- [email protected].
Tallow firm. > ior»nf
- Sugar—Raw steady; fair refining, 3%c;
centrifugal, 96-test, 3%e.-'' Molasses sugar
2Uc; refined unsettled". - ■>
Butter—Receipts were 8,849 packages;
steady; state • dairy, 20®27c; state cream
ery, 22@29c June creamery. : 18@25c; ; reno
vated, 16@24c; \ factory, 16@20c. : Cheese^-
Receipts, 2,722 pkgs; firm;; state full
creams, ©mall, early-made, fancy, color
ed, 12@12i4c; state full creams, small.
earlymade, fancy,' white, "12@12&c; large
early-made, colored, lie;: large.:- early
madie, white, lie. Eggs-^Receipts, 6,633
pkgs; weak; state and Pennsylvania, .2Sc:
Western, at - mark,'.: 2Sc; ■ Southern, •, at
mark, 27& c. Oott&e easy; No. 7 Rio, 5%c
Edwards, Wood & Co.
STOCKS '""SK?** GRAIN
BONDS ZVZZZSZ PROVISIONS
Members Duluth, Minn* - .. - - V ,
Ecsrd cf Trade, Chica^.. Room A Manhattan Private Wires*
Commerce, Minneapolis „ .Building, >——■—■^—mmmm—mm—m
Eoard of Trade, Duiuth. ' St. Paui t Minn. Telephone 559.
Minneapolis andZ>uluth$ a j u^ ts
MINNEAPOLIS.
' ■ 'Closing.
Tues. Mond.
May wheat, Minneapolis .... 73% 72%-%
July wheat, Minneapolis ~4%-% 74 1-16
May wheat, Chicago ........76%-% 75%-%
July wheat, Chicago ........ 76% 75%-76
May wheat, New York .V. 1;.. 82% 81%
July wheat, New York .. 81% 81%
May wheat, Duluth ........ 74% 74%
July wheat, Duluth ........ 75% 75%
May ; wheat, St. Louis ...... 81% 71 1-16
July wheat, St. Louis .... 75% 74%
MINNEAPOLIS, Feb. 25.—Liquidation
continued in wheat this morning. After
yesterday's close at 72%@72%c, a good
part of til-ie weak holdings yet remaining
went overboard on the curb on sales of
May down to 72% c. This made it look
as if the market had been pretty well
cleaned up of this weak long stuff, and
with Liverpool stubborn against our de
cline and coming only %@%d lower, the
expectation this morning was for recov
ery and a higher opening here. A good
many buying orders were in hand, and
the Chicago gossip gave . the sentiment
there as favorable, and said the buying
side, at the moment, was the more popu
lar one. But the liquidation had not yet
■spent its full force, and at the start
there was enough on sale to offset thu
new buying and force May to a. new low
point at 72% c. '
This low point marked the end of the
heavy pressure. The news turned more
favorable, and a little more confidence
was shown. Receipts at primary point.?
were not so heavy and local receipts
were about the same as last year A
.full response to our decline would have
meant l@l%d lower in . - Liverpool, but
that market closed only 9£#4d lower,
and was %d higher to %d lr rer on corn
Bradstreet s figured a decrease of 2,041 000
bu.in the world's visible. Of this 1,640,000
i^n^i sh. ow" east of the Rockies, and 1
400,000 bu in the quantity in Europe and
afloat. Buying began, and by noon the i
market had worked back to 73c for May
Primary receipts were 562,000 bu, com
pared with 616,000 last year, and ship
ments 25(,{KM) bu, compared with 267 000
bu. Minneapolis received 145 cars, against
141 last year, and Duluth had 256, against
BiSSSv 921 dooo°b u r Cleara™* were-heavy,
Chicago reported increased demand for
corn from New England, and New York
had 32 loads for export. Minneapolis May
sold to .73%@73*fic. and closed at 73%e
July- closed at 74%@74%c. Chicago closed
Ma" at ifi'fa<(Vtf>%c.
ri/'-VJ? 6 ulose today sentiment shows a
decided change from the extreme weak
ness of the past few days The market
is now freer of weak holders than for
some time and in better shape for a buy
ing turn. Even those who believe that
the present price of wheat is high are
hesitant about selling • short, especially
so as the snow covering is fast disap
pearing over winter wheat and there is
j the possibility af damage reports coming
as the wheat shows up. while a cold wave
tending southward would greatly increas
apprehension. At the close today there
m,? Ot»JfJi UC?l l 0nWheat left to be forced
wh' ,and fp . there is considerable short
wheat. The market is in good concVtion
couragtmTnt arPly °n &ny sW of"^-
The cash market showed no very in>
portant changes. There was the 'usual
Tuesday quiet tone and demand, while
fair was not especially sharp. 'No 1
northern sold at 72%@72%c for the bulk
ft &vSv? c to ™Ac: ,Ko - 3 wheat sold
at 69%@<0%c. 62c Rejected and no graie
ranged from 62c to 6«c eraae
Prices ranged as follows:
Wheat-Open. High, Low. Tue^Mon
-r co # ■ itok/ 791/
May .. 72%-%-% 73%:% 72%" 73y« 72%-%
Juy ", 74 rt 41/2-%73% 74%-%711-lS
1 w^?^ Clai closinST quotations: No.
1 hard 74% c; No. 1 northern, 72% c; No.
2 northern. 71%c@71%c; No. 3 wheat, G9%
@70% c; oats, 41@42e; Corn. 51@54c; rye sEc
barley, 53@63c; flax, $1.68; flax futures,'
February. $1.68; May, $1.69%.
rv^ I n °«j 11h? fl°H r market still stands un
changed, but millets concede that the out
look is improving. Prices are fairly
steady as quoted. Demand shows no
heavy increase, although there has b-en
bTyers* ty>On the part of "estic
1 Shipments hold up well, considering the
dSp'p ne aet F° r the da^^^o%bl3
*<?!?*} tetts are quoted at $3.8t«3 95
--second patents, [email protected],: first c:ears/fi.75
@3.50; second clears, $3.40. '
Flax—Only 9 cairs were in today and in
consequence there was a very light trade.
Jt $1 £ r?? easier anJ No- ] sold
at $1.68. Rejected sold around $1.66@166%
The basis was about 2%c under Duiuth
Minneapolis received 9 cars, against *4
Fmi? IT} £ ear ' and shipped 7 cars. Du
luth had 25 cars; .
a Closing prices: Minneapolis-Cash, $1.68;
Ih arrive. , $1.68 U February $1.68; May
'$1.69% • Duluth-Cash. $1.67%; on tra->k
May, $l OnVei $ -6S; Februar tt.67%;
r l H?i n7 Corn was fairly steady, vet the
price range was widely scattered No
grade sold at 50% c to 51c, and No. at 51c
r?int°- 7N °- 3 yeJlow closed at [email protected]
ceipts, 7 cars; shipments, 7 cars V
niTni i market was weak and lower
2? i/£ earlJ everything sold. No. 3 soM I
at 40c and 39% c. No. 4 white sold at V)V>c,
and at the close was quoted 41@42c. Re
ceipts. 4 cars; shipments, 5 cars
_ Feed and Meal-Coarse : cornm.'al
and cracked corn, $20; No. 1 feed, $21- "r> |
2 feed, $22; No. '3^ feed, $23; granuiaVed I
*?8? meal in cotton sacks, at the rate Of
$2.80 per barrel. •
Millstuffs-Millers are quoting un
changed, although there are some lower
prices heard occasionally on the outside
Bran in bulk is quoted at $15 per ton
'bulk shorts, $15; flour middlings, i'16.23®
16.<5; red dog, $1?^u7.50; feed in 200-lb
sacks, $1 ,per ton additional in 100-lb
sacks $1.50 per ton additional. Shipments
j2,252 tons. ■...:-. . -.' ■ ; . • _r- ■.■:.
■ Rye—No. 2 closed at 55c. Receipts 2
cars shipments, 1 car.
Barley—There was a fairly satisfac
tory demand. Feed grades are quotable
at 53@56c, and maltfng grades, 57@63c.
Receipts. 2 cars; shipments, 1 car.
Hay—Heavy receipts make the market
easy and prices as quoted are the out
side and obtainable only for choice. Up
land fancy, [email protected]; upland choice, 57.25
@7.50; No. 1, $6.75@7; midland, [email protected];
Medium, $5.50@6; timothy, choice "Sll®
11.50; rye straw, choice, [email protected]. Receipts
■87 tons. / ," '
State Grain Inspection.
„"*••.- Northern— No
Railroads. No. 1.N0.2.N0.3 Rej Gd
Great Northern .. 16 71 >14 1 28
C, M o & St.. P. .. 6 23 37 17 14
M. & St. L. ...... 6. 18, 3 .. 3
Soo Line ...........' 14 722 8 3 3
Northern Pacific 6 25 11 3 4
C, St. P., M. &O. 3 20 15 19
Total ..... ....:. 46 189 88 25 «1
■ Other Grains—Winter wheat, 1;. No. 3
corn, 8; No. 4 corn, 26; no grade corn, 11;
No. 3 : oats, 6; No. 4 northern oats, 4; No.
S rye, 2; No. S barley, 2; 'No. 4 barley, li;
No. 1 flax,l4; rejected flax, 19; no grade
flax, 2.
Minneapolis Cniru. ~
Curb on May wheat» ..'..,.....73 1-16®73%
Puts on May wheat ..........72%-% @72%
Calls on May "wheat .;;... 73% @73%
■ Milwaukee . Curb.
Curb on May wheat ........76% ." @76%-i4
Puts on May wheat ..........75%-%@75%
Calls on , May wheat ....... 76% @76%
Curb on May corn »«....,... 60 1-16
Puts on May corn «.:.;..... 59%-%@59%-%
Calls? on May corn ..:»..'.;. 60% ■■■■■;
DXJLTJTH.
©ULUTH, Minn., Ftfv 25,-The whea*
O'CONNOR & VAN BERGEN
BROKERS
Stocks, Bonds? Opain ? Provisions
202-203, GERSIAJJIA LIFE BLDG., F otfrti and Minnesota Sts., St. PnnL
Members Chicago Board of Trade. DireSt * private Wirea.
market was fairly active and, though
weak for a half hour after the opening,
it stiffened later. It opened unchanged,
at 74% c, and sold down to 74%@74 14c, and
then rose steadily to 74% c and closed at
thai price, an advance of %c. Cash sales
were 75,000 bu, at IV2C under May for No.
1 northern. Flax was fairly active and
sold down M>c to ?1.70, but rallied to $1.71
and closed at $1.70%.
The close: Wheat—Cash No. 1 hard,
76% c; No. 1 northern, 73% c; No. 2 north
ern, 70%cj No. 3 spring. 68% c; to arrive,
No. 1 hard, 76% c; No. 1 northern, 73% c;
May, 74% c; July, 75% c; Manitoba No. 1
northern, cash, 71% c; May, 73% c; No. 2
northern, 68c. Oats, 41 %c; rye", 53% c;
barley, 49@58c. Flax—To arrive, $1.68:
cash, $1.67%; May, 51.70%. Cora, 59c.
Cars Inspected—Wheat, 25fi; last year,
69; oats, 2; barley, 5; flax, 35. Receipts-
Wheat, 145.239 bu; corn, 525 bu; flax, 18,847
bu. Shipments—Corn, 9,893 bu.
CHICAGO 'CHANGE.
CHICAGO, Feb. 25.—Reaction after yes- •
terday's heavy depression in grains set in
today, and covering of short account, in
fluenced by an improved foreign : business,
braced the tone of the markets. May
wheat closed with a gain of Vc, May
corn %c and May oats %c. Provisions
closed a shade to 2%c lower.
Following yesterday's heavy liquidation,
cables were unresponsive and the early
'business - was marked by covering. New
liquidation for a time held prices down.
Then came in reports of a better foreign
demand. Clearances were large. Brad
street's.reportedl a visible supply decrease
of 2,041,000 bu, and late - reports had it
that the melting snow showed damages
to the winter crop not known before. Pit
traders bought cautiously, the liquidation
practically ceased and iiberal covering
set in again. . Trade » was heavy while
prices were firm on tlie early upturn, »ut
quieted down later. " Some professional
bulls secured low-priced stuff with a view
to later profits. Cash business also im
,proved. May opened a shade to %c high
er at 75% c to 76% c. slid off to 75% c, .and
reacted to 76% c. The close was firm; May
V 2 c up at 76%@76 Local receipts wtre
large at 73 cars, two of contract grade.
Minneapolis and Duluth reported 401 cars,
making a total for the three" points of
474 cars, against 439 last week and 305
a year ago. ., Primary receipts were 562,
--000. bu, against , 415,000 bu last year. Sea
board clearances in wheat and flour
equaled 946,000 bu', of which 475,000 bu were
flour. The seaboard reported twenty-five
loads taken for export.
Corn showed a tendency to dso better
after yesterday's break. There was still
some liquidation from the country, but
not of the urgent sort that marked yes
terday's business. Buying was started
early on the steady cables, both for shorts
and for investment. There was a big
business done early and the country oa.me
in and played both ways. The increased
receipts had a depressing effect, but the
market was sufficiently strong to over
come that influence. It is thought that
the liquidation is about over. Foreigners
bought -to some extent and helped with
the advance. May, whicfh opened un
changed to %c higher at 59%@39%c, sagged
for a time to 59% c, then sold to 60V&@
60%0, and closed firm and %c up at l
60c. Receipts were 331 cars. i
Oats had a strong market, and while
trade was dull there fras a decidedly ncr- !
vous feeling. The advance was largely
sympathetic, -though business was im
proved over that of last week. Some sell-
Ing was done on the increased receipts
'but corn influenced covering and better
nee May sold as low as 41^, and
closed firm at- its top figure, %c" higher
at 42% c, Receipts were 317 cars
_ Provisions ruled dull and slightly easier.
The lower prices for hogs at the yards'
induced some early selling, but the grain !
strength helped later. May pork closed
2*c lower at $15.52%. May lard a shade ;
foTe" at $?f® 9-37 ' &nd May ribs 2¥ I
n r£ he eiftlma^ d receipts for tomorrow
are. Wheat. 2t> cars; corn, 90 cars; oats '
100 cars, and 41,000 head of hogs. ' i
The leading futures ranged_as_follows: !
[6pen.|High.j LowlClose. j
Wheat— - ■•■■- -| ' I ~7 '
; May • •..:. .... $0.7Gy150.76% W.75%!|0.76V 4
IgUH .Wfi .76% 75%f .7«a
Corn-" 1 r°V 2 ■7 0% '75 ! -75^
Ma >- ::,: || I -59%] .60y 4 .59%! .60 '
J^'-Y ! .59% I .60% .59 I .60
September . .58»/ . .59 .58 .59
Oats— - I 1 I
May .... ...;-;. I .42 I .42% i Al\'z .42y 2
July •■• ...... .34^ .3514 ! .34% .85%-
Porki F H -3°y*| •30^1 •29^' -3°S
Ma .......... i5Wi5.60J10.50- |15.52%
lird-""" ••••j 15-65 115.72% 15.65 < 15.70^
Ma >" "■.'...« 9.37%| 9.40 " I 9.35 j 9.37 V.,
rSs- '"■ ' j 9-17% 9.52% i 9.47V 2 f 9.50^
Ma/ •••• ' • 8.40 8.42%! 8.40 | 8.40
July .......... I 8.52%| 8.52% 8.50. 8.52%
_Sep_tember ....| 8.62%| 8.C5 j 8.62% 8.62%
.Cash quotations ] were as follows-
gteady. Wheat-No. 3, 74%; No 2
re| 80@8Tc. -Np. 2, 42@42yc; No 2,
43C<-'44%c; No. 3 White 42%@43%c Rye-
No. 2, 58@58%c. Barley— to choice
[^Uing^ 59@60c. u laxseed-No. 1, $1.65<S
1.66%; No. 1 northwestern, $1.70. Timothy
hii^^^-o! 6-306-40- Mess pork-Pei
»5-Wla.Ss. Lard-Per 100 lbs, $9.17%
f£, °' «HSh( rib^- Sid (loose), ■ $8,25@
5.40. Shoulders-Dry salted (boxed). 7%
f& c- -Sides-Short Clear (boxed), $8.65®
8./0. hisky-Basis of high wines, $1.31
Receipts—Flour, 40,000 bbls; wheat 118 000
bu; corn, 181.0C0 bu; oats, 242,000 bu- rye
3,000 bu; barley, 78,000 bu. Shipments^
Flcur, 25,000 bbls: wheat. • 118,000 bu-corir
.57,000 bu; oats. 106,000 b'u; rye, 1.000 bu :
barley, 35,000 bu., On the Produce Ex
change today the butter market was asy
creameries, 18%@27c: ■ dairies, 18%@24c'
Cheese, firm; 10@12V4c. Eggs, fresfi", 23@
I . OTHER GRAIN MARKETS.
'-- • " • ■.* ____ ■■■ ♦ ■ ■■-
_ Toledo, ■ - Ohio - Wheat : active and
firm; pash, 84% c; F May, .84c; July, 79y 4 c.
Corn dp.ll, but firm; cash, 59c; May and
July, t 6o%c. Oats dull; cash, : 43% c? May,
43ci ££ y * 36% c" Clover se^-February
and I March. *5.62%; April, $5.57^; No 2
Alsyke, $S.6OT Rye—No? 2, 60c '.'? "4^
Milwaukee, Wis.-Flour . s@loc low
<er. Wheat steady; close No 1
1 he™- 75C:' No. 2 northern, 73%@
<4V*c; May, 76% c; puts, 75% c; calls, 765^c
vi c o Wilf; N°- 1\ 57^c- Barley, steadY
AO. 2, b/2C; sample, 58% c. oats steady-
Sfc? SS? g& Corn-May- **c;puts'
o .St- J jouso' MO'-^lose: Wheat high
fjf 2 red cash- elevator, 82% -
May 81% c; : July, , 75% c; No. ' 2 ha rd, 77@
fe^SfSBS NOa4 Ca&S C:N Mo^
a, 4S£ 431/4 C; July ' 35% c: No - 2
LIVERPOOL, Feb. .25,-Wheat-Spot,
xt°- 1 notrn spring,steady, at 6s l'/d-
No. 2 red Western winter dull, at 6s i/2d:
M>. . 1 California, no stock; ." futures quiet:
March,, 6s %d; Miay, 6s y,d. ■ '
Corn—Spot v steady; " American mixed
new>ss Id ■ American mixed, old, 5s 2d:
lUt^ eSia uiet:- F?! bi' uary nominal; March',
5s %d; Mtay, os %d.
Visible Grain Supply.
NEW YORK, Feb. 25.-Special cable and
telegraphic commui*cations to Brad
street s - show the -following changes in
available supplies from last account:
;, heat-United States and Canada, east
of Rockies, decrease 1,641,000 bu; afloat,
for and. in Europe, decrease 400,000 bo: to
tal supply, ; decrease 2,041,000 bu -v* -,
7^" n nited States and Canada, east
of Rockies, decrease 651,003 bu i -
Oats—United -h States and i Canada, east
of Rockies increase 180,000 bu. .
The leadfng increases are those "of > 700
W _»"J af ; Northwestern interior elevators
i 13,000 bu ftt Omaha, 120,000 bu at Port-
FINANCIAL.
A. J- GU^lf^iliGS
. —— DEALER IN——.
Wheat, Corn, Oats, Provision Fu«
tures and New York Stosks,
Rooms 333, 334 and 336 Endlcott Arcaij.
GIIARANTFF^ execution of all oriariil n, "
UUfllinil I tCO act markst prlcas. Instw
taneous servics. Bank referencas. Citr Dapart
ment Room 336. . .-■••'
Out of Town Department, Room 334,
Our daily market letter and boafc of infor
mation free upon application; tells you ho v
and why our business continues to incraass.
Come in and see us. Branch Office, Ryan
Hotel. No interest charged. ' •
H. HOLBERT & SON,
Bankers ana Brokers
34! Robert St. St. Paul.
CHAS. H. F. SMITH & CO.
Members of tha New York Stock Exchangs. S?s
cialsttontlon givati £ rain orders. Mombora Chi
caeo Eoard of Trads. PRIVATE WIRES.
Pioneer Press Bldj., St. Paul, Mlna
I-NVESTHENT SECUame3
J. C. GERAGHTY & CO.
COMMISSION BROKERS.
Room D. Endicctt Building, St. Paul.
Stocks, Bonds, Grain and I'rorisioiK.
DIRECT PRIVATE WIRES.
land, Me., and 63,003 bu at Depot Ha-bar
The leading increases are those of 615,
--000 bu at Manitoba storage points and 50..
000 bu at Chicago private elevators.
Produce and fruit
... Markets ...
1
Commission Row; Feb. Trade in the
open market at today's meeting of'the
Produce exchange established the follow
ing- prices in lots:
Butter—Creameries-
Extras 25
Firsts jj
Dairies-
Extras ,22
Firsts ..".!!."! • *2t)
Packing stock 17 @ jju.
Cheese—
Twins, fancy. .. .11 @ ,i;i/.
Good to choice 10 (a .10%
Full cream, Young America, 11%<5> .12 "
Brick, No. 1 \\\(w 12
Brick, No. 2 lO%@ .11
Limburger ' .ni/,
Swiss ...... . 14v"
Eggs-
Fresh Mock, cases included. .IS
Dressed Meats—
Veal, fancy 07 @ .07%
Veal, common .06 @ .06%
Country-d-ressed hogs [email protected];%
Dressed Poultry-
Fancy dry-picked turkeys, ,
small,rperib .14 @ .vi..
Same, large young toms .... .< .12 "
Turkeys, No. 2 and old toms. .10
Spring chickens, fancy . 12V, .12
Spring, mixed lots .......... .10' "@ .11
Ducks .12 @ . .13
Geese . .11
Fish— --....;.;,.;
Sunflsh and perch, lb 02 @ . .03
Crappies. per lb 06 @ .0.%
Pike • .13%
Pickerel ■ . , .08
Whiteflsh - - .OS
The. following prices are those at which
the commodities mentioned are selling- to
the retail trade. In large lots those
prices' may be shaded: . . 4
Beans— , - •
Fancy navy, per bu 2.00 2.10
Medium, hand-picked: 1.80 @ 2.00
Brown, fair to fancy 1.90 @ 2.10
Peas-
Yellow peas 1.25 Ca, 1.50
Green peas 1.35 @ 1.50
Potatoes— <?.T,- r *
Small lots, per bu .; 75 <ci .80
Car lots .70 10 .75
New potatoes,., bu ....3.50 @ 3.75
Sweets— \~- -■"■.. . .. . - r
Cobden, per bbl , 5.00 @ 5.50
Vegetables-
Artichokes, dozen 1.50
Beets, new, doz. bunches ,; .75
Beets, old, bu .65
Brussels sprouts, quart .25
Cabbage, bbl .....1.75 @ 2.00
Cucumbers, dozen , 2.00.
Carrots, bu .50
Celery, doz. bunches.... 40 (8) .50
Egg plant, d0zen........ 2.00 @ 3.00
lettuce, leaf, per dozen 30 @ .40
Lettuce, head, Southern, per
dozen —, • •• . .25
Onions, green, Caz. bunches.. .25
Onions, dry,, bu 1.50. @ 2.00
Onions, Span!sh, crate 2.00 @ 2.25
Peppers, < - -;1.00
Parsnips, bu 40 @ .50
Parsley, dozen 25 fa) .30
Pie plant, lb .07 @ .08
Radishes, dozen bunches .60
Spinach, bu..... 1.25 @ l.o«
Strawberries, per quart - .50
Turnips, old. bu .....:... .35
Tomatoes, 5-lb basket...:.... .75
Wax and string beans, bu.. 8.00
Cranberries— „
Jerseys, per lb .. 6.50 @ <.00
Wisconsin, B. B. fancy..... 7.00 @ 7.50
Boxes » — 2.50
Grapes—
Malaga, bbl 6.50 @ <.5O
Apples— ' ....
Jonathans, fancy, bbl ...... 6.00 6.50
Ben Davis ...... 5.00 @ 5.50
Western stock, per box .... 1.25 @ 1.50
Lemons —
California, per box .. 3.00 @ 3.50
Tangerines, per box .-• 4.00
Miscellaneous— ;
Bananas ........ ] 2.00 & 2.50
Honey, per lb . .11 @ .14
Popcorn, iper lb . ........... v .03
Persimmons, per crate 1.00
Grape fruit, Florida, box.. 9.00 9.50
Grape fruit, Cal., per box.. 5.00 @ 5.50
Pineapples, dozen 3.50 @ 4.00
Nuts—
Calif ornia walnuts, lb ...... .12
Peanuts,, raw .06 •
Peanuts,-roasted .07
Brazils ...... ..... . .16
Peoans, medium - .12%
English walnuts .12 ~
AJmonds ....:. .15 @ .16
Filberts ........ .12
Chestnuts ............ .10
Chestnuts, Italian .03
Hickory, small, Hsu 2.25
Hickory, ;large, bu >i>: 1.75
Butternuts, bu ■•.: .". I.CO
Cocoanuts. per 100 • ■ .: 3.00
Walnuts, ; 'black, per bu ...... 1.50 @ 1.75
Figs and Dates—
California dates, 10-lb box .. .75
Turkish figs, lb ../..... 11 @ .14
Arabian, lb ...... ......'.... .15
Fard .dates, lb v. .07 @ .08
Hallowee dates, lb ...: 04 @ .06
• Aip-ple Cider— ' ■', -' . >
Sweet, per bbl ...:............ 6.00
Sweet, half Wbl .;. 3.50
Hard, common, per bbl .... 4.50 @5. 00
Hard, fancy, per bbl ........ 8.00 @10 00
METALS.
NEW YORK, Feb. 25.— The local marker
for copper was firm, with lake a shade
higher at 12%@12^c, but electrolytic was
unchanged at 1244 c to 12% c, and casting a
12% c to 12% c. The London copper mar
ket was 2s 6d lower, with spot r| £~><
and futures at £55 15s.
Tin was a shade easier, with spot ai
25% c to 2514 c, and London was 13s lower,
with spot at £117 15s and futures at £m
L€ad was firm here but unahanged ;>;
4i^c; London was unchanged at £11 15.«
Spelter was 5 points higher locally
closing at $4.25 to $4.30. London was 2>
6d higher'at £18.
Iron was quiet but steady here and
firmer abroad.
Glasgow closed at 54s and M'.ddlesbon
at 48s.
Pig iron warrants closed locally at $11.5
(&12; No. 1 foundry, Northern, $17.505;
$18.50; No. 2 foundry. Northern, $17@lj-
No. 1 foundry, Southern, [email protected] No
1 foundry, Southern »oft, $16.50@17»
0

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