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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 27, 1902, Image 1

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VOL. XXV.-NO. 58.
PRINCE AND PENCIL PUSHERS
Notable Banquet Tendered the Royal Visitor at
the Waldorf-Astoria at Which He Meets
One Thouand Newspaper Men.
EMINENT JOURNALISTS ARE PRESENT
NEW YORK, Feb. 26.—After dinner
■with 100 millionaires of the nation today
Prince Henry of Prussia tonight dined
"With 1,000 of the men who maKe American
newspapers'. He was the special guest of
Herman Ridder, proprietor jj of the New
Yorker Staats Zeitung, who gathered at
his* table a majority of the leading men
of American journalism. Tney came
from the four quarters of the country
and made the most noteworthy gathering
of their profession ever assembled in the
United States.
The dinner was given in the handsome
ball room of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel,
but this immense apartment was not
large enough to accommodate the news
paper guests and the Astor gallery was
also used.
- The two rooms were splendidly decorat
ed. Mr. Ridder and the special guests
sat at an elevated table, above which
were the American and German flags.
Above them was the Prussian eagle done
in incandescent lights. From the boxes
hung clinging vines, and set on the
ledges were hundreds of palms. Each
table carried bouquets of American
Beauty roses,' round which were I can
delabra shaded in red. -
As the diners took their places* the
ladies of many of the party appeared in
the boxes which- wall the room.
Under Escort of Cavalry.
Prince Henry, attended by the members
of his . suite, drove to the hotel under
escort of cavalry and mounted police.
The demonstration in the streets leading
to the hotel, was the most cordial of any
that has so far marked his appearance
in public. Great crowds lined the way
and pressed against the police guards
that had been thrown around the Thirty
third street entrance to the hotel. , They
cheered when the prince came in sight.
Those who occupied seats with the host
and chief guest were:
Edward P. Call, Lieut. Gov. Woodruff
Consul General Buense, Melville E. Stone'
Admiral Evans, Capt. yon Mueller. May
or Low. Admiral yon . Seckendorff, As
sistant Secretary Hill, Frank B. Noyes,
SWORN TO SECRECY
MISS STONE SAYS BRIGANDS MADE)
HER TAKE OATH BEFORE
RELEASING HER
CASE IS STILL VERY PUZZLING
State Department, Considering the
'Pledges Made, Does Not Know
How to Secure, Punishment
of the Kidnapers.
SALONICA, Roumania, Feb. 26.—Miss
Ellen M. Stone and Mme. Tsilka will
start ..without delay from Salonica for
Constantinople. The liberated mission
aries are staying at the missionary head
quarters, where they are receiving the
congratulations of their colleagues.
Miss Stone says the brigards swore both
of their captives to absolute secrecy re
garding any information calculated to es
p. tablish the identity of the brigands, the
"" location of the places where they were
concealed, or other facts likely to com
promise their captors. As a matter of
fact the prisoners themselves are uncer
tain regarding many details of their wan
derings.
They did not know when they were re
leased in what section of the country
they were. An arrangement had been
made to release Miss Stone and her com
panion near Seres. Macedonia, where
Gragoman Gargiulo and Mr. House were
waiting for them; but the brigands de
clared it was too difficult to carry out the
plan and brought their captives, after a
hard night march, within one and a naif
hour's walk of Strumltza,
The two women were left with only the
shelter of a tree at 3:30 in the morning of
Feb. 23. The bandits pointed out the di
rection of the village and ordered the
captives to report themselves to the vil
lage elder, who, on learning of their
identity, would provide for them. The
brigands then turned back and disap
peared among the hills. p
_ WASHINGTON. D. C.. Feb. 26.-Minis
«*£__* lshman„ cabled today that Miss
* Stone was suffering from fatigue and
. nervous strain, and would not attempt
to move until today or tomorrow
Now that the captive is released the
state department does not hesitate to an
nounce its full approval of all that has
been done towards effecting the release
by Minister Teishman, Spencer Eddy the
secretary of legation, and Consul General
Dickinson. *
Secretary Hay has personally express
ed to Mr. Eddy, who is now in this coun
try his appreciation of his conduct
The department finds it impossible this
moment to determine upon the next sten
_ to be undertaken In this case. There is
reason to suspect that pledges have been
given by Miss Stone and by the rescuing
agents which.will very much complicate
any efforts : to secure punishment of the
brigands. : ■ -, .
MISS STONE TELLS STORY.
SALONICA, Roumanla, Feb. 26.—Mi« 3
Stone and her party, after being released
traveled on horseback from Strumites'" to
the nearest railroad station, a journey
lasting five hours. The local mission
aries and many of the inhabitants or
btrumitza accompanied the party for
some distance, singing -hymns.
Miss Stone Says that she duly received
all the letters Mr. House sent her during
her captivity. On one occasion she
sprain^ Her knee.by : falling through a
trap, door In a dart 5 room. She was
Madame Tsilka's ' only attendant at "the
birth of the latter's child. - •
Miss Stone says that the brigands al
ways treated them well. They built «
.hut for the prisoners on the fountain
provided horses for them when they trav
eled', and " carried Mme. Tsilka's I baby
whenever fliey *, were allowed to da 1&
*W \'l ?f3P.? never came Into contact
with ijielroaps, although the party was
obliged to halt a few times while on
false alarms. Miss Stone's captors made
preparation for action. ae
The brigands especially asked the ladies
to convey their congratulations to M
Oarguilo and others for the ingenuity
displayed in the payment of the ransom
As the party from Strumltza reached
the top of the Chippeli pass. Hearing the
Thi 1,2S_ t _ the travelers were^smpiS Dy
the sudden appearance of M. Tsilka and
thero was an affectionate meeting* be
: tween husband and wife. M. Tsilkf was'
then presented to his baby. Ae>luta Wd*
fbe M. INtl {ftobe
Gen. yon Plessen, Austrian minister;
Bishop Potter, Whitelaw Reid, German
Ambassador yon Holleben, Edward Uhl,
Archbishop Corrigan, Admiral yon Tir
pitz, Senator Lodge,. Admiral yon Eisen
d'echer, Charles Emory Smith, Senator
Haw ley, Senator Depew, Admiral Count
Buadissin, Charles W. Knapp, Capt. yon
Grumme, Gen. Corbin, Rev. Dr. i Gott
heil and. William C. Bryant. . -
As the prince took his seat the electric
light was flashed into the Prussian Eagle
above him on the southern wall," and the
power was also increased .in every one
of 2,500 incandescent lights that burned
in the room.
Hundreds of handsomely, gowned wom
en filled" the boxes above the dining hall..
An orchestra high up in the second tier
of boxes: played popular national music.
When "Die Wacht Am Rhein" was play
ed the crowd arose, ■■■ and after singing it
lustily,. there were loud cheers. "Amer
ica" received the same enthusiastic treat
ment. -'.-
X Excellent | moulded I.statuettes of Prince
Henry were distributed as souvenirs.. At
10:25 o'clock Mr. Ridder rapping for at
tention, proposed the health of the
"President of the United States" and
the ."Kaiser Wilhelm," arid, called upon
Whitelaw Reid to respond.
The banqueters stood while drinking to
the toast. • ;_ ---
Cheers for the Prince. _7
• When Prince Henry arose and was in
troduced the crowd burst into song:
"Hoch soil erleben,-mar hoch!"
After that the newspaper men sang:
"For He's a Jolly Good Fellow."
Before beginning his speech, the princ.
said: ■*.'. ..._' .«*-»- ~ -V
"This .is the largest. interview I ever
had."
Offers Hand Across Sea.
The prince spoke as follows:
"Mr. Toastmaster... and Gentlemen: 1
am fully aware that I am the guest and
Continued on Fourth Page.
CENSUS BILL FRAMED
COMMITTEES OF HOUSE AND SEN
ATE FINALLY AGREE ON
• MEASURE ■
KEEP CIVIL SERVICE RULE
Question of Director's Salary Com
promised and It Is Believed That
Merriam Will Remain •
as Director.
WASHINGTON, Feb. 26.-The conferees
of the two houses of congress on the bill
creating a permanent census reached an
agreement today.' The bill as agreed upon
embodies most of the amendments in the
senate, though some of them are retained
in modified forms. The senate provision
concerning the clvil.service is retained.
All the employes of the office at the time
of the signing of the bill except unskill
ed laborers, are to come under the provis
ions of the civil service law. The provis
ion requiring future appointments to be
made under the civil service law was
modified by the conference, so as to make
the requirement applicable only to perma
nent appointments. The director's salary
is fixed at $6,000: per annum, instead of
$5,000, as suggested by the house and
$7,500 as named by the senate.
_ The senate provision for an assistant
director is struck out, and a provision is
inserted requiring the. chief clerk to act
as director in the absence of that official.
The chief clerk's salary, is fixed at $2,500
The clause limiting the director's appoint
ment to four :-years'.--* time is eliminated.
Four chief statisticians and four chiefs
of divisions are provided for. | The sen
ate amendment providing that the collec
tion of statistics concering special classes,
as the feeble-minded and the blind, shall
occur decennially, is retained. The pro
vision relating to the collection. of cotton
statistics for the year was amended by
the conference so as to - require that
weekly bulletins on this subject shall be
published each year from Sept. 1 until
Feb. 1 following. ■/,/
It is believed that,: Director General
Merriam, if he does, not go into the cab
inet, will continue in official duty as head
of this department. „ f
KING ON RAGE COURSE
EDWARD VII. SEES HIS HORSE WIN
KEMPTOSN PARK STEEPLECHASE.
LONDON,, to. 26.-For the first time
since. his accession ' King Edward today
appeared on a race course, he went to
the Kempton park steeplechase, to see
his grand national candidate Ambush
11. run in the stand steeplechase. | This
was Ambush ll.'s first race in public
since the horse won the grand national
in 1900 and the first "appearance of;. the
king's colors on a course since* the death
of Queen Victoria,
. As anticipated, Ambush 11. wen yle
race and his _ victory ;. was followed by \ a
scene of wild enthusiasm. The ' distance
was two miles and a naif.
END OF OLD WHALER
PROGRESS, LAUNCHED IN ISOf>,
BURNS IN CHICAGO HARBOR. '
CHICAGO, Feb. . 26.-After years -of
rough service in the North Atlantic, the
shi]) Progress, launched in; New. Bedford,
in 180?, for the whaling trade, x met an in
glorious end . last evening, in the" South
Chicago harbor. ~ ' cy - : ~
Since the world's;' fair, when ..the T Prog
ress rode the waters of \ the outer lagoon,
equipped as -a- modern whaler,*, the .ship
has been moored in the > South Chicago
harbor. Some 'unknown-person set' fire
to the-vessel,' and she; burned to the wa
ter's edge. -'X .'■-■■ "',;;,;-., .'-.-; -
THURSDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 27, 1902.—TEN PAGES.
ALL DOWN WITH SCURVY
ENTIRE CREW STRICKEN APJDSUF-
FERS ON SHORT RATIONS.
.'. PORT ANGELES, - Wash., Feb. 26.—
French bark Los Adelphis, 162 days from
; Madagascar,^ hound ._. for 7; Portland, Or.,
against which there is j a reinsurance of
20 cent, arrived here today with 'al
most every man of the crew down with
scurvy. v For | the last twenty-five: days
the seamen subsisted, on one biscuit per
day ;to each man, ■ and 'were . for some
time without fresh . water, ; except rain
water. The cook, F. L. "Fletchie, died
and was burled at sea."-"- The condition of
the crew is pitiable, and \ they : will remain
here until they '-. recuperate. 7" Five men
were taken to the hospital.;.-Capt." Coffin
is obliged to wear a bandage covering his
nose and face to hide the . disease. - The
vested weathered the storm without dam
age. ;....' ■ :x Z . _.
FLOOD CAUSES TERROR
TWO; PENNSYLVANIA CITIES IN
DARKNESS AND FEAR
Ice on Susquehanna Breaks and
Forms a Dam 'at the Bridge
Between Columbia and
Marietta-
LANCASTER, J Perm., Feb, 26.—Resi
dents along the river front at Columbia
are in terror tonight. fThe worst flood
in recent years is being experienced. The
ice on the Susquehanna broke- about 4
o'clock between Columbia and Marietta
and passed down stream until \it reached:
the old dam just below \ Columbia where
a jam formed. The : water entered the
boiler room of the electric flight plant
drowning the fires and leaving the town
in darkness. If the rise continues at the
present rate the . lace , mills will be dam
aged arid- the two rolling mills cf the
Susquehanna Iron company put out .of
operation. In the darkness and confusion
it is impossible to ascertain the full ex
tent of the damage. _
The Conestoga is pouring a great vol
ume of water into the river at Safe Har
bor. , This . stream is higher than it has
been for thirty-five years. Lancaster too
is dark tonight because of damage from
this stream to the electric light plant.
Water Is pouring over the great steel
bridge of the Pennsylvania Railroad com
pany which spans the Susquehanna from
Columbia to Wrightsville. At midnight
the river was still rising .
BUSINESS IS SUSPENDED
INHABITANTS OF WELSH DAZED
AT THE EARL TRAGEDY.
! WELSH, La., Feb. 26—Business has
been j practically suspended in . this -little
town on account of the murder of the
six members of the Earl family.
The body of L. S. Earl, the -father of
the murdered boys, has been found in a
ditch near their home, with;the tnroat
cut and | the body far j gone in putrefac
tion. There is every evidence that the
murders" were committed as part of a
prearranged plot.
- The home of Ward Earl, three-miles
from here, was some distance from that
of his father's. j5 The j indications are that
Ward, Earl was first murdered, and that
his father was then summoned from his
home and murdered.^ Mrs. Earl left. a
piece of sewing on the machine in her
home, and left the house and the three
children had scattered the cards 'with
which they had been' playing about the
floor.
. When the bodies were found they had
been piled in a heap, with the exception
of that of L. S. Earl. The only possible
motive which-ean be conceived was rob
bery. " ;-.;■■■
Miss Maud Earl is in a critical condi
tion. Her mind seems to be affected by
the shock to such an extent that she can
not realize the enormity of ; the tragedy.
The reported arrest of the suspected
man in Missouri has not yet been con
firmed here.
The funerals of " the six victims took
place this afternoon. _. C;.
CITY WILL GRADE MILK
CHICAGO NOW WILL PAY HIGH
PRICE ONLY FOR CREAM.
. CHICAGO,: Feb. 26.—A resolution grad
ing the milk supply disposed of to con
sumers in Chicago by farmers within one
hundred miles of this city, has been pars
ed by the Milk Shippers' union. Here
tofore one _price has been charged the
dealer by the shipper for milk, poor cr
good. Now milk will -3 be divided into
grades according to the amount of cream
it contains. : '. • ' . 777^ .
KING IS NOT DEAD
REPORT THAT SERVIA'S SOVER
EIGN WAS KILLED IS DENIED.
I BELGRADE, Servia, Feb. There is
no foundation for / the rumor, which
emanated from Budapest, that the king
of Servia had been assassinated.
BULLETIN OF
IMPORTANT NEWS OF THE DAY
Weather Forecast for St. Paul: -.
Cloudy.
ITax Code Dies : Ignoniinonsly.
Prince Henry at Notable Dinner.
Senate Is in a Quandary.
War in Philippines Admitted, yy
Candidates Spring New Game.
..-George Seibert Dead.
Insurance Men Slake Money.
Market Stands Going .Fast. ;
Third Ward Club Indorses Smith.
3—Row in r North Dakota Colleges.
Big Power Plant Projected.
Traders Want Indians' Money. 7
Valet Jones on the Rack.
4—Editorial Comment.
Grist of the Political Mill.
Kiehle Warns Women. -3_.££_s
s—All the Sporting News.
—The Woman's Page.
Daily Short Story.
7—Day's Doings in Minneapolis.
Striates Adjusted Satisfactorily."
News of the. Railroads. "***
'"".:, ' - . - '-" X - • y ~ ■'. *
- ' ■-" ■ ■- ..-'....,.; .... ' -_■ .._■- - '•■-■ - -,
9—Grain and Provision Markets. "
- .'._- -' '-, , '_.' ..- , -_r'~'-.. ■' . . . . - ■ - , .: : .
10-e-Uardwai. Men Booming : Trade.
.."■/__ Fourth Ward Democrats: Meet. ""
FIGHT BLOCKS
THE SENATE
THE TILLMAN-M'LAURIN " QUARRE*.-
KEEPS BODY OF LAWMAKERS
.'■ " FROM WORK '"'''~'"^V
DEMOCRATS WIN 7 A POINT
Republicans Puzzled in - Effort to
Rectify -Mistake in ; Dropping ;"^
f Names of Belligerents -
From the Roll
! - -■ - , . ■ ' _ _-' - " __-' "
CASE SENT TO SUBCOMMITTEE
Special to The Globe.
1 WASHINGTON, D. C M Feb. 26.—
situation in the senate resulting from the
Tillman-McLaurin fight ;is .described by
Senator Cullom, of Illinois, who .re
marked to Tillman today that tne .sen
ate had apparently suspended itself in
stead of the - two members from : South
Carolina. . The Republicans ~ now realize
that : they made a serious blunder in at
tempting to deprive the,two. senators of
their right to vote before^ their cases had
been tried or reported on by a committee.
Senator Frey, , who jas speaker pro tem
pore, took the responsibility having
their names omitted from the roll call,
has publicly admitted, his error. . His Re
publican colleagues are looking for a
graceful way of doing the same thing.
The Democrats on the committee on
privileges and elections have "taken the
stand that the offending senators shall
not be punished by! [suspension or ex
pulsion and they have already, practical
ly won their ■ point. The Republicans . are
now agreeing that their punishment shall
be a resolution of censure and an apolcgy
from each senator publicly delivered. ;
- Senator Pritchard -is., contending . for
omitting the censure. as to McLaurin and
the committee. has offered the dispute. to
a subcommittee' composed _of Burrows,
Hoar, Foraker, ' Bailey - and Pettus; to re
port Friday morning. On the. refusal to
permit the two senators to vote the Re-'
publicans are already preparing ;to jtake'
up a strategic position to rear. The talk
new is mat the Philippine bill -..will' be
recalled from the house. The motion will
be | made to i reconsider the vote and. the
speaker will announce that the names of
Tilman and McLaurin were omitted
through a mistake and they will be per
mitted to register their votes. The
Democrats feel : that they | have scored a
victory in backing the Republican leaders
off the boards on . the constitutional ques
tion involved in. depriving South Carolina
of representation. : This victory added
greatly.to the prestige ©f Bailey, Turner
and Dubois, who acted fes leaders of the
opposition. ~^|:. 77"
No Conclusion Reached.
The committee on-privileges and elec
tions continued its* consideration .of-- the
Tillman-McLaurin episode ;" during - the
afternoon, but! reached no : conclusion be
yond deciding to refer the entire matter
to 3 a subcommittee and to meet again lon
Friday to consider any recommendation
made by the subcommittee. The after-•
noon session lasted three ]hours, and
after .the Democratic members took j their
departure at 5 o'clock the Republicans
continued the sitting. The meeting of
the full committee was devoted to a gen
eral exchange of views. No vote was
taken on " any proposition; -indeed, -. no
proposition was made either by the ma
jority or the minority." There was" entire
agreement -on the one point that V both
the South Carolina senators should ;be
punished, but there was disagreement on
the details of punishment , as .well" as on
the degree of it. .*_ r'.r ;-." _ '-.
The senators had before them full re
ports of the speeches of both the sen
ators, making careful /-comparisons'- of
their ■; language.', Each, member also was
provided with a copy of the constitution
and of the rules of the senate I and these
as well as the established parliamentary
authorities were consulted! frequently. A
half dozen different y suggestions were
made as to modes of punishment, . includ
ing suspension and censure by the sen
ate, and censure with the added require
ment of further apologies from the . of
fenders. '": There also was a continued
discussion of the/relative^ punishment of
the two men. -"• ; _" .:;./'• ,/'/'-/ >.
; Most of the Republican members
of the committee hold, that Senator
Tillman should be awarded a more r se
vere .form of- rebuke| than". .Senator...Me-
Laurin, while the Democrats do . not . gen
erally/concede that there should be dis
crimination. : I--..-.''"':r:ZZZZZX~Zx;:
-■ Bailey Leads the Democrats.
* Senator Bailey quoted at length from
the speech made ••" by Senator Tillman
which provoked —the / reeply of . Senator
McLaurin, contending that it, did not
make a specific charge of bribery. The
Democrats also held out* stiffly against ail
suggestions looking to the suspension of
. the privileges of the j senators as an at
tack on the rights of the state they rep
resent rather than en the senators' them
selves. .Z" -■■-..-" y.~;. '.XZZ-- : ._-.-.'-''
When the committee adjourned . its
members professed to be hopeful that an
unanimous agreement would De reached,
but they were not so hopeful as they
had been when • ftie noon /recess was
taken. The proceedings were no X of -a
character -to permit- definite \ conclusion
as to what the result 1- would be, but they
indicated censure as - the '. form of punish
ment most likely /to -be recommended.
Some of the Republicans, however, are
holding cut " for a more pronounced re
buke to Senator Tillman than could be
given in a verbal reprimand. 7/ -
• The subcommittee appointed is • com
posed of Senators Burrows, Hoar,-;and
Foraker, Republicans, and - Senator Pet
tus and Bailey, Democrats. ; ; This sub
committee will meet: tomorrow afternoon.
AGAIN AT WRITE HOUSE
. ~: - ' • -.<*• ._. " -' ■ ;: ~* -.
BOOKER T. WASHINGTON CALLS
7 ON PRESIDENT.
WASHINGTON,^ Feb 7(26.—800ker | T.
Washington; was: at the White'houses to
day and had a conference with President
Roosevelt, lasting s fifteen ; minutes. It is
said that political matters.: were 3 not
touched on. . y- -
CARNEGIE OFFERS PRIZE
HE WILL GIVE A GOLD MEDAL TO
THE FASTEST TELEGRAPHER.
ATLANTA, Ga,, Feb. 26.—Andrew Car-;
negie today wired - the secretary of the
American : Telegraphers ■Tournament f- to
offer ; a gold medal in . his name' tpr/.tliS
speediest work/in* the coming contest jln
Atlanta. "; Mr. Carnegie's _ telegram .came
from " Fernahdina^ Fla., and says: Z:Zxfi
:Z "May - the records be : broken, 73 to ; all."
The 'contest; will -be. held V Saturday. <
WILL PAINT A QUEEN
ST. . LOUIS WOMAN ARTIST HONORED
BY ORDER FROM ALEXANDRA.
Special to The Globe.
ST. LOUIS, I Feb. 26.-<Miss Anna "West
Shaw,; a ' St. ■ Louis artist,'; has been given
a commission to paint a portrait of Queen
"Alexandra, and will soon, depart ; for
.London." ; Miss I Shaw -is f thirty years of
age, ; and comes by her artistic tempera
ment naturally,, being the grand-neice of
Benjamin West, one jof the leading paint
ers :of early America. Miss Shaw took
her first painting , lesson .in her" native
city," her earlier; work being water - color
sketches of birds ■ , and . flowers. . She
finally- entered .' upon portrait , work and
found her life vocation. , While in Eng
land .Miss Shaw painted a 7 portrait 'of
Lady Clarke, wife of the chief equerry
of Edward : VII., and : Lady Clarke pro
cured the '.'! commission: for. her. that will
again take her to England. ■- Z
RAILWAYS OFFER DEFI
DECLARE THEY ~ WILL NOT GIVE
STATEMENTS OP REBATES
! Interstate Commerce Commission Is
Put to Necessity of Invoking
Law to Enforce Its
- Demands. " Z:Z-'Z- f'Zr.
CHICAGO, Feb. 26.—The interstate
commerce- commission and; the manage
ment of Western roads have locked horns
and it is expected that a legal contest
will follow. V The difficulty arises from
a refusal by the . traffic managers of -the
Western roads to furnish the commission
with data relative to rebates which were
paid during 1901. - * .
Concerted action has been taken in the
matter, and is the result of several
meetings among the executive officials in
which the question 7was . discussed at
length. 7; It is understood, that all have
agreed . to stand together, and § that the
refusal to give the jjj information sought
was r made after legal advice had been
taken. -, ..." "
Attorneys for the various roads are
said i.to; be a unit in asserting that the
commission has riot: the power to compel
furnishing the data desired, and the rail,
road officials have refused to give it, be
cause they believe the commission desires
to punish the packers who accepted re
bates. . -7 :- „"_ •..;.'.•: ."..•-
*It is generally believed that - the com
mission will try to ..' enforce the request.
BOERS BREAK THROUGH
LORD KITCHENER REPORTS THAT
•-■--■- - ... —. ... - ........
HIS LINE IS NOT SOLID. •
ILONDON, Feb. 26.—Lord Kitchener re
ports that 600 Boers, driving cattle,
rushed J the , outpost " line :■ near. Bothabt-rg,
Transvaal * colony, & during'"' the night of
Feb. 23 ■ and - that ; some of ... them..: got
through. The j Boers left fifteen dead and
six wounded on the field. s :3 : -, ■ -...
. r A dispatch from Lord Kitchener, made
public today, says: / 7
* "A convoy of empty wagons was at
tacked and captured : by ', the Boers, south
west | ofl Klerksdorp (Transvaal . colony,)
Feb. 24. The escort consisted of a force
of \; the I Imperial ;■ yeomanry, . three com
panies of the Northumberland fusiliers
and two guns. The fighting was severe,
but have no further details."
GIRL THANKS KAISER
MISS ROOSEVELT SENDS CABLE
GRAM OF CONGRATULATION:
„ Feb. 26.— follow
ing is the \ copy of \ a cablegram sent to
the German : emperor yesterday from
New : York, ;by Miess Roosevelt: // /:
. "His ; Majesty, the Emperor, Berlin,
Germany: The Meteor j has been success
fully launched. I congratulate you and'l
thank .. you / for your courtesy to me and
send you my best wishes..
-.-_■ "Alice Lee: Roosevelt." 7
END OF BUGKETSHDPS
MILWAUKEE CHAMBER OF COM-
MERCE WILL STOP THEM.
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Feb. 26.—The Mil
waukee Chamber of "Commerce today
adopted the . resolution- recommended by
the board of directors two weeks ago
placing a heavy ;penalty' on any / member
who pursues ■ so-called 7 bucketshop
methods. . The measure went through
without . a dissenting vote. This ruling
in addition to previous' legislation enact
ed /by the ; chamber, it is . thought, will
practically put an end .to i_.e bucket
shop business in Milwaukee.
MINNESOTA IS FIRST
EXHIBIT FROM BUFFALO IS TAKEN
TO ST. LOUIS FAIR.
ST. LOUIS, 1 Feb. Minnesota is the
first state In the Union to take steps to
ward the ~ installation -of its exhibit at
the Louisiana : Purchase '■ exposition. J.:
I. Bernard, of Pipestone, Minn., who .was
superintendent of the Minnesota exhibit
at the Pan-American exposition, arrived
in the j city.; today ; with ■ two > carloads of
.material for that , state's exhibit. * He
has SE made arrangements ito *-" store the
goods until the buildings are ready.
) „ The . material was taken from the Min
nesota . exhibit at the -Pan-American ex
position," and includes - only | the best: part
of . it. Word was ; received *at the world's
fair headquarters today. ; to" the effect
that Canada would* be represented at the
Louisiana-: Purchase exposition with a
creditable - building : and. exhibit.; v. ".
PRINCESS IN CUSTODY
CECIL RHODES ACCUSES HER "OF
FORGING HIS NAME.
'-.:•' C APE TOWN, Feb. ; 26.—Princess Radzl
will was arrested today ' on .the charge of
forgery, and was admitted to bail in ; £1.
--005. ; The" information . was : sworn ;to 7 by.
Dr. Schwoltz, and .was * supported; by:! an
affidavit"'. from * Cecil ? Rhodes, the charge
being-the forgery of ; the latter's name .to
promissory notes. -The princess was ra_
riianded.y _ .:'■;■-X\- 77--.7 ,rZZ.Z.
Z. It - was announced from Z Cape Town,
Feb. - 12, . that Princes. Radziwill that ; day.
paid the judgment for : £1,150 Z; obtained
against her Oct. 12 last by^^,Thoh_^lJ6aw,
a merchant of that . city, : for money ad
vanced "on a note ; for £2,000, said :to j have
been indorsed by Cecil Rhodes, but which
the latter^repudiated, , * -:" 7 "," 7
PRICE TWO CEXT3.-|gf y l"? £ ; 7
DIES AN IGNOMINIOUS DEATI
Work of Governor Van Sant's High Priced Tax
Commission Repudiated by Legislature '_•*
and Thrown to the Four Winds/ ".
MR. JACOBSON'S CRUSHING DEFEAT
. The code proposed by the tax commis-
on■','. died an f ignominous! death" in _ the
house _ yesterday; morning. The efforts
of the friends to resuscitate the bill, kill
ed Tuesday morning failed by a vote of
55 to 54. -'.■•':-!r-.:.--;..''!..»." . . . "-' ''":-■ ZZr
: The slaughter of the code on which
Gov. Van Sant's commission" spent nina
months in : preparation at an expense of
about $10,OCO and on which the legislature
has" expended most: of the $40,000 appro
priated for legislative expense in its con
sideration, was accomplished with / neat
ness and dispatch, i .The friends failed ut
terly/ in, their effort to proselyte from the
opposition by theft*. willingness to elimi
nate the Wallace amendments and : al-
though several of the members, avowedly
on the side sof the opposition, were [ ab
sent the friends failed to secure even a
majority of those present, which would
have accomplished the reconsideration
but /would not have passed """ the bill.
Their net gain was exactly one vote over
the vote of Tuesday. Their proposition
to eliminate the Wallace amendment
brought them six recruits and lost them
five ■of | their original supporters. Three
Democrats, three Populists and one Re
publican "switched to the friends and
four Republicans and one Democrat
changed their: votes to the opposition.
There were nine absentees, five of- whom
voted against the bill ■'. Tuesday; of the
other four absentees only one voted for
the bill -Tuesday. The.others have not
voted or been present to express their
position on the code.
The Democrats who changed to the
friends*: side : of the proposition in the
effort to secure ;•' a reconsideration were
Messrs. Feeny, Martin - and - Pennington;
the 7 Populists, . Messrs., Cumming and
Sageng, and the Republican, Yon Wald,
of- Goodhue : county. , Dorsey, Democrat,
switched over to the opposition, and with
him Hogan, Holm, Lee and * Ward from
the Republican ranks. The last skirmish
came on as naturally •as the rrising of
the sun, but for an hour the excitement
was .intense. After the roll call the
"friends" seemed not at all anxious to
rush the nratter of reconsideration, but
the opposition was not to be caught nap
ping. Several of its men were not pres
ent and fearing that the speaker would
; rule that a majority j vote to . those pres
ent, instead of a majority of the house
might reconsider, the opposition got busy
protecting /themselves against .any se
cessions of - strengtn through stragglers."
SIGNAL GIVEN FOR ' /. '
-,-.-•'.--. .'•:- ,7X7;;THE FINAL TRIAL.
... . . . .-.._. . _ _ _...
The house fussed along with routine
work for nearly .'"an' hour. _. Both sides
were alert| and every . move was j suspic
-iously ; watched -by the \ leaders. The op
position - ranks failed to dwindle away.
There : was ; nothing like any ,; certainty
about - the results 7. of the proselyting
crusades, but - a count of noses showed
that five of the - opposition were not on
the. floor and* the ; signal was given for
the last . trial. Yon -Wald, the one Re
publican on whom the party whip had
been successfully used, was selected by
Jaeobson to make the break. He moved
for the reconsideration of the vote and
Mr. Sageng, Populist, who had joined
the friends, came out with a strong
seconding speech in which he scored the
Wallace amendments. Siksorski, Demo-
QUITS IN DUDGEON
ALASKA COLLECTOR OF CUSTOMS
TALKS BACK TO HIS SU
PERIORS
REFUSES TO RESCIND "ORDER
Fear of International Complica
tions Did Not; Deter Official .
From ■- Doing; _. Bos
ine_s. ;. ' . „
WASHINGTON, Feb. 26.—Some time
ago the secretary of j the treasury receiv
ed unofficial information- that J. W. Ivy,
collector of / customs at Sitka, had in
structed his deputy at Unalaska, not to
permit Canadian vessels presumably
about- to, engage in pelagic sealing, to
obtain supplies at that port. The col
lector was /directed to send a statement
of facts to the department, and was in
formed that if such orders had been given
they must be rescinded. The department
today received a telegram from Ivy, S say
ing: -■-■•y ...... .7, 77.7. .;/..-.-'
"My instructions were not against ves
sels engaged In alleged illegal seal fishing
but against Canadian vessels actually,
engaged in pelagic sealing, which is il
legal and " criminal when committed with
in the marine jurisdiction [of .the/United
States. If there is an /ancient treaty
between the - United '■■- States and Great
Britain by which British - subjects can
commit depredations, \ destroying Ameri
can property, and depleting our revenues
of tens of thousands jof dollars annually,
while our own citizens are denied these
privileges, * the sooner such | treaty is ab
rogated-the I better. Your ■ solicitude j re-*
garding international complicationse with
Great Britain/need cause you no uneasi
ness, -.-"as the poaching season is not yet
opened. ;- Your J new: collector will .arrive
in time to enforce your /orders. .
"My Americanism will not allow me to
rescind an order which gives British sub
jects - privileges} within our marine iuris
diction which are denied our own people."
. ..'.'There is another matter that may- at
tract your attention. I have recently
. issued orders to the deputy at . Skagway,
a copy of which has been sent you, which
has ; put the Canadian officer, located
there } out of - business and sent: him to
his -own territory. You are aware of
the r fact that this officer became so ;of-"
fensive that he interfered with American
.officers}* in - the i discharge of ; _ their official
duties, ; opened ' United'; States customs
malls,:- dominated over the railway offi
cials, - discriminated in the order of ship
ment! in . favors of .(Canadian merchandise
against that shipped from Seattle, estab
fished a Canadian quarantine at Skag-}
way, collected y money and • performed
"other} acts of British sovereignty in &
port of the United States, such as hoist
:ing with -bravado(the _ cross of St. ' George
from the flagstaff 7of - his: custom ■ house." S
;.- "I have sent the concern, bag, baggage,
flag and other pharaphernalia flying out
of the rcountry.; ~ You . may fear the . shad-.
ow of international; complications and re
scind this order, but a Reed, an Olney,
or a Blame would "not."
crat, of Winona, tried to pretest against
the reconsideration and was ordered into
his seat- by the speaker. The house wait
in the utmost confusion for several min-'
utes, during which time the speaker deft. :
ly avoided recognizing 1 Sherman Smith* I
Laybourn and several other members of
the -opposition who were shouting for a
call of the house. - -. ' ,
7 The call was i at last secured and th<f
roll showed. that several of the stiffes(
members of the opposition were absent.
Jaeobson was quick to see the advantage
to him in the situation and moved that:
further proceedings ' under the call bd'
dispensed with. Laybourn objected an J
when Jaeobson attempted to force 'ula
position the temper of the house was
brought out and Jaeobson was again sat'
upon. ... s-.-r.y ■ y
The sergeant-at-arms with three as-"
sistants had rounded up a majority o$
the unexcusedi absentees, when a counS
of noses.satisfied the opposition that-ii
was* safe and the call was _ stopped'^
There were just 108 members on the floo*
when the roll was j finished and the vota
was a tie. The opposition had won by!
default when S. D. Peterson, who hart
been haled out ot bed, walked in and?
cast an emphatic vote against the recon
sideration proposition. The vote was an'
follows:
ionows: "• _.-■'■■:
Yeas—Messrs. Aanenson, Alley, Arm
strong G. W., Babcock, Bean. Brubaker, •
Burns, Bush, ,Cummings, Dealy, Demlng.'
Feeney, Gait, Gandrud, Grass, Harden! 1
Haugen, Haugland, Henricks, Herbert. !
Hillary, Hillmond, Hinton, Hunt, Jack
son, Jaeobson, Johnsrud, Larson,.. Lorn- !
men, Martin. Neubauer, Nichols, Nolan. •'
Nyquist. O'Neil, Ofsthun, Oppegaard, i
Pennington, Peterson J. A..'- Rapp, Rob
erts, Sageng, Sander,- Schwa.g, Stark,*
Stevenson, Stites, Swanson, Sweet, Tor
sen, Yon Wald, Wallace, Wilder, Mr, •
Speaker—s4. . . *
Nays—Messrs: Alford, Allen, Anderson*.
Armstrong J. A., Barteau,* Benolken, Ben
son, Berg, Bosworth. Bury, Butler. Dor
■sey, Dunn,.. Ferris, -Fust, Gainoy, ' Hem
stead, Hlckey, Hogan, Holm, Hurd.
Hymes, Johnson, Kelly, Laybourn, Lee,
Lemke, Mahood, Mallory, Mark, Miller.
Morley, - Morris, Nelson W., Norman.
Noyes, Ocobock. Peterson .S. D., PhilUpS.
Pope, Pugh, Rich, Rider. Riley. Ryan*
Scherf, Schurman, Schutz, "Sikorskl.
Smith, Ward, Washburn, Wells, . Whit*
ford, Wilcox— . . {
FRIENDS OF BILL .: I
- ;. ENGULFED IN GLOOM.
The . opposition went . wild with joy;
while the "friends" notably. the leaders,
Jaeobson' arid Peterson, were engulfed in.
a shroud . of . undisguised gloom. , The. ef
fect of the result 1 of the long drawn out
battle i on the respective . leaders, . Lay
bourn for the opposition and Jaeobson
for the friends, was similarly enervating".l 7
Jaeobson was 'Z crushed. His. voice
trembled and the personal element which
"entered into his defeat made the unseat
ing of the man who has been king of the !
house for t session after session almost'
pitiable.'.- Laybourn was in about the
same state of collapse. The sudden re
lief from the Intense nervous strain ■'
of the three weeks' fight and the ex
ultation incident to winning the : biggest
.fight in the history of Minnesota's gen
eral legislation : was too much for him.
i He, lay hack in his chair vigorously wip
; ing his : eyes. The '/ personal feeling was
i Continued on Fifth Page.
, r ... ................. .
HAS HOPE OF PEACE
INSPECTOR - GENERAL OF ARMY)
ADMITS THAT PHILIPPINES
ARE NOT PACIFIED
-■■-. . •" . .".. _ ... _ _
RAINY SEASON AGAIN BLAMED
Pretty Soon, Gen. Breckinridge Says,
Soldiers Will; Go Into the Inte
rior and Stop the Guer
rilla Warfare. .
SAN FRANCISCO, Feb. 26.-Brigadier
Gen. J. C. . Breckenridge, inspector gen
eral of the United States army, returned
on the transport Hancock from a tour
of inspection of the Philippine Islands.
He will remain, In the city for a few
days before returning to Washington to
make, has; report to the war department.
In discussing the situation in the Phil
ippines he said: - r
"The islands cannot be said to be en
tirely pacified for a certain amount of
guerrilla warfare Is going on. The mili
tary, forces are not operating to any
great "extent - just ; now as this is the \
rainy season.- After • the rains are over
I expect the soldiers will:penetrate to the
interior and bring about peace. I visited '
forty different posts and found that 9
there 15... room for great improvements. ;
The posts ; were much better, however,
than/I expected to find there. ; './
"The ± signal corps has done glorious
work. on. the islands. That branch of .
the service has lost more men than any :
other department /I believe that .if the ;
strength of the signal corps was doubled !
down V. there the work would be quad- '
rupled. "XX .
"Gov. Taft £as"; made great advance
ment toward, placing the islands on a
peaceful and substantial industrial foot
ing. - -y -■ • - ;■ -'; . ■
*. ."The , schools .( in . the ' islands are flour
ishing. The white teachers who havo
gone ;to the - Philippines .'■<" are accomplis- |
ing great results, but I believe - that it j
would be a great thing if native teach- ;
ers }of the } Philippines } were" sent here
to study our form of government.
. "I . think that • the -. day is not ; far dis- ;
tant ; when ( Manila : will; have a popula- - \
tion (of }a. million inhabitants—yes a; mil- '•
lion and a. half. It is (a' great seaport }
and . the Philippines .ire . most valuable :
possessions." .y '.-.•;,
BOY'S HEART BROKEN
MOTHER'S : DEATH CAUSES SUICIDE
OF f A LAD OF FOURTEEN.
: CHICAGO, Feb. 26.—1n grief because
of the death of his mother a 14-year-old
boy, Charles Anderson, committed sui
cide here, today by taking poison.:
"Since mamma died," * he said, in a
childish scrawl," left for his father, "I
don't seem to care to live. tl miss, her
so that I must die too. Good bye father.
The money * she ' left me, you. can. have/*

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