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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 25, 1903, Image 3

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1903-02-25/ed-1/seq-3/

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Laundry Lesson Number Four, 7
Explains its uses more and more
W "^^ © -^g any fabric.:
x 1"" "^ and cleans
1^ /^-NV "4^\ them ' to°'
i^H I ■ swift^ pany
% 3 M W Kansas City Omaha
J M m M WL M St. Louis St. Paul
"^%i W***^^ SL Joseph Ft Worth
MINNEAPOLIS
WILL DISCIPLINE
MAJORITY OF 150
Troubles in First Baptist
Church Becomes More
Acute.
The latest information that has leak
ed out regarding the long-standing
controversy in the First Baptist church
Is to the effect that the board of dea
cons has prepared a list of names of
about 150 members who are to be "dis
ciplined."
Several reasons are assigned for this
action. The principal one is non-sup
port. This charge, in most instances,
affects the members of the "minority,"
or the faction opposed to Rev. W. E.
Riley, the pastor.
One of the first persons called to ac
count was W. L. Klein, who was asked
to appear before the board of deacons
Monday night, for a second time, to
answer certain charges preferred
against him at the last quarterly meet
ing.
Mr. Klein replied to these accusations
Tvith a written document of such na
ture that rather than pursue the sub
ject further, the deacons ordered the
"Whole matter laid on the table and
what the next step will be is not
known.
Those who are in touch with the sit
uation declare that the Klein charges
will in all probability be removed from
the table, as the majority of the board
©f deacons is not anxious to have Mr.
Klein's reply made public.
The disposition of this particular
case in all probability will affect the
■whole minority, as many persons con-
Bider it in the light of a test case. The
tnembers of the minority are standing
by Mr. Klein and if his dismissal is
ordered many other members will leave
of their own accord. It is reported
that a committee has been appointed
Jo notify the 150 who are to be disci
plined.
CLASSED AS A LOTTERY.
Government Causes Arrest of Officers
of Diamond Investment.
Sanford W. Devore, N. A. Strong and
Edward D. Ziesel, officers of the De
vore Diamond Investment company,
having offices in the New York Life
building, are " charged with operating
a lottery. The two first named were
brought before United States Com
missioner Abbott yesterday for a pre
liminary hearing. Mr. Ziesel is in Chi
cago and is expected to return today,
"when he will deliver himself to the
marshal.
Messrs. Devore and Sprong waived
examination and were bound over to
the federal grand jury, bail being fix
ed at $500. It is alleged that the de
fendants have been sending through
the mails matter advertising an al
leged lottery conducted by the com
pany.
Sprong and Devore were officers ot
the Tontine Savings association, whose
business was closed up by the courts
about a year ago.
Killed by Switch Engine.
Andrew Nelson, employed by the
5 «^« Globe *
i Pianos 2203*
\ At 1
I Quickstep \
Gait
There's only one conclusion to
5 draw from the way Pianos are \
¥ dancing In and out of our store P.
# these days. 4
5 We Have the Kinds, 5
5 Quality and Prices %
a Which the North- 5
# west Wants. I
5 A few specials priced here, just V
W to sharpen your desire to know #
6 more about the generous stock, 0
0 and its wondrous low price pos- 4
d sibilities. New Uprights — a *
£ scratch here and there—but ?
X every one "fit as a fiddle" and #
IP absolutely warranted. c
4 | —Dyer Brothers, was $300. F
W $200 —Dyer Brothers, was $350. 0
9 Ludwig, was $375. d
A $265—Ludwig, was $376. \
1 $275 —Smith & Barnes, was $400 ?
'[ $275—Krell, was $400. #
V $275 —Emerson, was $375. 4
# $287.50 —Krell, was $450. 0
A $300 —Kranich & Bach, was $450 A
1 —Krell, was $500. V
?A little cash down, a little each £
I month, and a fine piano goes into 5
| your home, to afford constant w
$ pleasure while you are paying for m
1 1 It. We will reserve any one of 4
0 these pianos for later delivery. \
? I
J[ QTETSON... ![
<> riANDOLINS. 4
X banjoi. The Best J
|W. J. DYER & BRO., t
0 Largest Music House in the a
A Northwest. 5
J Sole Agents for Steinway and 5
\ Knabe Pianos. V
5 I7DfERBLDG., ST. PAUL, MINN, *
--■• ...-;■- ■•. ■-'■■-■■ ■•■--■•.".- • . .■ - ■,>.-.. •- : -
Jones & Adams Coal company, was
killed at midnight by being struck by
a Milwaukee switch engine at the
crossing at Fifteenth avenue south.
Nelson was standing near the tracks
with his back to the train and stepped
back on the track just as the engine
approached. He was taken to St. Bar
nabee's hospital, where he died a half
hour later. Nothing is known of his
relatives.
CARBOLIC ACID ENDS DEBAUCH.
D. S. Carting Closes a Spree by Com-
mitting Suicide. -
D. S. Carling thirty-three years old,
ended a week's debauch by drinking
three ounces of carbolic acid while
alone in his room at 201 Twelfth ave
nue south late last night. He was
dead when found.
Carling recently came here from the
old country and has been accustomed
to an allowance from his native home
each month. He had received no mon
ey for six weeks and becoming de
spondent commenced to drink.
He quit his work at the Great West
ern shops a week ago, since which
time he has been drinking continually.
Finally his funds gave out and he told
a friend that he was going to end it
ail by killing himself.
KILLS HIS FAMILY -
THEN HIMSELF
Terrible Work of a Seven
teen-Year-Old Boy in
Indiana.
FRANKFORT, Ind., Feb. 24.—Ed
ward Woods, the seventeen-year-old
son of a prominent farmer, several
miles north of here, killed his father,
shot and fatally wounded his mother
and sister and then committed suicide
tonight. The motive is not known.
After the shooting: the young man
went to the home of a neighbor and
said that robbers had entered the Wood
home and killed his father, mother and
sister and that he escaped after a run
ning battle with the desperado. He
was apparently greatly excited an<J
said he was organizing a posse to pur
sue his father's slayers. The boy then
continued on his way toward this city
and stopping at the next house, told
the same story. When he was question
ed concerning the shooting he became
confused and resented the inquisitive
ness of the farmer to whom he told
the story. Young Woods said he had
no time for further words, as he had
to run down the robbers and he start
ed toward the barn yard at the farm
er's home.
After the boy disappeared behind the
barn a shot was heard, and the farmer
to whom the boy had been talking but
a moment before, hastened to the barn
to find the youth with a bullet through
his breast.
BEAUTY OF MISS
DEACON IS IN PERIL
Operation to Remove Slight Defect of
Nose Causes Death of Bone.
PARIS, Feb, 24.—The story comes from
Biarritz that Miss Gladys Deacon, the
beautiful American girl, in seeking to im
prove a defect in her good looks, is in
danger of losing them altogether.
While most of Miss Deacon's features
have been called irreproachable, the pro
file of her nose did not conform strictly
to the classical ideal, and in order to
remedy this she decided to submit to an
operation. It is an operation common to
many women in France, and consists of
the inection of paraffin under the skin
of those parts where there is an objec
tionable depression. Such a depression
marred Miss Deacon's nose, and last fall
she placed herself in the hands of a "beau
tyJl££tor" and tne Paraffin was injjected.
v niie parnfnn is not an irritant.its pres
ence as a foreign object pressing against
the extremely sensitive pereosteum does
sometimes produce necrosis of the bone.
Ihis unhappy result is said to have fol
lowed the paraffin injection in Miss Dea
con's case, and she is now quite ill witr
a possibility of permanent disfigurement.
The beauty and heart conquests of
Miss Gladys Deacon have been the sub
ject of many cable dispatches. Her en
gagement to various European nobles has
been reported, and a few months ago
it was seriously said that she had captur
ed the heart of the crown prince of Ger
many, whom she met at Blenheim.
DEATHS OF A DAY.
Special to The Globe.
WINONA, Minn., Feb. 24.—Word has
been received here of the death at Kal
ama. Wash., of Thomas L. Qulner, who
for many years resided in Winona and
had charge of the rafting interests of the
Laird-Norton company at Fountain City
bay. His death was the result of an ac
cident, he being struck by a timber when
standing near a chute.
Special to The Globe.
EXCELSIOR, Minn., Feb. 24.—Rhoda,
the wife of A. D. Leach, died at Lake
Minnewashta, at the age of sixty-four
years, after an illness of one month. The
cause of her death was heart failure. She
was born in Staffordshire, England, and
has lived in this community fifty years.
NEW YORK. Feb. 24.—Ellery Ander
son, lawyer and political leader died sud
denly of heart disease at his home in this
city today. He was sixty-nine years old.
Mr. Anderson was an independent Demo
crat and at one time took a leading part
in the councils of that party. He was one
of the leaders of the "anti-Snap convic
tion" movement in 1892, was receiver of
the Union Pacific railway at one time
and Ijeld positions as director in other
railroad companies.
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1903.
DISPOSITION TO TRY
NEW THINGS IN
NORTH DAKOTA
Bills Pass the Lower House
for a Board of Control and
Eeferendum Vote on€hoice
for United States Senators.
Special to The Globe.
BISMARCK, N. D., Feb. 24.—The
house today passed the board of con
trol bill providing for a board of three
men to take charge of all state insti
tutions. The bill was amended, mak
ing the salaries of members $4,000 a
year and fixing headquarters at Bis
marck. The senate passed Simpson's
bill providing for a vote by the people
on the choice of candidates for United
States senators and certification of
the vote to the legislative assembly as
an expression of the people's choice.
There was a warm debate on the bill,
which passed, 24 to 9. The house pass
ed the Davis primary election bill,
which provided for fhe primary nom
ination of all candidates for office. The
vote was 79 to 14.
Special to The Globe.
PIERRE, S. D., Feb. 24.—The argu
ments today were confined to the sen
ate oil bill in the house, which created
considerable stir on an attempt of
Gross to amend, which was opposed by
Madison, Kribs and Brown, of San
born, and was finally sent back to
committee, on motion of Longstaff.
The .special appropriations bills were
pushed further along on the calendar
to avoid action until the anti-compact
insurance bill Is disposed of in the
senate. The house passed senate bills
to grant to townships control 6f the
water from artesian wells; to appro
priate money for a silver service for
the ship South Dakota and appropriae
money for criminal prosecutions from
the reservation country.
The senate passed house bills to pro
vide stone for a state capitol from the
penitentiary quarries; for uniform first
and second-grade teachers' certificates
and several small appropriation bills.
A bill for legislative reapportionment
in the house was killed on first read-
Ing by Indefinite postponement, on mo
tion of Goddard. The principal bills
introduced were: To provide for a
state revenue commission; requiring
gas companies to furnish instructions
for reading meters; authorizing the
purchase of certain lands at Redfield
hospital for the insane.
OLYMPIA, Wash., Feb. 24.—The sen
ate today passed a high liquor license
bill and the house defeated the anti
pass and anti-trust bills.
CASS LAKE IN DIRE NEED.
Impatient to Have Agricultural Lands
Opened Up.
Special to The Globe.
CASS LAKE, Minn., Feb. 24.—The
resolution sent to Congressman Page
Morris, and presented to congress by
him, from the Duluth Commercial
club, has given the business men here
hope that something will be done this
session of congress to open up the ag
ricultural lands already classified on
the reservation and put the pine on
sale in March. The Minnesota delega
tion at Washington is doing everything
in its power. It is imperative that
something be done at once, as the bus
iness in Cass Lake is in an awful
plight. The jobbers have determined
to end this state of things, if possible.
It is known that the government de
partments which have the Chippewa
reservation opening in hand are con
gested with work; that Land Commis
sioner Richards has stated that the
original survey is incorrect, and that
-new surveys may be necessary, and
that the commissioner has sent to the
surveyor general of Minnesota for all
plats and surveys of the territory to
be opened. Should a new survey be
made, it is impossible to open the
reservation before winter, If then, and
thus logging would be delayed another
year. Cass Lake is In dire need of
help, and so are the adjacent towns
and the Indians. Duluth and the Twin
Cities would also benefit.
ALLEGATION OF BRIBERY.
Printers Accuse a Member of the
Washington Legislature.
OL.YMPIA, Wash., Feb. 24.—Three
firms holding printing contracts with
the state have filed a written state
ment charging 1 that Chairman Louis
Levy, of the printing Investigation
committee appointed by the legisla
ture, has solicited from them $1,500 as
consideration for making a favorable
report on the letting of printing con
tracts last July.
Pending an investigation Levy was
retired from the chairmanship. Levy,
who is a member of the house from
Seattle, claims that the charges are
made to discredit his investigation
which he alleges has unearthed cor
ruption, and he claims that two of the
firms will recede from the charges
when called upon to testify.
Protecting Their Marshes in Court.
Special to The Globe
PLAINFIELD, Wis., Feb. 24.—An
important law suit in the circuit court
has been in progress over a week, be
ing the Portage County Drainage com
pany vs. the farmers who own marsh
in the proposed drainage district.
Over sixty witnesses have been sworn.
The drainage company purchased all
the marsh land it could obtain, and
now proposes to drain it, but the farm
ers who still own marshes there object
to the marsh being drained, claiming
it will hurt their hay land. Well
known attorneys from all over the
state are employed on the case.
Concert for Famine Sufferers.
Special to The Globe.
CROOKSTON, Minn., Feb. 24.—The
Gethsemane Quartette, of Minneapolis,
will g-ive an entertainment in this city
March 3 for the benefit of the famine
sufferers in Finland and Sweden. The
opera house and all of the talent will
be donated.
MASONIC SOCIAL FUNCTION.
Dedication of the New Masonic Temple at
Grand Forks.
Special to The Globe.
GRAND FORKS, N. D., Feb. 24.—To
night was a great night in the history of
the Masonic circles in this part of the
state, as the dedication of the new Ma
sonic temple was completed at one of the
greatest social functions ever held here.
The ceremonies were attended by over
500 Masons from all parts of the state.
Nearly all the grand lodge officers were
present. The members of that body con
ducted the formal exercises. Grand Master
Stockwell gave an address. The dedica
tory exercises were followed by a re
ception, ball and banquet.
Prosecuted for Train Robbery.
BTTTE, Mont., Feb. 24.— George Cole
the alleged train robber, faced eight dif
ferent counts in as many bills of infor
mation filed against him today. There
is one count of robbery, in which the man
with the gun is accused of taking 73 cents
from the person of V. M. Bell. Most of
the other charges are for assault in the
nrst degree on the persons of George Ott
and other members of the train crew, who
it is charged were shot by Col*.
WINNEBAGO INDIANS
MUST SOON GO
IT ALONE
Very Discouraging C^idition
of This Tribe Wnifi For
merly Inhabited Minne
sota—Their and
Present and Pfsd|e De
generacy— Gov^lntbent to
Withdraw Guardianship. •
Special to The Globe.
SIOUS CITY, lowa, Feb. 24.—T0 per
sons who observe the progress of the
Western tribes of Indians toward civ
ilization it Is an evident fact that the
Winnebagoes, who occupy a reserva
tion in Nebraska not far from Sioux
City, have advanced at a much less"
rate than any other tribe of red men
in the West. The opportunities which
are offered for the development of
their mental and moral qualities are
absolutely disregarded by them and it
is only by the enforcement of strict
rules on the part of the agent that
much lawlessness among them is kept
down.
The average Winnebago has Improv
ed but little during the thirty-seven
years that lie has resided on Nebraska
soil. While he has, of course, lost much
of the savagery in his makeup during
that period, yet he still clings to ol<J
superstitions and customs of primi*
tive days when he roamed the forests
of Eastern lowa and Minnesota.
His nature is devoid of ambition. He
resents the measures promulgated from
time to time by the national govern
ment, which are intended to flt him for
the responsibility and dignity of Amer
ican citizenship.
He still insists upon the ■wseird dance
tog-ged in war paint and feathers, with
gaudy costumes and he' glories In the
worship of his shiftless ancestors, in
sists upon wearing 1 long hair and de
mands the native blanket to be worn
about his shoulders.
Family Records Unknown.
His moral tendencies are very bad.
He disregards the marriage relation to
the extent that family Records are al
most as unknown as among beasts.
His habits are intemperate and often
vicious. In a word, he is' truly a bad
Indian.
Civilization has gone ahead too rap
idly for him and in a few years from
now when the guardianship of the na
tional government over his destiny
shall have expired he will certainly be
ill prepared to take the ba'c'Je of life on
his own shoulders. It will not be long
before the patents which the govern
ment issued and held in trust when his
lands were allotted shall be exchanged
for deeds by operation of law, and this
will mark the beginning of the descent
of the Winnebago.
Where he will end can now only b#
conjectured. He Avill be privileged then
to barter his lands at will. His nat
ural aversion to labor, his lack of in
dustry, his instinctive and insatiable
thirst for intoxicating liquors and his
debased moral nature will not augur
well for his future welfare. The close
restraint of reservation rule will give
way to the more liberal enforcement of
state laws and the Winnebago will
take advantage of the independence
given him.
The records of the state and federal
courts in Sioux City, O:naha and other
places adjacent to the reservation al
ready contain many instances of
crimes committed by Winnebagoes.
Every federal grand Jury is called
upon to investigate cases of white men
charged with Illicit traffic in liquors
among the Winnebagoes. White men
who engage in this business know the
weakness of tlje Winnebago in this re
si ect.
Have No Use for Thrift.
Although the government has pro
vided many conveniences designed to
promote ambition and thrift, especially
along agricultural lines, .among the
Winnebagoes, yet they have taken ad
vantage of but few of them. The ma
jority of these Indians lease their lands
to white men, through the agent in
charge of* the reservation; and live
solely upon the rental thus received.
This money is paid to the secretary of
the Indian department of the govern
ment and is distributed at regular in
tervals to the Indians. The money is
soon spent, the most of it for frivolous
things among merchants of nearby
towns.
A few years ago.the government or
dered houses built for a large number
of Indians on the Winnebago reserva
tion and the agent was shocked a short
time afterward to find that the red
men were using the dwellings for their
horses, while they themselves were liv
ing in rude tents or huts built of rough
boards or brush.
The records of the agency show that
the Winnebago tribe is decreasing In
number at a somewhat alarming rate.
In the twelve months from July 1, 1901,
to July 1, 1902, their population de
creased to the extent of fifty. There
are now about 1,100 Winnebagoes in
Nebraska, The decrease has continued
at a gradual rate from year to year.
This state of things is said to be due
to their unsanitary domestic life, their
Immoral tendencies and their dissipa
tion. They have had frequent epi
demics of disease In past years which
have carried them off in large numbers.
Two Tribes Contrasted.
Adjoining the Winnebago reserva
tion, which consists of about 110,000
acres, is the reservation pf the Omaha
Indians, containing about,l6o,ooo acres.
The contrast in the development of
these two tribes is very marked. The
Omahas are, as a rule, an Industrious,
ambitious tribe, whose members have
-utilized most of the privileges and op
portunities afforded them by the gov
ernment. They have built comfortable
homes on their allotments and many
of them carry on an extensive business
REMEDY HJppu||
"give* 0 W'^S^Bl'
Satisfaction. f^f 4»i <9 J&!m
Gives relief at once H^kf^ .^eH
It cleanses, soothes K^w^i-<c^^^Sil
and heals the dis-rSSPTw^iva2^^
eased .;■ membrane. : '.Hy y^i**' — -™«
It cures.: Catarrh....," *ma**%»*?**?£
and drives away aU h V FEVER.
Cold in the Head HA I rilVllni
quickly. It is ab-11"' |:*". 11""i
sorbed. Heals and Protects :: the Mem
brane. Restores : the . Senses of Taste arid
Smell. Full size 50c, at Druggists or by
mail; Trial Size. 10c, by mail. ...
ELY BROTHERS. 56 Warren Street, New
■. York. ''■ ■■■. *■<■'-„■. .■:••*-'y ■■ r ■■■■■■ /..'
The Northwest' 3 fff^'f*~ (% s£T^ 'I
Cfndermuslins: Prices Reduced #rtffeedlework~
On center bargain table, main floor, you will find an excellent assort- p?,,'^^ '°r 7 ednesday:
mentof good Undermuslins, all marked at i considerable reductions for iitSTedflStS' g oodvaTu des T *T
one day only. . You will find it very much to your interest to come per palr '-;;j • 300
today for these: / . „. / Bureau Scarfs, to match, ',„
-****«. Corset Co^rs E^rS^**;
~^^:sfak4* */Vraer VUVerS Damask Center Pieces, stamp- .„
Of cambric and muslin, M9}SB Ip Of cambric or nain- ed« all linen» 18x18, each JfC
in the new chemise ■ Hj HH■■ ' sook, :; in Marguerite -r n^ . „ „ - '
style, Empire, Hubbard ■Si T&BBr™ and French style, trim- , apstry Cushion Covers—Our regu
or sacque—elaborately «n JPQk •"'■- ' . mcd in lace, ,-embroid- |. af 49e kind, size 20x20, «£?-.
trimmed with lace, em- ~M fl 1 cry or hemstitching— ednesday, each. HOC
broidery and hem- ¥® W§ U f-H ■ , values up to $1.50, for m,....;,^ r ,,j -^ ■
da>.9Bc- Aong Chemise "
Umbrella Drawers \ Bargain BaSiHient
puS^^c^nne^m c b Umhr*«aMris I^^^^^ "
chon lace, embroidery or hemstitch- S^mJd' wUh^cks^Taceo^'S hGm' Wednesday, each.. „ S IIZC
Ing—values to $1.50, for 98c. broidery—values up to $1.50, for 98c. 36-inch Bleached Muslin —Worth
~~r~ ; — —■ — — r — _ — — 7c. Per-yard ' . -< ■ ►: _,:
: p. A §• 9 19 A § ~ " Wednesday .......;.... .:.QG
. Me™ cc J^aaies Underwenty%: outr Fla""'!::.4i/ 2C
An opportunity today to buy heavy, medium and light- Cotton Blankets, gray or tan, 10-4
weight winter underwear way under actual value. We are closing out all eof per Sirf^ecfaL 0 A'lC
: odd lots and broken lines. Among them are: ;..- s. . ... . , .. \ .
- . New Percales, 100 pieces in medium '
Ladies' fine Swiss ribbed all-wool vests in natural, sky pink white and nd dark colors, in Wednes- £*-
black: Jersey ribbed vests and pants in natural, white or . black; knee SSa at ' yaid "* *" * * *' '-'. " **C
length tights; lightweight natural or white union suits with " " Covert Cloth, all colors, in lengths
short sleeves. Regular prices up to $1.50, To close they 7Q/> o/ualy'. 0 PerTd*Vednes 2diy....<?C
are going at, choice for. ..;::.:# £7<* Dpess Ginghams _ A big. table full
Do not delay for these lots will soon begone. Come 'today and be sure worSTfc fvS^ mJpecVaf: COIT
of securing what you want, 7 Wednesday .~..:..;..:.......... &C
in farm and stock- raising. A large
number lease a portion of their lands
to white cattle men for grazing pur
poses and farm the rest, marketing
their grain and other products along
side of the white farmers.
The Omahas use improved machin
ery, have good, well-kept horses, dress
In citizens' clothing and are willing
and anxious to send their children to
the government schools. The mem
bers of the two tribes do not mingle
together to any great extent, because
the average Omaha's pride inspires a
feeling of social superiority over his
neighbor, the Winnebago.
The Omaha Indian is preparing him
self in most admirable and commend
able shape for the crown of American
citizenship which he is to inherit In a
few short years to come. The Omaha
nation Is increasing in numbers, the
record of the agency showing the in
crease each year is at about the same
rate at which the Winnebagoes are de
creasing.
The Winnebago tribe has participat
ed in no great wars, but have been
prominent as individuals in a number
of massacres during the period of their
residence in Minnesota along about
Civil war times. Their career shows
evidences of their obstinate and ob
streperous natures from the beginning.
Formerly in Minnesota.
History associates them with the
Sioux nation. About seventy years ago
the Winnebagoes had their home on
the Turkey river in Eastern lowa, near
Dubuque. They removed from there to
Long Prairie, Wis., near Fond dv Lac.
Then they went to Blue Earth county,
Minnesota., near Mankato. The gov
ernment had established a reservation
for them in Blue Earth county, but a
large number refused to go there, pre
ferring to remain at Long Prairie.
Those who went to the reservation
remained there until I^6l. The year
previous to that, in 18ffD, a number of
Winnebagoes took part in the famous
Blue Earth massacre, which was led
by the Santee Sioux and in which so
many white people were cruelly mur
dered. For this crime thirty-eight red
men were hung. Little Winnebago,
one of the famous chiefs of the Winne
bago tribe, who is yet living and is
nearly eighty years of age, was one of
those under sentence of death, but he
escaped the execution by some means.
The government in the spring of 1861
set apart a fine reservation for the
Winnebagoes at Crow Creek, S. D., and
gave orders for them to be removed
there, but there was a division of the
tribe again when it came time for
them to be transported. Only a little
over half of them wanted to be moved.
The rest were brought on steamboats
down the Mississippi and up the Mis
souri river to the new reservation in
Dakota. Those who remained in the
North congregated together around
Black River Falls In Wisconsin, and
hundreds of them live there yet. They
have no reservation. Those who were
brought to Dakota became dissatisfied
in a few months and In the fall an exo
dus started.
Down the Missouri.
They built canoes and 1,400 strong
they floated down the Missouri to the
Omaha reservation, where they landed
and went into camp. The agent took
charge of them and later the govern
ment provided a home for them there
by purchasing a large portion of the
reservation of the Omahas for them.
The most of the old-time chiefs have
long since passed away. But three are
now living in Nebraska. They are
Gray Wolf, White Grass and Big Bear.
All are well advanced in years. Gray-
Wolf and Big Bear are over eighty
years of age and White Grass is above
seventy-five years. Little Winnebago,
another old-time chief, who lives in
Wisconsin, is past eighty.
The members of the tribe In Ne
braska have an „ annual "May pole"
dance which is indulged in regularly
and which always attracts a large
number of white people. • This dance Is
given usually about July 4 and ; is a
time of great rejoicing for the red
skins. The . dance ; lasts for several
days and ♦the ."; Indians j come from all
over the reservation to one spot and
go into camp in tents to stay for the
event. On account of the immorality
attending these dances, the agent has
* threatened to forbid them. The agent
in charge of the Omaha and Winne
bago reservations is Charles P. Math
ewson, who .. has been in chage . of
both tribes for .the past four years. .
The tribes were under separate agents
up to 1880, when both were turned over
to one man.
i
PLOW PLANT DAMAGED.
j
J. I. Case Company, Racine, Loses
■ $100,000.
1 RACINE, Wis.. Feb. 24.—Fire tonight
in ? the plant of the J. I. Case - Plow - com- .
pany did damage to the extent of $100,000.
The loss 't is covered. by insurance.! " The
portion of the plant damaged is known I
as the : finishing . department, which is
separated from the other branches' by a
fire > wall. ■ The blaze is supposed- to have
started ,•■ from f spontaneous -. combustion
among the - oils ] and ] paints in the finishing
department :on the first floor.- The >plant
employed 500 men. " - - ',<■?
>T^-'.*i.i.:'-•■ ■- ■...-- ■ ••' •■■■»:s»»%
KNEW THE BIBLE BY HEART.
Canty Could Repeat any Chapter Ver
batim.
SARATOGA, N. V., Feb. 22.—Thomas
E. Canty, who is serving a third term
as a member of the village board of trus
tees, died of consumption at his home
in this place this morning.
ioi! c v,*ai sorn5 orn ln New Tork city in
1864, but had made this village his home
for several years.
_ When a boy he became a student of the
Bible, which he gradually committed to
memory until he had acquired the whoie
or It, and at a moment's notice could
repeat verbatim any chapter. - ■■-••
He was a blacksmith and a Democrat.
Paste Pot Pilgrims.
LOS ANGELES.CaL.Feb. 24.—The North
Dakota Press association excursion, com
prising forty-one members, arrived here
today from Colorado. The party will
spend several days sight-seeing in "South
ern California, going thence to San Fran
cisco.
ADVANTAGES OF TRAVEL.
Yes, travel develops a man beyond doubt,
ror that—all observers agree—
If there's anything in a man it brings it
right out.
Especially travel by sea.
—From the Philadelphia Press.
CONTRACT WORK.
Sewer on Rice Street.
Office of the Board of Public Works.
City of St. Paul. Minn., Feb. 24, 1903.
Sealed bids will be received by the
Board of Public Works in and for the
corporation of the City of St. Paul, Min
nesota, at their office in said city until 2
p. ra. on the ninth (9th) day oY March
A. D. 1903, for the construction of a sewer
on Rice street, from Maryland street to
Geranium street, in said city, according
to plans and specifications on file in the
office of said Board.
A bond with at least two (2) sureties in
a sum of at least twenty (20) per cent.
or a certified check on a bank of St. Paul
in a sum of at least ten (10) per cent
of the gross amount bid, must accom
pany each bid. Said check shall be made
payable to the Clerk of said Board.
The said Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
JOHN S. GRODE,
Official: R. L. GORMAN
Clerk Board of Public Works.
Feb. 25th-1903-10t.
CONTRACT WORK.
Sewer on Rondo Street.
Office of the Board of Public Works.
City of St. Paul, Minn., Feb. 24, 1903.
Sealed bids will be received by the
Board of Public Works in and for the
corporation of the City of St. Paul, Min
nesota, at their office in said city, until 2
p. m. on the ninth (9th) day of March,
A. D. 1903, for the construction of a sewer
on Rondo street, from Dale street to St.
Albans street. In said city, according to
plans and specifications on file in the of
fice of said Board.
A bond with at least two (2) sureties in
a sum of at least twenty (20) per cent.,
or a certified check on a bank of St. Paul,
in a sum of at least ten (10) per cent
of the gross amount bid, must accom
pany each bid. Said check shall be made
payable to the Clerk of said Board.
The said Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
JOHN S. GRODE,
President.
Official: R. L.. GORMAN,
Clerk Board of Public Worka.
Feb. 25th-1903-10t.
Effective March 1, 1903, EJMjJSJ
A NEW IlliS
gES Bra| iE^h HS&3PflEfl I^^9 )^^3i 83SBI i * 1111 mJA I Svi^^A^c^^^^ES
AOVERLANDTRAINS
L Each way every day
Cl VCD Leaves ST. PAUL at 10:30 a. m.
I L I Lit Via Fargo and Grand Forks.
"Puget Sound Express" Th™n ew
Leaves St. Paul 5 p. m., via Breckenridge and Casssiton.
2 DAILY TRAINS n
™■" - ..■,'■"■■■ ———FOR — — —™.
Spokane f Seattle, i Portland 9
——————— AND ■ ALL ■■—i i^— ■■ i-M
PAGiFIG COAST POINTS.
City Ticket office, Corner Fourth and Robert Streets,
CONTRACT WORK.
Sewer on Falrfield Avenue and Moses
-Street.
Office of the Board of Public Works.
City of St. Paul. Minn., Feb. 24, 1903.
Sealed bids will be received by the
Board of Public Works in and fo* the
corporation of the City of St. Paul, Min
nesota, at their office in said city, until
2 p. m. on the ninth (9th) day of March,
A. D. 1903, for the construction of a sewer
on Fairfleld avenue, from South Wa
basha street to Bell street and on Moses
street, from Fairfleld avenue, to the Mis
sissippi river, in said city, according to
plans and specifications on file in the of
fice of said Board.
A bond with at least two (2) sureties in
a sum of at least twenty (20) per cent.,
or a certified check on a bank of St. Paul
in a sum of at least ten (10) per cent
of the gross amount bid, must accom
pany each bid. Said check shall be made
payable to the Clerk of said Board.
The said Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
JOHN S. GRODE,
President.
Official: R. L. GORMAN,
Clerk Board of Public Works.
Feb. 25th-1903-10t.
CONTRACT WORK.
Sewer on Arunde! Street.
Office of the Board of Public Works.
City of St. Paul. Minn., Feb. 24. 1903.
Sealed bids will be received by the
Board of Public Works in and for the cor
poration of the City of St. Paul, Minne
sota, at their office in said city, until 'Z
p. m. on the ninth (9th) day of March.
A. D. 1903, for the construction of a sewer
on Arundel street, from Central avenue
to Rondo street, in said city, according 1 to
plans and specifications on file in the of
fice of said Board.
A bond with at least two (2) sureties in
a sum of at least twenty (20) per cent.,
or a certified check on a bank of St. Pau^
in a sum of at least ten (10) per cent
of the gross amount bid, must accom
pany each bid. Said check shall be made
payable to the Clerk of said Board.
The said Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
JOHN S. GRODB,
President.
Official: R. L. GORMAN.
Clerk Board of Public Works.
Feb. 25th-1903-10t.
CONTRACT WORK.
Sewer on Rondo, Chatsworth and Carroll
Streets.
Office of the Board of Public Works.
City of St. Paul. Minn., Feb. 24. 1903.
Sealed bids will be received by the
Board of Public Works in and for the cor
poration of the City of St. Paul, Minne
sota, at their office in said city, until 2
p. m. on the ninth (9th) day of March,
A. D. 1903, for the construction of a
sewer on Rondo street, from Oxford street
to Chatsworth street, on Chatsworth
street, from Rondo street to Iglehart
street and on Carroll street, from Chats
worth street, to a point 100 feet east, in
said city, according to plans and specifica
tions on file in the office of said Board.
A bond with at least two (2) sureties in
a sum of at least twenty (20) per cent.,
or a certified check on a bank of St. Paul,
in a sum of at least ten (10) per cent
of the gross amount bid, must accom
pany each bid. Said check shall be made
payable to the Clerk of said Board.
The said Board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids.
JOHN S. GRODE, •
President.
Official: R. L,. GORMAN.
Clerk Board of Public Works.
Feb. 25th-1903-10t.
3

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