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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, February 09, 1904, Second Edition, Image 11

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1904-02-09/ed-1/seq-11/

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SUMMARY OF THE DAY'S TRANSACTIONS IN THE MARKETS
ST. PAUL UNION STOCK YARDS
The Great Live Stock Market of the Northwest
NO LIMIT to the demand for Fat Cattle, Butcher Cattle, Hogs and Sheep
WE ARE ESPECIALLY IN NEED OF FAT CATTLE AND BUTCHER CATTLE
SUPPLY NOT EQUAL TO THE DEMAND
Chas. L. Haas Commission Go,
Live Stock Commission Merchants
Room 10, Exchange Bids., Union itcck
Yards, South St. Paul, Minn., and
Union Stock Yards, Chicago, 111.
411 correspondence will receive prompt
attention. Liberal advances made on
consignments. References—Union Stock
Yards or any Commercial Agency.
ROGERS S ROGERS
LIVE STOCK COMMISSION MER
CHANTS.
Room 2, Exchange Building, South St.
Paul, Minnesota.
Highest market prices obtained for
•tock. Prompt attention given to all cor
respondence and orders. Reference*:
Any Commercial Agency.
NEWS IS BULLISH,
. BUT PRICES SLUMP
Wheat Breaks on Account of
Heavy Liquidation and
Profit Taking.
Tn the face of extreme bullish condi
tions wheat declined yesterday on heavy
liquidation and profit-taking. All the news
was bullish, but the amount of July grain
thrown on the market was so large that
nothing could be done to stem the tide.
The war news from the East should
prove a big bull factor in the prices for
several days to come. *
Coin continues to grade low. The pres
ent cold wave may help the grade?. But
little of the grain arriving grades higher
than No. 4. The sample market yesterday
was weak and inactive. Oats were also
heavy. Liquidation was persistent during
the entire session.
The war news and the Baltimore fire
had a depressing effect on prices in the
stuck market yesterday. Of the two the
fire news was the more important. Fear is
expressed that many of the large insur
ance companies will be forced to dispose
of their securities to meet losses and that
the market for some time to come will be
flooded with offerings of good standard
stocks and bonds.
What the Brokers Say.
ML Doran & Co's Chicago grain letter
says:
Wheat—The weather throughout the
winter wheat belt was clear and cold,
with lower temperatures forecasted for
Tuesday. Argentine shipments were some
larger, with the increase chiefly in Ar
gentine and Australian clearances. The
Southwest receipts were somewhat
heavier. Kansas City and St. Louis re
ceiving 273.000 bu. against 107,000 a year
ago. Northwest markets were, relatively
speaking, very strong during one speil of
weakness. The Southwest sold the July
01 it ion. The French winter wheat crop"
acreage was officially reported as 258.000
acres less than a year ago. and the condi
tion 71 3-lu, compared with 70 5-10 last
season.
Coin -The temperatures throughout the
corn bolt were low, with a cold wave
• uining in from the Northwest. Of the
421 cars received, 353 Inspected No. 4 and
no grade; 68 No. 3, and none contract.
The sample market was weak, the No. 4
ranging from 2c to 3c lower and the no
grail.- lc off, being relatively stronger on
account of the demand from the sugar
refineries.
Oats.—There is little to be said In re
gard to oats. Liquidation was persistent
all day. The cash market is weak, vary
ing from 2c to 3c a bu lower.
J. C. Geraghty & Co.'s correspondent
say of stocks:
Logan & Bryan—The market is heavier
and lower. What seems a certainty of
war caused a good deal of depression
abroad. Enormous loss by fire in Balti
more is, we think, however, a much more
effective bear argument and one that oc
casioned much more selling of stocks.
The natural inference is that insurance
companies and many others, large hold
ers of securities, will be obliged to throw
, them on the market. With two such sen
sational , influences as these against the
price, it seems the part of conservatism
to wait. All ordinary conditions and in
fluences are supplanted by them for the
time being.
Walker Bros.—The market was weak
and with little support. London prices
were down and the traders began to sell
our market off. Prices declined easily
and nearly every one took the selling
side. Numerous things contributed to the
selling movement and traders found many
stop orders. We look for. a continuation
of this declining market. The short in
terest was enlarged and this helped to
:• keep up prices slightly. The feeling was
nervous and sentiment bearish.
Visible Supply.
NEW YORK, Feb. B.—The visible sup
ply of grain Saturday, Feb. 6, compiled
> : by the New York Produce exchange is as
. follows: - - - .
Wheat. 39,200 bu, decrease 5G0.000
Corn, 070.000 bu, decrease SSO.OOO
Oats, 8.596,000 bu; decrease 150,000.
Rye. 1,055,000 bu; decrease 105,000.
, Barley, 4,772,000 bu, decrease 114,000.
HIDES, PELTS AND SUNDRIES.
Quotations furnished by D. Bergman
. & Co.
Hides.
Green Salted — -IS-0 No. 1. No. 2.
Native hides, free of :
brands, 25 lbs and up. .7%@ .06%
Branded hides, all weights,
25 lbs up oG*[email protected] .054
Bulls, stags and oxen 06% .05%
Veal calfskins, S to 15 lbs .11 @ .09%
• Veal kip skins, 15 to 25
lbs 09 @ .0714
Deacons, under 8 lbs .... 50 @ .40
Long-haired kip, 8 to 25
" lbs .08 @ .07
. Slunk skins 20
Glue stock -i....... 03
Green—
Free of brands, tare, 3 lbs
each 06%@ .05%
Branded, all weights, tare,
3 lbs each .05%@ .05
Bulls, stags and old oxen,
tare, 3 lbs each 05%@ .05
Long-ha'j-ed kips or run
ners .., . . .06%@ .05%
Veal calf, S to 15 lbs 09%@ .08
Veal kip, 15 to 25 lbs... .08 @ .06%
Green-salted horse hides,
with tail and mane,
large 2.75 @ 1.75 ~
Green-salted horse hides,
with tail and mane,
ponies and small 1.50 Q .80
Dry Flint Montana—
Heavy butcher hides,
short trimmed 14% .15
Light butcher hides, short
trimmed, under 18 lbs.. .12 @ .13
Heavy butcher hides, long
trimmed .......;......'*. ,14
Llg-ht butcher hides, long
trimmed, under 18 lbs.. .12
Fallen or murrain IH4
- Kin. 5 to 12 lbs. - .12
Calf, under 5 lbs.. - .16
Minnesota. lowa, • Wisconsin and Da
i kota— "
- Dry hides. 12 lbs and up... .12 . - .-.10%
Dry kip. 5 to 12 lbs-. .12 .1014
Dry calf • .If) .14
Dry glue .04 .00
Dry salted .10 .09
HOGS SELL IOG HIGHER
RECEIPTS LIGHT —QUALITY POOR-
NOTHING CHOICE ON SALE
Cattle Supply Light—Prices on Killing
Grades Stronger—Stockers and Feeders
Unchanged—Sheep and Lambs Steady.
SOUTH ST. PATT,, Feb. B.—Estimated
receipts at the t'ninn stock yards today:
Cattle. 255; calves, 30; hogs, 2,015; sheep,
8,975; cars, ~<).
The following table shows the receipts
from Jan. 1, 1904, to date, as compared
with the same period in 1903:
Year. Cattle. Calves. Hoss. Sheep. Cars.
1904 ..14.313 2.077 140.48S 133,282 2.834
I*o3 .. 16,128 3-. 155 109,277 93,221 2,375
Ine 31,191 40,061 459
Dec ... 815 78
The following table shows the receipts
thus far in February, as compared with
the same period in 1903:
Year. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
1904 . . 2.50:: 320 20.06 a 18,577 417
1903 .. 2,826 460 13.780 27,293 397
Inc... 6,289 20
Dec ... 323 140 8,716
Official receipts for the past seven days
are as follows:
Date. Cattle. Calves. Hogs. Sheep. Cars.
•Tan. 30 169 13 4.359 4.925 SO
Feb. 1 347 40 5.084 .2.976 93
Feb. 2 C 72 162 4,046 6.295 U9
Feb. 3 402 29 8,824 3,654 66
Feb. 4 361 ' 29 2.253 24 43
Feb. 5 38!) 49 3.530 5,6*2 82
Feb. 6 132 13 2.329 34
The various railroads entering the yards
reported receipts for the day. by loads, as
follows: C, M. & St. P., 3; C, St. P.,
-M. >t 0., 1; G. N., 32; Soo line, 5; N. P.,
28; C. R. I. & P., 1. Total, 70.
Hogs. . . . - .
The following table shows the weight,
cost and'price range o£ hogs 1 for the past
seven days:
Date. Ay. Wt. Ay Cost. Price Range.
Jan. 30...'. 200 $4.63 $4.45<54.80
"Feb. 1 201 4.46 [email protected]
Feb. 2 203 4.54 4.30 75
Feb. 3 201 4.64 [email protected]
Feb. 4 201 - 4.64 [email protected]'.90
Feb. 5....,206- - * 4;62-. - [email protected]
Feb. 6.....208 : 4.7! . ; ' [email protected]'.00
Prices generally 10c • higher. , . Receipts
light. Quality poor. Price range, $4.65®
4.95; bulk, $4.70(®i.85; common light and
common mixed hogs are quotable from
$4.65 to $4.70; good," light and desirable
mixed from $4.75 to 4.85. and good to
choice- medium and heavy hogs from $4.90
to $5.05. Representative sales: ■ •
Hogg— " • '. »
No. r ~ Wt. Price.|No. Wt. Price.
76 .... 232 $4.95 .... 242 $4.90
84 201,4.85114 185 4.80
89 191 4.756? ........212 4.70
S3 160 4.65 '
Pigs and Underweights— ~
12 146 $4.40|15 123 $4.25
18 .... 11l 4.1Q1
Stags and Boars — —
1 .........:; 440 $2.00
Cattle.
Receipts light; beef and butcher cat
tle in active demand, with prices gen
erally quoted strong; bulls firm; veal
calves steady; milch cows unchanged;
stockers and feeders quiet at last week's
closing prices. Representative sales:
Butcher Steers— „,,.-■ .
Ncx Wt.PiiceiNo. Wt. Price
7 1115 $4.25 2-.. 1280 $4.00
4 1295 4.00 .1125 3.75
3 1273 3.50 5 1058 3.40
1 960 3.00
Butcher Cows and Heifers— .
1 .:....:. 840+4.00^2 1270 $2.75
7 „..747 2.65 2 ........ 900 2.50
5 .6^5 -2".40 -_•■,„,... it
Cutters an d Canners —
5 580 $2.25 2 1015 $2.00
1 780 .1.75 3 903 1.50
Butcher Bulls—
1 777 1420"53706 .2 ....... 1611T52785
2 .. 1250 2-.60 1 1200 2.50
1 1160 2.40 2 970 2.25
Veal Calves — ■'■■■• :
1. 110 $5.00 1 130 $4.75
1 110 3.50 .
Stock and Feeding Steers — .
20 1150 $3.40 5 952 $3.15
2 .835 3.1512 ...857 3.00
2 560 2.75112 .... 785 2.60
12 .... 600 2.50 5 536 2.00
Stock Cows and Heifers— ~
2 . .7. .77.7.77." .THio $2 '35
Milch Cows and Springers— ;
1 cow and 1 calf $32.75
1 cow and 1 calf 26.00
1 cow and 1 calf 23.00
1 cow and 1 calf 18.00
- ,*~ ,; t Sheep.
Receipts liberal, but arrivals composed
almost' entirely -of Westerns, consigned
direct to local feeders; market on good
sheep and lambs, quotably steady at last
week's closing; common kinds slow;
yearling wethers and ewes sold at $4.90
and $3.40, respectively. Representative
sales: s' -
Killing Sheep and Lambs-
No. Kind. ,: *v .Vv-jfhi ..Weight. Price.
101 Western yearling wethers. 84 $4.90
229 Western-ewes. ........r... 110 - .40
A?nong the shipper^" on the market
-••!•( ■: J. Sims,-Billings, Mont.; M. T.
Wolverton,' Herried, 'S. D.; Farley &
Ruesink, Cogswell, N. D.; J. \V. Allen,
G. G. P. Grovener, Fairmont, N. D.; F.
Schneider, ■-. Norwood M. Kabe, Royalton;
M. C. Black, Castle Rock; A. P. John
son, Deer Creek; A. S. Francisco; Medina,
N. D.; F. Balch, Cleveland; Berg &
Hagan, Wyndmere^vN. D.; J. Long &
Co., Hinsdale, Mont.; G.-' A. Lindskog,
Henclricks;.' T. Kasmuswn. G. T. Hegt
veit, O. A. Swanson. : 'Wlllmar; F. M.
Haight, "Morris; G. Waltersdorf, W. Gaus
■man, ■ Alberta; J. Reardon, Beardsley;
Perrizo Bros., Clontarf; J. M. Hogan,
Benson. :.
VARIOUS LIVE STOCK MARKETS.
Cliicago— Cattle—Receipts, 22.000; choice
strong and 10c higher; good to prime
steers, $&#5.70; pppr to medium, [email protected]
4.90; stockers and 'feeders, $2.25©4.10;
cows, $1,&[email protected]<,25' heifers, [email protected]; can
ners, [email protected]'2:50;" bulls, |[email protected];
calves, [email protected],....:Hogs— Receipts today.
33,000; tomorrow," 30,000; mixed and
butchers, $4.:i)[email protected]; good to choice
heavy, $5.05'Q)5.27%;" rough heavy, $4.85
@5; fair to light, [email protected]; bulk of
sales, $'4'.90<g)5.10. Sheep—Receipts, 25.
--000; Fheep and lambs steady; good to
choico wethers.: [email protected]; fair to choice
mixed, [email protected]; western sheep, [email protected]
5.25; native lambs, " [email protected]; western
lambs, [email protected] ----- ■--'
• South Omaha. Neb.—Cattle—Receipts
market steady to stronger; beef
steers, $4.35(3'5; cows and heifers. $2.75
<Sf!3.SO; stockers and feeders, $"[email protected]
Hogs—Receipts, 5.000;. market 5c higher;
heavy,[email protected]; pigs, [email protected] Sheep-
Receipts, 3.000; . market active steady:
sheep, $2.50'c74.70; lambs. $4.50«i>5 75
«, Sioux City. lowa—Cattle—Receipts,
2.000; steady;, beeves. $3.50©4; cows, bulls
and mixed. [email protected]; stockers and feed
ers. [email protected]; caK-cs and yearlings $2 50
®3.50. Hogs—Receipts. 2,500: market 10c
hfpher. [email protected]; bulk, $4.7'[email protected] 85
T«n«ns s , City, B Mo.—Receipts
7.000, including .600 southerns; market
higher;- beef steers. I [email protected]; southern
steel's. $3.2:>raM.25; southern cows $2.25<®
3; native calves and heifers. $1.7503 50-
Ktockers.and feeders. $*2.2. r>'7ii4 10. Hogs—
Receipts. 7.000: market . hikrher; heavy
$4.90^5.10; oackcr?:; $4.80©5; pigs arid
lights. $4.50«4.T5. : Shoen—Receints 3 000
--m.iJ'kct strong; sheep,-$2.50<3>4.75- lambs'
[email protected] ■::■'• «:■.-.--•
"no you ne*<! heln? .Lots of chances
tn-get-it throußh "Tho: Olobe'g Paying
Look them over new.
THE ST. PAUL* GLOBE. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 9. 1904.
MEMBERB REFERENCES
Chicago Board of Trade. Nat'l Ger. Am. Bank, Bt. Paul.
M nneapolls Chamber of Commerce American National Bank. StTpaul
Milwaukee Chambor of Commerce. Security Bank, Minneapolis.
J. C. GERAGHTY & CO.
Grain, Provisions, Stocks and Bonds.
Long Distance 'Phone 400.
Endlcott Building t t t : t ST. PAUL, MINN.
FIRE AFFECTS STOCKS
SUT BALTIMORE CALAMITY DOES
NOT CAUSE PANIC.
Opening Is Weak, but Support Appears
and a Rally Follows —In Final Hour
Short Selling Goes Hand in Hand With
the Liquidation.
NEW YORK. Feb. B.—The stock mar
ket today had to face the two-fold effect
of the great fire in Baltimore and the
breaking off of diplomatic relations be
tween Russia and Japan, either one of
which was sufficient to have justified a
severe break in prices. It is true that the
rupture between Russia and Japan has
been expected and presumably discounted
to some extent, as is the wont of specu
lative markets with good information on
coming events. But that the event was
not adequately discounted was clearly
enough demonstrated by the demoralized
tone of state issues on the Paris bourse,
which is the point upon which the ef
fects of Russian troubles would narrowly
con verge.
But our own market faced this double
threat with great apparent composure at
the opening, the first decline failing to
carry the level of prices down to the
parity of the London level before our trad
ing began. Support was evidently put
Into the market and prices rallied, and a
(juiet tone that seemed one of confidence
was brought about. It is doubtful whether
this was effective in. convincing anybody
that the slight spilling out of stocks at
the opening measured the whole effect
upon the market of the Baltimore disas
ter. The harm already accomplished was
sufficient to mark the event as a great
national calamity, and there wa^ nothing
doing in the early part of the day to in
dicate the ultimate limits of the damage.
It was early perceived, however, that the
dimensions .at the disaster already ex
ceeded those of any previous fire in our
history with one possible exception, with
the record of the Chicago flre itself ap
parently in danger of being exceeded.
Market Does Well, Considering.
When it is bocne in mind that both the
Chicago fire and the Boston fire were the
occasion of stock exchange panics,■• the
action of the present stock market must
be regarded as good. The liquidation
which was an inevitable consequence of a
wiping out of property value approaching
the cost of our war with Spain caused de
clines during the day in the principal act
ive stocks of 1 to over 3 points. The
rally of the last hour demonstrated that
short selling to a considerable extent
went hand in hand with the liquidation
and was not-backed with sufficient confi
dence to leave contracts open over night.
. The sharp relapse in prices failed, how
ever, to attract any effective demand
for stocks, leaving the outlook still un
; certain. Baltimore & Ohio was naturally
i a special sufferer, owing. to local causes.
Pennsylvania was heavily sold - all day,
with expressions of dissatisfaction over its
heavy borrowing. Union Pacific was a
conspicuous sufferer. Some of the day's
selling, both of stocks and bonds, was at
tributed to the account of the insurance
companies, in preparation for the heavy
claims to be met. All other considerations
disappeared before the .two great factors
of the fire and the war. ' «"«-'j
-Bonds were weak; total sales, par value,
$3,130,000. United States bonds were un
changed on call.
Closing List.
lSales.Highj.L,ow|Close.
Atchison [slvuu| bt>y\ Ob^l t>f
1 uo ptd | 1600| S3 | BSvsi 88
B. & Ohio |6J3UUj SOVat <<78i i*%
Uo pfd | auui 91 I 91 | yo
Can. racinc ..-. j 7100|116%|114%|115%
C. of .New Jersey...! 30U|i56>2i165 1156%
Ches. & Onio .| 1600| 32 | 31% i il£
Chicago & Alton... | 200U| 38% | 3?%] 38^
do pfd j | | | 83
Chi. ut. Western...) 1300| 15*41 15 | 16
Cni. & North-W | 500|163 loj |162
C, m. & St. P 14350U1411/2 ji3ay 8 |i39%
ido ptd j ! i |i',t>
Chi. lerm. & T \ 200| 9v.,i 9%| 9^
; do pfd . ; .| HOo| 22 ; 19V>| 20%
!c,c, c. & st. 1..| I \.....\ 72
Col. Southern j 500| 16% | 16 j 15%
-do Ist pfd I 100! 53 ! 53 | 53
do 2d pid | | j | 23
Del. & Hudson 1 2300|161 |158%|159%
Del., L. & W......| 100|264%|2«4%|284
Den. & Rio G......J 400| 20^1 20 ' j 19%
do pfd I 800| 68=5i| 68 I 67
Erie 132©0| L'6%| 25%| 25%
do Ist pfd I 5200) 64141 63%| 63%
do 2d pfd ... . 28001 4414: 42 i 42
Hock. Valley j. . ...|..... j 74
do pfd .. 100J 82% | 72% ! 72 V>
Illinois Central .... 3100 127%|126% 127%
lowa Central 100 20 20 i IS%
do pfd 1 I 3g- 72
K. C. Southern ) | 18%
.do pfd . I 200 33 133 ! 34
L. & Nashville 6400 103% 10;J%|103
Manhattan L 8000 140 |'140%
Met. Securities 200 84 83 ■ 821/t
Met. Street Ry .... 4400|117 115 115%
Minn. & St. L 1 60
M.,St.P & S. S. M.. 1100 59% 58" 58
do pfd 200 120 |119 117
Mo. Pacific 23700 90% I 88% 88%
Mo., K. & Texas... I 900 16% 16 | 16
do pfd i 500 36% 36 I 35%
.M. StP^SS M.. -1200 59% 58 58
do pfd ...../.„.. j 400 120 ' 119 117
Northern Securities "800 89 88 I 89
N. R. R. of M. pfd. 100 37 37 36%
N. Y. Central 8900 117% 115 115%
Nor. & Western.... 5200 58% 56&J 56%
do pfd ..;.■ gs'
Ont. & Western j 6900 21% 20% 20%
Pennsyvania 5... 227300 115 112% 113%
Jr., L,., C. & bt. JLj gQ
Reading .'.....". 23400 42% ' 40% 41%
do Ist pfd 7gv,
do 2dpfd\... sgi|
Rock Island C 0.... 20200 2'% '1% 21
do pfd ........... 3200 61% 60' 60
St. L..& B.F. 2dpfd 800 45 43 43Vi
St. Louis Sw. 100 13% 13% 13
a do pfd ........... 1700 32% 31' 31%
Southern Pac 60900 46% 46%' 45%
Southern Ry ...... ! 7600 2'> V 20% -»o2
do pfd 6200; 81% 80 80«
Texas & Pacific... 3900 26 °3 ->3 ■-
T.. St. L. & P..;.. 200 23 23 23
t^rV:::::::::;.. 4?o^ It g*
Union Pacific ...... 92200 78% 75% 76%
w do Pd • 700 90% 90 90 -
WbasL •• 1500 19 18 ]S%
wdO PPt T ;••\V■ •• ■ ■ 11900 361/s 35% 35
W. & Lake Erie... 1200 16 14% 15
W is. Central 800 18% 18 18%
do pfd ........... 500. 44% 42% 41
Adams ...., ; _ 009
American ' "" * ' TqJJ
United States :'.' '.'. 105
Amal. Copper..... 62400 45% '43.% 435^
Am. Car & Foundry 1600 19 18% lg%
do pfd .. 1200 6S 67 67
Am. Cotton Oil 200 29% 29 'BU,
do pfd ........... .... - ■ ■ go n
American Ice 1300 "7% "'7% 71/
Am?L^eedbn-::::.,! 29%; 28% I 158
Am. Linseed Oil I tin
do pfd ....; .".*;-" ■■ * 107
Am. Locomotive ... 3200 20% 19% 197^.
do pfd r,OO 77% 7754 773?
Am. -Smelt. & Ref.j 2000 47% i 47 4714
do pfd .'6OO 91 90 90
Am. Sugar Refining 19200 124% ll^ai i ■><>«■
Anaconda Mm. Co.. 1000 66 | 64% 64
Brooklyn R. T...... 20900 40 38% 38%
Col. Fuel & 1r0n.... 700 31 30% 30%
Consolidated Gas... 15000 189 185 186
Corn Product 1600 19 18% lg
do pfd '. .'.-.". . <>o
Distillers' Securities 100 23 '>3 ' 2">v,
General Electric ... 1900 168 165- 165
International Paper 1500 12% 11% li:
tdo pfd:........... 600 65 64% 64
International Pump • 33
do pfd .' ..." 7114
National Lead ..... 300 14% 14%' >14%
North American ... 700 82 81 Bl>8 l>
Pacific Mail ........ 4001 28 27% 28
People's Gas ... 3100 99 97% 97%
xPressed Steel Car. ..... 28
do pfd : ...... V. ....'. 68
Pullman Pal. Car... 100 215 215 °10
Republic Steel .... 400 7 7 "7%
-,d.°.P fd -~J • • : 10° 43% 43% 43%
Rubber Goods ..... 300 19 ; ( 18% 18%
"do pfd ........... ! 1001 78 78 76
Term. Coal & Iron.. 2200)36 34%1 35^4
tt >B. i£o*fc or - *i 7ooj 7141 7[ 7 8
S.B.SBOTWEU&CO.
■ . ■-;....•.
GRAIN BTOCK3.
National German-Amtrlcan Bank Bldjj.
do pfd VSiffi ] 1100 76 | 75% ! 75%
U. S. Realty ... 1100 7% 7 1 1%
do pfd .11000 55%' 52% 53
U. S. Rubber i 1 ! 10%
do pfd 100 46 46 146
U. S. Steel ........ 9000 11 %| 10% 10%
do pfd j44400! 56%; 55 ] 55%
Westinghouse Elec. 90016Q 158% 157
Western Union ...: j 700; 87 j 86%j 86%
Total sales for the day, 97-',WO shares. .
Offered. "
xEx-dividend.
New York Bonds.
- . ... . .. ■ —
U.S.ref.2s, reg.lO4%|JL. & N. uni. 45.103%
' do coupon . ..104%'Man. con. g. 45.103%
do 3s, rcg...106 jTMex. Cen. 45.. 68'
do coupon ...106 | do Ist inc.... 14
do n. 4s, reg.lo7 M. & St. L. 45.. 91
do coupon ...107 |M X & T 4s 97%
do o. 4s, Teg.l32'4 do 2ds 78.
• do coupon ...132% N RR of Mc.Js. 74
At. gen. 45.... 99% N V C g. 3%5.. 97%
do adjt. 45... 88% NJC gen. 55....130%
At. C. L. 45... Nor.' Pac. 45... 102%
B. &O. 4s 101 |do 3s .. 71%
do 3%s 94- JN. & W. con. 4s 97%
Cen. of .Ga,.55.105%10..5. L. 45& p... 91
' fdo Ist inc.. 70 -..-, Perm. c. 3%5... 94%
-C...&.0. 4%5..103i41Read. gen.- 45... 96%
C. & A. 3%5... 75%rStL & IM c.55...H3
C B & Q n. 45.. 92 |StL & SF fg.4s. 83
CM & StP g.4slOß''iSt L Sw lsts.. 93V!
C & N-W c.7s.l29%|Sea"d A L 45... 65
C R I & P 45.. 68 ISO. Pacific 45... 88%
do col 5s 79*4'! So. Ry. r>s li>%
CCC & SL g.4s. 97%lTex. & P. 1.5t5..110%
Chi. Term. 45.. 78%1T.StL & w 45.. 70%
Con. T0b..45... 57%jUnion P. 4s 10°%
Col. & So. 45.. 86 2f do cony 45.... 95% i
fD & Rio G 4s. 80 |US Steel 2dos . 71%
fT) &R G 45.. 98 HVab. lsts .. 115??
Erie p. 1. 45.. 98 _l do deb 8..V. 60%
do gen 45... 84*/JtfW. & L E 45... 90%
FW. & DC lsts.lOt (Wis. Cen. 4s 89%
H. Val. 4%5...105; \C. F. L con ss. 7->%
Offered. jj" -;. "T: I |
New York Mining Stocks.
Adams Con ....so.l&tLittle Chief .. $0 07
Alice 16! Ontario 4 50
Breece ...-..:.. .10'Ophir ......... 3 65
Bruns. Con ... .OSiPhoenix 09
Com. Tunnel... .07|Potosi ." 17
>>n. Cal. & Va. 1.50] Savage ...... '40
Hor n Silver .... I.2o!3ierra Nevada... '.56
Iron Silver I.2siSmall Hopes ... .20
Lead. Con : 02-Standard .....'. 2.40
• New York Money.
NEW YORK, Feb. B.—Money on call
easy, 1%®2 per cent; closing bid. 1%- of
fered at 2; time loans, tinner; 60 and 90
days, [email protected]*4 per cent; 6 months. 4%@
4%; prime mercantile paper, 4%@5> / 4;
sterling exchange firfnef, with actual busi
ness in bankers' bills at $4.85.70(9)4.84.75
for demand, and at $4.83 for 60-day bills
posted rates, $4.83% and [email protected]%;
commercial bills. $4.82%. Bar" silver.
56%. Mexican dollars, 43c. Government
bonds steady; railroad bonds weak.
Bank Clearings.
St. Paul , $868,058
Minneapolis ~............... 2,293,519
HAY, GRAIN AND FEED, |
'* HC -.■■■;.- "l\::-'ir> !'■■ ■-.'-:>: . ':; I , t ■
■, '.-.,,.-:■■ ■■'■■ '"i ■■T.-y ,-,'. r:.-::i ■r ■; ?• .
Quotations Established In Open Trade.on
the St.. Paul Board.
ST. PAUL, Feb. The following
prices were established in today's trade:
Wheat— ' . :
No. 1 on track ...... .93 @ .93%
No. 2 northern 90 @ .90%
No. 3 on trac 86 (a) .87
No grade 70 <§> .82
Corn
No. 3 yellow .:. .41%@ .42
No. 2 on track 40 (a) .41
No. 3on track ........... .39 @ 40
Ear Corn— ..
No. 3 yellow 41 @ 42
No. 3 40 @ .41
Barley—
Malting grades r ;..... .45%® .46
Feed grades ;. .38 @ .16
Rye—
No. 2 on track 63 @ .63%
Flax— -
No. 1 on track 1.15 <cl. 1.15%
Rejected .;V:.... 1.12%@ 1.14
Oats— - -
No. 3 on track ..»,, 40%@ .41
No. 4. white 39ii<g) 40
No. 3 •••••••• ;/....;.. ,38%@ .39%
Feed and Cornmeal—
Coarse cornmeal., and
cracked corn ..:.', ". \ . 16.00
Ground feed. No. , 1. one
third oats, two-thirda
corn .:... '..;.;..:.... 17.25
Ground feed. No. 2, one
half corn, one-half oats. 18.25
Ground feed, No. 3, one
third corn, twQ-thlrda
oats ........ ;.'......., 19.25 •
Bran, in bulk ..,. 15.50
Bran, in sacks, 100: lbs... 16.25
Bran in sacks. 1b5.... 16 00
Standard middlings, in . •
bulk .....: V- 15.50
Standard middlings, 200
--lb sacks 16.00
Standard middlings, 100
--lbs sacks . 1.75
Middlings, flour in.bulk.. 17.50
Middlings, in sacks, 100
lbs , 18.50 :
Oil meal, ton , .. , 21.00
Hay—Receipts, 10 cars.
Choice prairie ..... ... 9. 00
No. l prairie 8.00 @ 8.50
No. 2 prairie 6.50 @ 7.00 "
No. 3 prairie ; 5.50 @ 6.50
No. 1 midland t 6.00 (at 6.75
No. 2 midland ........... 5.50 Cw 6.00
Choice timothy ~ 10.00
No. 1- timothy 9.00 @ 9.50
No. 2 timothy ...... .. 7.50 & 8.00
No. 3 timothy «5.00 @ 7.00
Clover-hay ........ .. 5.50 @ 7.00
Packing hay 4.50 @ 5.00
No grade 4.00 @ 5.00
Straw— ' . • :
Rye straw .» .....5.00 @ 5.25
Oat straw ......;. 4.00 n 4.75
Flour- - , .
Patents, first ......... 4.45 @ 4.65
Patents, second 4.05 (ds 4.20
CleaTS, first ......... 3.25 M 3.40
Clears, second, in sacks.. 2.30 @ 2.45 '
Red dog, per ton,-140-lb
sacks - 18.00
The following quotations are in cotton
sacks, 98 and 49 lbs: ....
Granulated cornmeal, . . ';'.
wmte ..'.-'. 2.40
Granulated cornmeal, yel
low ;.. 2.30
Pure family rye flour .... 2.50
Best XXX. rye flourr. : - 2.60
Standard white rye flour. 2.60
Swedish rye flour .'....... 2.70
Midway Hcrse Market.
Minnesota Transfer. St. Paul, Minn.
Barett & Zimmerman report a better
trade than heretofore this season. Market
was welL supplied- with all classes of
and a fair attendance of buyers was had.
Prices ruled firm. Volues:
Drafters, extra [email protected]
Drafters, choice 165(fi!l!)©
Drafters, common to. good 130(g165
Farm mares, extra 1451&1G5
Farm mares, choice ]25<&146
Farm mares, common to good-... lOOfg-120
Chicago Produce.
CHICAGO, Feb. B.—Butter—Steady;
creameries, [email protected]; dairies, 13^@20c.
Eggs—Firm; at nutrk. cases included, 27
@29c. Cheese —Steady; daisies, [email protected]%c
twins, 9i£#loc; Young Americas, 10®
10% c. Poultry—Live, easier; turkeys, 12c
chickens, ll%c; springs, [email protected]^4c.
Elgin Butter.
ELGIN, 111.. Feb. B.—Butter ruled firm
on the board of trade today at 24V£c lb.
an advance of l^c over prices of" last
week. The gales in the district were
428,000 lbs. According to the annual re
port of the secretary of the board just
issued the average price for the year was
23.04 c.
WHEAT RULES WEAK
LIQUIDATION TAKES PLACE IN
SPITE OF BULLISH NEWS
Brisk Buying at the Start Sends Prices
Up, but a Vast Amount of Wheat Is
Thrown on the Market, Which Closes
Under the Figures of Saturday.
CHICAGO, Feb. B.—Heavy liquidation
demoralized the grain markets today,
notwithstanding the severance of diplo
matic relations between Russia and
Japan. Corn and oats were especially
weak. May corn declining 3e and May
oats 3»4c from the high points. Wheat
recovered partially from the break, clos
ing at about Saturdays final figures, but
May corn showed a loss of l'/sc and oats
2^4#2%c, Provisions were firm, the May
products closing unchanged to 10c high-
With war in the far East virtually com
menced, ard all foreign grain markets re
sponding, there was a dash to buy here
at the opening by some hitherto stubborn
short sellers of wheat. The result tem
porarily was higher prices. May opened
to lc higher at 94ȣe to 95c. and July
was up %@%e at 85%(&85%c. In a very
short time, however, the short sellers who
had turned buyers had cause for regret.
Both May and July wheat was offered in
large quantities. It was claimed that a
line of several million bu held by a large
local trader was sold out. The-throwing
out of this wheat induced general liquida
tion, and the market became extremely
weak. May going down to 93% c, a drop
of l%c from the top. while July sold off
to 83%e. or 2%c from the higher point.
The May delivery, however, received good
support from the principal long interest,
and the price of that option soon regained
a cent of the early decline, while July
rallied in sympathy.
The market was helped by a dispatch
stating that all offerings of wheat from
Odessa had stopped. A late break in corn
and oats had a depressing influence on
wheat prices, but additional support from
th- interest credited with being the larg
est holder of wheat caused a fairly Bteady
tone at the close. May was unchanged at
94c. but July was down i. 4 e at 84% c.
Clearances of wheat and flout were equal
to 440.700 bu. Primary receipts were 760,
--500 bu. against 851.600 bu a year ago.
The amount on passage increased 3.472,
--§OO bu, while the visible supply decreased
560.000 bu. Minneapolis, Duluth and Chi
cago reported receipts of 503 cars, com
pared with 463 cars last week and 736 a
year ago.
Persistent Selling in Corn.
The feature in trading in corn was the
heavy and persistent selling by a prom
inent commission house. The impression
among traders was that the principal bull
leader was disposing of part of an enor
mous line through this source. Several
other large interests were also on the
selling side of the market, including rep
resentatives of a number of Eastern spec
ulators. Offerings continued to come out
during the entire session and extreme
weakness prevailed. Stop loss orders were
reached in the downward progress and
this helped to send prices still lower. The
opening was firm along with wheat, May
being unchanged to %c higher at 54% c
to 55c. but within the first half hour the
price had fallen to 52% c.
Shorts took advantage of the lower
prices and covered moderately, causing a
slight rally at various times, but on each
small advance more long corn would come
out, and the market would decline lower
than before. The bottom was reached at
52c. a drop of 3c from the opening high
point. Theclose was at 52% c. July clos
ed [email protected]%c lower at 50% c, after selling
between 50% c.and 52% c. Local receipts
were 421 cars, none of contract grade.
There was the same experience in oats
as in corn .trading, and almost equal
weakness. The opening was firm on war
news. May being s <; to %@%c higher at
44%@44%0 to 44% c. Heavy selling by
a prominent ■ commission house led local
traders to the belief that the.se offerings
were coming from the big lme of the lead
ing long, and this started small holders to
sell. There were not many oats wanted
and prices started downward. The low
point was reached at 41% c, or 3^o below
the high figure. There was some recovery
late in the day on covering, but the close
was 2' / [email protected]%c lower at.4l%c. Larger re
ceipts and better grading were bear fac
tors. Local receipts were 307 cars.
The provision market showed strength
in spite of the weakness in grains. There
was a good advance early on an active
demand for pork and lard, but later part I
of the gain was lost on profit-taking,
caused in the break In corn prices. An
advance of 10c in the price of hogs was
the bull factor in the start, as was the
war situation. The buying was by com
mission houses and foreigners. After
ranging between $13.60 and $13.90 May
pork closed 10c higher at $13.07%. May
lard closed unchanged at $7.52%, after
selling between $7.52% and $7.62%. Ribs,
were up 2%c at $6.82%, after ranging be
tween $6.80 and $6.80.
Estimated receipts for tomorrow are:
Wheat, 45 cars; corn, 420 cars; ats, 310
cars; hogs, 32,000 head.
Range of Quotations.
The leading futures ranged as follows:
| Open. | High, { Low. | Close.
Wheat— i i i
May $0.95 $0.95 150.93%i50.94
July 85% j .85%]' .83Vgj .84%
Sept 80% .80%! .78% .08> /8
Corn— I I
Feb 49
May 55 .55 .52 .52%
July 52% .52% .50% .50%
Oats—
Feb I 39%
May 44%! .44% .41% .41%
July 39% i .39% .37% .37%
Sept 33% .33% .33 .33V 8
Pork— I I
May 13.75 13.90 13.60 13.67%
Lard— I I
May 7.65 6.67% 7.52% 7.52%
July 7.70 7.72% 7.57% 7.60
Ribs — | I
May 6.85 i 6.90 I 6.77% 6.82%
July 7.00 I 7.02% 6.92% 6.97%
Cash quotations were as follows: Flour
was steady. Wheat — 3. [email protected]; No. 2
red, [email protected] Corn — 2. 89c; No. 2 yei
low. 49c. Oats—No. 2, 39%<&39%c; No. 3
white, 38%@44c. Rye—No. 2. 60c. Bar
ley—Good feeding, 38c; fair to choice
malting. [email protected] Flaxseed—No. 1. $1.10;
No. 1 Northwestern, $1.16%. Timothy
Seed—Prime. $3.15. Pork— per bbl.
$13.50©13.62%. Lard—Per 100 lbs, $7.35
@7.37%. Short Ribs—Sides (loose), $6.50
(g>6.75. Sides —Short clear (boxed), $6.75
@6.57%. -WhLsky—Basis of high wines.
$1.27. Clover—Contract grade, $10.75®
11.. Receipts— 31,100 bbls; wheat,
31.500 bu; corn. 240,800 bu; oats. 179,200
bu; rye, 13.500 bu; barley, 98,800 bu.
Shipments—Flour. 12,60%-bbls; wheat. 30.
--800 bu; corn, 155.9'J0 bu; oats, 92,200 bu;
rye. 1.000 bu; barley, -13,300 bu. On the
produce exchange today the butter mar
ket was firm; creameries, 15<§>24c; dairies,
13%@20c. Eggs—Steady; at mark, cases
included, [email protected] Cheese— 9%@
10% c.:

MINNEAPOLIS.
Wheat— Close Mon. Sat.
Minneapolis May 92% 9t>V.i
Minneapolis July 89% 90%
Chicago May ........... 94 92%
Chicago July 91% 91%
Duluth 92 94
Duluth July .84% 84%
St. Louis May 88% 92%
St. Louis July 90% 91%
New York May . 95%
New York July 82% 82%
Minneapolis—The old story of a specula
tive moving counter to general expecta
tion was repeated in wheat. With many
things in sight to cause an advance, prices
fell back. May wheat, in the. early part
I of the session, sold from the opening at
! 93% c to 92% c. There was a flood of wheat
upon the market. It came from commis
sion houses and from Individual pit trad
ers, from city,and country, from East and
West. It was the selling out of millions
of bushels of wheat by holders who fig
i ured that a big setback was in order. Re
: ceipts, 441 cars..
The decline continued until May reached
91% c. The close was firmer at 92%@
92% c. July closed at 91%@91%c, and
September at 80% c. Following was the
range of prices:
Close. Close.
Open. High. Low. Mon. Sat.
May ......93% 93% 91% 92% 92%
July ......92 92 90% 91% 91%
Sept ......80% 80% 79% 80% 80%
On Track—No. 1 hard, 93% c; No. 1
northern,-92%c; No. 2 northern, 89% c;
No. 3 wheat. <82%@86%c. No. 3 yellow
corn, 40% c; No. 3 corn. 40c; No. 4 corn.
O'Connor & Van Bergen
yr-. BROKERS
Stocks, Bonds, Grain, Provisions
202-203 Cermanla Ufa Euildlna, Fourth and Minnesota Streets, 81. Paul. Minn
..;., Mombors Chicago Board of Trads. Dlreof Private Wlroa.
[email protected]*4e. No. 3 white oats, 38c: No. 3
Gats. 36©37 c. No. 2 rye, 62c. Barley. 3G
@52c. Flax-seed— flax. 51.13 V Feb
ruary. $1.125*; Ma*"- 51-15V4;' to' arrive,
*1.lo 3 8 . No. 1 northern wheat to arrive,
92% c; No. 2 northern to arrive, 89 % c.
Flour—Millers said there was no im
portant change in the general situation.
Orders are coming in more freely and the
total volume of business entered is some
what larger than last week, but it is still
very hard to do any business for export.
Shipments. 51,674 bbls. First patents.
$4.754.85;. second patents, $4.65<f«M.75;
first clears, [email protected]; second clears,
$2.50® 2.60.
Minneapolis Curb.
Curb on May wheat, sellers 9 •*>..'»
Puts on May wheat, bid........ 'ml
Calls on May wheat, bid 94
State Grain Inspection.
_ „ Northern. No
Railroads. N0.1hd.N0.1.N0.2.N0.3.Rej.Gd.
£*, Nor 34 23 11 6 2
Milwaukee 5 29 •>,! 4
M. & St. 1 7 11 6 .
Soo line .. 7 14 6 4 'i
Omaha ........ .. - ■ 7 2 l
Totals 41 49 64 37 8
Other grains—Winter wheat. 35 cars;
macaroni wheat, 1; No. 3 corn. 4- No 4
corn. 2; no grade corn. 1; No. 3 oats i-V
No. 4 northern oat.s. 28; no grade oats 5:
Ao 2 rye. 2; No. 3 rye, 11; No. 4 barley,
5; No. o barley, 82; no grade hurley i- No
1 flax, 13, rejected rlax, 17; no grade
flax. 1.
Cars Inspected Out- -No. 1 northern 29"
No. 2 northern. 24; No 3 wheat ■;: ' re
jected wheat, 39; no grade wheat' :: win
ter wheat. 15; No. 4 corn. 5; no grade
corn, 2; No. 8 oats. 35; No. l them
oats. 38; no grade oats :; ; No ;; rye r
1,."' 4. oarl f-v. 4; No. 5 bailey. 18; No. 1
DULUTH.
DUIAJTH, Minn.. Feb. s.— The wheat
opening was very strong, i^c up from
Saturday, but everybody seemed to have
it for sale and the break was .sharp and
immediate. May started it SSftc. and de
clined in 91% c. It recovered to 92% c, but
whs weak and closed at 98c. Trading was
extremely active all day. Flax declined to
$1.16^. with a pretty dull and feature
less market. Receipts today: Wheat 35
ears; rlax. 27; barley. i;i\ oats 22; rye I;
corn, l. Shipments—Wheat, J. 814 bu; oats,
8 649. Car? on track, 80. Changes in
Stocks—Wheat in store, 2,040.852, increase
138.46,;, fins. 5.881.75&, Increase 86,049;
oato, 1,481,613. increase 128.888; barley
138.156, Increase 50,441; rye, 113,385, in
crease 7.126; corn, 11/J24. no change.
( lose— Wheat Cash No. 1 hard 93% c;
No. 1 northern. »2c; No. 2 northern, 89& c;
May. 92c; July. J»O%c; September. s>\'~..,-
Flax—Cash. |1.13%; May. $1.165; July
»1.17,2. Oats, ;!S- S e. K ye, 58c.
OTHER GRAIN MARKETS.
Milwaukee, Wis.— Flour steady. Wheat
— Steady; No. 1 northern, 91%@92c; No
2 northern, 8«@9«e; May, 94c bid ; puts,
92% c bid; calls. 96c asked. Rye—Steady;
No. 1, G6c. Bailey—Dull; No." 2 [email protected];
sample. 38®58>£c. Oats—[email protected] 2c lower;
standard. 42^(g>43c. Com -lc lower; No
3. [email protected]; May. 52%@53c asked; puts
S>l%<-; calls. 54',sc asked.
St. Louts, Mo.—Wheat- Higher, unset
tled; No. 2 red. cash, elevator 98% c; No 2
hard. 85®87c; May, 88%@88%c. Corn-
Lower; No. 2 cash, 15c; .May, 49%@49&c;
July, 491^,11 t'.ii^e. oats Lower; No. 2
'■ash, 43c; May, 41% c; No. 2 white 44>;-' 1
Kansas City, Mo. —Wheat—May, 77%@
77% c: July. 74'>.e : cash No. 2 hard
82c; No. :;. [email protected]^ic; No. 4. 7<»<fi 750- re
jected, [email protected]; No. 2 red, 74c; No. 3, 91«g
92c. Com May, 44%@44%c; July, lJ',e;
cash No. 2 mixed, [email protected] 1 ; No. 2 white
42^c; No. 3, 42c. Oats—No. 2 white, 41®
4-' ■; No. 2 mixed, ;;:te.
PRODUCE AND FRUIT.
Ruling Price at Yesterday's Meeting of
the St. Paul Commission Men.
ST. PAUL, Feb. B.—The following
open market at today's meeting of the
Produce Exchange established the fol
lowing prices:
Butter— Creameries—
Extra 23 © .23%
Firsts 1!) O .20
Renovated 16 (yT .16%
- Dailies— -.-•--
Extra . .17
Firsts 12 <fi) .13
Rolls and prints ll 1/^"' .12
Packing stock 10 <<y .12
Cheese
Twins 10 © .12
Young Americas 11 (a) \\u.
Brick, No. 1 ~ .13
Brick, No. 2 .10
Eggs—
Strictly fresh, loss off.
cases included .26
-Dressed Meats —
Veal, fancy .07 © .07^
Veal, common to good 05 <cb .06%
Mutton 04 '§ .05%
Spring lambs (round
dressed) -07%
Country-dressed hogs 05%© .06
Rabbits, per dozen 50 "@ 2.50
Dressed Poultry-
Hens ....;;............... .10 i7i> .12
Springs 11 fl .12
Cocks 06 <O> .07
Turkeys 13 @ .15
Geese ..." 10 © .11
Ducks 12 © .12%
Live pigeons, per doz 75 © 1.50
Fish—
Herring .03 @ .04
Pickerel .05%
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_V
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all other earthly attainments. And yet *&o' Bs:^3T*TniMl*3^- jfejT
there are thousands of men who, if their g^^Ba^ So?
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poor specimens of true, robust, compe- lM^ *U^ac^lw _y»X
Such miserable mortals need not con- f?S® wifSS \s? C^ll t JSik
, tinue on the downward road that leads wQ '^ p. j*)BB f?%
either to a sea of physical wrecks, the \\ Vs3 JUi wL
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a wnrfte to %\ COU^^C I LIU tLDtnU institute «
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can , be:., cured! bjr. home Hours—B a. m. to 8 p. m. Sundays—S a. _2_™
• treatment. *" : m. to 1 d. m. :*;-■. O«
•..'.-'; «:-•»"• I*-.v# ■ ■"-■ i -.•-•■-■ ■■-■■■ ■ •'..-:■' _!#•'
prigr commission
V/V/ L_ CO. Incorporated.
M3ftu*s" a $600,000.00
BROKERS IN
GRAIN, PROVISIONS
STOCKS AND BONDS
Larg«st Private Wire System in Am»ri;a.
150 Branch Offices in princi
. pal Northern cities from
New York to Seattle, giv
ing sei vice unexcelled.
Responsible and Conserva
tive.
lis National and State
Hanks are our depositor
ies and references,
We charge no interest for carrying
long stocks.
Gsiwral Otficet: - N. Y. LIFE fI.DG.
MINNEAPOLir, MINN.
Branches:
X. V. Life. Arcade. Minneapolis
212 Third St. So.. Minneapolis.
No. 6 Endlcott Bldg. St. Paul
H. Holbert & Sons,
BANKERS AND
BROKERS.
341 Robert St. St. Paul
Crappies og © .OS
Pike v .07
Frog legs, per dozen 06 © .10
The following prices are those at which
the commodities mentioned are selling In
the rotaii trade. In large lota these pricea
may be shaded:
Beans—
Navy, per bu 2.10 © 2.35
Brown, per bu ....,1.75 at 2.25
Peas—
V- llow peas 1.00 © I.SS
Green peas 1.50 <g) 1.75
Cabbage
Home grown, per 1b 03%© .04
Potatoes— "^
Home grown, car lots 75 @ .78
Sweet Potatoes-
Virginia, per bbl 3.25 © 3.50
Illinois, per bbl 4.25 © 4.50
Vegetables—
Beans, wax, hamper 4.50
ets, per bu .60
Cabbage, per crate 1.00 <<J 1.35
Carrots, per hu .75
Cauliflower, dozen 2.00 © 2.50
Cucumbers, hothouse, per
dozen ..^ 1.25
Eggplant, dozen 1.50 @ 2.00
Mint, dozen .30
Lettuce, home grown .40
Lettuce, Southern, per box .B0
Spallets, doz. bunches.... .75
Onions, homo grown. bu., .75
Onions. Spanish, crate.... 1.75
Peppers, green, basket.... 1.00
Parsley,- home grown 40 © .f.ij
Radishes, hotbed, doa 50 a .CO
Celery, Minn., dozen 50 @ .GO
Celery, Cal., per crate 4.50
Celery. Cal., per dozen.... 1.00
Spinach, bu 1.25 © 1.50
Turnips, new, bu .40
California tomatoes, 4
basket crate 2.75 @ 00
Oyster plant, large
bunchen, dozen .60 © .75
Kings.le bbT .. 3.25 © 3.50
Kings. 1)1)1 3.25 (ft 3.5()
Russets 3.75 fai 4.00
Northern Spies 4.50 <8> 5.00
Baldwins 4.00 (a 4.25
Greenl-igs 3.75 <ij! 4.00
Gra"bes—
Malagas 5.00 @ 6.00
Pears—
Winter Nellis 2.50 © 2.75
Oranges—
Cal. Washington navels .. 2.75 fj) 3.00
Fancy seedlings 2.:
Grape Fruit—
Florida .. 7.00 ,© 8.00
Lemons—
Messina 3.50 © 3.75
California, fancy, as to
size 4.00 ©4.25
California, choice 3.75 <ig 4.00
Bananas —■
Jumbo 2.75 ©3.00
Large 2.75 «4 3.00
Medium , 2.25 © 2.50
Berries—
Cranberries, bbl 7.50 © 9.00
Cider—
Boiled cider, 5-gallon keg. 2.50 © 2.75
Fruit cider, per half bhl... 3.50 @ 4.00
Hard eider, per half bbl... 4.00
Hard elder, per bbl 7.50
Dates-
Package dates, per case... 2.00
Saire dates, per lb .04%
Figs—
' California figs, 10-lb boxes. .80 © .90
Imported figs, per lb .15
Nuts—
, Almonds, per lb 15 © .17
Brazils, medium, per 11)... .12
Pecans, polished, per lb. .11 © .13
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