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THE WEATHER
For St. Paul and Vicinity—Fair and
warmer.
For Minnesota —Fair and warmer
today; showers and cooler Sunday
with south winds.
VOL. XXVII.—NO. 184
CLEVELAND MOVEMENT AT
ST. LOUIS LOOMS LARGE
Alleged Design of Friends of Ex-President and Gorman
to Effect the Nomination of One of These—Parker's
Supporters Will Try to Force the Nomination of Their
Candidate on the First or Second Ballot
ESTIMATE OF THE SITUA
TION
Delegates elected 994
Necessary to a choice 663
Instructed for Parker 270
Instructed for Hearst 146
Instructed for favorites 146
Total instructed .562
Total uninstructed 432
Preferences for Parker 195
Preferences for Hearst 54
Total for Parker . 465
Total for Hearst 200
Doubtful 183
ST. LOUIS, Mo., July I.—Two dis
tinct lines of operation developed today
in the preliminary skirmishing of the
Democratic national convention. One
is an attempt to rush the nomination
of Judge Parker on the first or second
ballot, and the other is to scatter the
vote and prevent an early nomination
■with a -view of naming Cleveland or
Gorman.
The friends of Gorman and Cleveland
are working to hold the convention for
several ballots in the hope that their
candidate would be named. The Gor
men men are not parties to the Cleve
land movement, nor are the Cleveland
advocates combining with Gorman's
friends. There is no alliance, but it is
to the interests of both that the Par
ker strength be disintegrated as soon
as possible.
Cleveland Men Observant
There are a few men here—men of
the old Cleveland guard—who are
watching every point and who are in
close communication with Cleveland's
supporters, and they have been feeling
the pulse of men as they arrive. They
are using the race issue on the South
ern men and with all delegates they
use the argument that Cleveland is
the only man that the Democrats can
t-U'i-t. With some effect they are point-
WOMANACCUSESBOY
Mrs. Wiener Says Her Husband
Was Killed by Kardash
Special to The Globe
LITTLE FALLS, Minn., July I.—
Mrs. Kate Wiener, confined in jail on
suspicion of murdering her husband,
today told the sheriff that John Kar
dash, aged seventeen years, was the
perpetrator of the crime, his intention
- being to marry the young widow. Mrs.
Wiener says the deed was the result
of collusion between herself and Kar
dash. Kardash was taken into cus
tody. .
There is considerable doubt as to
his guilt, it being the opinion of some
that the woman has sought to fasten
the crime upon Kardash in order to
shield somebody else.
AUTHOR OF "DIXIE"
WAS A PRAYING MAN
So Says Officiating Clergyman at the
Funeral of Dan Emmet
MOUNT VERNON, Ohio, July I.—
The body of Daniel Decatur Emmet,
the author of the song, "Dixie," who
died June 28, was laid to rest in Mound
View cemetery this afternofen. The
funeral was in charge of 8.-P. O. Elks
Lodge No. 140. Al G. Fields, marshal.
A large number of persons called at
Emmet's late home during the day.
The religious service was that of
the Episcopal church, conducted by
Rev. W. E. Hull, whose remarks about
the dead man were principally con
cerning his authoriship of the song
"Dixie." Emme;s home life, Mr. Hull
said, was an edifying one. He never
retired without prayer nor .<?at down
to a meal, no matter how scanty, with
out giving thanks to God. The casket
was lowered into the grave while the
Mount Vernon City band played softly
the music that Emmet had written and
which made him famous.
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— — —— ' ■ : ; ■
THE ONLY DEMOCRATIC DAILY NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCULATION IN THE NORTHWEST \ cqq
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE
ing out to the Southern delegates that
they need no better excuse for sup
porting Cleveland than that they did so
for the purpose of preventing negro
domination by the Republicans.
. The man who is credited with being
the head "and front and manager of the
Cleveland movement, Thomas F. Ryan,
will arrive tomorrow; Ryan is a dele
gate from Virginia and has been iden
tified with the Atlantic Coast Line road.
He has also been associated with
Charles F. Murphy, leader of Tammany
Hall. Ryan is credited with having
some Southern state delegation up his
sleeve ready to throw to Cleveland.
How Gorman Stands
Gorman's position Is stated to be
that he will not enter into any com
bination to prevent the nomination of
Parker unless it means his own selec
tion. He will not be lised to pull out
chestnuts for Cleveland. Around Gor
man are gathered the Maryland, West
Virginia and District of Columbia dele
gations, and some from other delega
tions, with a bare possibility of secur
ing New Jersey and Pennsylvania. But
like Gorman, former Senator Smith, of
New Jersey, and James A. Guffey, of
Pennsylvania, want to see success- 1- in
in sight before the jump.
There is a story that the recent con
ferences between Gorman, Smith, Guffey
and McLean had for their main object
a proposition to control the party or
ganization; that in the selection of a
national committee chairman some one
should "be chosen who would name
men for the campaign committee un
der the control of these men.
To Head Off Hill
This control is desired to prevent it
falling into the hands of David B. Hill
and also so that the machinery of the
party organization should not be used
for Parker in 1908 if he should be nom
inated and make a good showing this
year. No one appears authorized to
speak with authority for. any man who
participated in the conferences, but
whatever occurred the friends of Gor
man here are still talking about the
Continued on Tenth Page
SMEAD HAS TO WALK
Belfew Is Appointed Agent of
the Flatheads
Globe Special Washington Service
1417 G Street
WASHINGTON, D. C, July I.—The
president today appointed Samuel Bel
lew, of Missoula, agent of the Flathead
Indians in Montana, in place of Wil
liam H. Smead. removed. Charges
were recently made against Smead In
connection with the issuance of per
mits to Indians for grazing cattle,
which were investigated by Inspectors
Nesler and Special Agent McNichols.
Their report sustained "the charge?,
and Smead's removal followed.
—Walter E. Clark.
THE NEWS INDEXED
w ■ . .'.. O
-■: -: Cv page I- :: :
Robert C. Dunn' Named by Republican
■.-•■■ Convention 1-*-■;''.'***,'*-*■■. ? ■''"■'
Cleveland Talk in St. : Louis
Smith, Desperado, Enters lowa ■ ' - V
Vladivostok Squadron Tripled
PAGE II
Fourth of July Fund Assured
Lund University Students Give Concert
Supreme Court Decisions' -.
' ; . ■_".•". - ::■'■■. PAGE III "'■" - *
News of the Northwest -^ - lIPII
News of the Railroads ; "i-1;
PAGE IV
Editorial .: Comment : :
Census Bulletin on Negroes -r; Vi;:
PAGE V
In the Sporting World V
PAGE VI
Story of State Convention . :
■"■-■■''-"T.-' PAGE VIII '■ ■•"■■-'■; ■- • ■
Of Interest to Women - -
PAGE IX
.Financial and Commercial
PAGE X
Launch- Explosion on Minnetonka Fa
tal to One .- ■ '
SATURDAY MORNING. JULY 2. 1904—TEN PAGES
THE TICKET AND THE MEN WHO WON OUT
Governor —
ROBERT C. DUNN
(Princeton)
Lieut Governor —
RAY W. JONES
(Minneapolis)
Secretary of State —
PETER E. HANSON
(Litchfield)
State Treasurer —
. JULIUS H. BLOCK
- (St. Peter)
Attorney General—
EDWARD T. YOUNG
(Appleton)
Justices of the
Supreme Court —
CHAS. B. ELLIOTT
(Minneapolis)
CHARLES L. LEWIS
(Duluth)
C. S. BROWN
(Morris)
E. A. JAGGARD
(St. Paul)
NEW CLUE TO SMITH
IS DISCOVERED
Sheriff Harris' Hunted IMur
derer Is Said to Have
Entered lowa
Special to The Globa.
PRAIRIE DU CHIEN, Wia., July 1.
—John Smith desperado, who is want*
ed for the murder of a policeman at
Havre, Mont., and of Sheriff Harris,
of St. Croix county, and whom state
militia and posses have been trying to
hunt down, was identified by a.news
paper picture this afternoon as having
applied for sufficient to buy a
few meals at newspaper offices of the
Crawford County Press and Pearl City
Record Wednesday afternoon.
He was noticed-particularly on ac
count of nervousness. He wore a stiff
black hat, t gray coat, dark trouser3
and badly worn "patent leather shoes
and walked over the Milwaukee pon
toon bridge to the lowa side early in
the evening.
It is supposed that he came down
from Trempealeau on a freight train
Wednesday morning and walked down
the main business street to the news
paper offices. Officers here had no de
scription of the criminal.
SAVES TWO WOMEN
BUT BREAKS HIS LEGS
Railroad Vice. President Is Among
Those Badly Injured in a Wreck
BATTLE CREEK, Mich., July I.—ln
a rear end collision between a local
and a limited car of the Jackson &
Battle Creek Traction company today
near Marshall, three men were seri
ously injured and a score of persons
badly shaken and bruised.
A. ~L. Spitzer, of Toledo, vice presi
dent of the road, was sitting in the
front observation compartment of the
limited car with two women, when he
saw that a collision was inevitable. He
managed to hurry the women into the
rear part of the car, but caught the
full force of the crash himself. Mr.
Spitzer's legs were broken and he is
injured internally. Motorman G. L
KeHy had his legs broken and is in
jured internally; E. E. Wilson, a clerk
at the Battle Creek sanitarium, had a
leg broken.
Both cars were east-bound, the lim
ited car running sixty miles an hour.
The local had disabled one motor after
leaving Battle Creek and on the Bear
Creek curve broke down entirely. A
flagman was sent back to warn the
limited which was following five min
utes behind, but the second car was
unable to stop in time to avoid the
collision.-
r» *"• i-k _ _ . * «-» . 1
R. C. Dunn, af Princeton
HAYS HAS A CHANGE
Minnesotan May Be Assistant
Secretary of Agriculture
Globe Special Washington Service
1417 G Street
WASHINGTON, D. C, July I.—lt
is expected that M. Hays, in charge
of the Minnesota experiment station,
will be a candidate for appointment as
assistant secretary of agriculture,
made vacant by the d^eath of Mr. Brig
ham at his home in Ohio yesterday.
There was. some talk of BFigham's
resigning two or three -years ago, and
Hays then let it be known to some of
his friends that he was seeking the ap
pointment. Secretary "Wilson was will
ing to let Brigham out, but the friends
of the late President McKinley rallied
to his support and he remained- Hays,
secured a lot of indorsements for the
job at that lime- «. . will probably use
them now.
Secretary Wilson would probably
like to have Hays"as assistant, as he-
has offered him other good berths in
the department, but they have been de
clined with thanks.
—Walter E. Clark.
FRIENDS OF PARKER
UNFOLD SOME PLANS
UTICA. N. V.. July I.— Former Sen
ator David B. Hill, farmer Lieut. Gov.
William F. Sheehan, Jacob A. Cantor,
Eliot Danforth and other adherents of
Chief Judge A. 8.. Parker, while en route
to the Democratic national convention, are
perfecting plans for a complete destruc
tion of Tammany's opposition to their
candidate. Senator Hilt professed to be
lieve tonight that->3uclge Parker would be
nominated on the second ballot, if not on
the first, and that the nomination would
be effected on<Trjday.
Mr. Sheehan carries in his pocket four
proxies of national eonwnitteemen who
cannot be present»at the meeting sched
uled early in the week, and that he ex
pects to use thent in perfecting the tem
porary organization in favor of Judge
Parker. This wiltybe a great advantage
gained, for the. JBating temporarily of
delegates from .e<ftitesting states favor
able to Judge['{^ggjjjLgr will give them the
naming of riieiribecS? of ifoe committee on
credentials who w-fll' ma|te the permanent
vote controlling tb&^elesation. The death
of the national. cor/yrii>te«man from Ne
vada, it was n&teW to«(ay, also removes
a vote, against Judge- Parker's friends on
temporary organization.-
There is a general fefeling on the train
that the Tammany' opposition cannot
amount to muefr af St. Louis, Mr. Can
tor voiced sentinreiits which the rest of
the party approved by nod when he said:
"The fact of the fnatter is that the rank
and file of Tammany in for Parker, and.
Leader Murphy knows ft. In fact, a ma
jority of the leaders are for him."
Asked how the igans of Tammany to
oppose Parker woulji be met, Mr. Cantor
said:
"We shall accuse rtliem at once of bad
faith and shall prove tftat bad faith to the
various delegations. i n the first place,
they wijf be asked how -they will vote
and they will tell ftiat they have to vote
under the unite ruJe'.Cor Parker. We shall
point out- that ul their own resolutions
offered at the sreate* convention they in
dorsed Parker as fine presidential tomber,
but asked not tO'be instructed. And as we
name all of the aaempejs of the various
committees "we fepl: that we have very
much the upper hantL'•
Mrs.- Hall, daughter ©f Judge Parker,
is on the train_.goii£| toijthe convention in
hope of seeing herv|ath4r nominated.
Railroad Commissioners —
IRA D. MILLS
(Moorhead)
W. E. YOUNG
(Mankato)
Presides tial Elec tors —
THOMAS LOVVRY
(Hennepin)
A. Wj^WRIGHT
(Olmsted)
THOMAS SIMPSON
(Winona)
" BASIL SMOUT
(Faribanlt)
B. B. SHEFFIELD
(Rice)
JOHN G. NELSON
(Washington)
E. W. BACKUS
(Hennepin)
G. W. PETERSON
(Todd)
FRANK CLIFF
(Big Stone)
J. H. HEARDING
(St. Louis)
PETER E. HOLEN
(Marshall)
JAPANESE TRAP
VLADIVOSTOK FLEET
There Is Belief at Tokyo, and
Japs Make Important
Land Capture
TOKYO, July 2.—Vice Admiral
Kamimura evidently trapped and at
tacked the Russian Vladivostok squad
ron off the islands of Tsu, in the south
ern entrance to the Sea of Japan, las.t
night. The result of the encounter is
unknown.
8:30 a. m. —The Vladivostok squad
ron was reported in the Tsushima
straits last night.
Capture Is Significant
Special Cable to The Globe
TOKYO, July I.—Bulletins received
tonight from Gen. Yamaguchi, in con
trol of army land lines, indicate that
Genr Kuropatkin will have to select
his battleground without delay. Ya
maguchi reports that several battalions
cf the Second brigade occupied Ponn
sihu after an engagement of two hours.
This is the most significant news of
the war in two weeks, from the view
point ofthe army board here, and while
no official of the government will dis
cuss the importance of this bulletin,
the weight of it can be recognized
from the fact that it shows at least one
brigade of Gen. Kuroki's army to be
midway between Mukden and Liau
yang. The point seized by the Jap
anese soldiers is in the middle pass
of the Shing mountains, fifteen miles
north of the Motien range, and a Jap
anese brigade can with equal celerity
march southweast on Liau-yang or
northwest on Mukden.
As to Chess Board
LIAO YANG, July I.—Gen. Kuropatkin
and Gen. Kuroki are moving their troops
like men on a chess board. The Jap
anese are now twenty miles from Liao
Yang. The rains are Impeding their
movements. Detachments totaling 1,200
men have been detailed from Gen. Ren
nenkampff's Cossacks to scout in the de
files and hills, harassing the Japanese
and not allowing them any rest day or
night. The Japanese artillery is said here
to be commanded by an American. His
tail form is frequently seen with the bat
terie<~
Kuroki's army is extremely active east
of the Russian position and the Russians
are correspondingly active. The Russian
center is being rapidly pushed north
ward to a point where Kuropatkin es
tablished his base after the battle of
Vafangow. So far as the Russians know
Kuroki is steadily pushing onward
through all the mountain passes, even to
ward Mukden. Preparations at all points
are now practically complete. The dem
onstrations made during the last few
days against the Russian left flank threat
en to completely change the position of
the two armies.
Rain May Check Operations
ST. PETERSBURG, July I.—lt is be
lieved here that the commencement of
the rainy season will materially affect
the- whole military situation. The au
thorities consider that it greatly lessens
the probability of an immediate decisive
engagement between Gen. Kuropatkin and
Gen. Kuroki, and it is thought that it
will close the campaign in the upper part
of the Liaotung peninsula until good
weather sets in. The Japanese will prob
ably be forced to hold the positions
where the rain finds them as best they
can.
PRICE TWO CENTS ?Pv?SKt«
TEST VOTE STARTS
DUNN LANDSLIDE
COLLINS MAN MOVES TO
MAKE IT UNANIMOUS
Battle Is Lost to St. Cloud Candidate
When the Country Vote Unseats the
Collins Delegation From Hennepin
—Dona hower and Douglas Go Down
Before the Combine and Justice
Lovely Is Defeated
The beginning of the end of the most
bitter political struggle ever waged in
Minnesota was witnessed in the Met
ropolitan opera house last night short
ly before 7 o'clock, when the Repub
lican state convention,' after two days'
session, voted to adopt the minority
report of the committee on credentials,
which provided for unseating the Collins
delegates from Hennepin and other
counties.
The announcement of the result of
the vote —622^ votes for adoption and
450 1,6 against adoption—was practically
the announcement of the nomination of
Robert C. Dunn for governor, as the
vote had been strictly along guberna
torial lines, and it served as the signal
for an outburst of pent-up enthusiasm
such as has never before been wit
nessed in ar state convention, in Minne
sota.
For a quarter of an hour there was
the wildest confusion from the upper
most part of the gallery, down through
the balcony, into the body of the house,
and back onto the stage, where many
of the delegates were seated. The in
stant the result was made Known the
hundreds of supporters of the former
state auditor who were in the house
were on their feet, cheering and yell
ing, waving flags and throwing hats in
the air. The .noise was almost deafen
ing, but it could not be stopped. No
attempt was made to stop it.
It was not a scene of disorder, but
one of enthusiastic approval. And
right in the center of the demonstra
tion were seated the 113 delegates from
Hennepin county,. not one of whom
moved from his seat. The picture of
defeat was in their faces.
It was almost five hours later when
Mr. Dunn was placed in nomination as
a candidate for governor, but at that
time there was less interest, although
almost as much of a demonstration.
The result was a foregone conclusion,
and not another name was placed be
fore the convention.
James A. Martin, manager of the
Collins campaign, dispelled any ques
tion there, might be \n the minds of the
delegates as to whether the fight would
be carried farther when he arose from
his seat in the Steams county dele-
CENSURES PREMIER
Budget Committee Takes Ac
tion Against Combes
PARIS, July I.—The budget commit
tee of the chamber of deputies voted
today for the suppression of the ap
propriation for the French embassy at
the Vatican and also passed a resolu
tion, which will be incorporated in the
.committee's report to the chamber,
censuring Premier Combes for his re
fusal to express the views of the gov
ernment on the subject.
NANTES, France, July I.—Extensive
establishments of the Premonstrant
and Capucine orders were closed today
after violent resistance. The Premon
strant monks barricaded their door 3
and windows. A battalion of infantry
and a detachment of dragoons assisted
the police. Firemen finally deluged
the monastery with water, forcing back
the monks from the barricades. The
occupants were taken out with ladders.
Similar expedients were used to expel
the Capucine monks.
READ THE GLOBE
THE ONLY LIVE NEWSPAP£*
IN ST. PAUL
i
gation and moved that the nomination
of Mr. Dunn be made unanimous.
The fight was over and the Prince
ton man was an easy winner. The
campaign which resulted in the nomi
nation by acclamation of Robert C..
Dunn, of Princeton, as the Republican
candidate for governor of Minnesota,
was the most bitter ever waged in the
Northwest.
For weeks past both the Collins and
Dunn forces have been claiming a vic
tory, the managers of each candidate
claiming enough votes to nominate
their man on the first ballot. The
fight was carried into every county in
the state, where it was fought out in* j
the primaries and again in the county,
conventions.
So bitter and determined was the
fight that eleven counties came into the
convention with contesting delegations,
among them being Hennepin, with itg
113 votes.
For a week past the managers of the
two factions have worked day and.
night, and no trick known to practical
politicians was left unturned, if there
was a chance to gain a point, no matter
how small the gain might be.
Bolts were threatened by both sidas,
and while, the Collins factions after de
feat had been administered, joined in
making the nomination c£ Mr. Du7~""*'
unanimous, there is still a feeling be
tween the two factious that nothing
will heal, and the Republican party
in Minnesota is in a worse condition
than it has been for years.
The Dunn forces are justly proud of
their victory, although they have
claimed all along that victory was
theirs, and have been willing to make
known their strength at any time they
were called upo"n.
The Dnnn victory, In the face of the
campaign that has been made, is con
sidered a stinging rebuke to the state
administration, which was lined up al
most as a solid phalanx against the
Princeton man and in favor of Judge
Collins, who made his campaign as an
anti-merger candidate.
One of the happiest men about the
hotel lobbies last night, aside from the
active managers of the Dunn cam
— -Tf- .
Continued on Seventh Page
CHARGE IS MURDER
Coroner's Jury Finds Against
Miners' Officials
CRIPPLE CREEK, Col., July I—A3
the result of the finding of the cor
oner's jury which investigated the
death of Roscoe McGee and John Davis
during the riots at Victor June 6. Pres
ident James H. Moyer and W. D. Hay
wood, secretary-treasurer of the West
ern Federation of Miners, together
with 46 other men are charged with
murder and Inciting riot. The bonds
of Moyer and Haywood were fixed at
$10,000 each. The verdict accuses Wil- .
liam Boyle of killing' John Davis and
Albert Billat of killing Roscoe McGee.
Suspends Preachers for Speculating
WILMINGTON, Del., July I.—The
ministerial committee which tried Rev.
W. H. Corkran and Rev. C. S. Baker,
of the Wilmington M. E. conference,
on charges of indulging in stock spec
ulation, today returned a verdict of
guilty and both were suspended until
the next session of the conference,
which will be held in March, 1905.

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