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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, July 11, 1904, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

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«->THE WORLD OF SPORT
SAINTS DROP FIRST
GAME TO LOUISVILLE
O'Brien's Poor Throw in First
Inning Lets in Run Which
Proves Fatal
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
•St. Paul 76 48 28 .632
Columbus 74 45 29 .609"
Milwaukee 73 42 31 .575
Louisville 79 43 36 .544
Indianapolis ....76 37 39 .487
Minneapolis ....74 36 39 .473
Kansas City ....71 27 44 .380
Toledo 73 22 52 .297
Yesterday 1 Results.
St. Paul 1 Louisville 2.
Minneapolis 1. Columbus 0.
Milwaukee 4. Indianapolis -2.
Kansas City 6. 9, Toledo 4. 8.
A delirious chuck by O'Brien -at the
dawn of yesterday's misfortune made
it an extra inning affair, and the Saints'
extra inning luck was on hand to take
immediate advantage of the situation.
Had it not been for O'Brien's wild-eyed
heave, the Saints would have mixed
whitewash for the Colonels- for nine
innings and retired with their one well
earned run. instead of losing to the
crowd the Millers ran around. Score,
St. Paul 1. Louisville 2.
After the first inning the game de
generated into an uninteresting pitch
ers' battle between Sessions and Camp
bell, and as far as pitching went Ses
sions had the big end of the argument.
In the tenth round he let up for a sec
ond and walked White to first, and this
"was the beginning of the sad finish,
for a sacrifice and a hit brought White
to the skillet and the one run needed
went into effect.
In the down-town park the game
vould have been a successful bingle
fest, as the pill was batted into the
air high and long all the time. From
the getaway the outfielders were pop
j.ing back and forth. One-half of the
Saints put out went to the meadow
- md a dozen of the Colonels went
outside the infield.
"Pop" Sohreiver would probably have
four home runs to make him glad, as
be laced a long fly out every time he
up. but they all lodged in tena
< ious receptacles and "Pops' efforts
were for naught.
Watty Makes It Easier
Thanks to the consideration of Mr.
"vv'atkins and his signal service brigade.
CoLorabus was given the round figure
i:; Minneapolis, so that by losing: yes
terday the .Saints are not out much in
the matter of standing-. If Columbus
had broken into the scoring class yes- I
terday the Saints would be still carry
it:? the banner, but Clymer's raiders
Mould have been marching along close
enough to snau-h it at any moment.
Kerwin was the first Bourbon up,
and he picked out the first ball Ses
sions flung to him. The ball hopped
Ight down to O'Brien, who juggled
it briefly and then threw it into the
crowd. Th^> ball crossed the first base
line half way between Kelley and home I
and Kerwin straightaway betook him
self to second, Hallman worked off a
successful bunt along the third base
line and Daniel came to third.
With Dexter up Session delivered a
high one which Sullivan jumped for
hungrily, but could not land, and Ker
win came home. Dexter new out to
Flournoy and Arndt and Schreiver
dropped the ball to Jon*es. who receipt
ed for it. While Kerwin scored on
>ns" wild pitch, he was due to
• •nme in any way on one of the three
g Bies m the outfield.
Junes hit the first ball over for a
single trai to the left meadow, and
son immolated himself and put
.■:. Jones went to third
'heeler's out, but O'Brien couldn't
••lihution being a rain-'
hich Hailam put away after 1
iimselt" vigorously.
Steal Is a Failure
• 1 the bulb to Ses
went back to the bench, and
sent a sizzler to third whu-h
:ed on the !eg and White
1 BOtyid •■-.t lirst. He
■ad. and as he didn't see
■ t of arriving there legiti
ied to be dishonest. It
"irl story. Sullivan Tiad
■ all there before he got a good
Qninlan bumped a high one to
Kelley picked nut a likely one and
bumpeij v ou2 to right center, and
Marcan put him at second with a sac
and Flournoy brought him home
with :i .siimie to left. Sullivan flew
out to center, and Sessions flew out to
third and the inning ended with the
:ied. "
The third inning saw three up on
each side and but three tried in the
Colonels' half of the fourth. Marcan
got ar single with two out in the Saints'
half, but Flournoy forced him at sec
ond, and that hit was wasted. The
Colonels decided that a bunting game
waa the thing, and Brashear made the
theory look plausible by beating- one
to first. White couldn't do it in two
tries and then flew out to Flournoy.
Quinlan gained the distinction of being
the only Colonel to fan. and Campbell
lined the ball by third base for a single.
Kerwin lammed the bail square and
hard and it smashed into Sessions be
fore he had time to hear it. The ball
hit Sessions a half a dozen times in
Ji| IRON PILLS
t REEVES' e^se
IRONPILLS
"Reitlf "Refuse
>( \7^ Iniproie wf^Kfj^ Imitations
People^.aiM^^^ Promptly"
M /0 tlvS^ Tired Mothers. Overworked Mothers, Rundown Mothers,
/ P^l \\ X all need the saving pow*r of Reeves' Iron Pills. Enrich
'yJ^V^ x J 2 the blood and nerve fores. Health Mmm Haziness.
viv'^Mt?**^^ Good for People Tired of Being Sick
riA Good for People Sick of Being Tired
\f «s§assy For Sail fay AH Drug- • ///*/)
QG&gP Bfsts $1 ■ Bsttte. /hi JJ
Beware of Iraifata.v Genuine Bears Signature Hi^ \ *^&*Mrip
as many different places but it subsid
ed in time to get Kerwin at first and
retire the side without scoring.
The fifth began propitious for the
Saints. Sullivan getting to first on
Quinlan's fumbling. Sessions couldn't
do better than a fly to center and Camp
bell threw the ball into Jones' under
pinning and Umpire Hart awarded him
first as a solace. With a man on first
and second and but one out, most of
the fans could see a run and many of
the enthusiasts saw several. Jackson
forced Jones at second and Wheeler
popped up a high fly which fell into
Schriever's big mitt, and the good
chance went to the bad.
Saints Lose Chances
The visitors got a single in the
sixth but no one went by first, so they
drew another cipher. O'Brien opened
by fanning and Kelley got his second
hit. Marcan drove a fastT jumper to
Quinlan who caught Kelley at second
and threw Marcan out at first.
Three straight out is the visitors'
history for their part of the seventh,
which also started well for the Saints.
Floi'rnoy outran a bunt and Sullivan
landed him on second with a. sacrifice.
Sessions and Jones followed, each con
tributing a foul to the tender mercies
of Schriever, and that chance disap
peared.
There was nothing but one base on
balls for the visitors in their portion of
the eighth, which furnished still an
other opportunity to the Saintly crew.
Jackson started by flying out to center,
and Campbell, not to be outdone in
generosity by Sessions, gave Wheeier
his base. O'Brien hit a hot liner to
Campbell, which shot off to one side
out of reach. Once more there was a
man on first and second, but Kelley
drove the ball to Brashear, who re
versed the usual order of the double
play by- throwing Kelley out at first,
and White threw the ball back to sec
ond in time to catch O'Brien.
The usual allowance of three men
came to bat for the visitors in the.r
half of the ninth and none reached first.
Flournoy landed on first in the Saints'
half on Quinlan's error, but did not get
any encouragement, and the ninth in
ning was over with the score still tied.
The tenth started with the three
weakest batters of the visitors com
ing up, while the Saints* had their
strongest. The strain began to tell on
Sessions and he threw four wid« ones
to White and White walked to flrsu
Quinlan sacrificed him to second ana
Campbell flew out to Jones.
The responsibility was then up to
D. Kerwin. and Daniel got away with
it. as usual. He singled to left field,
and Flournoy hit White with the ball
at the plate and White scored.
With the Colonels one to the good it
didn't look particularly bad with the
array of batting talent coming up.
Jones went out at first, and Jackson
stin slated the enthusiasm of the fans
by pping off a two-bagger to. left.
Wheeler boosted a high fly to center
and O'Brien picked out the same spot
for his fly, and that end 3 the sad tale.
Score:
Louisville— AB. R. H. PO. A. E. i
Kerwin. rf 5 1 1 1 0 0!
Hallman. If 4 0 1 3 0 0
Dexter, cf 4 0 0 8 0 0
Arndt. 3 4 0 1 1 0 01
Schriever. c 4 0 0 4 1 8 '
Brashear. 2 4 0 1 2 3 0
White. 1 3 1 0 8 1 0
Quinlan. 8 3 0 0 3 4 2
Campbell, p 4 0 1 0 3 0
Totals 35 2 5 30 12 2
St. Paul— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Junes cf 4 « 1 7 0 0
Jackson, rf 4 0 1 3 0 0
Wheeler. 3 4 0 0 1 2 1
O'Brien. S 5 0 1 1 2 1
Kelley. 1 4 1 2 10 0 0
Marcan. 2 J 0 1 1 1 0
Flournoy, If 4 0 2 5 0 0
Sullivan, c 3 0 0 2 2 0
Sessions, p 4 0 0 0 4 0
Totals 35 1 8 30 11 2
Louisville ..100000000 I—2
St. Paul 0 10000000 o—l
Two-base hit. Jackson; sacrifice hits.
Jackson. Sullivan, Marcan. Quinlan; rirst
on balls, off Campbell 1. off Sessions -;
struck out. by Campbell 1. by Sessions 1;
wild pitch. Sessions: double plays. Bras
hear tn White to Quinlan. Quinlan to
White: time, 1:20: umpire. Hart.
Toledo Loses Two
KANSAS CITY. Mo.. July 10.—Kansas
City won two games from Toledo today
by slugging the ball. Scores:
FIRST GAME
K. C. H.P.A.E.; Toledo. H.P.A.H.
Vanßu'n.rf 13 0 OlFrisbie.cf.. 0 3 0 1
Nance.lf... 12 0 Olclingman.s 0 3 7 0
Sullivan.;}. 12 1 OlLee.lf 2 0 0 1
Ryan.c 17 0 0 Moriarty.;;. 0 13 0
Hill.cf 2 2 1 OReading.rf. 0 10 0
Rothfuss.l 0 8 0 OBrown.c... 0 12 0
80nner.2... 2 1 1 l'Reisling.l.. 112 0 0
Leewe.s... 2 2 2 1 Sweeney.2.. 2 3 2 0
Barry.p... 0 0 0 IDeering.p.. 10 3 0
•Butler... 100 v;
Gibson.p... 0 0 0 0! Totals... 62417 2
Totals.. 11 27 S 3]
♦Batted for Barn- in eighth.
Kansas City ..2 <j 0 0~ ij 0 ij 2 *^H
Toledo '■■■■0 0 0 0 1 0 0 3 o— i
Two-base hits, Nance. Sullivan. Hill.
Butler. Lee; home run. Ryan; sacririco
hits. Nance. Sweeney; srWen bases. Nance.
Rothfuss: double plays. Leewe to Roth
ufss. Sweeney to Clingman to Reisling;
hits, off Barry 6 in 8 innings, off Gibson
0 in 1 inning; bases on ball?, off Barry 4,
off Gibson 1. off Deering 2; struck out,
by Barn- 4. by Deering 2: wild pitch,
Barry; hit by pitched ball. Reisling.
SECOND GAME
K. C. H.P.A.E.I Toledo. H P \ E
Vanßu'n.rf 2 0 0 o!FYisbie.cf " •• 0 6
Nance.lf.. 2 4 0 0 Clingman.s 0 2 2 0
Suili\-an,3. 10 1 OiLee.lf 17 0 0!
R.an.l 213 0 1 Moriarty.3. 12 3 1
Hill.cr 12 0 l.Rcading.l.. 3 8 0 0'
Butler.c... 2 9 2 o'Brown.c.... 1110
Bonner.2.. 10 4 o:Reishug.p.. 112 1
Leewe.s... 12 3 2;Sweeney.2. 12 3'
Gibson.p.. 0 0 2 OjWeinig.rf.. 0 3 0 0
Isbell.p 102 1]
! Totals.. 10*28 11 4
Totals.. 13 30 14 5! ,
*One out when winning run scored.
Kansas City 3 0 0 3 10 0 10 1 9
Toledo 0 000610 10 o—g
Two-base hits. Nance, Sullivan, Butler.
rHE ST. PAUL GLOBE. MONDAY! JULY 1L 1904
Lewee. Frisbie. Reading, Brown; home
runs, Nance, Reislins. Lee; sacrifice hits,
Nance. Sullivan. Ryan 2. Butler. Bonner,
Leewe. Reisling. Sweeney; stolen bases.
Van Buren, Lewee; hits, off Gibson 6 in
41^ innings, off Isbell 4 in 4V. innings;
bases on balls, off Isbell 2, off Reisling 2;
struck out. bjr Gibson 5. by Isbell 4. by
Reisling 1; wild pitch, Isbell; passed ball.
Butler; left on bases, Kansas City 12. To
ledo 9; time, 2:35; umpire, Bausewine.
Millers Blank Columbus
MINNEAPOLIS. Minn.. July 10.—Ford
allowed but two hits today and Minneap
olis scored its third straight shut .out.
Hickey, too. was in great form. Davis'
muff of Sullivan's long fly in the third, i
followed by Freeman's single to right
field, scored the only run of the game.
McNichols' fielding was a feature. Score:
Minn. H.P.A.E.' Col. H.P.A.E.
Maloney.rf 0 10 e^Davis.rf.... 116 1
Sullivan.ci 14 0 OjWrigiey.2.. 0 0 1 0 1
Coulter.lf.. 110 o!Friel.3 10 2 0
Freeman.l. 213 0 o'Klhm.l Oil 0 0:
Weaver.c. 0 4 1 OiClvmer.cf.. 0 0 0 0 i
McNic"ls,3. 0 1 •» OMartin.lf... 0 4 0 0
Fox.:: 0 t -1 OBridweli.ss. 0 0 2 0
Oyler.sa... 0 12 1 Simon,c 0 8 3 0
Ford.p 0 0 2 OiHickey.p... 0 0 40i
Totala... 427 16 ll Totals.... 224 12 1
Minneapolis ..0 0100800 •—1
Columbus ....0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—Oi
Sacrifice hits. Fox! Weaver: stolen
base. Frlel: struck out by Hiekey 9, by
Ford 4; bases on balls, off Hickey 4, off
Ford l; hit by pitcher, by Ford 1, by
Hhfloay 1: first base on errors. Minneap
oils 1. Columbus 1; left on bases. Aiinne
apolis 8. Columbus 4; umpire, Klem;
time, 1:40: attendance. 4.800.
Brewers Defeat Indians
MILWAUKEE, July 10.—Milwaukee de
feated Indianapolis in a closely contested
game today by a score of 4 to 2. The
home team won mainly because the visit
ors could not solve Stricklett's detlvery,
four hits being all they could get in the
nine innings. The score:
Mil. H.P.A.E.; Indpts. H.P.A.E.
Stone.rf... 10 0 OjSwander.lf. 0 3 0 0
Schaefer.ss-1 3 4 1 Magoon.sa. 0 3 2 1
O'Brien.2.. 12 3 0 MeCreery.cf 1 3 1 a;
Clark.3 10 4 OiM'g'm'ry.rf 10 0 0]
Pennell.lf.. 0 0 0 OHeydon.l.. 0 5 1 0J
U gherty.ef 1 0 0 OjCarr.3 0 0 4 3
Bateman.l. 115 2 Oißarry.c 2 7 2 0
Slattery.c. 17 0 OjMartin.2... 0 3 2 0
Stricklett.p 10 4 I'Phillips,p.. 0 0 2 0
Totals... 827 17 2 Totals.... 424 14 4
Milwaukee 0 0100012 •—4
Indianapolis ..00001001 o—2 ■
Earned runs. Milwaukee 2, Indianapolis
2; two-base hits, O'Brien, Stricklett. Bar
ry; three-base hit. Dougherty; struck out,
by Stricklett C. by Phillips 4; left on bases.
Milwaukee 4. Indianapolis 4; umpire, Hol
liday; attendance. 4.800: time, 1:25.
Red Wing Wins
Special to the Globe \
RED WING. Minn.. July 10.—The Ed
wards-Woods team of St. Paul got the
small end of the score in today's game.
Both pitchers were in fine form, but the
Red Wing hits were more opportune.
Score:
R.H.E.
Red Wing 1000 00 2 0 *—3 4 3
Edwards-Woods 080?H«« o—o0 —0 3 2
Batteries —Davidson and Malloy; Lyman
and Carlson. Umpire—Malloy.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Boston 68 46 22 .677
New York 66 4« 2« -606
Chicago 71 42 29 .592
Cleveland 63 35 23 .556
Philadelphia 66 34 32 .515
St. Louis 64 28 36 .438
Detroit 66 28 38 .424
Washington 65 12 53 .185
Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 1. 6. Chicago 2, 5.
Even Break at St. Louis
ST. LOUIS. Mo.. July. —Chicago and
St. Louis broke even here today on a
double header. -Clever fielding by Dun
don was the feature of the opening game.
In the second .. game Sievers was taken
out of the box in the middle of the eighth
inning, as he: was weakening. Sudhoff
succeeded him and did better. Attend
ance, 12/900. Score: 'I--'
FIRST GAME
St. L. H.P.A.E.; Chi. H.P.A.E.
Burkett.lf. Oil OiDundon.2. .. 0230
Heidrick,cf 12 0 OjJones.cf ... 15 0 0
Jones.l .... 111 1 e[Callahan,lf 2 10
H'lsman.rf"l 1 0 G|Green.rf... 110 0
Wallaces. 2 11 0 Davis.s 13 2 0
Padden.2.. 15 3 OjDonahue.l. 0 8 0 0
Kahoe.c... 14 4 o|Tannehill.3 2 12 0
Hi11.5b.... 0 14 OSullivan.c. 16 10
Pelty.p.... 0 13 1 White.p... _0 1 3 0
*Sugden... 000 0
— 1 Totals... 827 12.0
Totals .. 7 27.17 1| '
* Batted for HIU in ninth. . '
Chicago 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 —2
St. Louis 0 0 0 Q'l 0 0 0 o—l
Two-base hits, Sullivan. Wallace: dou
ble play. Davis to Dundon to Donahue*
stolen bases. TannehilL Davis; hit by
pitcher, by While. Pelty; wild pitches
White 2; bases on balls.. off Pelty 2 off
White l: .struck out. by White 5. by Pelty
3: left on bases. St. Louis 4. Chicago 3;
time. 1:40; umpire, O'Loughlin. -
SECOND GAME
-St. L. H.P.A.E. Chi. H.P.A.E.
Burkett.lf. 3 1 0 ' o:Dtmdon.2.. 2 4' 7 6
Hemphiil.rf 1 1 0 IF. Jones.cf 13 0 0
T. Jones.l 111 0 l'Callahan.lf. 3 0 0 0
Heidrick.cf 2 3 1 ojGreen,rf... -2 2 0 0
Wallaces. 025 O'Davis.s.... 1320
Padden.2.. 2 4 4 0 4Oonahue.l. 111 2 0
I Hill. 13 0 o!rannehill,3 1 ° 0 0
Sugderwe.. 0 7 0 l|3ullivan.c. 1 5 •> 0
Siever.p... 0 12 0 Patterson.p 0 13 0
♦•Hlsman 0 0 0 0 .
Sudhoff.p.. 10 2 01 Totals.. 12*3116 0
Gleason.3.. 0 0 0 0? ;
TotaLs . .11 33 14 " - -
♦•Batted. for Hill in ninth. : "
*One out when winning run made.
Chicago 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 1 0 o—s
St. Louis.. ;.3 0 10 0 0 0 0 1 Qi—
Base hits, off iSierer.9 in seven and a
half innings; off Sudhoff 3 in three and a
half innings;: two-base hits. Sullivan. Pad
den. Caliahan: three-base hits. . Bu^kett '•
sacrifice hits. F. Jones. -Wallace: double
plap,. Heidrick to - Sugden. Heidriek to
Hill: passed ball. Sugden: stolen bases
F. Jones: hit by pitcher, by Patterson, T.
Jones. Huelsman;: bases on balls. ' off
Siever 3.* off Patterson 3.. off • Sudhoff >1 •
struck out. by Sieves 3. by.Sudhoff. 2 by
Patterson 1; left on bases. Chicago •
•^lB UIS 4 ' umpire- O'Loughlin; time!
I WESTERN LEAGUE "~|
• FIRST GAME .
At Denver— . R.itf''
Denver .......:.0 3100311 Mil i
Omaha. .......,.ao 1 03 83 1 o—B lo 3
Br^a^ McCarthy,
SECOND GAME
At Denver— " R H ;
Denver ......... 6 0 0«0 0 0 2—2^6" 0
Omaha r;:^- 0000 010 0 o—l 8-3
Hostetter ami Lucia; Quick and Freeze.'
At Colorado Springs— RHE.
Col. Springs ...05123000 I—l 2 io" I
Dcs Moinea ..0 000 0 9 0-0 3—3 s s
\~Hleman and Herman; Liefleid and
FIRST GAME
At Sioux City— on -n;
Sioux City 00000018 o—l lo 3
St. Joseph 10 0 000 0 3 0 i 5 1
Garrett and Ward; Maupln and Garvln.
SECONT) GAME
At Sioux City— R.FTP 1
Sioux City 4*2 0 0 0 2 9 *-8 10 2
St. jo?eph eeooioet) o—i 4 '<
Three X League e>;
Rock; Island 4. Decatur 2 i;' -
Cedar Rapids 6. Davenport 3
Rockford 4. Dubuque s.i,d**;:&:;
BloomiEgton-S,": Springfield 5.' ■-■'"■
ENTRIES ARE URGE
state Fair Harness Event
Draws Fast Hofses
All racing entry records were again
broken when Secretary E. W. Ran
dall, of the Minnesota state fair, an
nounced yesterday that the list for the
fair of 1904 reached a total of 338. No
state fair in the country and in fact "no
one week race meeting of any kind hag
ever approached such a total. The list
is 71 greater than last year and
over 100 entries beyond 1902.
The popularity of the Minnesota,
races is attested by the fact that en-~
tries are made from half the states of
the Union, from the Atlantic to the
Pacific and from Manitoba to the gulf.
Stables in New York dtp, Virginia,
California Arizona. Winnipeg and
Texas are represented. Some of the
speediest horses in the country are on
tire list and magnificent racing at the
fair of 1904 is assured.
Some of the individual races have
abnormal totals. The great $5,008 pace
has a total of 47 entries and the 15.000
trot of S3, while lists of from 20 to 35
are common through the programme.
Even the 2:09 pace, which iB the fast
est race at the meet, has 18 entries.
The 2:35 trot for $2,500 has 18 entries,
the 2:45 trot 20, the 2:17 trot 28 the
2:24 pace 36. the 2:18 pace 30. the 2:25
trot 38. the 2:21 tro* 33, the 2:40 pace
22. the 2:12 trot 22 and the 2:30, 22.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
New York 70> 52 18 .743
Chicago 57 41 2S .612
Cincinnati &8 39 23 573
Pittsburg 66 36 30 .545
St. Louis 68 34 34 .500
Brooklyn 7a 28 45 .384
Boston 70 27 44 .386
Philadelphia 68 17 61 .•" >50
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 3, Brooklyn 2.
Cincinnati 1. 7. Philadelphia 4, 1.
St. Louis 3, 1, Ne^w York 2, 3.
Giants Lose and Win
ST. LOUIS. Mo.. Juhr- 10.—St. Louis
and New York split even on a double
header this afternoon, the home team
winning the first. 3 to-2. and New York
getting the second. 3 to 1. Nichols was
more effective than McGinnity in the
opening game, the runs of both teams
being made on hits. In the second Luther
Taylor pitched a. brilliant game for New
York. Attendance. 19.800. Scores-
FIRST GAME
St. L. H.P.A..E.: N. Y. H.P.A.E
Farreil.2.. 12 5 o'Bresna'n.cf 10 0 0
Sharmon.rf 0 3 0 Ojßrowne.rf.. 0 10 0
Beckley.l. 112 2 o;i>eviin,3... 0 1 1 0
Smoot.cf.. 0 2 0 OiMcGann.l.. 111 1 0
Brain.s 13 2 0 Mertes,ll... 12 0 0
Barclay.lf. 2 0 0 oDahlen,a... 3 13 1
Burke.o... 10 2 0,Gi1bert,2.... 113 0
Zearfoss.c. 0 4 0 orWarner.c...0 rWarner.c... 0 5 6 0
Nichols.p. 0 11 o;McGinn'y,p 12 4 0
Totals.. 627 12 Oj Totals... 824 12 1
St. Louis 0 (3 0 2 0 I 0 0 •^S
New York 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 Q —2
Earned runs. St. Ljuis 3. New York 2:
two-base hits. Mertes. McGinnity. Barclay.
Dahlen; three-base hit, McGann; .sacri
fice hit. Smoot; double plays Dahlen to
Gilbert to McGaaa, Dahten to McGann;
stolen base. Barclay; bases on bails, by
MeGir.nity 6. by Nichols 1; struck out, by-
Nichols 2. by McGinnity 3: left on bases,
St. Louis 4. New York 5; time. 1:24- um
pires. O'Day and Emslie.
SECOND GAME
St. L. H.P.A.E.i N. Y. H.P.A.E.
FarrelL2.. 12 4 n Bresnarucf 1 o 0 0
Shannon.rf 0 3 0 Oißrowne.rf. 0 110
Beckley.K 113 0 OiDevliu.3... 13 4 0
Smoot.cf.. 2 3 1 OMcGann.l.. 311 0 0
B>ain.s 0 0 5 <) Mertes.lf... 13 0 0
Barclay.lf. o 1 0 OiDahlen.s... 0 0 6 0
Burke.3... 0 0 1 HGilbert.2... 14 10
Zearfoss.c. 0 5 1 o!Bowenn'n,c 0 4 0 0
O-N«ffl,p.. 10 4 o'Tayior.p... 10 2 0
„, ,_, McCor'k.cf. 0 10 0
Totals.. 527 1G 3|
Totals... 8 27 14 0
St. Louis 0 8 0 9 0 0 0 0 I—l1 —1
New York 1 0 0 0 Q Q Q Q 2 —3
Three-fcase hit. McGann; sacrifice hits.
O'Neill. Gilbert. Dahlen. Browne; double
play. Devlin to Gilbert to McGann; stolen
bases. McGann. Gflbert. Beekiey; bases
on balls, off O'Neill 1; oft" Taylor 1; struck
out. by O'Neill 4. by Taylor 4; left on
bases. St. Ceuis 3. New York 6; time.
1:26; umpires, Emslie and O'Day.
Reds Break Even
CINCIXXATI. Ohio. July 10.—The Cin
cinnatis and PhiladPlphias split even in
a double header this afternoon. The first
game went to the visitors through then
opportune hitting, aided by bases on balls.
In the second game McPherson was hit
hard enough in the first inning to put
the locals in an easy position from the
start. Attendance. 10.260. Score::
Cincin. H.P.A.E.: Phila. H.P.A E
Huggins.2- 112 OTitus.cf... 2 2 10
Seymour.cf 0 5 0 OGleason.2. 1 2 € 0
Dolan.rfr:. 2 2 0 OiLush.rf... 0 10 0
Odwell.lf.. 0 0 0 ODoyie.l... 213 2 1
Kelley.l... 011 0 ODooin.c... 12 10
St'nfield.3. 0 3 2 f> Majree.lf.. 0 4 « 0
Corcoran.s 2 18 O;HaJI.3 . 0 0 10
Peitz.e 14 3 0 Hulswitt.s 0 16 0
Haxper.p.. 0 0 0 OFraser.p.. 0 2 10
Totals. .. 627 15 " Totals.. 627 IS 1
Philadelphia .I*loo2oo o—4
Cincinnati ...1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—l
Earned runs. Cincinnati 1. Philadelphia
3: two-base hits. Huggins. Titus 2. Do
lan 2: three-base hits. Dolan. Doyle; dou
ble plays. Peitz to Steinfald. Lush to
Doyle. Hulswitt to Gleason to Doyle: bases
on balls, off Harper 3. off Fraser 1: sac
rifice hit. Magee: struck out. by Harper
3, by Fraser 3; time. 2:33; umpire. Zim
mer.
SECOND GAME
Cincin. H.P.A.E.: PhUa. H.P.A.E.
Huggir.s.2 14 2 OTitus.cf... 13 0 0
S'vmour.cf 12 0 l;Gleason.2.. 0 5 10-
Dolan.rf.. 2 1 0 0 Lush,rf 0 0 0 0
Odwell.lf.. 2 3 0 OiDoyle.lb... 2 9 2 0
Kelley.l... 4 8 1 o!Dooin.c... 0 2 1 0 <
Sfnfdt.3. 0 0 1 "Magee.lf... 2 2 0 1
Woodruff.3 0 0 1 OlHali.3 0 13 0;
Corcoraius 0 1 3 0 Hulswitt.s. 1 4 4 3 i
Schletc... 0 7 0 i) MPhersn.p 0 13 0!
Ewing.p.. 013 0,!
: Totals... 627 14 4
Totals, 10 27 11 1;
Cincinnati ...3 i) 2 0 Q 0 () 2^ o^7
Philadelphia ..OOQloooo «)—1
Earned runs. Cincinnati Fj two-base"
hits. Dtdan. Odwell. Kelley: three-base
hit. Huggins: double play, Huggins to |
Kelley; ni-st on balls, off Ewing 5 off
McPherson 1; hit by pitched ball, by Mc-
Phrrson 1: time. l:3fc umpire. Zimmer.
Microbes Defeat Superbas
CHICAGO,-r Jitfy-rW—-Con-Triton- blanked
; the visitors for eight ; innings;; allowing
i only three scattered r singles,* the -locals i
; having , scored three runs ;by ; hard i hitting-.
In.the ninth inning ~! the Brookiyns buncoed
;. a double and three singles,. the last man
; up poppingra, little fly. leaving two men
on bases. -EversV. work at .second was a
feature. Attendance. 11.200. Score: . -.\
■ n Chicago H.P.A.E.! ■ Brooklyn. H.P.A.E.
Slaglclf... 110 -OiGessler.cf... 0 3 0©
Casey.3 .-2--0 <1- 1D1110n.1.. 1 -7. D «
Chance.l.. 213^;«JLumley.rf.. IV 2 * «
; McCthy.c. 23 0 • 0 - OSheck'a.lf.. 0•: 9 1- 0 •
ONeil.c... 0 3,2: o(Babb>ssr... .1' 6 2 0
Evers.2.v.; .0- 5 « &Berg"en.c... 5!0^4 11;
Tinker.ss.. '8 2."3» 4>!AfcCTmk:k,3 2- 0 10 ;
WiUiams,rf.-.1V2 0 O'Jordan.2... = 0"-l 3:? d.
Corridon,p.':.l 1~.2i 0 Jones.p 10 10
sri.-" c , / ——— 'xßitter ;..;vl- « fl|o i
; ; Totals... 9 2716'H*Ritter....M 0 0 0
•*Dobto»._ 0 9 «
:-•■' --'■:'■'- \.\ : v ,~ Totals.... 724 » 1 is. j
; •Batted for Jordan in ninth. T-^ r. ■ /.- •.,. . i
**Baftcd for Jongs in ninth. -: -^-' -;'^.-
Chicago----.v.v.-9;;0r;f1.■".1.i2a-,Oi--.ft-0-if-r-;
Brooklyn ... .0 g r 0000000 L j 2-2 J
Left o bases, Chicago{s,^Brooklyn^7;i
Baseball
Today
St. Paul
Louisville
i-etmon Field, 3:45 p.m.
ADMI3S ON 25c.
two-base hits. McCarthy. Chance. Casey.
Luroley; three-base hit. Chance; stolen
bases, Lumley. Chance. Babb; double
play, Tinker to Ever* to Chance: struck
out. by Corridon 4. by Jones 4; bases, off
Corridon 3. off Jones 2; time. 1:45; um
pire, Moran.
Javas Are Beaten
Special to The Globe
STTLLWATER. Minn.. July 10.—'Cozy"
Dolan, of St. Paul. Still-water's crcn.-fc
catcher, celebrated his last appearance in
a Stiilwater uniform today by making
three hits, one of them a long homer over
the left field fence. His batting and
throwing contributed largely to the defeat
of the Minneapolis Javas. who lost by a
score of 9 to 4. Deller pitched a good
game for the home team, but Phylo,
pitching for the visitors, was touched up
for twele hits and also gave five bases
on bails.
NORTHERN LEAGUE
Standing of the Clubs
sSSoI: Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Duluth ..45. 33 12 733
Crookston ■ 43 22! 21 512
Grand Forks ...45 23 22 .511
Superior '........42 IS- 23 .452
Fargo ..... .46 29 26 - .435
Winnipeg ...... 44 17 27 .386
Yesterday's j Results
Grand Forks 1. Crookston 3.
Superior 2. Fargo 4: .
Duluth 7. ' Winnipeg - i
Superior Loses Long One
Special to The Globe
SL'PERIOR. Wls., July 10.—Superior i 3
making a record for losing extra inning
cont«sts. dropping another to Farsa be
fore a big crowd today. With the score
against them in the ninth Superior got
one and ti3d. and there was nothing do
ing until the fourteenth, when Fargo
counted up two. Both pitchers did well,
but Doll was wild once or twice. Score:
R.H.E.
Superior ..0 001008010000 o—2 10 3
Fargo 1010*00000000 2—4 7 1
Batteries—Doll and Rogers; Foulkes
and Lynch.
Crookston Gof-s Up
Special to The Globe
CROOKSTON. Minn.. July 10.—Crook
ston won second place in the percentage
column of the Northern league by •win
ning the game from Grand Forks today
by the score of 3 to 1. The eighth in
ning was the most sensational ever wit
nessed in Crookston. Grand Forks had
the bases fuil witta nobody out. Hess was
caught it the home plate and the side |
was reared by a lightning double play,
when Morton was caught at the home
plate also and Schamwebber. the batter
-was caught in the double play at first.
The score: R H E !
Grand Forks ..0 0100000 o—l 6 2
Crookston 20000001 • 3 4 l
Batteries—Thomas and Henry; Morton
and Hess.
Easy for Ouluth
Special to The Globe
DULUTH. Minn.. July JO. —Duluth had
no difficulty in capturing the last of the
series from Winnipeg this afternoon. Score
i to 2. A double, a single, a sacrifice
and an error were responsible for the tal
lies made by the visitors. During th»
rest of the contest the Maroons did not
have a shadow of a chance of scoring.
Shepherd's home run gave the locals
their first score in the first. Score:
"R T-T T3"
Duluth 10020103 *—7 9 2
Winnipeg 0 0000200 O—S 3 1
Batteries—Owens and O'Leary; BartO3
and Clarke.
WITH THE AMATEURS
Two baseball teams, composed of teleg
raphers of 'St. Paul and Minneapolis,
played a game at Lexington Park yester
day morning: for . the benefit of the union
telegraphers recently discharged by the
western Union Telegraph company. The
game resulted ~in a victory for the St.
Paul operators by the score of 4 to 3. A
notable gather, of telegraphers from
both - cities witnessed the same. It was
a well played game, and but for the wiid
ness of Pitcher Rustad. who became rat
tled in the tirst inning. Minneapolis would
have won.: The St. Paul brass-pounders
found - Rustad easy and pounded out four
earned runs in the first inning. It looked
as if they wtbtb liable, to make forty, when
Mullane was sent in the box to relieve the
~adly rattled twirier. After that St. Paul
was unable to score.
The operators realized quite a sum for
the benefit of their brethren.
The score follows:
St. Paul. H.P.A.E. "Minn. ERIE
Cassen.rf... I 0-0 lU'lane.c&p. 15 3 0
T. OSln O'Leary.cf. 2100
Fitzg'ld.ss. . 2 2 2 oTßustad.p&l 0 0 4 3
vT.Xorth.2. 13 4 0 R.Xis'gT.l.c 1 7 0 0
Halstead.cf 0 10 ■_0 O'Rourke.lf 2 1- « 0
3wanberg-.3 10 2 l'La'rabee.ss 0 4 1 0
J.McK'n.lf. 2 10 o:Saunders.3. 110 1
D.McK'n,p. 2 3 1 . OJMeGeough.3. 1110
A.McK7n,l-' 0 9 3 O'K.Xis'ger,3. 14 0 0
Totals... 92713 2 j Totals.... 924 71) ~4
St. Paul ......4 0 0 0 0 0 0~~0 •— I
Minneapolis ..lOOOOOOQ 2—3 :
Left on bases, St. Paul 6, Minneapolis 7; ;
two-base- hits. T. North. J. McKinnon, ;
W. North:: three-base hit. Halstead: sacri
fice hit. D. '. McKinnon: stolen bases. Fitz- i
gerald, Swanberg; double, play, A. McKin
non to D. McKinnon to •T. North; struck "<■
out, by D. McKinnon 6. by Mullane 3. by :
Rustad 1: bases on balls, off Rustad 5 oft 1
D. McKinnon 1; j time, 2:00: umpire J ■
Geraghty. '
The Tenth Battery defeated the Great i
Northern team in a one-sided same by a
score of 9 to 1. Batteries—Tenth Battery
Vollhaber and Smith; Great Northerns,
Gustafson and.Anderson.: The Tenth B.
F. :A. challenges - any team in - the city or :
state. Address. W. Coughlin, Box B." 71,
Fort Snelling. .>-._.
The West: End. Defenders defeated the
Clarkin Bros, by a score of 10 to 8. The
feature of the game was E the heavy bat
ting of: E. Brown and Acteling. The De
fenders also defeated the Banholzers -by
a score of 13 :to 12..: For games address
J. G. Fuerst. 467 Warsaw street.: /
-The - Hansena were defeated by the
White Bear team in a fast game:. by > a
score of 3 to 2.". Dell : struck out 14 men
and CoHette 6. U The Hansens want Sun
day ; out-of-town . games, • StiHwater and
Hudson: preferred... Address . Manager - 263
East Seventh street. '
- The St. ;Paul Colts defeated the Elks by
a score of 6-to■> 3. - The Colts have • won
fourteen - straight % games : and . challenge
any team iin th« sixteen-year, class.-. For
games address - W.- M.; Young,: care • F O."
K. & Co.. City. . --:
;■'■•' The ; Oakiands defeated the Annapolis
Street Rivals by a score of 22 to***. Cun
ningham's : pitching': was the • feature. t- He
struck . out: 23 -. men.- For * games ~i n the
seventeen-year class -call M. 2180. LI.
: The Parlors' defeated the : Pickwicks on
the ; Payne avenue grounds : ;by a score 'of
10 to 7. The Parlors . want" a game for
Sunday with some; stone: local team.- - Ad
dess *W. Swaostom. 623 Rose steet.';'
The North- Star Juniors defeated the
Daly Street Stars by a score of 13- to 11.
and-the Kiiiain Lions 12 to 7. For games
In the eleven-yearr.?class' address F.
Herian. 429 Bay street.
f■' The ! Central i Cheese team defeated the
Eureka Dairy, by a score -ofi 12 to 9. - The
winners want games with any twelve-year
team. '' Address Archie Cook,: 344 f Sherman
street.
*' The i Jameson . & : Heveners • defeated I the
City Meats I by a | score of '22 to : 21. and ■ the
Hooligans 3 to 0. . For games ad
dress 165 Carroll street. : > ".. -
The i: St. Anthony Park team s defeated
the Great Xorthern at St. Anthony by a
score of 12 to 5. . ■'.'-. .. - -;
•SiThelGtobeTcoliege i defeated "? the Pioneer
college trr. the Hamline grounds by a score
o£ 12 to It, '-■ ~--? ?..-■ v;: '■"V:"''--i-;*. r;:.:^^Ml
"IN ALL THE WORLD NO TRIP LIKE THIS?
The Expression (No Exaggeration '
Northern Steamship Company Announces Regular
Sailings of the Steamer "NORTH WEST"
From Duluth to Buffalo
A jiSk**""' ~^™i—^*^^*** >'
■ " - : —iu.'.'n-ii".'riiiJifi'imi*——y~"^^*^^^^B ■ "-'
EVERY TUESDAY AT 11:30 P. M.
Returning Leaves Buffalo Every Saturday at 9:00 p. m.
Ports of Call En Route: Houghton, Hancock, Marquette, Sault St«.
Marw, Mackinac Island. Detroit, Cleveland,. Harbor Springs, Milwau
; kee, Chicago.
_ The -North Land" sails from Chicago every Saturday at 4- 09 v m
For berth reservation and full information call on or address W J
S^PaoF'^M T" :A>-^ Great Northern -'BaWway; Fourth and Robert Sts.*
NEWS OF THE CITY
SHANLEY IS PLEASED
St. Lake's New Parish School
Praised by Bishop
"Education" was the theme of the
sermon deliveredryesterday morning at
St. Luke's Catholic church. Portland
avenue and Victoria street, by Bishop
John Shaniey, of Fargo, formerly pas
tor of the St. Paul cathedral.
Bishop Shaniey congratulated the
people upon their intention to build
this year a spacious narish school. He
was glad to hear that the school would
be a large one from its beginning, and
X
••- I Xl' r * r •« I
BISHOP JOHN SHANLEY %
that the school building- would lack
nothing: requisite for a first-class in
stitution of its class. •
The m-eessity of education was en
forced by the bishop—the need of de
veloping mind as a complement to th»
developing of soul.
The church had fully recognized this
need. It had always taken a vital in
terest in the cause of education. Dur
ing- all the centuries it had gone on es
tablishing subordinate schools, ad
vanced schools, seminaries, colleges,
universities; had instructed both sexes
and all nations. Through many gener
ations, indeed, the church had been
the only schoolmaster. So powerful and
persistent had been the struggle of the
church against ignorance that, without
the efforts of devoted churchmen dur
ing the long period of the .dark ages,
all higher education, all the wisdom
and learning of the ancients, would
have been lost to modern civilization.
This reminder of what Catholicism
had done for education would encour
age and stimulate, as the bishop hoped,
the friends and builders of the new
school. He trusted that they would
make the St. Luke's school quite
worthy of St. Luke's church.
The foundation of the school has al
ready been laid in Portland avenue,
beyond Victoria street. Rev. Ambrose
McXulty, the pastor of St. Luke's, is
hastening the work of construction so
that the school may be opened for th
reception of pupils not later than the
middle of September.
Limestone and light brick will be the
chief materials used in the building,
it will have two stories and a high
basement. The basement walls will be
of brick, and the upper walla of brick,
with stone trimmings. The structure
will cost $31,000.
The corner stone of the school will
be laid at 3 o'clock next Sunday after
noon.
THIRTY-EIGHT ARE
INJURED IN WRECK
Missouri Pacific Passenger Train
Jumps Switch Near St. Louis
ST. LOUIS, Mo,. July 10. — While
running at full speed the tender of the
engine drawing an east-bound excur
sion train on the Missouri Pacific
jumped a switch near Larabie, forty
miles west of here tonight, derailed
fouT cars, which were thrown down the
embankment, and injuring thirty
eight persons. None will die, and only
three were seriously injured. The se
riously injured are: S. W. Breedemann.
back wrenched; J. H. Sturdevilte, badly
cut and leg fractured; Mrs. Dora An
drews, colored, badly cut. All are from
St. Louis.
Don't Get a Chancs
'Is it true, pa, that storks can fly 100
miles an hour?"
■"Well, not in Utah: they hare too many
stops to make."—Town Topics,
DEMON MONKEY BAD
Gentry Bros.'Loop Artist Balks
on Trainer
The show grounds at Srtby and Vic
toria, streets were crowded with people
all day yesterday to get a glimpse of
the lameus Gentry dog and pony actors
that have come to make their brief
visit of three days.
Yesterday was wash day with the
animals and those who strayed to the
great white tents saw the hostlers
scrubbing and cropping cute ponies and
washing and combing whimpering
dogs. The latter are just like small
boys—they dislike washing. They will
all look new when they come down
town this morning, drawing or sitting
up in miniature chariots of red and
gold.
"Monkavolo," the demon baboon
who loops the loop, had a spirited tilt
with Trainer Gatetti under the can
vas yesterday. The Simian has been
"acting up just awful" the past week,
and several times has positively re
fused to take his cue. He was put
I through a vigorous course of tuition
j and rehearsal.
"Monkavolo" is the envy of all show
men, but not The coveted pupil of train-
I ers. He performs many other feats
outside of his centrifugal ride.
The difficulty yesterday occurred in a
scenff which is participated in by "Mr.
and Mrs. Schneider," a pair of trick
j dogs dressed in human apparel, and
their offspring, "Monk." during this
scene is employed as a footman on the
equipage in which "Mr. and Mrs..
Schneider" take their airing. The car
riage drives to the center of the ring,
■where the dogs take their places in the
seat. Of_course. the little canine, be
ing unable to climb into the buggy of
his own strength, he is usually assisted
by "Monkavolo," but the latter must
have been drinking.
Trainer Galetti was obliged to exer
i cisc vigorous means to conquer -Monk."
| but not before his duck clothing had
changed from the immaculate white to
red, and his neck and hands were a joy
for surgeons. He finally subdued the
infuriated little pupil, and said, after
the encounter, that "Monkavolo" would
be all right for his act today.
"Monkavolo" recently created a deal
of excitement in the Gentry show train
between Faribault and Minneapolis, by
I escaping from his cage, landing on the
bell rope and releasing the air brake-.
It was necessary to sidetrack the en
tire train and search tor the trouble,
which caused a delay of three hours.
The parade of the Gentry shows will
start at 10:30 o'clock this morning and
will travel the following streets:
Show grounds to Dayton avenue, to
Sixth street, to Jackson, to Ninth, to
Wabasha, to St. Peter, to Iglehart. to
grounds.
ST. PAUL GIRL WEDS
QUIETLY IN DULUTH
Miss Pearl Sargeant and H. C. Hale Are
Married
Special to The Olobe
DULI'TH. Minn.. July 10.—"Papa, I
-e^ant you to meet my husband, Mr. H. G.
Tale."
This was the greeting which Conduct
or J. W. Sargeant received late last
night when he stepped from the Northern
Pacific "Limited" after completing his
trip from St. Paul.
It was his daughter. Miss Pearl Sar
geant, who spoke, but true to her state
ment she had become Mrs. H. C. Yale
only a few hours before.
Plans had been made to surprise the
fond parent, but a meddlesome friena had
spoiled the fun by wiring information of
the marriage to Mr. Sargeant at Hincktey,
SB the way up. so that he was fully pre
pared for the "surprise."
Miss Sargeant came from St. Paul, her
home, yesterday morning for the an
nounced purpose of vtsitmg her at<nt ia
this city. Mr. Yale also had business In
the city and the marriage was agreed
upon at once.
Mrs. Tale was formerly a member of a
theatrical company and she had planned
to continue her career on the stage, but
her marriage yesterday put an end t«
her aspirations.
Mr. Yale is a lumberman of Minneapolis.
Defeats Young America
Special to The Globe
CARVER. Minn.. July 10.—Funk. th«
star local twirter. held the Young America
aggregation down to four stingy hits to
day. Score. 9to 3. The Carver'boys out
played and outbatted their opponents by
a large margin. A large crowd witnessed
the contest. Batteries—Funk and Bra
denhagen, Baason and Clark.
New Leaf From Boswell'a •
Bosweli— l>o you believe all they «ay
about the gas n»eter?
Johnson—Why. I don't even believe th«
gas meter my3elf.—Boston Transcript.
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