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The Saint Paul globe. (St. Paul, Minn.) 1896-1905, July 31, 1904, Image 17

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059523/1904-07-31/ed-1/seq-17/

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16
fSPORTS
SAINTS REVIVE AND
iiiliiiii
Ferguson Holds Blues Down
to Four Singles and Mates
Bat in Five Runs
Standing of the Clubs
Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
fit. Paul 96 60 36 .625
Columbus 91 55 36 .604
Milwaukee 94 55 39 .555
Louisville 96 , 53 43 .552
Minneapolis 94 47 47 .500
Indianapolis 95 44 51 .463
Kansas City- 92 33 59 .359
.Toledo 95 30 65 .316
Yesterday's Results
Kansas City 0, St. Paul 5.
Milwaukee 5. Minneapolis 3.
Toledo 5. Louisville 4.
Indianapolis 4, 2, Columbus 5. 5.
KANSAS CITY. Mo.. July 30.—1n the
first game of the series here this after
noon the St. Paul team handed the Blues a-
Bhut-out by the score of 5 to 0. The
Saints whanged Frantz's planters with
just sufficient frequency to win out but
not to make a runaway match of it. Nice
bunches of singles were scored 4n the
second, third and eighth innings, while
the efforts on the part of the local stellar
aggregation to connect with Ferguson's
elusive benders are represented by four
lonesome singles.
The only chance the blues had to score-
Came in the seventh inning. With one
man out, Lewee singled and Ryan dupli
cated the feat. Butler drove a h«t one
to Wheeler, who flashed it to Marcan.
nailing Ryan, and Marcan whipped the
tall to Kelley in time to catch Butler.
St. Paul's runs in the second were the
result of two-baggers by Flouvnoy and
Sullivan, and Marcan's single. In the
second Jackson drove Jones home with
a single and scored himself on two outs at
first. Singles by Flournoy and Kelley.
■with Frantz's wild pitch "gave St. Paul
another tally in the eighth. A double
header will be played tomorrow.
Kansas City— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
liothfuss, lb 4 0 1 9 1 0
Nance, If 3 0 0 1 0 0
Bill, cf 3 0 0 4 0 0
Bonner, 2b ... 4 0 0 2 1 0
Gear, rf 4 0 0 1 0 0
Lewee, ss 3 0 2 3 1 1
Ryan, 3b 2 0 1 0 1 0
Butler, c 3 0 0 4 2 0
Frantz, p 3 0 0 0 4 0
Totals 29 0 4 24 10 1
St. Paul— AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Jones, cf 4 1 1 2-0 0
Jackson, rf 4 1 2 0 0 0
"Wheeler, 3b 4 0 0 3 2 0
Flournoy, If 4 2 2 2 0 0
Kelley. lb 3 * 2 14 0 0
O'Brien, ss 4 0 1 0 4 0
Marcan, 2b 3 1 1 2 7 1
Sullivan, c 3 0 1 4 1 0
Ferguson, p 3 0 1 0 1 0
Totals 32 5 11 27 15 1
Kansas City. .00000000 o—o
St. Paul 0 6 2 0 0 0 0 1 *—5
Two-base hits. Jones, Flournoy, Sulli
van; sacrifice hits. Ryan, Kelley; stolen
■bases, Nance, Jackson; double plays,
"Wheeler to Marcan to Kelley. Lewee "to
liothfuss; bases on balls, oft Ferguson 2;
struck out. by Frantz 4, by Ferguson 4;
wild pitch, Frantz; passed ball, Butler;
left on bases, Kansas City 7, St. Paul 4; •
time, 1:15; umpire, Klem; attendance, 700.
Brewers Defeat Millers
MILWAUKEE. Wis.. July 30.—Milwau
kee's new local pitcher, Louis Manake.
held the Minneapolis batters down well
today and won his first game. The score:
Mil. H.P.A.EJ Minn. H.P.A.E.
Stone.lf... 10 0 OjMaloney.rf. 2 5 0 1
Schaefer.s. 12 3 OiSullivan.cf. 15 0 0
O'Brien.rf. 3 10 O'Coulter.lf.. 0 10 0
Clark.3 10 1 OlFreeman.l. 0 5 0 1
Hem'hill.ef 0 2 0 OWeaver.c... 2 4 0 0
Bateman.l. 2 9 0 OlMcNic'la.S.. 10 0 0
Reitz,2 0 3 3 OiFox.2 0 4 4 0
Speer.o 110 1 0 Oyler.s 10 2 0
Manske.p.. 0 0 2 0 Ford.p 0 0 2 0
*Ferry 0 00 0
Totals.. 927 10 1
, Totals... 7 24 S :1
'Batted for Ford in ninth.
Milwaukee ... 1 (T~2 I 0 0 0 I *^5
Minneapolis . .102000000 3
Earned runs. Milwaukee 4, Minneapolis
Push Sale
Savings
A little exaggerated per
haps, but still nearer to the
truth than some of the ad
vertising you have been
regaled ; with during the
?. past six weeks.
We never insult your
intelligence by quoting
prices so low that quality
must be sacrificed to meet
them. When we say $16
>' to $28 for Suits to order
worth from $20 to $35 it
means the { same attention
in their majiufac
|^^Li;that - has : made the
r.^irie of Nicoll a house
\Wtd word iii millions of
American homes, A call •
•* wfl! convince you. ~ "'"•'■'; : Vf.
LOUIS s*\ jhC^Mf Corner
■;- -; CcjA^rys^^ Seventh
NASH, \^/f>W£€& and
m. •» 1 la^ Robert
***»•*«' TAILOR Streets.
WrY: W. G. JERREMS/:President.
NEWS FROM DIAMOND, TRACK AND FIELD
DANCIN' SAL WINS
Reimbold Breaks Winning
Streak of We're Here
Dancin' Sal danced over the waves at
Bald Eagle yesterday afternoon to the
music of a stiff breeze and showed her
heels to the balance of the fleet which
sailed in the regular weekly regatta of the
Bald Eagle Yacht club. Capt. Joe Reim
bold was at the tiller and he sailed the
Sal to a splendid victory, winning over
the Owl, which was sailed by his brother
George, and Mohican.--We're Here, Ojib
way, Winnequa. Ensign and Siwash, which
finished in order.
Commodore Thomas threatened to
make a runaway race of it in the Mohican,
but Owl and Dancin' Sal both closed on
him at the third mile and then passed
him. We're Here, which seemed to hold
everything safe in the first four races,
also tried to pass Mohican, but Capt.
Thomas decided to call a ha it. and refused
to permit any other boats to finish ahead
of him.
The wind was blowing strong from the
south, and all boats heeled over to the
capsizing point. Notwithstanding the
stiff breeze the contestants all went out
with full canvas and no accidents were
reported, excepting the breaking of a jaw
on the Thor's gaff, which was repaired,
and the race finished. Teal and Thor
wore the only two entries in Class B, the
former winning handsomely, sailed by
Capt. Hollerhoff.
The race tor points is growing more
interesting, and although the Rood boat
We're Here is still ahead by a comforta
ble margin, the fact that the other boats
have been taking her measure in the past
two races presents a hopeful condition
to the skippers of the tailenders.
1; two-base hit. Weaver; three-base hits,
O'Brien. Bateman. Clark; bases on balls,
off Manske 4, off Ford !i; hit by pitched
ball. Sullivan; stolen bases, Clark. Oyler;
wild pitches. Manske, Ford; struck out,
by Manske 7, by Ford 4; left on bases,
Milwaukee 7. Minneapolis 8; umpires,
Stricklett and Morgan; time, 1:50; attend
ance, 1,500.
Columbus Wins Both
INDIANAPOLIS. Ind., July Indian
apolis lost both games of a - double
header to Columbus today. In the first,
a 'ten-inning, game, 'Indianapolis by a
batting rally tied the 'score in. the ninth.:
The locals were ragged in the - field. In
the second . game Columbus pounded
Cromley for five runs. Scores: _
FIRST GAME
Ind. A.E.| Col. H.P.A.E."
M'Cr'ry.cf 0 2 0 2 Davis.rf.... - 0 0 0 0
Magoon,s.. 2 5 5 1 J.Martin, 4 10 0
Carr,3 2 3 1 Kihm.l 16 10
Swander.lf 10 1 0 Frlel,3 . 0 3 11
H'gr'v'r.rr 3 0 0 OYeager.c... 13 „2:0
Dickey,!.. 013 3 OClymer.cf.. 0 0 0 0
Berry.c.... 0 4 10 Wrigley,2.. 2 2 9 0
F.Martin, 2 111 Bridwell.s.. 15 3 0
Phillips.p.. 0 0 1 OHickey.p... 10 0 0
Fisher.p... 0 11 ODorner.p... 0 0 3 0
Heydon.c. 0000 " . — -■— __
M'tg'm'y.2 0 110 Totals;. 1130 19 1
Newlin.p.. 0 0-0 0
•Cromley.. 0 0 0 0 - ;'-*":■ ■•_-[
i
Totals.: 103015,4 . , ' •■ ,
*Batted for Berry in ninth.
Indianapolis ........1 0 0 0 0 2 o—4
Columbus. ■...,.. ...0 20010010 I—s
Hits, off Phillips 2 in one inning, off
Fisher 7 in eight innings, off Newlin 2 in
one inning, off Hickey 3; in one inning, off
.Dorner 7 in nine innings; bases on balls,
off Fisher 2, ■ off Dorner 2; struck out, by
Fisher. 3, by Dorner 2; hit by pitcher, by
Dorner. - Carr; two-base hits, -:■ Yeager,
Wrigley; three-base hit, F. Martin; home
run, Wrigley; sacrifice hits. Dickey 2,;
Swander.; Kihm. Friel; double play. Brid
well to Kihm;'stolen bases, Clymer, Brid
well; ■ passed : ball. Berry; left -on bases,
Indianapolis 9," Columbus 7; umpire, Grim;
time, '1:50^.'.:' .i^■■;■.,- . '* •_.
?SZf£ -: ~'~ •■- •■..- SECOND GAME '.. '
Ind. H.P.A.E. Col. H.P.A.E.
M'Cr'ry.cf. 0.3 0 0 Davis.rf . ...2002 1
Magoon.s.. 0 3 1 IMartin.lf.. 2 2 0 0
Carr,3....\ 12 1 2 Kihm.l.... 013 0 0
Swander.ff. 2 2 0 0 Friel,..;. 12 0
H'gri'v'r.rf 11 0 Teager.c... 0 6 2 0
Dickey.l.. 19 2 1 Clymer.cf.. 0 0 10
Heydon.c. 0 3 3 0 Wrigley,2.. 11-12
Martin. 13 3.2 Bridwell.s.. 0 3 5 0
Cromley.p. 0 15 Olmsted,p.. 10 10
- Totals'...-' 52716 " 6 Totals... 72713 ~4
Indianapolis ..0 I 10 0 0 0- 0 —2
Columbus ....0 2 0 0 0 3 0 0 o—s
•, Bases on balls, Cromley 2. off Olm
sted 5: struck out. by Cromley- 2. by Olm
.sted 5; hit j by' pitcher, Hogriever, | Carr;
two-base hit. Davis;, three-base hits,
Martin, Swander, ' Friel; sacrifice hits,
Magoon. yeager; double play, Carr • to
Martin to Dickey; . stolen base. Bridwell;
left on bases. Indianapolis 11, Columbus 5;
umpire. Grim; time, 1:40; attendance,
3,000.
. Toledo Wins Another
' TOLEDO. Ohio; July 30.—Toledo made
it three out of four from Louisville today
by timely hitting .' and brilliant fielding.
German kept the hits scattered. Score: -.
Toledo. H.P.A.E. i Louis. H.P.A.E.
O Hara.lf 2 3 0 Kerwin.rf.. 1110
8urn5.2.... 2 2 4 OiHallman.lf .230 0,
Frisbie,cf..O 2 0 Quinlan.s.. 0•-0 .: 4 0'
Lee.1....... 213 0 1 Arndt,3...« A 10 0
Clmgman.s 12 3 OjSchriever.c. *. « 2' 0
Moriarty,3. 2 .2 1 0 Brashear,2. 2 4 3 0
Brown.c;.. 0 2 1 o|White,l.. 2 9 0 0
Donovan.rf 01 0 o|Reidy.cf.. 010 % 0
German.p.. 10 4 0 Bohannon.p 10 2 0
Totals.. 10 27 13 1| Totals ..10*24 12 ~0
•Burns out. hit by batted ball, one out
when winning run was made. ;
Toledo^. .10. 0 0 0 3 0 0 I—s
Louisville ... 2 0 0 l o i -q..'q .q_4
, . Stolen bases. Burns, Kerwin; sacrifice
hit ■ Quinlan; two-base hits, O'Hara, Lee.
•Valman: home runs. Bra^hear. Schriever'
double play Clingman to, Burns to Lee;
bases on balls, off German 3. off Bohannon
5; struck out by German 2, by Bohannon
3, hit by pitcher. Clingman; left on bases,
X 'at&'&Se? VjST' 1:5°: Umplre '
|" NORTHERN LEAGUE^
Pargo Loses to Crooks -
Special to The Globe V* , -■ ~
t^FJ^? GO ';N> D July 30.-Crookston
th^r T,un erf° rl|f s sw» and bunched
their hits with Fargo's errors. Thomas
h^ I"i, lnci*)le- | ft^r being pounded to
nard Thursday. Score:
Fargo .......... .00020 0] 0 0 0-2 H3 *5 '
Crookston|'. .:. ;. 110 0 0 0 3 11—7 8 ' 0
Batteries—Fargo. Lempke and Buck:
Crookston. Thomas; and Hehry. -
': -, -. Champs Defeat Forks
Special to The Globe '
__WINNIPEG, Manitoba. July • 30.«-Grand
Forks ; . was easy for the Maroons ■- this
morning. Shack and Shannon . both be'ng
required in the box. -Bartos had them
guessing all the way. Shannon was put
in the box in > the fourth and.; ttie cham
pions got six runs o«f. him. Score: :-.^i
■ " -".' ■■ '■ '■-'-, "\ "■■ ' "'.'- 'V .- . ■ ■ ■-■■',- ■*' -■- t>. XX "B*'
Winnipeg ;...... 10 3 6,0000 0-?dijs E 2
Grand : *orks.. .0 20000 10 0— 11 »
o Grand F<rks Shack. Shannon and How^
ard; , Winnipeg, Bartos and Clarke. \k
Duluth Blanks Superior :
Special to The Globe " :. .--- ;,--- "■
' DULUTH. Minn.. July —The Su
perior ball team went to disastrous defeat
thia afternoon before 1 the White Sox, the
thrl c !ns«? °- Superior got only
»Mr/L hItVS Gehrine- while Duluthltook
thirteen off Carey. i Th« visitors only once
got a man as far as third. Cfehring made
a home run In the sixth. The score:
Duluth^ r^..^*o 15 0 2 2 0 1 •—f'g'E6
-Superior =..-.;.oo 0 8 0 0 0 o:oZo~i>?
Sxfr^!^~^ulut^'^ehrlliS andO'l^ary;
ouperior, Carey and.Rogers. ■-' •...-.-•■•-_-. f,
■'.: ; Hor«e Hurt on Track l - ;-^
SARATOGA. N. Y. 2uW ;30 _J R
«cwS on Uk yea£° ld "Bl^- white «-:
12^ a SM"
THE ST. PAUL GLOBE. STOJDAY. JULY 31.* 1904
HORSE LOVERS OF THE TWIN CITIES '
TO UNITE IN SHOW AT FAIR GROUNDS
- -. '-■■--.. -^w .- ;,-'•'■•;."-" .. ■ .■■'■' - ... ' .' ■■: : ■■■ .-' . -';.: ■„■■; :*: '" -__i_is ■_^_l_^:” - • ■••-■■-■:.•-.»•'<• :■...■-■::,-;-, ■■■;.;:.■■'.
Some Notable Four-in-Hand Turnouts Entered
for the Twin City Horse Show
Plans Are Prepared for Bringing Together the Equine Aristocracy of the Country Under the
Largest Tent Ever Used for This Purpose—Date Set in September When
Prize Winners Are on Tour of Uaited States
ST. PAUL and Minneapolis will co
operate this year and give h
joint horse show, to be known aa
the Twin City Horse show. It will be
one of the largest shows ever put on
in this section of the country and on a
more elaborate scale than anything
yet attempted in the entire West.
Horse shows in this part of the
country are in their infancy, and they
are here to stay, and this show will be
the initial Twin City horse show and
the beginning of the fall circuit of
horse shows. Following this show comeg
Omaha, Louisville, St. Louis, Kansas
City, Chicago and the National horse
show at Madison Square Garden, New
York. These shows are but one week
apart, and the shipping facilities are
the best in the country and the cir
cuit, is so arranged that the exhibitors
can ship in a direct line from one show
to the other.
The prize list and entry blanks are
ready, comprising fifty classes, and
conditions are made to fit all exhib
itors. Over $8,000 is offered in prizes
? AMERICAN LEAGUE T
»— -——•";.;:. ;' " „ •/;. — a
Standing of the Clubs
/ v Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
Boston ...... ...:'.86 52 -•■- 34 -.609
Chicago: :"...... 88 53 .35 .««2
New Y0rk...... 83 - 50 33 .602
Cleveland V...... 82 47 _I 35 . •' .573
Philadelphia 84 46 38 .548
St. Louis ..::%'... 79 34 45 ■ .430
Detroit .........83 33 50 .39S
Washington .....82 18 64 .220
. Yest*rdays Results
, Philadelphia 4, Detroit 1.
Boston 4. Chicago G.
" Cleveland 9. • Washington; 4.
New. York 3, 9," St. Louis 2, 2.
Highlanders Win Two
' • NEW YORK. July 30.—New i York : took
both games from St. Louis today. The
first lasted ten ■ innings, New ' York • scor
ing the winning run on Sugden's ; bad
throw and Keelers fly. . The second game
was.won'9.to 2 on the visitors' misplays."
Scores: : . N j
FIRST GAME
St. L. H.P.A.E.I N. Y. • H.P.A.E.
Burkett.lf. 0 3 0 0 Do'gh'ty.lf. 10 0 0
Heidi'k,cf. 13 10 Keeler.rf... 12 10
Hem'hill,rf 0 0 0 0 Elberf ld.s. 116 1
Moran.3... 10 3 OJAnd'son.l.. 011 1 0
Jones.l 0 91*0 Williams,2.- 24-4- 0
Wallace.s.. 0 2 6- 0 Fultz.cf.. ..1.2- 0 0
Padden,2... 7 3 l|Cnnroy.3... 0 110
Sugden.c. 14 1 1 McGuire.c. 18 10 ;
Glade.p.... 1 0 1 0 Chesbro.p.. 2 110
: Totals.. 6*28 16 2j Totals. 9 3015: 1
. . *One out when winning run scored. ::-
St. Louis.. 0 0 0 2 I 0 0 0 0 o—2
New York..O 1 00100'IQQ I—3
.; „ First :on errors, St.- -Louis, 1; left; on:
bases. New York 8. St. Louis first base
on balls, off - Chesbro •"•1; ■ off " Glade :3;
struck out; by Chesbro 7: by Glade 3; two
base ". hit. Moran;,: sacrifice hit, Fultz;
stolen bases. Dougherty. Fultz, Padden,
Sugden: double plays. McGuire to Wil- =
liams. ■. Williams ■to Anderson, Eloerfeld to
Williams to Anderson. Moran to Padden to
Jones; umpire, Sheridan; time,: 1:50. _ -;
i -K;[[ SECOND GAME :^-;;./ ;- ';■. \::r- :
- St. L. ■•--.; H.P.A.E. N. Y. H.P.A.E.
Burkett.lf. 1.2; 0 0 r>oehty,lf.. 14 11
Heidri'k.cf. ;o■, 1 0\ 0 Keeler.rf...-: 2 - o^o-0
Hem'hill.rf 10 0: 0 Elberfl'd.s.. 12 4 0
Moran.3... 2": 12 1 And'son.l. 110 10
Jones,l&2. . 210 2 1 WHliams,2. 2 5 3 ? 0
Wanace.s.." 2 4-"5 ;; 1 Fultz.cf .*:.." 1; e 0'•0 - 0
Padden,2.. 0• 15 1C«nr0y,3... 2 12 0
Sugden.l:.' 9 3 0 OKleinow.c. 3 10
Xahoe.e... : 0-2." 1 0 Ortti.p :...". 2 2 10
Sudhoff.p.. 1010 : :<- • —--— — 11..
: ;■.-: :- -:-■ ____ Totals.. 12 27 13 cl,
• Totals... 9 24 16 4j \
St Louis 00000020 o—2
New York:.v;:or 06 00 1 2 0 *—9
-- '* First "on ',: errors,; New -. York 1; : left on
bases. New lork 6, St. A Louis 6; flrst"on
balls.-; off ■ Ortb 1, off . Sirdhoff " 3; ~ struck
out. ;by Orth 3;; by; SudhoiT 1; - home I runs,
Fultz, * Conroy; ■- three-base r hit, Burkett; •
two-base hits, Orth, Wallace; 1; stolen
: bases, i Dougherty, Conroy; n double play.
Wallace :to Jones; passed . ball, ■ Kleinow;
umpire. Sheridan; b time, 1:55; ';• .attend
ance, 12,20-7- .:•:■:- . V : .. i
;: : Wadded Beats Detroit
I■■ PHILADELPHIA, "' Pa., July . 3fi.—ln
ability to connect witji WaddelL's delivery
- wa» the cause ef r<Detroit*s ■; f<mrth suc
cessive ? defeat by Philadelphia. " Klllian
retired in ;\ the ■- fourth a inning k because ?- di
;lllness, k-Attendance.:^ 9.700.v ; Score: -; S. ■ '
~-Det;v- H.P.A.E. | Phila. H.P.A.E.
Barrett.cf. 0 10 0 Hartsel.lf., iO-:3'-O*o;
M*lntyre,lf 110 0 Pick'ring.cf 0 2 0?0
--.Carr.l."V.~. :> 17 1 3 ©Davis.l.... 2 1« o^o
Gr'verdjt 11-0 ; BL,.Cress.3.. 0 : lt^i
Low«r.2 .; ,*•; I g-5 2 ftSeytoaid^rf. 3:* C « © *
G'mingr.3 * 0 2 i?S {WMiUT>4jy,!i.. ?5 1116
Reville.c. I^3 3»*f^-Cr«ls,s.. 21 v 6 0
O'Leary.s. 3 #iehreck,c. 0 7 0 0
and letters have been received al
ready from horse show men who visit
ed here last year, in addition to many
new exhibitors who are in the field,
Including the owners of the largest
and leading stables of show horses in
the country, expressing their inten
tions of making entries. Many cham
pions from the East are entered, in
cluding hunters, jumpers, saddle and
harness horses. Special attention has
been paid to harness and saddle horses
and some of the most competent men
in the country have been invited to
judge.
The horse show this year will be
given at the state fair grounds, mid
way between St. Paul and Minneapo
lis, under the largest tent ever built
for horse show purposes, being 350 feet
long and 150 wide, with an area over
300 feet long and 80 feet wide, which i»
larger than the ring of Chicago's Coli
seum and Madison Square Garden,
New York city.
The tent will be located just inside
of the state fair grounds, and one can
step from the Como-Harriet car into
the canopy leading to the tent, which
will be decorated beautifully in the
horse show colors, and brilliantly
Killian.p.. , 0 0 0 OjWaddell.p.. 0 0 2 0
Stovall.p.. 1-0 2 0" —— -
... ____ Totals... 82710 0
Totals.. 624 15-1 ■■■■.••-...
Detroit 0 0 0 0 6 0 T~O o—l
Philadelphia ..0 0 0 2 2 0 0 0 —
Left on bases. Detroit 6. Philadelphia 6;
earned runs, v Detroit •1, PhiladelDhia 4;
stolen base. Seybold; two-base hit," Davis;
three-base hits. Murphy,. Davis; - hits, off
Killian in four innings, off Stovall 3in
four innings; struck out. by Waddeli:7, by
Killian 1. by. Stovall 1; bases on balls off
Waddell 1, off Killian 1; wild pitches, Kil
lian 2; hit by pitched ball, Hartsel; time,
1:28; umpires, .King and O'Loughlin.
Champs Drop Another
BOSTON. TVlass., July 30.—Gibson's
wildness and loose playing by the locals
gave Chicago a victory. Attendance. 14,
--.101. Scorer .:. ...,■--.- ■ -.;.-...]■, -„
Chi. H.P.A.E.- Boston. H.P.A.E.
Jones,cf.... 110 OlSelbach.lf.'. 0 2 0 0
Holmes.cf. 0 3 0 01C011in5,3.... 2 3 3 1
Green.rf.... 2 2 0 Stahl.cf.... 2 3 0 0
Cal'han.lf. - 1 3 0 Freeman.rf 2 10 0
Davis.s.... 0 0 2 o|Parent,s. 2 4 2 0
Donhue.l. 010 1 OlLachance.l ]1 10 0 0
Dundon.2.. 2 3 1 o|Ferris,2.'.. . 112 1
Tan'hill.3. 10 4 o|Criger,c.... 0 10
McFarl'd.c 13 1 OlGibson.p. 10 4 0
Altrock.p.. 0 2 3 *Unglaub... 0 0 0 0
■y . I |
Totals ... 827 12 0 Totals ...11 27 12 2
;;, ♦Batted for Gibson in the ninth.
Chicago .......4 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 o—60 —6
Boston ........0 1 3 0-0 0 Q.Q' —4
Two-base hit. Collins;: three-base hits,
Ferris. ■ Stahl.\.Freeman.v Dundon. McFar
land, Collins; stolen base. Parent; sacri
fice : hits. •■; Lachanee, Donohue; first - base
on balls, off Gibson 3, off AHrock ' 1;
struck out, by.Gibson 2, by Altrock wild
pitches, Gibson 1, Altrock 1; tinje, l:50;:
uirtpire, Connolly. v.'.^-; . .- ':
Simple for, Cleveland, j
";■ CLEVELAND. Ohio,: July 30.—Today"s
game. was marked by poor playing by the
Washington team and timely and con
secutively hitting by the locals. Score:
: Cleve. H.P.A.E. Wash. : H.P.A.E.
Flick,rf. .110:0 Coughlin.3. 1111
Lush.lf ;. 110 0 HiH.rf .. 3 0 0 1
Bradley,3.. 13 1 Cassidy,s.' 13 5 1
Lajoie.2... " 4 6 1 0 Stahl. 1 .; 113 0 1
Hickman,i;2 11 1 0 O'Neil.cf. . 2 0^0; 0 \
Turner,s. .10 5 0 M'C'rm'k,2 2 2 4 0 1
Bay.cf... 110 OHuelsm'n.lf: 12 0 0
Buelow,c. : 0 5 5 OClarke.c... 2 3 1 lj
Donahue.p a 0 3 . OPatten.p... 0 0 "j4 0
Totals .v 14 27 16 0] " Totals.. 13 24 15 15
Cleveland 11200203 •—9
Washington • ..0 0000«00 4—4
Two-base hits, Clark. Lajoie, Stahl; sac
rifice hits,■":; Lush. Buelow, Patten; stolen 1
base. .- O'Neil; double ; plays, : Buelow -_• to
Lajoie r-Buelow to Hickman to Baelaw;
Turner to Lajoie to Hickman; bases on
balls, off Donahue 1. off Patten 4; left on
bases. 1 Cleveland S. Washington 4; struck
out, by Donohue 4, by Patten 3: time, 1:40;
umpire, Dwyer- attendance, 5,485. V
T WESTERN tJEAGUE^
• At St. Joseph— ■ '^5 -'■ ■;'R.H. E.
St. Joseph..•"...-.;. 0 2 0 0 2 0 0 0 o—4 -;;5;-l
Omalia .-. 7. .; .■; 10000110 — ' 11 1
? rMaupinand Garvin, ' Pfeistef and Gond
ing. '. :■.„;-. ;t;. . ;• '.": :■:■. Z' -'^ty^
At Dcs Moine»— :■ ' -'.- -: H. E.
Dcs Moines 0 10 0 0 0 0 0 I—2 -.7* 1'
Denver >..;.....-t0 0 0 oi2iO-l».?g" 0
' Kerrison and Lownes, Hostetter and
Lake. : L: ■•■;;■■■-; .•■-•; ■;■?'-.•■: ;fi; ■■-::.
;-'- At Sioux City— H. Jt E.
Sioux City....".... 0 1 « 1 « 2* O th^-i' 8 1
Col. «prtnss 6 «t?«*l« 2^-« 13 3
-1-* JLHMfeuaan and Jieltey, Villeman ancl 1
Otm wM,"/-,y.-r.v:::-, :■-;•-■.; •.■;<-y<^%~ :-;•■; ;■:■*;> -„-vr
lighted "with thousands of incandes
cent and arc lights.
The street car company has prom
ised flve-rminute service in order to
accommodate the crowds, and patrons
_who come in automobiles or carriages
will be furnished the best of accom
modations for their vehicles. The
merchants of both cities have prom
ised to decorate their business houses
in the horse show colors of red and
white.
Horse show headquarters are open
ed at 218 Manhattan building. Twin
City phone 2137, and any information
desired will be cheerfully given. The
tent will seat 3,000 persons at one
time. The ring will be covered with
tanbark to prevent dust, and the peo
ple of the Twin Cities will be afforded
an opportunity to see a first-class
metropolitan horse show. Entries close
Thursday, Sept. 1. up to 12 o'clock
(midnight), but entries mailed that
day will be accepted.
Although the management of the
show will be directly in the hands of
W. G. Carling, secretary and treasurer,
there will be a board of governors
named, which will include some of the
most prominent men in the Twin
Cities.
T NATIONAL LEAGUE T
g ,—. . ' ; — ■— a
Standing of the Clubs
—-a.--" Played. Won. Lost. Per Ct.
New York ......86 62 24 -.721
Chicago ........85 53 32 .524
Cincinnati ......88 ■. 52 36 .596
Pittsburg . .84 48 36 .571
St. Louis .......87 . .47 40 .541
8r00k1yn'....:..89: 32 57 .360
Boston .:........ 92 33 59 .359
Philadelphia .....86 22 64 .256
Yesterday's Results
New York 6. Philadelphia 4.
Chicago 3, Cincinnati 0. :■
Brooklyn 0. Boston 6. ■■-
Pittsburg 5, ■ 2, St. Louis 2, .1.
. Two . for Pittsburg
.PITTSBURG.* Pa., July 30.—Pittsburg
won both games, the first •by Taylor's
wildness and by hitting at.the-right time.
In the second game the score was tied in
the eighth inning, through Fassett's wild
throw, and won in the ninth with Leach's
hit, scoring. Ritchey. Attendance, 7,850,.
Scores: . ■ • „ ': - -'•■'>_
. Pitts..- ; ■ H.P.A.E. St. L. . H.P.A.E.
Leach,3.... 113 o!FarreH,2b. 15 2 0
Beaum't.cf 2.200 Shannon.rf 13 •" 0 0
Kruger.lf.. 14 0 Olßeckley.l... 17 0 0
Wagner.s.. 0 2 2-0 Smoot.cf . .0300
Bransf'd.l 0 7 0 0 Brain,3.. 112 0
Sebring.rf. 14 1 . o|Barelay,lf.. 0 3 11
Ritehey,2. 14 3 IShay.s..... 10 2 0
Smith,c... 1 3 0 0 Grady.c.... 0 2 2 0
Miller,p... 0 0 1 o|Taylor,p.... 0 0 10
Totals ... 727 10 1 Totals ... &24 10 1
Pittsburg 0 2 0 11 0 1 0 •—5
St. ■L0ui5.'.....! 0 0 0 0 0 10 o—2
. Two-base hits, Sebring, Shannon, Brain,
Shay; sacrifice . hits, Bransfield, Smith;
stolen bases, Leach, 3hannon, ' Beckley;
double play. ■ Grady to Farrell; first base
on balls, off Miller- 2. off Taylor 5; hit by
pitched ball. Shannon; struck out. by Mil- :■
ler 6, by Taylor 1; wild pitches, Taylor 'J; :
time,- 1:40; umpire. Emslie. :
' SECOND GAME
Pitts. - H.P.A.E.I :St. L. j H.P.A.E.
Leach.3.... 3 2 4 o|Farrell,2... 13 7 2
; Beaum't.cf. 14 0 o»,Shannon,rf 0.-0-0 j0:
Kruger.lf.. 0 5 0 Oißeckley.l.. 113 0 0
Wagner.s.. 0 13 olSmoot.cf... 13 0 0
Bransf'd,l ■1 10 0 1J8rain,3.... 0 4 4 1
Sebring.rf.': 110 . Olßarclay.lf. 0 0 0 0
Ritchey,2.. 0 3 3 - OjShay.s .....02*4-0
Cariseh.c. "■ 0' 10 -OfZearfoss.c.. 2 110
Leever.p.. .2, 0 2 0 O'Neill.p. 00; 2 0
Totals ... 827 12 1 Totals "».- 5*26 18 3
. *Two out when winning-run was made. .
Pittsburg ......0 0- 0 o*o- 0- 0 1-I—2
St. Louis ...1 0*0: 0- or Q=o;o Q—i
- Tworbasehit,. Farrell; three-base hits,
Beaumont, ',-; Leever; ; ..• sacrifice hits, '■' Bea\» •.
mont. Shannon. .: Beckley. " O'Neill; ,: double
plays, -Wagner -to \ Rltchey to Bransfielc?,
Shay to Farrell to Beckley; \ first base ion
balls, - off O'Neill 3; struck out, by Leever
1; time,. 1:35; umpire, Emslie.-•" - , -;
_ Giants /Defeat • PhiiUes * T.
: j NEW YORK. ? July 30.—Loose • fielding
spoiled today's game < between v New York
and Philadelphia, won by the
home i team 6■to ;4. Attendance, 11,833.'
Score: .-■ c:'--" "■■" '-:■ ■'..' - ■'■"■ ■:■'-■: -.-.' •-; .-.,:-.
Phila. vi, H.P.A.E.j .N. Y. . H.P.A ■
Thomas.cf \ 2;3 10 s OjM'C'm'k.cf :" 110 1
Gleason.2.. 112 WBrowne,rf .i 0 2 0 2
W'lv'rt'n,3 12 3: 0 Dunn,3 :.; V 3-02 C 0
McGee.lf.. "0 2 0 0 McGann.l. 214 0 0
Doyle, 1 17 lMertes r , 10 0 0
Titus.rf... 3 2 0 2jDahlens... 14 3
Hulswitt.s 110 ; 1 (Gilbert, 1110
Donohue.s. 0 0 ,0:1 B'werm'n.c I 5 0- 0
D00in.e.... _,* 6 4 Tajlor.p,.. 0:« .* 0
Suthoff.p.. 0 110 'v _-___
•Roth OJO-o^o Totals,. 10 2714 6
-': Totals.. »24]r2 s; y\. -...;:y. "V ' ;;. .'--:.■■;
; *Batted for Suthoff in ninth inning.- wr-
Philadelphia -.0~3 p 0 r-d,; 8; (j 1. 0 v fli^
- New York ■■■■10 :-. 04 :-■- 10 I', ft 0 £ * —6 ■
.i-i Two-base ■; hit, j '-MeGa nn . sacrifice hits,
. Gleaspni- f)«oin.- Mertes; .-..1 ,-steien- '<- -bc^es.i
Thomas, McCornrick. vDunn,l^ Dahlen - 2;
SP©RTS
RYAN IN MISSOURI
Turf Financier Is Oat of Jail
on Bonds
a rST\f? Ul S> ¥°-' Jul >" 30.-John J. Ryan
arrived i n st. Louis today in the custody
of Detective Killian, to answer four in
•on^!J, ents chargir>e the embezzlement of
5b(JO,000. Other indictments charge the
larceny o f smaller sums.
Ten minutes after Ryan arrived over
the Pennsylvania, his attorney, Charles
Nolan, stepped from an Illinois Central
tram, revealing a chase which the latter
made from New York, as the result of a
ruse Killian had played to get his pris*
Nolan declares that Ryan was kidnaped
by Kilhan and George Fickeissen the at
torney who went to Jersey City to repre
sent the state in any legal proceedings
which might arise. Nolan is outspoken
m denouncing; the methods he says Fick
eissen used in getting Ryan out of New
Jersey.
Ryan -vas released by the sheriff in
bonds of $7,000, for which his sister-in
law, Mrs. Mary Latoney, went surety.
double play. Doyle to Wolverton; left on
bases, Philadelphia 0, New York 4; first
base on balls, off Taylor 2. off Suthoff 1;
first base on errors. Philadelphia :, New
York 4; hit by pitched wail, by Suthoff:
struck out. by Suthoff3, by Taylor 4;
passed ball, Doom; time, 1:40; umpires,
Superbas Draw Blank
BROOKLYN. X. V., July 30.—Boston
defeated Brooklyn today, 6to 0 Jones
was batted freely. Score:
Boston. H.P.A.E.i Brook. H.P A E
G^ier.cf 3 10 o!Dobbs,cf 1 2 0 0
Tenney.l.. 2 8 4 OiDillon.l 010 0 0
Abbat'io.s. 0 5 3 oiL.umley,rf... 0 3 10
C001ey.1f.... 10 0 O'.Sheckard.lf 0 10 0
Derhanty,:} 10 1 OjStrang.2 12 10
Raymer.2.. 2 12 Olßabb.s... 0 4 2 1
Carney.rf... 13 0 0 Bergen.c... 13 2 0
Moran.c... 0 5 1 OjJordan.3 0 2 4 0
Wiliis.p... 14 2 &-:Jones,p 0 0 4 0
Totals ...11 27 13 9j Totals ... ?, 27 14 1
Boston 1 0 0 0 0 0 1 2 ° (5
Brooklyn 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O—Q
Colts Blank Reds
CHICAGO. July 30.—The visitors were
unable to hit Weimer today and -were
blanked, 3 to 0. Attendance, 7,000.
Score:
Chi H.P.A.E.I Clru H.P.A.Ei
Slagle.lf... 2 10 o|Huggins,2.. 0 15 1
Casey,3... 2 11 O'Seymour.cf 2 10 0
WiH'ms,l. 210 0 OjEwing.cf.. 0 0 0 0
MCarfy.cf 0 3 0 o|Dolan,rf.... 0 110
Kling.c 0 6 0 OjOdwell.lf-2 14 0 0
Evers.2 114 O'Kellum.lf.. 0 0 0 0
Tinker.s... 0 5 3 OjKelley.l 0 8 10
Barry.rf... 0 0 0 OjO'Neill.L... 0 0 0 0
Weimer.p... 1 0 2 o,Corcoran.s. 0 2 3 0
'Woodruff,3 10 0 0
Totals ...8 27 10 OlPeitz." 0 110
Schlei.c 0 5 2 0
Hahn,p 1110
. Totals ... 524 13 1
Chicago ..1 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 •—3
Cincinnati 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 O—Q
Left on bases. Chicago 3. Cincinnati If;
two-base hits, Seymour. Woodruff. Wil
liams, Weimer; three-base hit, Williams;
sacrifice hit. Dolan; stolen base. Tinker;
struck out, by Weimer 6, by Hahn 3; pass
ed ball, Schlei; bases on balls;, off Weiiner
1; time, 1:35; umpire, Johnstone.
STONE IS CLINCHING
HIS POSITION ON TOP
...
STONE, the heavy hitter of the Brewers, still holds the honors in the -
American association, and gives every evidence of being able to re- <*>
tain the coveted position, which is drawing the eyes of. the big league <i>
magnates on him. His figures change «tmt little from week to week. x
Except for some "unforeseen slump on his part, or a phenomenal rise on the ♦>
part of some other ambitious hitter, there is little doubt but Stone will ••
finish the season at the top. • ..,, '..
Jackson is slowly but surely falling off in his work with the stick. ♦•
> and while is is far from being a poor one with the bat, there ar.-> lV
several in ' the association who rank him. Jones is hitting his 'usual x
clip of .317, and is but .003 behind Jackson. :"<§v
, As a whole the association shows a decided falling off in hitting, but *>
the Saints manage to improve as a team. Kelley has been the -greatest <$>
gainer of the week, and is now well up in the list of hitters. Peirce <r>
has been doing well, and Wheeler and O'Brien are hovering around the g
.300 mark. . - , . <l>
Jackson still "holds the home run and stolen base record. The figures <{,
follow: , * ■■ ■'$>
2 S
_ Players— G. AB. R. H. BH, BH.HR. Ay. SB. SH. G. L. <»
Stone,' Milwaukee.. S7 383 80 155 26 6 6 .405 10 2 .001 ....<J>
Bohannon, Louisville.... 17 52 10 19 3 2 1 .365 .. 1 .018 ....'*>
Schaefer. Milwaukee 87 344 <>9 119 23 12 2 .346 35 14 002 V
Cromley. Indianapolis 28 81 14 28 5 3 2 .346 1 .013 <?»
Hart. Louisville r,S 281 38 91 14 7 1 .324 10 4 ..* y
Kihm. Columbus.. 89 343 61 111 22 7 3 .324 16 9 006 •>
"Jackson. St. Paul 91 359 68 115 22 3 9 .320 40 10 015 y
Friel, C01umbu5.............. 87 360 67 114 9 9 5 .317 11 8 .001 .... ?
Jones, St. Paul 77 334 61 106 21 6 2 .317 13 1 -7
Sullivan. Minneapolis .....87 3.39 03 105 13 4 2 .310 10 15 .016 X
Kerwin. L0ui5vi11e............93 406 65 125 20 ■ 3 5 .308 13 3 006 /
Maloney, Minneapolis... 90 369 63 113 15 8-4 .306 26 12 .003 ....X
Coulter. Minneapolis 89 358 30 109 21 3 5 .304 12 16.... X
Hemphill. Milwuakee... ..86 316 59 96 14-2 .. .304 22 7 013 X
McCreery, Indianapolis ...88 352 49 107 15 8 6 .304 13 6 .007 Z.
-Williams. Indianapolis ..7 23 3 7 304 .. 1 <-.>
Arndt. Louisville ........90 353 66 107 19 1 5 .303 8 6 .... .006 X
Lee. T01ed0......::..\....... 43 166 16 50 11 1 4 .301 3 1 .004 >
Wheeler, St. Paul . ...92 384 62 113 IS 8 4 .247 22 9 .005 .... X.
Schriever. -Louisville 66 243 35 71 12 2 5 .292 3 8 .012 .;..&
• Carr. Indianapolis 90 351 55 101 15 4 1 .290 6 12 .004 ....Z
Hallman, Louisville 86 338 48 97 13 4 3 .287 16 4 .... .003 .>
Bateman, 1 Milwaukee.:....". 87 327 53-94 13 8 7 .287 9 .. .007 ....<s,
. Sullivan, Kansas City .42 164 18 47 11 1 .. .286 .2 1 014 <i>
O'Brien. St. Paul;...". 92 358 44 102 28 2 3 . .285 17 11 .005 <§►
.Hill, Kansas City. B.°, 331 42 94 19 .. 2 .284 8 2 008 -v
Nance. Kansas City ....78 292 37 S3 15 4 3 .284 S 10 .... .... <y
Corbett. St. Paul. ....12 32 3 9 .... 1 .281 .... 005 <V
Campbell. Louisville 43 141 20 39-8 2 .. .280 12 006 y
Reading Toledo.. 46 16° 17 45 10 .. 1 .278 5 4 002 <?
O'Brien. Milwaukee 76 291 31 81 7 2 1 .278 9 18 006 V
Swander. Indianapolis 84 348 40 96 14 4 1 .276 11 3 .001 .... y
Kelley,. St. Paul 84 326 50 90 22 .. 3 .276 6 6 ..'?
Brashear. Louisville ...90 324 48 89- 15 4 2 .275 15 5 .017 y
Bonner. Kansas City.........90 331 28 91 10 1 .. .275 6 11 .011 .... y
Butler. Kansas City 72 227 15 62 16 1 1 . .273 3 6 013 7
Yeager, Columbus... ....72 242 33 66 12 4 5 .273 5 2 .022 ....*/
Wright, Louisville... ....27 82 12 22 12 .. .270 2 012 '?
"Dickey, 1ndianap01i5..........79 271 43 72 7 .. .. .270 15 14 .005 V
McNichols. Minneapolis 73 288 35 *77 4 1 2 .267 6• 14 005 {
Clark. Mi1waukee............ 85 353 44 94 13 1 .. .266 16 4 .... 001 /
Magoon. Indianapolis 80 308 47 . S2 11 ■ 1 * 1 -266 13 20 010 y
Morgan, 'Minneapolis 14 49 4 13 1 2 .. .265 ..?...:. .017?
Simon. Columbus: 29 83- .7 22 , 2 1 .. .265 1 3 013 ?
Pennell. Milwaukee ...... 84 318 40 84 15 2 .. .264 6 13 .00« y*
Davis. C01umbu5......:....... 83 353 49 ' 93. 15 16 .. .263 16 7 - 004 %
Wrisrley, Columbus.. 87 366 55 96 26 4" 1 .262 11 14 ::..! .015 /
Frisbie. Toledo 91 366 50 94 12 1 2 .260 12 10 X
Clfngmnn. Totedo-St. Pau1...80 300 39 78 13 3 1 .260 10 19 .009 Z
Leslie. Minneapolis .....44 128 17 33 .9 2 .1. .257 ,2.. 1 ..... 001,..
Bridwell. Columbus. .....87 312 42 SO 6 2 .. .256 ~lo= ;"9 JC<}ll <;.
Hogriever. Indianapolis 67 266 39 .68 .6 "2 .. .255 11' 5 ..... .001 <&
-Rvan. Kansas City ;.84 327 36 '83- 17 1 1 .254 -7 'i.V. .006 4
Marcan.- St. Paul ." ......8g 322 39 81 18 11 -.351 23 TO Ml ....
.Burns..- T01ed0.......... 76 276 .29 -;. 68 la -••'.. 1.- 1: .250. : :lI. J 12 -.*>■ .004 <U
-Freeman. Minneapolis :..... 19 ; 80 -3 r 20 3 .: ■".:■-.'': 250 ' ' %\:pl .050 ....'<*>
Fisher. 1ndianan01i5.......;...24* .'BO 10 20 3.. ..-.250 ■"?.?..! 3 *»« <$■
'Oear. Kansas Clty...-....:.'":.:39 120 12-80 4 1 -'..■ .25* 2 '3 "•;$: y
Moriaritv. Toledo .:....„.;.23 89 6 22 2 1.....248 2 2 .026 .... <$►
Kgan. Louisville ;...... ::...:27 83 4 21 1 .. "... .247 1 „-■ *'•••• .006 y
■ Ptricklett. Mi1waukee.........27 81 11 20 » 3 247 4". XJ*... .000 y
Peirce.' St." Pau}.-.:-'..7:v.;...29 105 11 26 2 .... 247 4' S-f.027 .... 4>
Flournoy. St Paal .:....... 21 73 13 18 2 1 .." .2*5 « %*-*... .065 <•'
Martin. Columbus ....:;....87 328 39- 80 5 6 1 .244 * 18=:.... .fl«j
Clymer. C01umbu5.......... v:B2 323 44 78 22 : 3 2 .241 7 ■»».. .#O3 y
Deering. v Toledo, 1..........;1>4- 71 12 17 4 .. 1 .240 ..- 1 * i^V .018 <»
Dexter. LouisvUle :.....-.72 285 39 68 9 4 2 .238 11 '+"'■*&. .063 <?>
Phillips. Indianapolis.;.. .....31 105 12 25 1 1 .. .238: l'.-'^Ol <?
Slatterly, Milwaukee 70 ; 244 30 58 8 4 4 .237 3 ••- $??/>.". .009 'V
Heydon. Indianapolis ..;. 70 230. 26 59 6 9 1 .236 5 11."'..:. .001 ?
Van Buren. Kansas City..:.,5& 222 34 52 ' 4 1 .. .234 7 3 ...1.. ....<?>
DonoVan. Toledo. ...V..IS 60 5' 14 /.232 4 4 .... ....<£
White. Louisville ;::. .:..;;;.73 T 255 35 • 58 5 2 _.. . .227 12 "4 j#«4 .... y
Martin. Minneaoolis-Ind ::".:.37 134 14 3* - 4-2 .. .224 « •*•••• .007 y
Slagle. Bt. Paul;.v...-..r....:.28r 86 .9 19 .. .. :;'. ' .221 1 2*§ .-."..;■ X '
Weaver. Minneapolis .'.:70.-'268 19 59 .--7 1 *. .220 3 16)^.020 .... %
Quinlan. L0ui5vi11e....;....;. 93 322 -43- --71: 6 3 1 .220 4 "la- '.010 ..":.X
[Sullivan. St. PauKr:....;.:...65 232 22 51 8 .. .. .220 S 14 .... .003 Z.
Oyler. Minneapolis:..:...'.-.... 90 301-32 66 7 1 -. .219 10 18 .003 ... .X,
ReisHng. ToleeU>.'r.";':*.T.r;...;47 156 15 34 .8 ... - .218 -.6 - 9 .007 .... X
Montgomery. Indianapolis. ....79, 302 38 66". 13 2 3 .218 >.% 7. 12 :.„.•.» .002 X
Curtis. Milwaukee "..::....26 '79-4 17 S.". .- .215... '2 .012 " .;.. X"
Lundblum. Toted6;.v:'r;;.^:v;.ls 42 9 19 .. .. .. .221? 1 •2 • Vv.'.* :... -X'
f Sessions. St.-Pau1;:....;...":.. 21 7« 12 15 5 .. .. .214... I .010,1
O'Hara. T01ed0:.....;. .'......58 213 20 45 12 I-;-.. .211 5 10 ','JM9^ ..:. A
Durham. Kansas s City.:..-;:/. 28 91 -; 5 19;-1 ..1 .208 .3 1 : .... •<.oo9'Z'
Clendon. Columb.ua..' ..,..26 V77'.5 •. 16 11 .. .208 '-1 7 ' .tW " ..V. ■ <J>
Olmstead. Columbus ......17 49 4" 10 -:«?.. 1 v;. 204 .. 1 •;:.. .003 <L
Lew*?*. Kansas City ;..'.:.;.:: 84 279 22 56"f 11 /. .. 201 4 k- .... .010 <i>
-,FergusonsSt.-Paul::v..;.'.;^..la 51 5 10 1 .. ...196 1 .. .... 001^'
Berry, Indianapolis 31 102 ,11 .20 5 V.. v. .13S 2 6 ''V::rir' |>
RACES AT BRIGHTON
EASY FOR FAVORITES
Public Choices Win Four Events
at Prohibitive Odds on
Getaway Day
NEW YORK. July 30.—The mid-sum
mer meeting of the Brighton Beach Rac
ing association came to a close today with
a good card and a big crowd in attend
ance. Four favorites won and they were
all odds on. Hamburg Belle, last year's
Futurity winner, who made her second
appearance of the year today, won the
Brighton Oaks for three-year-old fillies,
one mile and a sixteenth. She was quoted
at the prohibitive price of 1 to 12 and was
not extended at any part of 'the journey,
winning easily. Only three horses faced
the starter in this race. The start was
prompt and Hamburg Belle rushed into
the lead and continued to show the way to
the finish, winning by two lengtns. Dim
ple was an easy second. '
Tradition and Jonquil, from the Pagct
stable, ran one-two in the Neptune- stakes
for two-year-olds, six furlongs. They
were also held at the prohibitive price of
1 to 8. Pasadena cut out the running to
the stretch, where Hildebrand sent. Tra
dition to the front u+id won by one
length from her stable compauion." Jon
quil, who in turn was one and a half
lengths in front of Pasadena.
Lavator, favorite. won the Aintree
stakes, a steeplechase over th<> shot t
course. Lavator won this stakt last
year.
Jockey Fuller had his first mount to
day in over a month. He rode Old Eng
land in the tifth race and finished third.
He also had the mount on Eugenia
Buich in the closing rate, but failed to
get in the money. Summaries:
First race— Czaraphone won, Martha
Gorman second. Go to Win third.
Second race—l^ivator won. Grandpa
second, Walter deary third.
Third race—Tradition won. Jonquil .<■<.»•
ond. Pasadena third.
Fourth race—Hamburg Bello won, Dim
ple second. Sonoma Belle third.
Fifth race—Counterpoise won. Consider
ation .second. Old England third.
Sixth race—Duke of Kendall won.
Cloverland second. Palmbearer third.
Towns Retains Title
SYDNEY. N. S. W., July 30.—George
Towns, the holder of the title, easily de
feated "Dick" Tresidder, of New Castle.
N. S. W.. on tho Parramatta course today
for the world's sculling championship and
a purse of £5.000. Towns won by seven
lengths. Time, 21 minutes 48 4-5 sec
onds.
Sunday Ball in Kansas
TOPEKA. Kan.. July 30.—Judge Hazen.
of the district court, today decided that
Sunday baseball could be played in To
peka. One of the Missouri Valley league
players had been arrested on the charge
of playing ball on Sunday. The court held
that the Kansas laws did not name base
ball as a Sunday offense.

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