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The Irish standard. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn. ;) 1886-1920, July 02, 1887, Image 8

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90059959/1887-07-02/ed-1/seq-8/

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ST. PAUL.
It cost 135,000 to print the laws of the
last Legislature.
~T. D. O'Brien has gone to New York,
and will visit the principal eastern cities
before he returns.
T. Reardon is breaking ground for a
large brick block to be erected in the
rear of the Reardon block, on Seventh
street.
The Bricklayers' Co-operative Asso
ciation of St. Paul, capital stock $50,000.
has been incorporated under the laws of
the State.
The young men of St. John's parish,
on Dayton's Bluff, presented Father
Scallan with a gold-headed cane on
Wednesday evening.
The county commissioners of Ramsey
and Hennepin counties have agreed to
build the bridge across the river, con
necting .Lake street with Marshall ave
nue.
President Cleveland and wife will visit
the twin cities in October. Mrs. Cleve
land will be astonished when she looks
over her
Louis
tic
former playground in this city.
The commencement season is now at
hand. It is called "commencement"
principally because the fathers of the
graduates "commence" to see what they
oost
Miss Winnefred A. Cummings, for a
long time a teacher in the public schools
of St Paul, died at Chicago on the 23d
inst. The remains were brougnt to this
city, and laid to zest in Calvary.
tit. Patricks' parish will enjoy a picnic
in the beautiful grove in the rear of the
church on Monday, July 4. All of the
prevailing athletic games will receive at
tention. A good time is guaranteed.
The loyal French Catholics of this
city celebrated St. Jean Baptiste's an
niversary in an appropriate manner at
Market TfoH on Friday last. Addresses
were delivered by the pastor of St.
church, A. Dufresne and others.
Bev. Thomas J. Gibbons, secretary of
the board of directors of the Clerical soS
ciety of the diocese of St. Paul, has
a meeting of the board for the
eleoti"" of officers to meet at the Bish
op's residence on Tuesday, July 12, at 2
p. m.
McCarthy & Donnelly's undertaking
zooms were badly damaged by fire on
Tuesday night. Fortunately the flames
were confined to the basement, but a
great of damage was done to oostly
••,
OUR BUSINESS MAXIMS:
Hen's Suits.
We show thousands of DRESS AND
BUSINESS SUITS of every grade,
description and price. No mat
ter what texture or style you
prefer we can meet your
demands promptly
Men's Suits, warranted well made, for
$5
(not all wool Men's Union Cas
simere suits, $7 and $8 Men's
AH-Wool, durable and good
quality, $9 up to $12. We
show the best $10 and
$12 Suit ever
showninthe
city.
goods on the first floor. The damage is
estimated at about $15,000, which is
covered by insurance.
J. J. Smith, of the Law and Order
League, is paying attention at present
to violators of the minor law, and in
this he is supported by all citizens irre
spective of creed or temperance habits.
The closing exercises of the Cathedral
boys'
8Chonl
took place at Turner hall
on Friday afternoon of last week. A very
pleasing and instructive programme was
carried out in a most excellent manner.
There were eight graduates: Chas. G.
MacCarthy, Lewis Delaney, Thomas
Kerker, Thomas Dougherty, John Ryan,
Frank McMahon, John Wheeler and Mi
chael Dougherty. On Tuesday after
noon the closing exercises of the girls'
school took place at Market hall. There
was a very large attendance and those
present enjoyed a programme which
do honor to much older scholars. Miss
M. Cosgrove received the Webster's dic
tionary, given by J. G. Donnelly, for
best composition gold medal for pen
manship to Miss K. O'Brien gold medal
for excellance in scholarship, Misses
Cosgrove, Ryan, Doyle, Naughton and
Bueh. St Mary's girls* school rendered
a really fine programme in the handsome
new school just completed at the corner
of Ninth and Locust streets. Medals
were awarded to Miss Mary Holland^
Mim Kate Banning and Miss Mary
Lyons. Miss Julia Bailey received first
prize in Latin. Father Gallagher's
beaming countenance was all aglow
Tuesday evening as he directed the pro*
gramme ofthe closing exercises of St Mi
chael's at Liedertafel hall. Songs and
titeraiy exercises,followed by .a dialogue
in six acts, was well rendered
and appreciated by the
large audience. Numerous prizes were
awarded, and many a heart made happy.
The average daily attendance for the
past year has been 300 pupils.
HYMENEAL
At Savanna, 111, on Wednesday,
June 22, at the Catholic Church* took
place the ceremony which united Miss
Maggie Rourke, one of Savanna's love
liest and most accomplished daughters
to Phil W. McElin,. of Chicago. A re
ception was given at the bride's home,
where the new couple were made the
recipients of many hearty congratula
tions and material tokens of friendship.
The bride has been a resident of Sa
vanna all her life and will be greatly
missed as a leader of society. Mr. Mo
Elin is a gentleman of education and
well worthy of the prize he has won.
The happy couple will make their future
home in Chicago.
President—M. J. Lang.
Vice-President—William Delaney.
Recording Secretaiy—M. J. Bell.
Financial pecretary—Patrick M. Ma
roney.
Treasurer—John Dowlan.
"For a young division this is one that
has grown with rapid strides, the credit
for which belongs to the officersi during
the past year, but particularly to the
indefatigable exertions of P. J. Hogan,
the active past financial secretary."
At a late meeting of Divison No. 2,
A. O. H. of St. Louis county, held at
Tower, Minn., the following gentlemen
were elected officers for the ensuing
year:
President—James Harrington.
Vice-President—Daniel Hayes.
Recording Secretary—M. J. O'Leary.
Financial Secretary—Edward Brown.
Treasurer—J. D. Murphy.
"Our division is small in numbers
but true in principle," writes Record
ing Secretary O'Leary.
At a meeting of division No. 1, A.
O. H., of Anoka, June 26 1887, the fol
lowing officers were elected for the en
suing year:
President—James McArdle.
Vice-Presdent—John Senna?
Recording Secretary—M. J. Ryan.
Financial Secretary—T. M. Ryan.
Treasurer—Thomas Coleman.
At a regular meeting of Div. No. 1,
A. O. H., St Cloud, in their hall, Sun
day, June 26, the following officers were
elected for the ensuing year:
President—Wm. J. Murphy.
Vice.Presidenfr—D. J. Morrison.
Recording Secretary—J. D.Sullivan.
Financial Secretary—O. O. Boyle.
Treasurer—M. Branley.
Marshal—M. J. Connelly.
Sergeant-at-arma-^Jas. T. Meagher.
Doorkeeper—Patrick Bonner.
THE IRISH STANDARD: SATURDAY, JULY 2, 1887.
IITWE FULFILL OUR PROMISES."^
We do not advertise to enrich newspapers we do not advertise because we are anxious to
spend money we do not advertise just because some other concerns do so we do-not advertise
merely because solicitors ask us to patronize tneir mediums we do not advertise to deceive the
people by glaring and improbable announcements we do not advertise simply because some one
tola us to use printers' ink and, finally, we do not advertise beciause we want to make a splurge.
We endeavor tb keep ourselves within the bonds of reason and good judgment, to confine our
selves to a plain statement of facts, and to maintain the dignity of our business. WE ADVER
TISE BECAUSE WE WANT THE PEOPLE TO KNOW WHERE THEY CAN BUY THE BEST
MADE CLOTHING FOR THE LEAST MONEY we advertise because we are anxious to meet
the public in our store, where the best opportunities are offered us to convince them that we
positively maintain the lowest prices in the city and where they can be more readily assured that
our advertisements, like our garments and prices are worthy of considertion we advertise be
cause we seek invistigation.
WHEN WE ADVERTISE WE TELL THE TRUTH!
Custom Tailoring.
This season we have made special efforts to
excel in the assortment of WOOLENS, from
which we make suits to order. Never in the his
tory of the West was there such a stock of Wool
en goods congregated under one roof as we are
displaying this Spring, and we are prepared, in
our new quarters, to SERVE ALL IN FIRST
CLASS SHAPE. We know that one poor suit of
Clothes will do us more harm than fifty good
suits can benefit us, and therefore we guarantee
perfect satisfaction in every respect.
HARRISON The Tailor, 45 w^^on Aye
Election of Officers.
The name of A. J. Dolan, treasurer
elect of Division No. 8, A. O. H., Min
neapolis, did not appear last week in
print, and THE STANDARD takes this
occasion to announce that "Andy" will
be responsible for No. 3's funds for the
ensuing term.
At a recent meeting of Division No.
1, A. O. H., St. Paul, the following of
ficers were elected for the ensuing year:
President—James Ryan.
Vice-President—John Cantwell.
Recording Secretary—M. A. Conroy.
Financial Secretary—C. B. McBride.
Treasurer—P. L. Dawson.
At the annual meeting, held Tuesday
evening, Division No. 3, A. O. H., St.
Paul, elected the following officers for
the ensuing year:
St. Oloud.
Correspondence of The Irish Standard.
Division No. 1, A. O. H., of this city,
is in a flourishing condition, having fifty
members in good standing thirty-seven
have joined the A. O. H. life insurance
fund.
James P. Healy, of Graceville, is dis
trict agent for the Continental Insurance
Company, and is located at St. Cloud.
He is a member of Division No. 1, A
O. H., Graceville. I hope Brother
Healy will have good success in this
new field.
The Fourth of Jul? will be celebrated
in grand style. There will be a grand
picnic at Empire Park on the banks of
the Mississippi and horse racing, boat
and tub racing on the river, and all
kinds of amusements.
The case of Mrs. Huffman against the
St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba Rail
road company was dismissed in the dis
trict court by Judge Collins. She
brought suit against the railroad com
pany for $50,000 damages. Mr. Huff
man was a brakeman on the railroad and
on the 20th of October, 1885, was thrown
off a box car by a defective brake and
killed at Nelson. This is looked upon
as a bad decision. She will appeal to
the supreme court Mrs. Huffman has
two small children.
I am glad to see Scott county coming
to the front with its new division of the
A O. H., and that Brother Shields will
continue at his good word. Hope to
see all others continue to do likewise.
O. O. B.
GENERAL LABOR NOTES.
The conference of the Amalgamated
association and the iron men was fruit
less.
The Chicago bricklayers refuse to ar
bitrate differences on the basis proposed
by employers.
The Window glass making ssason is at
an end and the various factories in Pitts
bnrg and elsewhere have arranged to
close this week.
Union strikers at Rochester, N. Y.,
endeavored to force non-union men to
join them in a fight with the police
one ™an was killed and several hurt
Collector Magone investigated the
case of 18 French silk weavers who
landed at Castle Garden Sunday, and
ordered that they be sent back to France
under the act of congress prohibiting
the importation of contract labor.
vOne thousand yards lawn to close—
prices to suit all—at O. T. Swett's,228
Central avenue.
i'C-'s rs
Keep faith with the people. Deal with them honestly, justly
and without favor. Tell the truth and avoid prevarications.
Inspire confidence.
MR. GLADSTONE IN WALES.
(Continued From First Page.)
good she isnervous, hysterical and dys
peptic, and therefore the strength of
her muscles is not what it should be
and you will find that Mrs. St. Clair's
life and conversation as thus detailed
by Mrs. Stowe are a continual lamenta
tion on the hardship of her case from
the fatigue she experiences in conse
quence of the performance of the neces
sary duty of flogging the slaves. Gen
tlemen, we have been flogging Ireland
with rare periods of intermission for
centuries, and it is no wonder that the
operation gets a little fatiguing it is no
wonder if Lord Salisbury's arm is tired,
for it is impossible permanently to gov
erna free people by coercive means in
the light of day and in the atmosphere
of freedom which happily pervades this
country. If you really believe that Ire
land could be pacified with such means
as are now in operation, it would be a
different matter but pray recollect that
our true opposition to this bill is be
cause it is not an attempt to render
more stringent the law against crime,
because it is not really in the main di
rected against crime, but against those
combinations of the people which in
substance have been known in this
country under the names of trades
unions, which trades unions have been
open to a good deal of criticism, and
have produced various inconveniences,
but which, notwithstanding, have vin
dicated the independence of the labor
ing population of the country, and have
upon the whole produced an immense
balance of good. The laboring popula
tion of this country had a power which
the Irish laboring population had not,
and this attempt to strike at their com
binations, not when they pass into
crime, because we make no difficulty
or "objection to the punishment of a
combination when it passes into crime,
but this attempt to put down a combi
nation which is not crime has received,
and, I trust, will receive, the hearty and
determined opposition of every Liberal
politician. Believe in the Irish people
to this extent, that they are human be
ings, full of noble qualities, and if they
have defects, as no doubt they have, for
we all, in every country, have them—
in my belief there is no country on the
face of the earth in which you can so
clearly trace these defects to the mis
government and the oppression from
which they have been sufferers for cen
turies. Believe in them to that extent.
Do not credit the statements of those
who allow it to be said, and who are
fond of saying, though they do not let
it out in public, though it is known to
1
',y
1
Men's Pants.
Our Pant's Department contain an as
sortment of over 10,000 pairs of Pants,
and we are constantly adding to its
immensity. As may be readily
con jectured,this enormous stock
includes eyery grade and style.
Men's All-Wool Pants, as
low as $2.50 Men's All
Wool Pants, in neat
stripes and checks, for
$3 Men's fine quali
ties in Corkscrew
a a
Diagonal, $4 to
6
fine Im­
ported Cassimere Worsted Pants, 96,50 to $8.
Be sure and see these grades.
r-v '/"t
Jrtt ^'"'r -HP
1,
be their normal sentiment, that Ireland
is a country made to be governed by
force. Ireland is not a country to be
governed by force any more than Wales
or England or Scotland was made to be
governed .by force. It is the injustice
with which she has been treated that is
at the root of nearly all her miseries,
and nineteen-twentieths of her sins are,
in my belief, an undeniable proposition
to be traced thereto. It is for you to
consider whether you will take your
stand upon that ground or not but if
you do take your stand upon it, I will
venture to cheer you in a difficult and
arduous contest—to cheer you with the
assertion that in the future your
triumph is as certain as anything in the
future can be. and that in the present
you have the sympathy, the approba
tion and the prayers on your behalf of
the British empire at large, of the
Anglo-Saxon race at large, and of civ
ilized Christendom in all quarters of the
world.
Hastings'
Correspondence of The Irish Standard.
Felix Mears, the section man who
was sunstruck over at Newport last
week, died shortly after being taken
home, and was buried from St. Boniface
Church. He leaves a wife and four
children.
The pupils of St. Boniface Academy
and Guardian Angels school gave a
musical and dramatic entertainment at
Teutonia Hall Wednesday evening to a
full house. These entertainments are
always a grand success.
The Rev. J. F. Dolphin visited Belle
wood last Sunday morning and cele
brated mass at 8 o'clock, the first
they have had in a long time.
A grand celebration here the Fourth
of July. Our people have at last
aroused themselves and intend to have
a real old fashioned time. A general
invitation is extended to all.
The Rev. J. B. Halton, a former be
loved pastor of this city, has regained
his health and has been located at Pres
ton, in Fillmore county. His old friends
and parishoners of this city wish him
success in his new parish. He came to
Hastings on his first mitwfon ang
worked hard and faithfully for over fif
teen years, going on missions and sick
calls over rough country roads, through
storms and cold, until his health gave
way and he had to resign and take a
rest. The best wishes of all go with
him, and Preston Catholics have a pas
tor they may be proud of.
Division No. 1, A. O. H., will elect
officers tomorrow (Sunday) for the en
suing year. c.g.
Seventy-five parasols to close at a liar
C* T. Swett, 228 Central avenue.
'•i va."'.: -v —OS
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