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The public weal. [volume] (Minneapolis, Minn.) 1906-1908, May 01, 1907, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90060338/1907-05-01/ed-1/seq-3/

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CLEAR THE WAY!
Lo! a cloud’s about to vanish
From the day!
And the brazen wrong to crumble
Into clay.
Lo! the night’s about to conquer,
Clear the way!
With the Right shall many more
Enter smiling at the door;
With the giant Wrong shall fall
Many others, great and small,
That for ages long have held us
For their prey.
Men of thought and men of action,
Clear the way!
—Charles Mackay.
“ORGANIZATION” DEFEATS THE
PEOPLE.
(Continued from page 1.)
only at the end of a riot which would
have been disgraceful but for its pur
pose.
If the people of Minnesota want any
thing in the way of respectable, de
cent legislation, it can be had only at
the hands of a political party which
stands, as an organization, for respect
able and decent things, and to this
fact the people are certainly waking
up.
No one questions that a legislature
composed of Prohibitionists would do
its duty in relieving the state of the
moral, political and financial incubus
of the saloon; and the record of the
Prohibitionists at the legislature this
year, together with their platform,
ought to be sufficient proof of the cap
acity and intelligence of the Prohibi
tion party on such questions as con
front the state. On the other hand,
no legislature that will refuse to allow
the people of the state the right of self
government can be trusted by the peo
ple on any other question whatsoever,
for it should be remembered that the
County Option bill and the Prohibition
constitutional amendment bill were
neither of them measures essentially
hostile to the liquor traffic, but simply
provided that the people by their
sovereign will might determine what
attitude the government of the state
should maintain toward an institution
that is recognized by all to be inimical
to the fundamental purposes of gov
ernment —namely, the protection of
the life, liberty, happiness and well
being of the people.
PERPETUATED THE SALOON.
Among the anti-saloon measures de
feated by the Legislature were:
The County Option bill; a bill prohibit
ing the transfer of liquor licenses and
requiring the licensee to have been a resi
dent of the county for one year next pre
ceding the issuance of the license; a bill
making the liquor bond of some actual
value instead of a legislative lie; a bill
providing for the submission to the peo
ple of a constitutional prohibition amend
ment; a bill prohibiting a saloon within
one mile of any public school in unorgan
ized territory and within 500 feet in mu
nicipal organizations incorporated under
other than a city charter; a bill extend
ing local option to towns of all classes,
and a number of minor measures.
Stood by the Machine.
There were a number of attempts to
materially modify the primary system;
some by extending it; others by re
stricting it, and others making such alter
ations in it as to increase its burden
some nature, especially upon minority
parties. Probably the most important of
these in its beneficial effects was the
bill introduced by Mr. T. E. Noble, one
of the Prohibition representatives, pro
viding for the non-partisan election of
merely clerical and administrative offi
cers, who have nothing to do with the
development or carrying out of a party
policy, such as county treasurer, county
register of deeds, county superintendent
of schools, and all judicial offices. All
of these, however, were sandbagged by
the ever watchful political machine, which
recognized them as threatening the
prestige of the dominant political party.
A Populist for the People.
The one election bill in the interest of
the people, which became a law was in
troduced by Senator Sageng, the only
Populist member of the session, and pro
vides that no fee shall be required for
placing upon the general election ballot
the names of any candidates nominated
at the primary election. This means
probably not less than S9OO to the Prohi
bition party in this state, and the old
system was entirely unjust. Candidates
filing for primary election will still be
required to pay a fee of $lO if the dis
trict is all confined to one county, or S2O
if it exceeds the boundaries of one coun-
ty.
Mr. Lobeck’s bill throwing certain safe
guards about boys under eighteen years
of age was enacted into law, and is a
wholesome and important measure.
All the political parties had put them
selves squarely on record for the elec
tion of United States senators by popular
vote. Early in the session, Mr. Higgins,
Prohibitionist, introduced a bill calling
for a constitutional convention under ar
ticle 3 of the constitution of the United
States, for the purpose of effecting this
reform. Despite smooth tactics in the
Elections committee and on the House
floor by the “organization” to delay the
measure, it was passed, but in the Senate
it was put to sleep. This is an illustra
tion of the infidelity of the old parties
to their platform promises. While both
Democratic and Republican parties go on
record in their platforms for this exten
sion of popular government, it is very
clear that the organizations themselves
are against increasing the power of the
people as against that of the politician.
THAT APRIL SPURT.
As April opened, we had between
1,400 and 1,500 of the 5,000 new self
paying subscriptions which we desire
paying subscriptions which we desire
to place on our books between last
November and next November. As
the first half of the year would close
April 30th, we made an earnest ap
peal to our friends to get us the 1,000
subscriptions necessary to put us half
way through our big and splendid job.
The office force worked like beavers
to accomplish this result. We mailed
thousands of appeals separately to
our friends, enclosing subscription
blanks and return envelopes. We also
mailed thousands of sample copies.
'All these things cost us a big bunch
of money. We didn’t get the 1,000
subscriptions.
We are not discouraged. Far from
it. We are nearing the 1,700 mark
and are moving steadily forward to
our goal. Our blood is up. We simply
must have the 5,000 new subscrip
tions.
But somebody will have to hurry.
Time is passing. In our last issue we
told how the job could be divided up
into clubs of all the way from 100
down and of the splendid work which
could be done by even a large number
getting us one subscription each. We
don’t feel like ringing the changes on
this idea this month. We are willing
that one person should get the whole
bunch or that some thousands of our
subscribers should send only one sub
scription each, but the 5,000 new sub
scriptions we must have. You are
saying “Amen” to that, are you not?
And you will help, won’t you? You
determined to do so months ago but
just hadn’t got to it, that’s all. We
want to hear from you this month.
Our eye is still on that 2,500. Two
thousand will be a sort of a half way
house. Our hundreds will be mile
posts which we will not pass as rapidly
as on the railroad but we will pass
them. Mark that! The saloon must
die! It ought to die quickly. It
would, if its enemies would get out
and hustle. The saloon cannot bear
the light. Give the people the facts,
circulate our papers and you will have
a check for a reserved seat at its
funeral.
STATE HAS NO RIGHT TO
LICENSE SALOON.
By section 1 of the bill of
rights it is declared that the
state of Indiana was founded
for the peace, safety and well
being of the people, and by sec
tion 1 of article 8 of the state
constitution it is made the duty
of the general assembly to en
courage, by all suitable means,
the moral and intellectual im
provement of the people. It
would seem to follow logically
that this imperative duty cannot
be discharged by delegating, for
a monthly consideration, to an
inherently unlawful and im
moral business the right to ex
ist and subject the citizens of
the state to its baneful influen
ces. * * * THE LOGIC OF
ALL THIS MUST LEAD TO
THE CONCLUSION THAT
THE STATE CANNOT, FOR
A LICENSE FEE, GIVE THE
SALOON BUSINESS A LEGAL
STANDING.
—From Decision of Judge Sam
uel R. Artman of Indiana,
Feb. 13, 1907.
PROGRESS IN NORTH DAKOTA.
Gov. Burke and Geo. Murray, the
new enforcement commissioner, are
doing business. One of the new laws
under which they operate requires all
persons holding federal liquor license
to register the same with the county
auditor, advertise for three weeks in
local papers the name of the person
to whom the government tax receipt is
issued, etc. Another provides for the
seizure and confiscation of liquors
shipped into the state contrary to law.
Another prohibits the soliciting of
orders for liquors. Another holds the
leaser of a building which is used for
the sale of intoxicating liquors equally
responsible with the man who sells.
Still another provides that a search
warrant shall be issued upon affidavit
of any person that intoxicating liquors
are being kept on the premises in un
usual quantities or for the purpose of
sale.
Nearly every time we visit Stone’s
School of Watchmaking, we see new evi
dences of growth. This splendid school
occupies large space in the Globe Build
ing, St. Paul.
THE PUBLIC WEAL.
«!»
HOME BAKING
ej s
• • 712 Hennepin Avenue
REPUBLICAN PARTY WARNED.
The Western Christian Advocate, a
Methodist Journal of discrimination
and influence, said:
“We believe that the seating of Mr.
Smoot will be as great a w'rong as was
the Dred Scott decision and will have as
grave consequences to the moral and so
cial welfare of the nation. Reed Smoot
as an individual is of small consequence,
as Dred Scott as an individual was of
small consequence, but Smoot, like Scott,
is the central figure around whom center
great issues. Upon his case the indica
tions are that the decision will be by a
party vote as the decision of the Supreme
Court in the case of Dred Scott was by
a partv vote. AND THE DECISION IN
SMOOT’S CASE, AS THAT IN DRED
SCOTT'S CASE, WILL HAVE IN OUR
OPINION FATEFUL POLITICAL RE
SULTS.”
A FAIR FIGHTER.
The liquor interests may thank their
stars that Representative Higgins was
not selected to lead the movement for
county option. His one star play was
absolute prohibition for the state, and
he came so near making good that he had
the enemy frightened. Mr. Higgins has
that one quality so foreign to the average
white ribboner —some regard for the other
fellow’s opinion—and this spirit of fair
ness has stood him well in the measures
he has been fathering. He is generally
well liked.
“Among the new subscriptions which
I have recently obtained are those of
three young men who are just coming on
the stage of action.” So writes one of
our club-getters. What could she do
more likely to add stability and strength
to our movement?
The Hon. C. W. Trickett, who wiped
out the 165 joints of Kansas City, Kan.,
and paved the way for the enforcement
victory of April 2, 1907, says: “Eight
months ago I believed in high license and
local option, especially for the larger
cities, but today, after living in the larg
est city in Kansas under enforced pro
hibitory law and having seen the advant
ages flowing from it compared with the
results of high license just across the
line in Missouri, I am opposed to re
submission and in favor of the Kansas
prohibitory law. It is a good law and
can be enforced in every city and coun
ty in the state, and if this law is as
sailed or put in question, I would feel
called upon to lend my humble services
to defend it upon the stump from one
end of the state to the other.”
If any of our subscribers ever hear a
person declare that he has tried, but
without success, to stop his copy of The
Public Weal, as is sometimes said of
other papers and, it may be, of ours also,
they will confer a favor upon us by stat
ing squarely that one of the easiest things
in the world is to stop one’s copy of The
Public Weal if he writes us to that effect
and pays up his subscription to date.
When subscribers notify a postmaster of
their desire to discontinue their paper,
the postmaster sometimes overlooks noti
fying us. The only safe way is to write
us direct. If the subscriber is paid to
date, we strike his name at once from
our list. If he is in arrears, we write
him, advising him of the amount due
and stating that on the receipt of the
same his name will be stricken from the
list. We do not intend to force our paper
upon any one. We are trying to make
such a paper as the enemies of the saloon
will want in their homes for their own
perusal and that of their children until
the end of the fight.
OLIVER W. STEWART’S DATES.
As we go to press Mr. Stewart is
starting a ten-days’ strenuous engage
ment with the State Committee. He
spends the 10th and 11th at White
Bear, Kellogg and Lake City. His
further appointments are:
SUNDAY. May 12th. Winona. Fore
noon, First Baptist Church. Afternoon,
Y. M. C. A. Evening, First Congrega
tional Church.
MONDAY. Afternoon, Stewartvllle.
Evening, Spring Valley. TUESDAY. Af
ternoon, Rich Valley. Evening. First
Christian Church, St. Paul. WEDNES
DAY. Afternoon, Afton. Evening, First
Baptist Church, Minneapolis. THURS
DAY. Afternoon, Maine Prairie. Eve
ning, Clearwater. FRIDAY. Elim
Church. Gordon township. Evening,
Sauk Center. SATURDAY. Afternoon,
Deerwood. Evening, Brainerd. SUN
DAY, Mav 19th. Duluth, Forenoon, Da
nlch M. E. Church. Afternoon, Y. M. C.
A. Evening, to be announced.
Not an ache in a barrel. —Street car
advertisement.
There’s a lie in every letter of that
statement.
■ IAIIFII Finest quality Clover
lillllL V honey in 30 lb. cans, one
nnr I can 10 ets. per lb., 2or
11 Villa I more cans 9V& cts.; 12 lb
cans. 72 lbs. to a case.
9Mi cts. per lb. Amber honey % cent per
lb. less than Clover. Address.
M. V. FACET, Preston, Fillmore Co., Minn.
DORSETT’
ELICIOU
ELICACIEwJ
CATERING
—St. Paul Dispatch,
ICE CREAM
Minneapolis
LAMBERTVILLE
“SNAB-PROOF”
Robber Boots
Not lowest
priced, but are
cheapest because
they wear long
est. Ask your
dealer for
“Lambertville
Snag-Proof.’*
If he does not
have them —or
will not get them for you—apply to
Goodyear Rubber Co.
ST. PAUL, MINN.
North western Distributers.
Til IQ Mffll C AND 45 OTHER FUR BEAR-
I niO TfULI ING ANIMALS. Handsomely
lithographed in-natural colors, each animal
numbered and described, together with 36
page book, “HOW TO TRAP WILD ANIMALS "
Postpaid for lOcts. Stamps, Silver or Money
Order. Prio* Uiti of Raw Fun and Hldot Fro*.
NORTHWESTERN HIDE & FUR CO.
200-4 Ist St »■ MIHHMPOUS, MIN,
HSi furs
To mcmillan fur & wool co.
MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Illustrated Circular Free to anyone inte etted in
. RAW FURS.
Trapperc' Guide Free lo those who ship to ur
EVERGREENS THAT UVB.
wm
FRUIT TREES THAT BEAR.
Our CATALOG and “PLANTERS’ GUIDE*
which will aid yon in choosing the hardiest vari
eties for planting in the Cold North, le FREE.
■END FOR IT. ALBERT LEA, BUNN.
RELIABLE LOCAL AGENTS WANTED,
You May be Swindled
if you fall to read this paper
before going into the Squab
Business. A copy will convince.
MONTHLY, SO CENTS PER YEAR.
THE, SQUAB BULLETIN,
203 News Bldg., St. Paul, Minn.
City Councils, District
ntltlM Ul- Attorneys and Individ
ill"" I L.U IIV Ll ualswhoareinterested
in the enforcement of
the liquor laws are requested to correspond
with me. I have been in this business for years
and can give you gilt-edge references. Rates
very reasonable. All kinds of detective work
solicited.
S. B. JACOBS
2840 29th AVE. S. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
For Good Homes,
Responsible Tenants, or Insurance
that Insures, in St. Paul, be sure
HUSTLING
3

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