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The mirror. (Stillwater, Minn.) 1894-1925, February 21, 1895, Image 4

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90060762/1895-02-21/ed-1/seq-4/

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MARLIN '9l.
The iUALlßKEßepe.Url'ie»lnlh«Kifl« U.e Following Cartridge. Wltli-
ent any Change. In Adjustment:
SEH^
This ammunition is cheap and for sale everywhere, and as compaied with re
peaters using the 32-20 cartridges, will save the entire cost ot the ride in the first
two thousand cartridges. The ammunition is what costs in the long run. (.et
the best ride made to shoot cheap cartridges.
The 3“* calibre uses 32 short and long rim lire, and 32 short and long centre-tire
cartridges. Each ride has two tiring pins, one rim and one centre, and they can
he interchanged without tools. I his size also has an elevating leai sight bu,,
in other respects is the same as the 22 calibre. It is the best farm ride vet pro
duced The long cartridge will kill a beet or hog, and the short is just the
thing to shoot a hen or auv kind of small game, such as squirrel, woodchucks,
rabbits, ducks, geese, etc. ‘it can he used where 32-20 would he dangerous.
How About the NEW and ONLY 25 Calibre.
Write for (Catalogue to
THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS Go.,
\KW HAVEN, Conn.
• ••68e9«««t«««*««9««*«***«** 0 * 0 ' t *** >M# * M **** #9 * 99 *
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:: DONAHOE’S V DONAHOE’S ••
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other better.
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Delight every American Catholic and interest every
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rfll Wa.l.iHilton St.. Boston, Mass.
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Cit Paper Pains,
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Only lOc. Lac It.
Elsewhere tliey cost from to 40 cents.
Designs of new garments are published every
week in The llepublie with an order blank for
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Thousands of ladies in every State have pur
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THE DAYS OF YORE.
We have all heard about them—the days of
yore—the good old times—most old persons like
to descant upon them. Old men are reminiscent.
To think little of the future and to be continually
recalling the past is an infallible sign of old age
or premature decay. The old man has no future,
He is waiting by the wayside for the last great
change to overtake him. It is natural that he
should love to sit in the sunshine and think of
the old days. Grandchildren may play about
him. They are only memories. They simply
revive the memories of other children that were
hi the long ago. The newspapers interview—for
sake of comparison—old people on questions of
the day. They only get memories that have very
little connection with the present. The “oldest
Inhabitant” of a town is often known as its big
gest liar. Not that lie is so from intention, or Is
ambitious to be untruthful; but he mixes a few
facts with much fiction and his poor memory
does the rest. He really thinks the tilings he
heard when he was a hoy are things that he saw.
There was an old lawyer who was learned in
many ways, but could not make a convincing
argument. It was wondered why he did not
succeed in court. A sharp member of the liar
said "the old man takes his own opinions to he
law. and the judge cannot find them in the
books.” Old men are often found mistaking
romance for truth and trying to write a history
on the baseless fabric of dreams.
Dyspeptic relics of the days of yore are always
telling of the good tilings they had to eat when
they were boys. Nothing since has been so good
as the mince pies and doughnuts mother made
in the days of yore. The butter was sweet and
pure in those days. Liquor had not been adulter
ated. they said, and for many years drinkers
could enjoy the pleasure of being drunkards
without goiug mad or experiencing the horrors
of the jim-jams. These old remembrers of
other days forget that their stomachs are worn
out. In the days of yore they could relish the
toughest morsels of jerked beef. Now they must
have poached eggs. It is the stomach of the old
man that has changed, and not the stuff he once
delighted in.
Get on to the-old oaken bucket that hung in
the well,” the “moss covered bucket,” that
"iron-bound bucket.” or whatever it was. sus
pended by a pole over a wet hole in the ground.
The "Old Homestead” actors sing sweetly of it;
but it does not pan as it lias been pictured in
days of yore. The rolling stone gathers no moss:
there is no reason why the hanging bucket
should have an abundance of it. It is well
enough to go back to that well. l?ut you have
growu tall and the well curb seems lower and
the well shallower than it was in days of yore.
The water is not the same. The old oaken bucket
is played out and has no moss on it. The songs
are as sweet and the fragrant apple blossoms of
the orchards fall as gratefully; but the old well
and the red-clieeked girl with the white sun
bonnet and curls who drank its waters are only
memories now.
Our‘fathers, god bless them, were patriots.
They made from a howling wilderness, in spite
of native foes and unspeakable privations and
sacrifices, the grand country it is our business to
preserve. They suffered and endured. They
were obliged to suffer, and they had to endure
or die. Don't run away with the idea that they
sufferedand endured because they rather liked
that sort of thing. George Washington was the
father of his country because he happened to lie
the best looking and soberest young man about
when a father was wanted. There is no know
ing what sort of a general he would have made
if responsible for the handling, moving and
feeding of such armies as (; rant and Lee op
posed and led. The great orators of the days of
yore, if living now. would find difficulty in keep
ing themselves great in tiie face of electricity,
and webmesses that flash and print and publish
to the world within the hour all the speeches
great men make. A speech made in one town,
printed and sent ahead by mail, becomes a
chestnut when the speaker comes to repeat it in
tin* next.
Conditions have changed since the days of
yore and men have changed. Men are grow
ing wiser, and those who take proper care of
themselves are stronger. The modern John L.
Sullivan, in good shape, would give the ancient
Hercules a smart tussle if he would drop his
club and go in under Queeusbervy rules. The
world has progressed since the days of yore.
The original devil used the simple snake racket
to make himself master of the situation. There
were no diamonds, nor seal-skins, nor opera
boxes, nor champagne slippers in those days.
"Jiut Satan now is wiser than in days of yore,”
says Pope. You may be sure he is- obliged to be
to lead anybody astray. The truth is. there
never was such a country as this, nor ever such
an age as the present for all of us. and especially
for the young. The fruits of the thoughts of
others are theirs. All the accumulated wisdom
of all the centuries since history began, all the
triumphs of human effort to improve human
conditions, since the first man and woman made
aprons of tig leaves in response to tiie first awak
ening sense ol modesty, are theirs. The exper
ience which their fathers have paid dearly for is
theirs. The institutions of arc and learning that
it iias required ages to establish are theirs, at
hand, to be enjoyed now and in all the years to
come. The days of yore were well enough in
that long ago; but when compared with the
present days—more pleasant and not so yore—
they are not in it. Minneapolis Times.
Uppertkx— Can you mention any tiling
against my ancestors.
Cynic—Yes. Their posterity.—l'own Topics.
ON THE STRAND
Mai —So you are going to America for a little
change, sour ladyship?
His nibs— Yes. doing over to hit my wife for
a hundred thousand. I’m broke.
DO YOU KNOW
That the real insanity expert is the man who
succeeds in getting sent to the asylum when he
deserves to go to the penitentiary?
That when a man first marries a woman he
feels like he could eat her up. and in about
three years he wishes he had?
That if you want to be successful, don’t squeal,
but root?—From St. Louis Humorist.
Steward Benner has had the bakery enlarged
by the addition of the room formerly used as
the state blacksmith shop, under the tailor shop.
The room has been entirely renovated, supplied
with new tile flooring, and the brick wall divid
ing this shop from the bakesliop removed, con
necting the two rooms. It is a much needed im
provement. as the additional space will be fitted
with shelving and used as a cooling and general
storeroom. The doorway leading into the black
smith shop, from the court, has been partly
walled up, and window frames placed in, giving
this room sufficient light and ventilation. It is
an all round improvement and the bakery boys
appreciate it.
CHICAGO BAKERY & b r^ u ‘
CHARLES HEITMAN, Proprietor.
♦ Oakes & Candies. MEALtS AT ALL HOURS
241 South Main St., uext to OPERA HOUSE, Stillwater, Ulniiesota.
MINNESOTA MERCANTILE QOMPANy7
Wholesale Grocers.
THE ONLY EXCLUSIVE
JOBBING HOUSE
LUMBERMEN’S SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY.
We compete successfully with any house tributary to this territory.
Our shipping facilities being superior to those of any other
house in the NORTHWEST, our customers can depend on having all
orders entrusted to us filled with PROMPTNESS & DISPATCH.
Comer Chestnut & Water Sts., STILLWATER, HIAVMSOTA.
New York
Dry Goods & Millinery,
Carpets & Wall Paper.
Our stock of ladies’ and
children’s garments the
Largest ever shown in
The city.
Dry Goods
Gall and Examine Our
Immense Stock.
Louis Altalon & Go.,
113 to S2l No. .Tlalii St. A
114 lo 122 So. Water SI ,
Stillwater, Hina.
Emporiums.
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DETROIT FREE PRESS.
2'HF FRFF PRESS isa La rife twelve Pa<y Weekly, and has tin Lar<j<tst
Number of Spenial Contributors of any Weekly Published in America.
IMI “Mm Tits" Duaiieot, «sss&.
J\x\ d a Large Premium List.
ALSO
Special Womans Page. “ s r ple
DETROIT FREE PRESS, Detroit,. Midi.
lUtmetunv* ©Jjtmght
By Mark M- “Brick” Pomeroy.
A monthly paper devoted to the most advanced thoughts of the age.
PRICE #I.OO Per Year.
Send {OT Specimen Copy to mmE J||Q||Q||T f C.
46 World Building, NEW YORK.
Lowest Prices in the City.
Goods Warranted as
Represented.
& Clothing
Largest stock of
Men's, boy's and child's
Clothing, hats, caps, and
Furnishing goods in
The city.
IT ALSO HAS
IjY the city.

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