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The mirror. (Stillwater, Minn.) 1894-1925, December 26, 1895, Image 4

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90060762/1895-12-26/ed-1/seq-4/

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The man who is in the highest
stale of prosperity, and who thinks
his fortune most secure, knows not
if it will remain unchanged till
evening.
The line which separates regard
and love is so tine that the young
heart transgresses the boundary
before it is a ware of having even
verged upon it.
The grandest and strongest na
tures are ever tin* calmest. A fiery
restlessness is the symbol of frail
ties not yd outgrown. The repose
of power is its richest phase and
its clearest testimony.
The hills of lofty endeavor and
high achievements lie all around
us. and if we never catch a glimpse
of the \iews they afford, we need
not com plain that it is because of
the insuperable limitations of our
surroundings.
Without earnestness no man is
over great or does really great
things. He may be the cleverest
of men: he may be brilliant, enter
taining. popular : but. if lie has not
earnestness, lie will want weight.
No soul-moving picture was ever
painted that had not in it depth of
shadow.
If you cannot be happy in one
wav. be happy in another: and this
facility of disposition wants but
little aid from philosophy, for
health and good humor are almost
the whole affair. Many run about
after felicitv. but they are like an
honest man looking for his hat
while it is on his head or in his
hand.
Discipline, like the bridle in the
hand of a good rider, should exer
cise its influence without appear
ing to do so should be ever active,
both asasupport and as a restraint,
vet seem to lie easily in hand. It
must always be ready to check or
to pull up. as occasion may require;
and only when tin* horse is a run
awav should the action of the curb
he perceptible.
Everybody is bound to some
kind of service: everybody is de
pendent upon his fellows. The
veriest recluse must have food,
•clothes, and a shelter; and. if he
can make these himself, he is still
dependent upon the courtesy of
his neighbor to let him alone. It
is impossible to be wholly inde
pendent, and the attempt might
as well be abandoned. But it is
jrossible to be reasonable; that is
within the reach of every one.
Wealth and fame and high po
sition are often the signs of quali
ties commanding our highest re
spect. They frequently speak of
industry, economy, skill, talent,
intellect, wisdom. As such they
are deserving of honor. But, when
we honor them not as signs, but as
realities, not for what they repre
sent. but for what they are. when
we crave them and struggle for
them, and resolve to gain them at
any price, even at the sacrifice of
the very qualities for which they
stand, then we are taking the very
life of real respectability.
Do not expect to be treated as|
you have treated others. If you!
have been charitably disposed, orj
have assisted others, do not enter-1
fain the vain expectation that you
will receive a somewhat propor
tionate return of thanks and kind
ness. The reward for such assist
ance is the pleasure and gratifica
tion to yourself of knowing that
you have been the means of reliev
ing the wants or alleviating the
sufferings of others. This is the
only reward that any man can ex
pect. and gives more satisfaction
in the long run than any other.
Every one who has the charge
<>f youth should see not only that
they are protected from what is
evik but that they are surrounded
bv what is good, and be careful
not only to preserve them from
the malaria of vice, but to place
them in the pure and bracing at
mosphere of high thoughts, noble
ideals, and worthy deeds. There
are two influences ever pressing
upon them; the one is direct, vol
untary. intentional —the other, in
direct, involuntary, unpremedi
tated. The former all conscien
tious persons endeavor to exercise;
the latter, because, like the atmos
phere, it eludes our grasp, is often
neglected and forgotten. —From
The Philadelphia (Pa.) Saturday
Fve. Post.
ew Y ork «*******»•
Dry Goods & Millinery,
Carpets & Wall Paper.
Our stock of ladies' and
children’s garments the
Largest ever shown in
The city-
Dry Goods & Clothing
„ ; Largest stock of
Call and Examine Our ... , ,
Immense Stock. jMen’s, boy s and child S
liis ikdn 4a. hats ’ “ 1
1131» 121 so. Main si. & Furnishing goods in
114 to 122 So. Water SI., ° °
Stillwater, »«»*>• CUy.
Emporiums.
MINNESOTA MERCANTILE COMPANY.
'nit' ONLY EA'eCUSIVE
JOBBING HOUSE s/V
IN THE CITY.

We compete successfully with any house tributary to this territory.
Our shipping facilities being superior to those of any other
house in the NORTHWEST, our customers can depend on
having all orders entrusted to us filled with PROMPTNESS
& DISPATCH.
LUMBERMEN'S SUPPLIES A SPECIALTY.
Corner Chestnut
Water Si*.,
Binder Twine.
Manufactured at the
■ Minnesota State Prison
THE BEST "-MARKET.
i :: *
Pure American Hemp Twine 520 feet to lb.
Standard Twine 500
Sisal Hemp Twine
Manila <fc Sisal (Mixed) 575
Pure Manila Hemp Twine 050
jdZJMRY WOLFER, Warden,
STILLWATER. * MINN.
Lowest Prices in the City.
Goods Warranted as
Represented.
Stillwater, Minn.
UNION SHOE *
MANUFACTURERS OF
BOOTS <& SHOES.
’Pvongola, Kangaroo, Russet, Calf, Oil Grain, and
Satin Oil in Mens’, Boys’, Youths’, Womens’, Misses
and Childrens’. ■ ■■w
i Also Full Lines of Felt Shoes and Slippers, in Mens',
Womans’, Misses’ and Childrens’
STILLWATER
WHAT RIFLE DO YOU USE?
A MARLIN!
BECAUSE
U lias a Solid Top. $ \, 0 PROTECTION.
It Ejects at Side. A 4 COMFORT.
It l»a*» Fewest Pari*. “ —a (OWENIEM E.
It i* ld<£lit In IVeiglit. 4 /f\ f PLEASI RE.
It has the Ballard Barrel. j ACCURACY.
THEREFORE, you want a MARLIN.
The MARLIN rifle whether the action is closed or open has the
parts fully covered and protected and never exposed to rain. sand, and
dust. Write for catalogue to
THE MARLIN FIRE ARMS Co.,
MEW HATEK, Conn.
POMEROY'S By Murk M. '‘Brick Powßfoij.
A.htmncc ©ffowgljL
A MONTHLY PAPER UEVOTEI) TO THE
MOST ADVANCED THOUGHT OF THE AGE.
__ Price SI.OO per Tear.
SEND FOR SPECIMEN COPY'TO
ADVANCE THOUGHT,
46 WORLD BUILDING NEW YORK.
THE INTER OCEAN
Most Popular Republican Newspaper of the West
And Has the Largest Circulation.
DAILY (without Sunday) $6.00 per year
TERMS DAILY < with Sunda y» 58,00 year
BY MAIL The Weekly Inter Ocean | SI.OO
PER YEAR ' t *
AS A NEWSPAPER THE INTER OCEAN keeps abreast of the times in all
!?I^N^TA'i?Blsri>‘P t CL&"uTEKfFRE n '
The Weekly Inter Ocean
AS A FAMILY PAPER IS NOT EXCELLED BY ANY.
| It has something of interest to each member of the family. |
ffIMBCT* ITS YOUTH’S DEPARTMENT is the very best of its kind. r^P|g
aSS^F 1 ITS LITERARY FEATURES are unequaled. I!
POLITICALLY IT IS REPUBLICAN, and gives its readers the benefit of the
ablest discussions on all live political topics. It also gives tnem THfc NEW- O
THE WORLD.
IT IS A TWELVE-PAGE PAPER.
Tup INTER OCEAN IS PUBLISHED IN CHICAGO, THE NEWS AND COnaERCIAL
CFNTFR OF ALL WEST OF THE ALLEGHANY MOUNTAINS, AND 15 BETTER
ADAPTED TO THE NEEDS OF THE PEOPLE OF THAT SECTION THAN ANY
PAPER FARTHER EAST.
It is in accord with the people of the West both in Politics and‘ p‘ .
Please remember that the price of The Weekly Inter Ocean is ONLY ONE DOL
LAR PER YEAR. Address THE INTER OCEAN, Chicago.
MINN.

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