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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, September 27, 1913, Image 6

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IN NEED OF TEACHING SISTERS.
The Benedictine Sisters under the
immediate direction and supervision
of the Right Rev. Bishop Matz, of
Denver, Col., and the Rev. Father
Liciotti, of WalBenburg, Col., desire to
make known the great and urgent
need of religious teachers in the
Western Catholic schools, and particu
larly in Walsenburg.
A magnificent schoolhouse has been
built and equipped with the latest
and best modern improvements, and
yet has stood idle for the last year
because no Sisters could be found to
undertake the work. The whole city,
with a population of 3,000 families,
Protestant and Catholic, crave for a
Sisters' school and a hospital. There
is no hospital of any kind in the
whole place, so any one can easily
see the great field for Catholic zeal.
The Sisters, therefore, appeal to
those with music, hospital and teach
ing qualifications as well as house
hold skill to consider this vast field
of opportunities and hope that many
will correspond to work for God in
this neglected part of the West. Ap
plications may be made to the Right
Rev. Bishop Matz, of Denver the Rev.
Father Liciotti, pastor of Walsenburg,
or the Benedictine Sisters of Walsen
burg, Col.
DIOCESE OF ZAMBOANQO.
Bishop O'Doherty gives the follow
ing striking summary of the condition
of his diocese of Zamboango, in the
Philippine Islands.
1. It is one of the largest and
newest diocese under the U. S. A. Flag,
its first Bishop having taken posses
sion, in September, 1912.
2. It is one-third of the Philippines
in area, 600 miles from North to
South, 600 miles from East to West,
and includes 300 different islands.
3. Local history is, three centuries
of bloody encounters with the Moros
or Mohammedans: nor is traveling
alome universally safe even at the
present day.
4. This diocese includes all the
warlike Moros of Sulu, etc., and most
of the pagans of the whole Philippine
Islands.
5. Our Catholics are generally poor:
they have been more interested in
protecting their lives than in
amassing wealth.
6. We have only seventy priests to
cover an area of 40,000 square miles,
and this cut up in 300 separate
islamds, in typhoon swept seas.
7. We have not sufficient priests to
attend to the Catholics (300,000),
much less to reach all the pagans:
though our priests are most anxious
to give up their parishes and go into
the mountains, if I can get other
priests to replace them.
8. Some parishes, formerly of ten
and 15,000 souls have been without
permanent priests since 1898 as a
result I found, when I came here, that
some 50,000 Catholics had become
Aglipayan heretics, for want of priests
to sustain and instruct them.
9. Under American Rule, many
settlers from the northern Philippine
Islands are pouring into this diocese,
but we have no priests to send them
It. We have many American
planters of hemp, cocoa-nuts, etc., but
the majority are non-Catholic.
11. We have not a single diocesan
institution: no hospital, seminary, col
lege, high school or asylum of any
kind.
12. Half of the children die before
the age of five, for want of care:
though the land is fertile and the
climate excellent.
13. We are dependent on the charity
of Protestant missionaries for hos
pitals who, it must be confessed, are
most anxious to have Catholics to go
to their institutions.
14. In time we shall have
descendants of many Americans and
millions of Filipinos. Now we can de
cide what religion shall be theirs.
15. Help us in the beginning, and
them, please God, we shall be able to
take care of ourselves. Send us a sub
scription to repair our churches, put
up a few dispensaiites and get homes
for poor children: above all speak to
apostolic men to relieve our greatest
need, that of priests who will give
spiritual food to the many souls that
are perishing through lack of it.
THE HIERARCHY SPEAKS.
The Second Plenary Council of
Baltimore uttered no words of deeper
import than those recommending to
the Bishops and their clergy, the Re
ligious Orders and their laity, the
conversion of the Negro. Its language
is so earnest and energetic as to re
mind one of the letters of St. Francis
Xavier from the Indies. The Bishops
"whom the Holy Ghost has placed
to rule the Church of God" are still
of the same mind. They yearn to see
the aid of the whole Catholic body
enlisted for this great cause in such
a public and permanent form, as
would bring missionaries to the work
from every diocese and money from
•very parish in our country.
CHURCH HANDICAPPED.
Lack of English-Speaking Priests
In China Keenly Felt.
"China's choice of the English lan
guage as second only to the national
tongue and its use as a medium of
education has given an overwhelming
advantage to the Anglo-American
Protestant missionaries, denied in a
great measure to the Catholic priests
of the Latin races, says Rev. Hugh
Scallan, Shensi, China.
"Their schools, colleges and nni
versitiee overflow with students the
output of their press inundates the
country their Young Men's Christian
Association is patronized by the high
est in the land their hospitals, served
by the ablest physicians, bring them
into sympathetic touch with *11
classes of society:
u --I?-
'J ..5I0N FIELCSA
••11— •-.
"Not that the light of the Catholic
Church is hid under a bushel. It is
the only religiou that overawes by a
mysterious power, which is its divine
light. In the eyes of the most en
lightened of the nation's leaders, it is
China's sole hope its self-denial, the
only cure for the universal selfishness
which opposes the existence of a pros
perous state. But the dearth of Eng
lish speaking Catholic missionaries
handicaps the Church in its strenu
ous endeavor to keep abreast with
Protestant missionaries in the van
guard of progress of China s awakened
millions."
STUDENTS FOR FOREIGN
MISSIONS.
American aspirants to the foreign
missions may today find an outlet for
their zeal.
Some of the religious Orders and
Societies, notably the Franciscans,
Jesuits, Holy Ghost Fathers, the Con
gregation of Notre Dame, the Broth
ers of Mary, La Salette Fathers and
the Society of the Divine Word, are
beginning to provide subjects for the
field.
We note, too, with interest that the
newly formed American Foreign Mis
sion Seminary at Maryknoll, Ossining,
N. Y., began its second year on
September 14, taking students for
philosophy and theology.
This Seminary also opened an Apos
tolic School in Scranton, Pa., Septem
ber 8, under the name of the Blessed
Venard Apostolic School for Foreign
Missions.
Boys over fourteen years of age
and up to twenty-one will be received
at this house if they are well recom
mended by a priest and have an in
clination to the foreign missions.
Such youths are encouraged tc
write to the Seminary Directors al
Maryknoll, the address of which wt
have given above.
IN A CHINESE SEMINARY.
The glory of the Catholic Church is
her Catholicity. She is not a Church
of one race or for one color, but from
the very day of her foundation she
has been reaching out to gather into
her fold human souls of every race
and of every clime.
In the spirit of the Church our mis
sionaries labor to establish the Cath
olic Church amongst a people, and,
this accomplished, they pass on to
other races and to other lands to
bring the light of the gospel. As soon
as conditions warrant it, therefore,
the missionary Bishop establishes
seminary. It begins, generally, in
poverty, and struggle and sacrifice
marks its progress. The seminary of
North Ho-nan is an example of the
average missionary seminary.
As in the early years of the Church
the seminary is the Bishop's house
Situated on an eminence outside the
city of Wei Hwei the building itself
is nothing to boast of, though it com
bines the first requisites for a good
schoolhouse it has plenty of light
and air. Another feature, and one
that surprises the natives, is the large
yard for outdoor games that sur
rounds the school. A sound mind in
a sound body is the Bishop's prin
ciple, one that is new to the Chinese
who never make an unnecessary
movement. When they see the sem
inarians doing gymnastic feats or
playing football, therefore, they gaze
on in astonishment and remark to one
another that the young men must
have changed their very nature when
they entered the seminary.
Study, of course, holds the first
place with the youthful aspirant for
the priesthood. Chinese and Latin
are the first studies in the seminary
then come history, geography, arith
metic, writing and singing the eccle
siastical sciences come later, during
the five years preceding ordination.
One entering the class rooms of the
seminary would remark the absence
of the maps, pictures, etc., that are
characteristic of European and Ameri
can schools. The reason for this
the old, old missionary reason
poverty. The Bishop desires also to
add the studies of chemistry and
physics to the curriculum, but has not
the means to fit out a laboratory.
China has been a sleeping giant,
but the giant is awakening with a new
life thrilling through his every mem
ber. In that new life Christianity will
have its share, indeed is having its
share, and the seminary is becoming
more and more a part of the spiritual
life of every diocese in the land. The
people are turning to the Church as
never before, and the native clergy
will have to bear a larger part of the
burden of the work of evangelization
with each year. The foresight and
the sacrifices of the missionary
Bishops have made this possible, and
the outlook for the Church is there
fore very bright.
FR. THIRY'S FAITHFUL FLOCK.
The July number of Catholic Mis
sions contained an article by Fr. F.
Thiry, P. F. M., describing the mar
tyrdom of a group of early Christians
and relating how their descendants
had in secret and alone managed to
preserve their Faith for centuries.
The people in question fled from
the outskirts of Nagasaki to a village
in the Goto Islands called Mizunoura
Forty years ago, after enduring
much persecution and suffering, they
ventured to erect a small church and
ever since the practice of their re
ligion has been made possible by the
ministration of the priests from Nag
asaki.
Fr. Thiry, a young apostle, himself
a victim of poor health brought on
as a result of hard work, asks for
assistance. His own "little econo
mies," made only by much self-sacri
fice, result in a discouragingly small
sum. The old chapel of forty years
ago is falling in ruins. The poor
Christians, used to patience and long
suffering, wait and pray. Why not
lend a helping hand to this worthy
flock and its faithful shepherd.
50,000 CATHOLIC CHILDREN
are now reading THE CHILD APOS
TLE. It is a monthly magazine of 24
pages of stories, pictures, etc., just
for the children. It costs only 25
cents a year. Isn't your boy or girl
worth having a little magazine all
their own? Send 25 cents in coin or
stamps for a year's subscriptbm* or
ask for a sample copy."
Address:
THE CHILD APOSTLE,
v
1133 McCormick Bldg., Chicago, 111.
A FEAST DAY ClfT
It was early spring in San Fran
cisco, the Golden Gate of the West.
The air was soft and balmy ftnd deli
cately fragrant with the wealth of
flowers bursting into bloom.
Agatha Lambert was "coming out."
The process was a slow one, with its
dances, receptions, dinners and teas,
but altogether delightful to the moth
erless girl, who, after ten years spent
in the peaceful monotony of a convent
school, had been taken under the pro
tecting wing of her mother's girlhood
friend, Mrs. Scott-Martin.
Mrs. Scott-Martin was not a Cath
olic, but she had promised the dying
mother to care for her child, to give
her a Catholic training and when the
time should come, the right kind of
start up the social ladder.
The fulfillment of the promise had
proved most pleasant to Mrs. Scott
Martin. From a sweet child, Agatha
had developed into a sweeter woman,
bright, frank, sympathetic, with great,
laughing, blue eyes that revealed the
heart and soul of a child.
The round of festivities was near
ing its close. On this perfect after
noon a "tea" was in progress, and as
the luxurious brougham rolled along,
Mrs. Scott-Martin suddenly recalled an
important meeting of the Missionary
Board on which she served, and which
she must attend. It would not delay
them long.
They found some thirty women
gathered, fine, earnest souls, who,
Agatha soon learned, gave up a day
each month to work for missions in
foreign lands. The idea was all new
to her. She had of course prayed for
the heathen, but she never knew or
dreamed of personal service for such
a cause. She was quite sure Catholics
did nothing of the sort, at least in
America, and her heart filled with a
queer longing as she heard these
women plan the collection of funds
for foreign missions and discuss meth
ods of arousing others to activity.
That night she wrote to the Sisters
who had mothered her, asking all
kinds of questions about mission work
and opportunities of service. The an
swer was discouraging. Outside of
prayers and almsgiving to home mis
sions, and to the "Holy Childhood"
and the "Propagation of the Faith,"
they knew of nothing she could do.
A year passed—one of those delight
ful, never-to-be-forgotten years when
youth is care-free and the pleasures of
life wholesome. But the seed sown in
the xcmng girl's heart had taken root
and was beginning to bear fruit.
In the midst of her joys she thought
much of that Mission Board meeting
and tried to interest her Catholic
friends to do some real work for mis
sions, but it was all in vain, for priests,
nuns and laity had too much to do at
home to be concerned with the heath
en. "Feed my sheep," seemed to be
a local command. Each shepherd had
his own flock and would not see be
yond the fold.
Yet the missions called insistently
to Agatha Lambert, and grace to an
swer was not wanting. To the "hor
ror" and amazement of all, she quitted
the life she had made so bright and
had so loved, to join, in Europe, an
order of foreign mission nuns, because
in her native land none was to be
found.
It was a time of famine in India.
The land was parched and dry, and
hunger, suffering, and fever desolated
the district which a few months be
fore had given promise of a luxurious
harvest.
A little group of Sisters who had
labored there for ten years in one of
the poorest missions, was reduced to
absolute want, the more keenly felt
because the sick and the little ones
whom they had adopted were dying for
lack of nourishment, and souls they
might have saved with a few grains
of rice were being turned away daily.
Two of their own number had already
died.
Agatha Lambert was in this group of
nuns. She had gone the whole way
for souls.
It was her feast day and after Mass
she had gone up to the clearing back
of the convent to oversee the making
of some adobe bricks, to be used,
when times should be better, for a
dry, clean chapel, a decent class-room
and a sunny room for the sick. For
ten years she had tried to secure this
much-needed addition and today, al
though peace was deep in her heart,
she felt the impossibility of it all. Her
strength was almost gone, and her
Companions dying.
Would relief never come? For the
moment her courage was low, her
heart sick. But at the sight of
weary Sister coming towards her,
Mother Agatha's face lighted with her
ever-ready cheer, and she laughed out
right when the Sister announced
"There's a present for you below. It
came with this note. Three guesses!
Her thoughts flew back to the child
hood days when three guesses meant
a real Paris doll, a jewelled ring or
boxes of sweets. So she made all
three and then "gave up."
The Sister handed her a crumpled
note. She opened it and read:
"Palem remembers your feast day.
She is very unhappy and no one loves
her. She does not forget to pray.
She gives you her only girl, her baby.
Keep her forever. Make her one of
Mary's children. Her name is Palem,
too."
She read the note again and mused.
Her feast day! Famine, hunger
everywhere! Such a gift! Another
mouth to feed, and there was not
enough to go round now!
THE CATHOLIC BULLETIN, SEPTEMBER 27, 1913.
Mother Agatha looked beyond the
hills toward the land of plenty she
had left, and then down into the val
ley where she could see the starving
children lying listlessly about. What
could she do!
She recalled Palem, a sweet orphan
ed child beloved of all, who had wish
ed to stay with them always. But lik
most Hindu girls the little one hai
been betrothed in infancy and at foui
teen had been claimed by the seven
teen year old groom, who would not
release her. That was five years ago.
In the atmosphere of idolatry she had
kept her faith sweet and her heart
close to Mary! And now Palem's child
was waiting in the valley below.
Quickly Mother Agatha went down
the hill, giving a kindly word, a sooth
ing pat to the suffering ones about her.
Inside the house, on a table, lay her
feast day gift—a little, brown tilt of a
thing, laughing and cooing as if all
was well with the world. A ray of
hope—the promise of better things, the
babe seemed, and for the moment
hunger, toil and care were forgotten.
Mother Agatha took the child in her
arms, carried it to the altar and pre
sented it as Mary had Jesus, to God.
He would provide.
That night the rains fell, a cry of
relief went up through the land, sleep
came, and God's peace held the little
community in its loving embrace.
Mother Agatha smiled. She saw a
vision of her own land in its luxury
and comfort—a land where there is
no dread of awful famine, no fear of
pestilence. She saw the pitying smile
her friends had given her as she left
them so long ago. And she prayed
from her grateful heart that God
would reveal to them as He had to
her His universal love for souls.
She took another peep at the bat
(Theodora—gift of God—she woul
call her) and then, exhausted, feu
asleep with the divine promise ring
ing in her ears: "In as much as ye
do it unto the least of these, My little
ones, ye do it unto Me."
—Marp J. Rogers, A. B., in the Field Afar.
There's romance enough at home,
without going half a mile for it only
people never think of it.
Williams Grocery Co.
WHOLESALE TO ALL
New Teas and Coffees
Write for Price List
216 Washington Ave. N. MINNEAPOLIS. MINN.
jjjilBIBSiiMlll
Conducted by
Sisters of St. Joseph
26
Telephone Dale 354
Western Badge & Novelty Co.
ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA
JNDER THE CONTROL AND DIRECTION OF ARCHBISHOP IRELAND
•ated in extensive and beautiful grounds on the banks of the Mississippi. Five co
lious buildings, including a Residence Hall completed last year at a cost of $130,0
atholic Military College, classed "A" by the War Department, with an officer of 1
ted States Army detailed by the Secretary of War. A large and well-trained facu
riests and laymen.
legiate Department. Embraces the branches of a liberal education leading
Degree of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Sceince.
demic Department. Includes all the branches of a High School Course.
nmercial Department. A thorough, practical and comprehensive training in 1
ects necessary to a commercial career. Best methods in Bookkeeping, Phonograpl
ewriting, etc., supplemented by a training in English Literature, Commercial Law,e
oaratory Department. For the instruction of young boys and of those who are
ified to enter the Academic or Commercial Department.
cor­ ral
ST. MARY'S ACADEMY
GRACEVILLE, MINNESOTA
BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL
FOR GIRLS
St. Agatha's Conservatory of Music and Art
East Exchange Street, Cor. Cedar, St. Paul
Piano, Harmony, Violin, Mandolin, Guitar, Zither, Banjo, Voice, Elocu
tion, Languages, Painting, Drawing, China Decorating. Pupils may enter at
any time. Call or send for terms.
ri MJtxy uciiuul for ua ia
A thoroughly equipped High School.
Graduates admitted to the University of Minnesota without examination.
A good Business Course for Students who do not desire the regular Acad
emic Course. Conducted by the
Enroll For The Fall Term
Investigate our modern courses. Head*
quarters for ROWE'S BOOKKEEPING AND
ACCOUNTANCY, GREGG SHORTHAND,
TOUCH TYPEWRITING, ETC. Individual
instruction. Special courses for experienced
bookkeepers and stenographers. DAY and
NIGHT school all year. Send for catalog.
Only Accredited Business School fa St. M.
PRACTICAL BUSINESS SCHOOL
WALTER PASMUSSEN. Prop.
393 Minnesota Street St. Paul. Minnesota
I
John A. Lethert, Prop.
Manufacturers of
IJSLI
Banners, Button.
iLr,!w! Flags, Pennants,
S O U V E N I S E
20 East Sixth Street, Second Floor
ST. PAUL. MINIS.
E. NORDCllllST 6 CO.
Painters and Decorators
PAINT AND WALL PAPER
779 E. 7th Street St. Paul, Minn.
Charles J. 1'. Young A. Young, Jr.
JAMES A, YOUNG & SONS
CUT 8TONE
Bedford Cut Stone a Specialty
Office: Corner Sixth and Seventh Streets
Mill and Yard: Upper Levee, Foot Chestnut
Telephone Connections
ST. PAUL, MINN.
To Dealers in Tablets
Send for samples and quotations
of "The Quality Tablet" the big
gest and best 10c tablet on the
market Contains 120 sheets of
high-grade bond paper.
The John Leslie Paper Go.
MINNEAPOLIS
fU fw*
5 1* Si
TEA. Llptoa's No. I Quality. H-lb.
regr 35c ffrade for UUl»
CHOCOLATE MENIER I i-lb. can 44c
Powdered M-lb. can 23c
COFFEE, Our 'Jockey Club" Blend.
verr rich and delicious, per lb
BUTTER Choice Fresh Creamery, per lb. 32c
mPFQP Fancy Full Cream, per lb. QA
tObSrOCf I Fancy Mild Brick, per lb. *OC
Waw Waw Table Sauce, ree. 25c bottle 18c
Chili Sauce '"Jockey Club", reg. 25c bot..20c
Monogram Seeded Paisins, re? 10c pkt. 7'4c
Cleaned
Currants, finest
quality,
per
Minneapolis Office and School Furniture Go.
MAKE A SPECIALTY OF
Church Furniture
eX
Send lor Catalogue
omei FACTMY: Ctmr 8th St. ui 8th A*. S. E.. WMfAWtli
lb lie
and Assorted Pickles, re? 25c bot I9c
ASSORTED SOUPS, "Ready Maid". Of.
finest quality, special, 3 cans for "W*
PURE OLIVE OIL, I
ourree. gloobot 7,c
Antoninl's Finest-*
Italian
5 72c
i our reg. 55c bot. 42c
fifrHTPr AlP Delatour's N. Y., doz. pts. ..$1.30
Ulll^Cl nlC Pur. Brd. St.Paul's, doz. pts.$|.IO
CI ftiiD Michaud's Extra Fancy CO CA
UU 11
Patent, the very finestjk/
g.
I
A( 4Dl*V
can^flr
IjfcL
1 i-wvn 98.1b. sack
SOAP Cose Queen I p.nox 8 rakes 2Sc
i
Catalogue sent on request
______
Sisters of St. Joseph
i
th
A
IHE E. HACKNER CO.
Desigaers, Manufacturers and Importers of
ALTARS, STATUARY
Church Furniture, Etc.
S e o n o i v i s i o n S s
U CROSSE WISCONSIN
MOTHER SUPERIOR
VILLA MARIA ACADEMY
Fontenac. Minn.
THE
e
VILLA SANCTA SCHOLASHCA
Beautifully situated in a most healthful location
DULUTH, MINNESOTA
ft 7* If^f jtk.C 1
OF
v
CHAMBERLAIN, S. D.
The Catholic College of South Dakota
A Boarding aud Day School for Young Men and Boys
Beautifully located on the banks of the Missouri river. Excellent
facilities for athletics. Thorough moral, mental and physical training.
Collegiate, Academic, Commercial and Preparatory Courses. Music De
partment. Private rooms at moderate prices. Catalogue upon request.
A
1
Conducted by the SISTERS OF ST. BENEDICT
Under the Patronage of the Rt. Rev. James McGolrick, D. D.
Affiliated to the Catholic University of Washington, D. C. Accredited
to the University of Minnesota. Collegiate, Academic. Commercial
and Preparatory Courses, Music. Art, Elocution and Domestic
Science.
For Information Address SISTER DIRECTRESS
OUR
.0vW
It is situated on a bluff in one of the most beautiful regions of the
healthful Minnesota Valley. The terms are comparatively low, because
the school is not established for the purpose of gain. The Religious desire
to place within the reach of their pupils, away from the distraction and
noise of a large city, the opportunity for acquiring a thorough and prac
tical education.
The buildings are large, airy and fireproof, containing all modern
conveniences and comforts. The Academy grounds cover an area of sixty
two acres, including a natural park of fifteen acres, and a widespread
campus. Nothing has been spared to make the place attractive and
homelike.
The curriculum of studies provides for instruction in the elementary
branches, physical culture, elocution, dressmaking, plain and fancy needle
work, cooking, oil and water colors,china painting, vocal and instrumental
music. Special attention is called to the commercial course provided for
such girls as desire the safeguards of Christian training along with com
mercial proficiency.
A complete high school course is offered to all who desire the
advantages of a classical education.
For Information address, THE MOTHER SUPERIOR.
COLUMBUS COLLEGE
'If i
Address REV. M. J. BREEN, C. S. V., President
NCTFIRRRIEM XCABTMY
f-AiilBAULT, MINNESOTA
CONDUCTED BY THE SISTERS OP ST. DOMINIC
Accredited by the Minnesota State Board of Public InstructiM 'attd by
several prominent institutions of learning.
Offers complete courses in these departments:
AC4DE1IC Including Classical and Scientific Connes
PRFP4RAT0RY INTERMEDIATE- PRIH4RY
NORUAL—€0ii£RCIAL
••sic,
Art,
Dramatic ExprtSSlOB
Opens September 9,1913 Year book on application
VILLA MARIA ACADEMY
~Acci ty of a.'
A SC FOR GIRI RON! MINN.
NAZARETH SCHOOL FOR BOYS
LAKE CITY, MINN.
BOTH CONDUCTED BY THE URSULINE NUNS
These two Institutions, conducted by the Ursuline Nuns, are unexcelled anywhere. The
locations are beautiful and healthful. Every convenience for the proper care and education of
young girls and boys. Term» reasonable. Write far Catalogue, which gives full description
and term* for both institutions. Address
ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY
COLLE€iEVILLE» MINN.
largest and best-equipped Catholic Boarding College in the North
west. Founded 1857. Conducted by Benedictine Fathers. Ideal loca
tion, 85 miles northwest of St. Paul, on the shores of two beautiful
lakes, surrounded by wooded hills. Large buildings with all modern con
veniences. Library of over 30,000 volumes. Valuable museum. New $40,000
Science Building. Large Gymnasium and Gymnasium Instructor. Unrivalled
facilities for in-door and out-door exercises. Registration last year 439 40
Instructors. Widely known for excellent mental and moral training.
Shorthand and Typewriting, Music, Drawing
Preparatory, Commercial, Scientific, Classical,
Philosophical, Theological.
For Catalogue. Etc^ Addlttt
ALLEGE OF ST. CATHERINE,
A CATHOLIC COLLEGE FOR GIRLS
Accredited by the Minnesota State Board of Public Instruction and by
several prominent Universities.
Seventy Acre Campus* Plre«Proof Buildings.
COMPLETE COURSES fN ttHESB DEPARTMENTS
The Collegiate, leading to the degree of
y
LAOY OF
CO
LASH
Located on Good Counsel Hill, Mankato, Minn.
This institution, conducted by the School Sisters of Notre Dame from
Milwaukee, offers a course of studies embracing all branches of art and
science

4•
MOThER SUPERIOR
NAZARCTh SCHOOL TOR BOYS
Lake City, Minn
THE VERY REY. RECTOR
ST. PAUL
MINN.'
Bachelor of Arts—
or College Preparatory Music and Painting in their various branches
Domestic Art, Household Science and Cooking.
The College enjoys the patronage of Archbishop Ireland.
Year Book on Application Address the Secretary
St. Benedict's College and Academy
ST. JOSEPH. MINNESOTA
A Boarding School for Girls and Young Ladies
With which is connected a Boarding School iot Little Uof
between the ages of six and twelve years.
Accredited to the State University of Minnesota. Collegiate, Academic,
Commercial, Preparatory and Primary Departments. Special advantages im
Music, Needlework, Art, Expression and Domestic Science.
The Academfc
For Particulars Address SISTER DIRECTRESS

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