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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, March 14, 1914, Image 1

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Volume 4
THE ANGELIC DOCTOR
ST. THOMAS IS THE PATRON OF
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS, THE MOD
EL OF TEACHERS AND PUPILS
—EXTRACT FROM A SERMON
PREACHED BY FATHER GILLEN
ON THE PATRONAL FEAST OF
THE COLLEGE OF ST. THOMAS.
The patronal Feast of the College
of St. Thomas was commemorated on
Thursday, March 12, by solemn relig
ious services at which the faculty and
student body of the College and of St,
Paul Seminary, as well as a number
of priests from the Twin Cities and
elsewhere, were present The Solemn
High Mass was celebrated by the
Rev. Philip B. Gordon, a graduate of
the College, and the sermon was
preached by the Rev. Mathias Gillen
of the teaching staff.
The Sermon.
After a brief introduction, Father
Gillen gave a historical sketch of the
life and labors of St. Thomas and
made practical application of the les
sons to be drawn from his sanctity
and learning to the present duties and
future activity of the student body.
He said in part:
Descended from an imperial family,
endowed with a more imperial mind,
by genius, an Italian, by race, of min
gled Suabian and Norman blood, heir
to all the thought and feeling of
twelve centuries of Christianity,—wiser
with the wisdom of experience,—well
equipped was St. Thomas, prepared, it
would seem, by a singular Providence,
for the task of making a vast and
final synthesis of world-knowledge,
such as was possible to the thirteenth
century.
Surveying the whole field of knowl
edge, welcoming truth from whence
soever it might come, he gathered his
material from every quarter. He real
ized at a glance that since God is the
author of all truth, divine truth must
be in perfect accord with the truths
which nature and reason had taught
him that each separate created thing
reflects, in a certain measure, the wis
dom and power and beauty of God.
He enlisted in the service of faith the
sound reason of him whom he had
loved to call "the philosopher," care
fully sifting the wheat from the chaff,
cautiously departing trutl- from cx
ror. Then, throwing the whole force
of his constructive power and lucidity
of exposition into one vast effort, he
reared his monumental structure. He
gave to the world for all time, as the
fruit of well-nigh half a century of
humble communing with God, his mas
terpiece, the Sum of the Science of
God, the most perfect exposition of
Christian Doctrine, a system "clad in
a panoply that is proof against the
blow of the heretic and the thrust of
the unbeliever."
CONTRACT LET FOR ARMORY
Honor the Saint.
Our meeting is not, however, to dis
cuss the subtle philosopher or the
consummate theologian, but to honor
the Saint. There is a tendency to dis
parage the commonplace, a desire to
look for the novel in ideas, and yet
there are times when we all need to
hear again counsels, not new but ever
true. And I choose rather to impress
on the hearts of those who have not
yet borne the burden of the day and
the heat, for their inspiration and em
ulation, a few of the lessons which the
master has taught us.
Singularly-gifted minds always com
mand our admiration. With his depth
of mind, and subtlity and clearness,
and irresistible logic, St. Thomas is,
indeed, a genius to be admired. But
he is more he is a model to be imi
tated. His work is his life. As the
one is the model of synthetic perfec
tion, so is the other a perfect synthe
sis. In the mind of St. Thomas, as we
glean from his writings, we find the
most perfect blending of the natural
and supernatural. In his soul, the "hu
man qualities which spontaneously in
spire respect and admiration blend
harmoniously with heroic virtue, so
that he stands forth as one of the
"most saintly of scholars and the most
scholarly of saints" and for this rea
son was he chosen the ideal patron of
Catholic schools, the especial model
of Catholic teachers and Catholic stu
dents.
A Model for Students.
To him we look for intellectual light
and leading. From first to last he
was the most diligent of students who,
in the search for knowledge and truth
scorned delights and lived laborious
days, and became an intellectual
giant. Yet he was not puffed up by
his triumph not arrogant, because of
his superiority not impatient with
the dull, nor severe towards the medi
ocre. Though he loved study, and be
came possessed of all the learning of
his day, he cared nothing for intellec
tual power except in so far as it pro
moted the interests of the Church of
Christ. Would that this example of
unselfish devotion inspired you this
morning to dedicate to the service of
the Church and the furtherance of di
vine truth, every fibre of your mind
and heart! Whether as layman or
priest, a few yettFblfc-nce, ou are all
called to one and the same Apostle
ship, the promotion of the interests
of holy religion. You are now laying
the foundation. Men are hut boys of
a larger growth. As you are today
fashioned in mind and heart, while at
this nursery of religion and learning,
so you will be as men tomorrow.
Yield, therefore, to the gentle mould
ing that is going on, perhaps imper
ceptibly, from day to day, and do not
shrink sluggishly from the labor and
[Continued on PageS.]
COLLEGE OF ST. THOMAS
AND CLUB HOUSE TO COST $70,-
000—STRUCTURE WILL BE 230
FEET LONG AND 100 WIDE-
AUDITORIUM WILL SEAT 900—
ARMORY WILL BE LARGEST IN
TWIN CITIES EXCEPT ST. PAUL
AUDITORIUM—READY FOR OC­
CUPANCY NEXT SEPTEMBER.
Last week the trustees of the Col
lege of St. Thomas approved the plans
drawn by Butler Bros., for a new
building which will serve as a com
bination armory and club house. The
contract for its erection was let to
Butler Bros., tor more than $70,000.
The new building will house both
parts under the same roof. The front
portion of the structure will serve as
a club house, the first floor being de
voted exclusively to this purpose. The
second floor will be used as an audi
torium with a seating capacity of
nine hundred. It will serve for all
sorts of reunions, lectures, etc., as
well as for the commencement exer
cises. In the basement will be placed
lockers and baths and a shooting gal
lery for indoor target practice which
constitutes an important part of the
winter military work of the cadets.
The front portion of the building
containing the club house and audi
torium will be 100 feet in length and
58 feet in breadth. The armory prop
er will extend 172 feet back from the
club house and will be 100 feet wide.
It will be the largest hall in the Twin
Cities with the exception of the St.
Paul Auditorium. The walls will be 18
feet high and an arched roof, spanned
by trusses, will be 28 feet above the
floor at its highest point. A portion
of the floor space will be reserved for a
gymnasium, but it will be so arranged
that the whole floor will be available
at a moment's notice for drills, tour
naments, athletic competitions and
the like.
The building will be of red pressed
brick, the club house section being
two stories high with basement. The
lower part of the armory will
also be of red pressed brick, while the
upper part will be arched. The build
ing will face toward Cleveland ave
nue and lie parallel to Summit and
the rear part of the armory proper
will practically reach the east wall of
the athletic field.
Work on the building ^ili begin
at once and the opening of the school
year next September will see St.
Thomas College provided with facili
ties for athletics and military drill un
equalled by any institution in the
Northwest
AUSTRALIA'S PRIEST
FATHER DIXON WAS TRANSPORT
ED AFTER THE REBELLION OF
'98 AND SPENT TEN YEARS ON
THE AUSTRALIAN MISSION-
DIED IN ICELAND IN 1840.
When Father Dixon's remains were
recently transferred from the old
churchyard of Crossabeg, County Wex
ford, Ireland, to the plot reserved for
priests in the new church, a tragedy
of the "troubled times" of '98 was
vividly recalled.
In those 'days when Wexford flung
her little army of pikemen against
the strength of English guns and
bayonets, Rev. James Dixon was a
priest in this little parish near New
Ross. Because his sympathies were
all with his afflicted people, he soon
became a marked man, and was ar
rested and transported to Australia.
It is recorded that on that terrible trip
to the Antipodes on the convict ship
Father Dixon was chained to the
corpse of a black man and was left
attached thus till the rats had almost
carried away the corpse bit by bit.
Only one destined for greater service
could have held to life and reason
through such an ordeal. Father Dixon
was the pioneer priest of Australia
and his name is still reverenced there.
After ten years ministry at the ends
of the earth, he returned to Ireland
and served as a priest in his native
parish of Castlebridge. His death oc
curred in 1840, and he was buried in
the old churchyard plot of Crossabeg.
After seventy-four years his remains
have been transferred to a new place
of rest. "The Mills of God" have been
working steadily since Father Dixon
was first laid away under the sod of
Wexford and a new day has dawned
for his people. He was only one
among many Irish priests who suffered
not alone torture and imprisonment
for their faith and country, but the
long, slow martyrdom of watching the
decimation of their people in those
trying times gone by.
ELECTED
I
HON. T. D. O'BRIEN CHOSEN
HEAD OF ST. PAUL COUNCIL,
K. OF C.—ACTIVE IN ESTABLISH­
ING THE ORDER IN MINNESOTA
—FIRST STATE DEPUTY.
The Honorable Thomas D. O'Brien,
former Justice of the Supreme Court,
was unanimously elected Grand
Knight of St. Paul Council, Knights of
Columbus, at a meeting held in the
club rooms last Tuesday evening. He
succeeds George T. Redington, who
died last week.
Mr. O'Brien is a charter mem
ber of the St. Paul Council—the
first Council of the Order estab
lablished west of Chicago—and was
very active in promoting its organi
zation. He was elected its first Grand
Knight and was untiring in his ef
forts to place the society on a good
foundation throughout the State. He
was the first District Deputy and af
terwards the first State Deputy of
Minnesota, and has always been an
enthusiastic promoter of every proj
ect for the welfare of the organiza
tion in St. Paul.
During his tenure of office as Grand
Knight, the National Convention of
the Knights of Columbus will meet
in St. Paul and upon him, will de
volve the duty of making plans for
the entertainment of the delegates
who will assemble in this city the
first -week of August.
CHAPLAIN'S UNIFORM CHANCED
WAR DEPARTMENT HAS DECIDED
TO MAKE AN ARMY CHAPLAIN'S
UNIFORM INDICATE HIS RANK.
The long discussed subject of an
appropriate uniform for the Chaplains
of the United States Army has at last
been settled by the War Department.
All the chaplains in the service were
called upon for an expression of opin
ion as to what each thought was the
proper uniform. There were many
different opinions on the subject. The
suggestions were considered by a
board of officers.
The new uniform' will show the in
signia of a chaplain's grade, and will
thus be an outward mark of rank,
a thing which many of the Catholic
chaplains opposed, claiming that it
would often be a decided hindrance in
their work with the enlisted men.
As a rule, the Catholic chaplains are
satisfied with the present uniform and
were opposed to any change that will
remove the insignia of their clerical
calling or any addition to the uniform
that will be an outward exhibition of
rank, claiming that experience has
demonstrated that the Catholic priest
is able to do most effective work as a
priest, and the dearest title by which
he is known among officers and men
is not that of "Chaplain," but "Fa
ther."
OBLATE MMM DEAD
FATHER LEFEBVRE OF LOWELL
WAS HEAD OF THE AMERICAN
PROVINCE OF HIS ORDER SINCE
1898.
Rev. Joseph Lefebvre, O. M. I., for
mer Provincial of the Oblate Order of
the United States, died at the rectory
of St Joseph's Church, Lowell, Mass.,
on March 4, in the seventy-ninth year
of his age.
Rev. Joseph Lefebvre, O. M. I., was
born in Constant, Que., April 15,1835.
He was educated in the Seminary of
St. Sulpice in Montreal, entering the
Oblate Order in 1854 upon the com
pletion of his studies there. His theo
logical studies were finished in St.
Joseph's College of the Oblate Order
in Ottawa. He was ordained in June,
1858.
In 1873 he became provincial pur
veyor for the Canadian province. For
the next twenty-five years he was on
duty in St. Peter's Church, the largest
Church of the Oblate Order in Mon
treal.
In 1898 he was appointed Provincial
of the American province^ which then
comprised the whole, of the United
States.
effllSMMfiJipilllDIIED
AUSTRIAN EMPEROR RECOGNIZES
THEIR DISTINGUISHED
SERVICES.
Three Christian Brothers recently
received distinguished honors in Aus
tria. Rev. Brother Gerhard, Pro
vincial, has been named Imperial
Counsellor by His Majesty, the Em
peror Francis Joseph. Brother Euche
rius, Assistant Provincial, has re
ceived the Cross of Knighthood of the
Order of Francis Joseph. In return
for services rendered by the Brothers
to destitute inhabitants of Scutari,
Albania, during the siege of that
town, Brother Celestinus, Director of
the Christian Brothers' School there,
has been decorated with the gold
Cross and Crown given for distin
guished service.
51
ST. PAUL, MINN., MARCH 14, 1914.
LOSS- ROSES
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
James C. Nolan.)
I cannot' smell your rotoes when I'm
dead,
Nor see their petaled depths that hold
the dew
Though banked in masses all about my
head,
No sense of mine can unto them pierce
through.
To me they must he a if they were
not
Their all-transcending loveliness be
tost
Why bring them when I cannot know
them? What
Shall quit your conscience of the
wasteful cost?
My catafalque be draped in somber
black
With lighted tapers at the feet and
head
For so our fathers through the ages
back
Deemed fitting when they prayed be
side their dead.
CHIEF MBOIOF IRELAND
A CATHOLIC HAS OCCUPIED THAT
POSITION FOR FORTY YEARS
ONE OF THE GREATEST LAW­
YERS IN THE BRITISH ISLES.
Prom February 17, 1874, dates the
appointment of the Right Honorable
Christopher Palles, then Irish Attor
ney-General, to the position of Chief
Baron of the Exchequer, in succession
to Chief Baron Pigot. Born on Christ
mas Day, 1831, the future Chief Baron
received his education in Clongowes
Wood and Trinity Colleges, being call
ed to the bar in 1853. He took silk
in 1865, became Solicitor-General in
1872, Attorney-General in the same
year, and held the latter post till 1874.
The Lord Chief Baron enjoys the
reputation of being one of the great
est lawyers in the three kingdoms.
His legal reputation may be gauged by
the fact that in July, 1912, he re
ceived the signal honor of a summons
to assist the Judicial Committee of
the Privy Council in connection with
a knotty problem concerned with the
Canadian marriage t:*ws. Though the
judgment of the Court was given by
Lord Haldane, it was an open secret
at the time that the elucidation of
the problem was largely the Chief
Baron's work.
He is a Catholic, and Is a County
Cavan man by birth, an LL. D. of
Dublin and Cambridge Universities
and a Privy Councillor for Ireland
and England.
BEAHOLLf CONVERTS
PROMINENT WRITER8 WHO HAVE
BEEN RECEIVED INTO THE
CHURCH.
Anti-Catholic preachers and publica
tions fairly revel in telling of the
Church's attempt to foster ignorance
among her people. In- doing so big
otry merely exposes its own ignor
ance, says the Catholic Record of Lon
don, Ont.
Among men and women well known
in our literary life the following are
converts to the Church: Miss B.
Anderson ("White Avis"), "John Ays
cough," Rev. .F. Aveling "C. M. An
thony," Miss E. Austice Baker, Anita
Bartle, Madam Belloe, Dudley Baxter,
David Bearne, S. J., Egerton Beck,
Edmund Bishop, James Britten, K. S.
G., Miss Bradley and Miss Cooper
("Michael Field"), Montgomery Car
michael, Madame Cecilia, Cecil Ches
terton, Rev. J. Copus, S. J., Mrs. V.
M. Crawford, Isabel Clarke, Felicia
Curtis, Mary Angela Dickens, Herbert
Dean, Louisa E. Dobree, Mrs. East
wich ("Pleydell North"), Ruth Eger
ton, F. Y. Eccles, Rev. G. A. Elrington,
O. P., Margaret Fletcher, Robert
Francillion, Mrs. Hugh Fraser, Rev. R.
Garrole, S. J., S. T. Gatty, F. S. A.,
Rev. T. J. Gerrard, E. Gilliat Smith,
Emily Hickey, Margaret Howitt, Rev.
E. R. Hull, S. J., Mrs. Arthur W. Hut
ton, Wentworth Huyshe, Genevieve
Irons, Frances Jackson, Mrs. Coulson
Kernahan, Mrs. Hamilton King, Mrs.
Leggatt, Shane Leslie, W. S. Lilly, T.
Longueville ("The Prig"), Miss M.
Mallock, "Lucas Malet," J. Hobson
Matthews, Mrs. William Maude, Wil
fred Meynell, Mrs. MeynelL Rev. P.
M. Northcote, W. Vance Packman,
May Pemberton, Mrs. Hungerford Pol
len, Mrs. Raymond Barker, Robert
Ross, J. F. Scholfield, Aimee Sewell,
Alice Shield, Rev. S. F. Smith, S. J.,
Hugh Spender, Miss F. M. Steele, Ida
Taylor, Leslie Toke, Rev. Vassail
Phillips, C. SS. R. Canon Vere, Mary
Alice Vialis, E. Vincent Wareing,
Maude Valerie White, G. C. Williams
son, Mrs. Yorke Smith, Rev. B. Zim
merman.
APPOINTED GRAND CHAPLAIN
Kaiser Wilhelm has appointed by
royal decree Father Joppen, first
chaplain of the garrison of Breslau,
as Grand Chaplain of the German
Army and Navy. The Holy Father
has already appointed him a Titular
Bishop and his episcopal consecra
tion will take place on March 22 in
the parish church of the garrison at
Berlin.
THE KEWJATHEDRAL
GIVES NOTE OF DISTINCTION TO
ST. PAUL—WILL ATTRACT
VISITORS.
"Girard," who conducts a brilliant
column on "Topics of the Town" in
the Public Ledger of Philadelphia,
says the St. Paul Dispatch, bewails
the fact that the City of Brotherly
Love, like most American cities, has
no church of outstanding architectural
distinction, although in theaters, pub
lic buildings and the like Philadelphia
can vie successfully with the best Eu
rope or the United States has to offer.
"We have handsome churches, as
churches go in this country, but not
one great church. In this respect
Philadelphia differs from no other
American city, except, possibly, two
where beautiful cathedrals are now
building. Considered solely as an edu
cational object every big city should
have at least one overmastering re
ligious edifice."
Girard no doubt has St. Paul in
mind as one of the two American
cities "where beautiful Cathedrals are
now building," and the Cathedral, like
the state capitol, will in the future be
one of the show places of the city. In
this connection Girard says: "Since
countless Americans travel thousands
of miles every year to see European
Cathedrals, it would seem like com
mon sense to have a few at home."
Unquestionably the Cathedral now
building here will attract visitors from
far and wide, and constitute one more
argument why tourists en route to one
or the other coast should include St.
Paul in their itinerary.
APPOINTED VISITATOR GENERAL
FOR THE DOMINICANS IN
LATIN AMERICA AND CUBA.
Very Rev. Thomas Lorente, O. P.,
rector of St. Anthony's Church, New
Orleans, has been appointed Visitator
General for the Dominican Order for
Mexico, Central America, Cuba and
Porto Rico.
Father Lorente is a Vicar of the
Dominicans of the Holy Rosary in the
United States, and was at one time
professor of Canon Law in St. Thomas
University, Manila, P. I. In 1899 he
was appointed private secretary to
Archbishop Chappelle. Later he was
made pastor of St. Anthony's Church,
and since his appointment he has
established a fine seminary at Rosary
Ville, La. He will visit the Dominican
convents in Latin America and Cuba,
and send a report to Rome.
AUSTRALIAN BISHOP DEAO
VICAR APOSTOLIC MURRAY OF
QUEENSLAND WAS A MEMBER
OF THE AUGUSTINIAN ORDER.
The Right Reverend Dominic J.
Murray, Titular Bishop of Issus, and
Vicar Apostolic of Northern Queens
land, Australia, died last week. He
was born in West Ireland, and joined
the Augustinians in 1874. He finished
his theological course in Rome and
was ordained in 1880. In 1898, he
was made Vicar Apostolic of Northern
Queensland, and resided at Cooks
town. His vicariate has a Catholic
population of seven thousand.
CEYLON JAJHOLICS
PREDOMINATE IN EVERY DIS­
TRICT—THEY ARE 83 PER
CENT OF THE CHRISTIANS.
The Ceylon Catholic Messenger,
touching on the progress of the
Church in Ceylon, says:
"The preponderance of Roman
Catholicism at the present time is
very marked. In seven out of the
nine provinces more than 70 per cent
of the Christians are Roman Catho
lics. The districts with the largest
proportions are Chilaw with nearly 98
per cent, Mannar 97 per cent, Millait
tivu 93% per cent, and Trincomalee
90% per cent. Puttalam, including the
pilgrims at St. Anna's on the census
night, shows a proportion of nearly 99
per cent of the Christian population as
Roman Catholics excluding the pil
grims, the proportion is 98 per cent.
The enormous and increasing popu
larity of the great Roman Catholic pil
grimages at St. Anna's and Madu are
abundant proof of the strength of the
Roman Catholic Church in Ceylon.
Roman Catholicism has improved in
every district, and is the predominant
sect in every district of the island. At
the last census Matara was the, one
exception, but at this census the Ro
man Catholics are in a majority in
this district also. The proportion of
Roman Catholics amongst the Chris
tians is 83 per cent, as compared with
82 per cent at the last census."
WRITER A CONVERT
The London Tablet announces the
recent reception into the Church of
Crawford Flitch, a brilliant writer,
whose "A Little Journey in Spain,"
has lately appeared.
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
Cecil Underwoed.}
Democracy may mean—certainly
does mean—larger blessings and bene
fits for the average man yet from
an artistic standpoint, compared with
monarchy, it is a decided failure. It
lacks the picturesque gradation of so
ciety like a range of mountain pines
from the valley to the peak—from the
humble toiling subject, up through
gentlemen and ladies and Knights and
Counts and Viscounts and Barons, and
Dukes and Duchesses—up through all
the gentility and unique millinery till
one reaches the crowned and sceptred
Monarch. All this medieval display
of state carriages and scarlet livery.
Grooms-in-Waiting and Guards of
Honor, Lords of the Household and
Lords of the Stables, Field Marshalls
of the Garter and the Golden-Stick,
Lord Stewards and Equerries and
Mistresses of the Robes,—all this me
dieval pageantry, as your correspon
dent saw it in London recently, is
bound to capture the eye of the artist
and he would hesitate to exchange the
gorgeous vision for the dead levels
and burning sands of democracy.
Here in streaming London's central
roar, the gaping crowds stood as silent
as the long lines of soldiery while
the State Carriage drawn by six large
beautiful cream-colored horses slowly
moved down toward Westminster. In
this carriage you behold two emblems
of an old order that is dying—two
shadows of a thing that once had sub
stance—his majesty, The King! her
majesty, The Queen! They are on
their way to open Parliament and the
King will speak as of old about "his"
dominions and "his" people,—magna
nominis umbra! We must confess
that we lifted our democratic hat as
the royal pageant passed—lifted it out
of pure sentiment for the old dying
order, the ghost of medieval glory
struggling out of the grave.
THE OPENING OF PARLIAMENT
BRILLIANT SCENES MARK THE
EVENT IN ENGLAND'S CAPITAL
—THE ROYAL PROCESSION—
THE KING'S SPEECH—THE BAT­
TLE OF DEMOCRACY.
The Precession.
But the readers of The Catholic
Bulletin are anxious to get a glimpse
of the Royal procession, and, in spite
of their democratic birth and training,
they will not object, I fancy, to spend
an hour or so with the Lords and
grand ladies. It is worth the trouble,
if only to glance at the fine costumes
and quaint dresses.
Accordingly we will proceed at once
to the story. Spring was in the air
and the sun shone brilliantly where
the King accompanied by the Queen
drove in state to open Parliament.
Tempted by the fine weather, and
partly, doubtless, drawn by the feeling
that the opening of this particular
Parliament was a more than ordinari
ly momentous event, unusually large
crowds lined the whole route from
Buckingham Palace along the Mall to
the Horse Guards Parade, and from
the entrance to the Horse Guards
down Whitehall to Westminster. No
where did the people stand less than
five or six deep. The route was lined
by troops of the Brigade of Guards—
Scots, Irish, Coldstream and Grena
dier—and in the almost summer-like
weather it seemed a pity that their
brilliant tunics were hidden under the
sombre and heavy great-coats.
The procession was as admirably
ordered as such ceremonies always
are in London, and there was no un
toward incident or interruption to mar
the day. A great number of people
had assembled in the immediate neigh
borhood of Buckingham Palace. An
other large mass was collected around
St. James' Gate. The Duke of York's
Steps were packed to the last inch of
standing room, and a vast crowd
thronged the Horse Guards Parade. In
the forecourt of the Horse Guards
was drawn up a detachment of little
girls from the Duke of York's School,
gay in their red cloaks, and outside,
reaching up and down Whitehall, was
probably the densest crowd at any
point on the route, many thousand
people having apparently come to the
same conclusion that the best place
at which to see the procession would
be as it swung out from the Horse
Guards into the width of Whitehall.
Here as elsewhere at junctions of
streets on the route, were cordons of
mounted troops, the 19th Hussars, and
a large force of police, who kept the
crowd in order with their usual happy
combination of strictness and good
sense. At this point the band of the
Irish Guards was stationed, and dur
ing the long half hour before the dis
tant cheering told of the approach of
the procession it played industriously
and, as always, extremely well. All
down Whitehall the windows and bal
conies of the Government offices were
filled with groups of spectators. Down
the wide roadway, with the ribbon of
soldiers and banks of massed people
on either side, there was an almost
continuous passing of vehicles going
southwards, taxicabs, private motor
cars, and Ambassadors' gorgeous
coaches. Then, some time before the
arrival of the procession itself, came
a Royal carriage conveying the Crown
and Sword of State, with a clattering
escort of Life Guards. The cheering
of the crowds along the Mall could be
faintly heard in Whitehall. There
M,NVRR

I f'ef*
h»lfc*ESOT*
HISTORICAL
SOClt I y
was a moment of silence as the pro
cession passed through the Horse
Guards', and then, while the Irish
Guards' band crashed into the Nation
al Anthem, the procession itself came,
as brilliant as ever and losing none
of its charm or picturesqueness from
familiarity. First the glittering Life
Guards, then the Royal carriages,
then more Life Guards, then the old
State coach in all its barbaric splen
dour, and again Life Guards.
A Royal Pageant.
The procession moved at a foot's
pace in the bright sunlight all scar
let and white and gold, black horses
and bay and cream, with the trample
of hoofs and tossing of plumes, while
the air rocked with the music and
cheering. The pageant looked very
stately as it moved deliberately down
the broad road to Parliament square
where in every direction again the
crowd was dense.
Both the King and Queen looked
well as they bowed to right and left
in acknowledgment of their welcome.
As soon as they had arrived at the en
trance to the House of Lords the thun
der of the first of the 41 guns was
heard from St. James' Park, where,
to the terror and confusion of the
water-fowl, they were fired from in
side the railings of the Park pointing
westward over the ornamental water.
Most of the spectators remained
along the route to see the return of
the -procession, which was slightly
earlier than had been expected. The
State coach had re-entered the Palace
gates and the troops were filing away
by 3 o'clock. Ten minutes later the
sky became overcast and the late af
ternoon was grey and chill. It was as
if the "King's weather" had come to
do honour to the occasion.
(Continued on Page 8)
CATHOLIC JPIPEDII
350,000 SUBJECTS IN ONE GREAT
WORK—INDEX VOLUME WILL
APPEAR ON MARCH 20.
The editors of The Catholic Ency
clopedia announce that the index vol
ume will be ready for delivery on
March 20. This is just nine years
from the time of their organization as
a board of editors and seven years
from the appearance of Volume 1.
Some estimate of the amount of
labor required in the compilation of
this index volume may be formed
from the fact that it has taken one
year and four months after the com
pletion of the fifteen volumes of the
encyclopedia proper, although it had
been in preparation four years before
that time.
Again, from the contents of the in
dex itself some estimate may be had
of the value of the encyclopedia: Here
is information on every point in
which the intelligent Catholic can be
interested here is an answer to every
question that can be raised about the
doctrine and practices of the Church
or about its history and the achieve
ments of its members here is a so
lution of every problem or difficulty
and a settlement of every controversy
that haB to do with the Christian re
ligion or with the activity and in
fluence of the Catholic Church and of
the religious bodies that have sepa
rated from it here is a suggestion of
numberless lines of most useful read
ing. Finally here also is a revela
tion of the marvelous and beneficent
operations and influence of the Church
in every sphere, in civilization and
progress, in material and economic de
velopments, in art literature, science,
education, sociology, as well as in the
various fields of ecclesiastical learn
ing.
Now that the Catholic Encyclopedia
is an accomplished fact, the editors
and all connected with the enterprise
are bent on making it an instrument
of sound knowledge and of good in
fluence everywhere.
With a view to putting it within the
reach of every Catholic, even of the
most moderate means, the publishers
have brought out several new editions
at prices to suit every purse, and they
have begun an active propaganda to
bring the work to the attention ef
Catholics everywhere and of non
Catholics also.
DIVORCE STATISTICS
TWO MILLION DIVORCE8 IN
AMERICA IN FIFTY YEARS.
The Secretary of an International
Congress on Marriage and Divorce,
Dr. Moody of San Francisco has com
piled statistics of divorce in the
United States for some fifty years
past. He told the State Commission
of California the other day that the
total rises to 2,000,000.
The worst feature, perhaps, is the
increasing ratio of late years. With
only 18,000,000 married women in the
country, 110,000 divorces are reported
during the year just closed—a greater
number than ever before. "More than
1,400,000 children," Dr. Moody says,
"have been needlessly deprived of one
or both parents by the divorce court.
The result has been an increase in the
attendance at reform schools, orphan
ages and in some instances at the rate
of from 33 per cent to 100 per cent."
'Vr**
Number 11
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