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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, March 21, 1914, Image 1

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Volume 4
IN THE NEW CATHEDRAL OF
ST. PAUL.
The following appeal to the German
Catholics of the Archdiocese of St.
Paul, has been issued by the commit
tee of priests who "have charge of the
work of securing funds for the com
pletion and adornment of the Chapel
of St. Boniface in the new Cathedral
of St. Paul.
CHAPEL OF ST. BONIFACE
THE LETTER.
To the German Catholics of the Arch­
diocese of St. Paul:
The new Cathedral of St. Paul is
Tiearing completion and it is hoped
that before the opening of the coming
year it will be dedicated to the service
of Almighty God. All who see the ma
jestic edifice, enthroned upon the lofty
heights of Summit Avenue, overlook
ing the beautiful city of St. Paul, will
certainly exclaim: Our Cathedral is
indeed a magnificent monument of
Christian art, and a great memorial
of the deep-rooted faith, of the mag
nanimous spirit of sacrifice of those
who are building it.
To enhance its beauty and to em
phasize its symbolism of the Chris
tian apostolate a number of chapels
have been provided, which encircle
the main altar, the throne of our
Blessed Lord in the Holy Eucharist.
Several of these chapels have been
set apart to honor in a most special
way those Saints of heaven, who are
looked upon as the Apostles and Spirit
ual Fathers of the children of the
races, which compose the Catholic
population of our Diocese. To this
circumstance we owe the "German
Chapel," placed under the patronage
of St. Boniface, the Apostle of the
Germans. This chapel has been hand
ed over to us and it becomes our
honored duty to fit it out and adorn
it in a worthy manner.
There should be no room for doubt
or hesitation. No one shall be per
mitted to surpass us in willingness,
spirit of sacrifice, and promptness of
action. Our chapel shall not be in
ferior to any of the national chapels
in beauty and adornment it shall be
worthy of St. Boniface, the glorious
Apostle of the Germans, worthy of
the race from which we spring, worthy
of the German Fatherland, which
throughout its length and breadth has
preserved so many noble Cathedrals,
veritable monuments of Christian
architecture. We owe it to our num
bers in the Diocese and the North
west we owe it to the memory of our
fathers, the German pioneers of Min
nesota, who not only rendered fertile
the land of its prairies with untold
toil and labor, but also, with still
greater devotion and perseverance,
built churches and schools wherever
they went. In this manner they fol
lowed in the footsteps of St. Boniface,
and took care that the precious in
heritance of our holy faith be deliv
ered unto us and be firmly rooted in
this adopted country of ours. They
have sacrificed their all for the de
velopment and greatness of our com
monwealth, but they builded on the
solid foundation of Christian faith,
Christian morals, Christian civiliza
tion, and Christian legislation. Re
ligion was the guiding star, the one
object in their efforts towards the up
building of the state.
The Chapel of St. Boniface is to be
an everlasting monument of German
faith and steadfastness of purpose, of
the spirit of sacrifice that character
izes the German people, as well as of
German art. When future generations
will write the history of our days, a
good account should then be given
of the German Catholics of the pres
ent time and our children and chil
dren's children should be able to
praise our memory and say: When
at the beginning of the century the
great Cathedral of St. Paul was built
and paid for with great sacrifices, our
fathers were at their post and showed
themselves worthy heirs of the faith
and of the spirit that ^animated the
glorious St. Boniface, the Apostle of
the Germans. Nothing else will ob
tain for us more easily the protection
of our patron saint than our willing
ness to erect the German Chapel in
honor of St Boniface. And hence we
feel confident that there is not in
this whole Archdiocese a German
Catholic, even though he may live
among brethren of other races, who
will remain indifferent at the mention
of St Boniface and the Chapel of St.
Boniface.
That much as to the idea under
lying this laudable enterprise. A word
now as to its execution in practice.
And let it be said from the start, that
in this matter as well we will permit
no one to surpass us. As the chapel
is to be built on this earth, it cannot
be done without money the vile
metal, which rules the world, and to
which so much vice and virtue at
tach themselves, must also carry into
execution the beautiful idea of the
Chapel of St. Boniface. Let us give
of it willingly towards this holy pur
pose. Who knows through what hands
has passed the coin which you have
in your keeping! Who knows what
sinister purposes it has promoted! If
you place it in the hands of the com
mittee on the Chapel of St. Boniface,
you will place it, if not in holy hands,
at least in good ones. It is said that
the offering of the Peter's Pence is a
bond of silver, which binds the faith
ful to the Holy Father in Rome. So
shall it be here. The silver coins
which we offer for the Chapel of St.
Boniface shall be a bond of union be
tween our saint in heaven and his
spiritual children in the diocese they
shall be expressive of our sentiment,
in virtue of which we feel ourselves
to be one in the profession and prac
tice of our holy faith, one in the love
of and loyalty to our new fatherland.
Let it be remarked here that the
word silver should not be taken ex
clusively. Should the bond which
will bind us to St. Boniface be of gold,
there need be no fear that the saint
will dislike it nor will it be ^looked
upon with disdain by the committee
working for his chapel. Indeed, gold
ties are necessary, since the cost of
fitting out and adorning the Chapel of
St. Boniface is estimated at $20,000.
We will reach this amount without
difficulty if every German Catholic
of the diocese considers himself a pro
moter of this work specifically Ger
man in character, if each one gives
promptly his share to the honor of
God and St. Boniface, and sees to it
that his neighbor does likewise.
It is not our intention to gather sub
scriptions and doubtful promises for
the future such are not German ways.
What I give, I give it in cash, and at
once. I will do it right now in this
holy season of Lent, when sacrifices
and alms are expected of every good
Catholic. Every German priest will
gladly receive such alms for the
Chapel of St. Boniface and in places
where there is no German congrega
tion also such German Catholics of the
laity, as may have the proper creden
tials. Contributions may also be sent
directly to the treasurer of the com
mittee, the Rev. P. M. Jung, St. Mat
thew's Church, 507 Hall Avenue, St.
Paul, Minn., where all the funds will
ultimately be gathered.
One request is made to all contrib
utors: to indicate their full name for
a document containing the names of
all benefactors is to be embodied into
the altar of the Chapel of St. Boniface.
Over the entrance to the chapel or in
another prominent place is to be a
marble tablet with the inscription in
German: Chapel erected in honor of
St. Boniface by the German Catholics
of the Archdiocese of St. Paul, in the
year of our salvation, 1914.
Steps have beer taken to secure a
German artist, whose endeavor it will
be to give expression to the national
German character in the adornment
of the chapel, as far as that can be
brought into harmony with the style
of the Cathedral. All materials to be
used are to be imported from German
lands and whatever sayings or texts
will ornament the walls, all will be in
the German language.
That all things may go well, and
that the Chapel of St. Boniface may
be a credit to the German Catholics
of the diocese is the earnest wish of
the committee of priests appointed at
the general meeting of the German
priests of the diocese.
The committee
VERY REV. F. J. SCHAEFER,
Chairman.
REV. P. M. JUNO,
Secretary and Treasurer.
RT. REV. MGR. A. PLUT.
RT. REV. MGR. W. M. STULZ.*
REV. P. WIESNER, O. S. B.
REV. VAL. NELLES, O. F. M.
REV. ANDREW J. RINKE.
REV. ROBERT SCHLINKERT,
REV. PETER SCHIRMERS.
•Deceased.
St. Paul, Minn.! March 12,1914.
APPROVAL OF THE MOST REVER­
END ARCHBISHOP.
With much pleasure I give my ap
proval to the invitation sent to Catho
lics of German birth or descent,' that
through their generous offerings they
put the Chapel of St. Boniface, in the
new Cathedral, in fitting form to do
honor to the Cathedral itself, to the
name of the great apostle of German
Lands, to the heirs of the apostleship
of St. Boniface, to-day children of the
Archdiocese of St. Paul.
To the worthy priests taking charge
of the task of making the Chapel of
St. Boniface a beautiful symbol of his
apostolic labors for Religion and Fa
therland—to the Catholics of the
Archdiocese ready to aid them in
their task, I gladly impart my bless
ing. That their reward from Heaven
be the richest, is the earnest prayer
of my heart.
The scheme once planned of sur
rounding the Master of the Sanctuary
in the new Cathedral with chapels re
calling the early Christian Teachers
of the nations, to whose sons and
daughters the Archdiocese of St. Paul
owes life and prosperity, a place, as
suredly, was due to St. Boniface, the
Apostle and representative of the
faith of the German Fatherland. Mu
nificent have been the gifts of Ger
man faith and piety to the Archdio
cese, and of those gifts there neces
sarily should be a perpetual testimo
nial in the Cathedral, the Mother
Church of the whole Archdiocese.
But little time, I am convinced, will
be taken to gather together the sum
of money needed to complete and
beautify the Chapel of St Boniface—
the German Chapel—in the Cathedral
of St. Paul.
JOHN IRELAND,
Archbishop of St Paul.
St Paul, March 12, 1914.
TOLIC DELEGATE TO COLUMBIA,
VISITED THE UNITED STATES
ON HIS WAY TO SOUTH AMER­
ICA.
Last week His Excellency, the Most
Reverend Alberto Vassalo, Apostolic
Delegate to Columbia, sailed from New
York for South America to take up
his official residence in the city of
Bogota as the representative of the
Holy Father.
The new Apostolic Delegate was ap
pointed by Pope Pius last Novem
ber and was consecrated by His Em
inence Cardinal Merry del Val on
January 18. He is forty-five years of
age and has held several important
positions in the diplomatic corps. He
was formerly an attache of the Papal
Legation in Munich, Bavaria, and audi
tor of the Legation at Brussels, Bel
gium.
During his brief visit to America he
visited several of the eastern cities
and paid his respects to Mgr. Bonzano,
the Apostolic Delegate at Washington.
In Columbia, where he will be Envoy
Extraordinary as well as Apostolic
Delegate, there is a population of five
millions, almost entirely Catholic.
There are fifteen Bishops in the coun
try, all of whom will welcome the
new representative of the Holy
Father on his arrival at Bogota on
April 5. Mgr. Vassalo succeeds Mgr.
Montagnini who died some months
ago.
LENTEN SELF-DENIAL
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
James C. Noian.)
Because that One two thousand years
ago
Did fast, was crowned with thorns,
was crucified
At sumptuous tables I saw* men to
night
Some most inviting dishes put aside.
Because, to stay His thirst upon the
cross,
A sponge was filled with vinegar and
gall,
I noticed, though the revelry ran high,
That some there were who took no
wine at all.
Wise? Foolish? Let us not discuss the
point
The fact itself I care that you should
know
Such things are done today because
that One
Was crucified two thousand years ago
LAWYER ENTERS IIIITIITE
MR. FINN OF THE NEW YORK BAR
IS A NOVICE IN A FRANCIS­
CAN MONASTERY.
Maurice E. Finn, a wealthy Califor
nia lawyer, is now a novice in St
Bonaventure's Franciscan Monastery,
Patterson, N. J., where Is Is studying
for the priesthood.
Mr. Finn has been engaged in the
practice of law in New York for the
past year. He is thirty-four years
old and is the son of the late W. E.
Finn, a California banker, one time
mayor of Sutter Creek, Cal., once the
center of a famous gold rush. Mr,
Finn received his early education in
the West and later took the classical
course at Holy Cross University,
Worcester, Mass.
NOTED EDUCATOR DEAD
PROVINCIAL OF THE CHRISTIAN
BROTHERS IN THE EAST WAS
HONORED BY THE FRENCH
ACADEMY.
From Jerusalem comes the news of
the death of Brother Evagre, the well
known Provincial of the Christian
Brothers in Syria and Palestine. He
Tvas born in 1831, and during the time
he worked in Palestine he saw over
40.000 scholars pass through his
schools. In November, 1912, the
French Academy decreed to him the
prix de vertu, and his work as a pio
neer of French influence in the East
was generally recognized by his coun
trymen.
SII miTOS II IB
MOTHER OF 15 CHILDREN DIES
AT AGE OF 70.
Mrs. Josephine M. Math, who died
at Baltimore, Md., on March 6, was
the mother of fifteen children, six of
whom entered the sisterhood. She
was born in Germany seventy years
ago. Her husband's brother, the late
Brother Clementian, was Superior
General of the Christian Brothers,
with headquarters in Lembech, Ger
many.
ST. PAUL, MINN., MARCH 21, 1914.
I DISTINGUISHED IISITDB'tnra IFHUOUt iCTlim
ARCHBISHOP VASSALO, APOS­
FORMAL OPENING OF COLUMBUS
HALL IN WINNIPEG—HOME OF
THE KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS
AND OF THE CATHOLIC CLUB—
A MAGNIFICENT STRUCTURE.
On March 13, Columbus Hall, the
home of Catholic associations and so
cieties in Winnipeg, Man., was form
ally opened to the, public. Many
thousands, among them a large rep
resentation of non-Catholics, took ad
vantage of the opportunity to inspect
the new building and its elegant ap
pointments, and to participate in the
program gjven in the spacious audi
torium. Among the speakers were
the Most Reverend Archbishop Lange
vin of St. Boniface, the Rev. William
Patton, O. M. I., pastor of St. Mary's
Church Mr. E. Cass and Mr. J. J.
Callahan.
Columbus Hall is the outcome of a
movement which began some years
ago to provide a central home for
Catholic activity in the city of Winni
peg. The project was first taken up
by the Knights of Columbus in 1909.
They formed a corporation known as
the Columbus Hall Association for the
purpose of securing funds for the new
building. A plot of ground was pur
chased on the corner of Graham Ave
nue and Smith Street for $23,000. As
soon as this was paid for the promo
ters of the building concluded that,
instead of building for the exclusive
use of the Knights of Columbus, it
would be better to amplify the plans
and erect a structure that would meet
the requirements of the rapidly in
creasing Catholic population of Winni
peg, one that would accommodate all
the Catholic societies of the city.
Accordingly, plans were drafted
for a building that would cost $125,
000, and in April, 1913, the contract
for the main part of the structure was
let to Frid Lewis & Co. for $91,600.
The first sod was turned in the fol
lowing May and work was pushed so
rapidly that the building was prac
tically ready for occupancy last Janu
ary, and the Catholic Club and the
Knights of Columbus moved into their
respective quarters during the month.
The ground floor is devoted to stores
on the second floor are the club rooms
of the Knights of Columbus and of
the Catholic Club an#the-third floor
is divided into a gyi^feium and audi
torium.
The total cost of Columbus Hall,
fully furnished, is $180,000, the most
of which is paid for. The income
from all sources will be about $18,000
a year, sufficient to pay current ex
penses and five per cent on the capital
invested in the project.
The Catholic Club, which was or
ganized in 1899, comprises the most
prominent Catholic laymen of the city
of Winnipeg. It will celebrate the
formal opening of its new quarters
shortly after Easter with a banquet
at which the principal addresses will
be given by the Most Reverend Arch
bishop Langevin, the Right Reverend
Bishop Fallon of London, Ont., and
the Hon. C. J. Doherty of Montreal.
FOB EODCATIONjL PURPOSES
By the death of Charles Julian
Reich, at Tyrone, N. C., on March 3,
Mt. St. Mary's College will receive
$75,000 and Georgetown College, $10,
000. The legacies revert under the
will of the late Dr. Charles W. Hoff
man, former librarian of Congress,
who died in 1896.
The will stipulates that $10,000 be
given to Georgetown College for a li
brary and the residue to Mount St.
Mary's College for the erection of a
substantial stone church on the site
of the old edifice.
CHAPEL OF SS.
IN THE NEW CATHEDRAL OF 8T.
PAUL.
Committee of Priests Formed to So­
licit Funds to Complete the Chapel
of the Patron Saint of the Slavic
Races.
A number of priests of Bohemian,
Austrian and Polish extraction met at
the residence of the Most Reverend
Archbishop on Tuesday, March 17, for
the purpose of devising ways and
means to obtain sufficient funds to
complete the chapel in the new Cathe
dral dedicated to SS. Cyril and
Methodius, the patron saints of the
Slavic races.
The task was accepted with enthu
siasm by the priests present on that
occasion and, on behalf of the Cath
olics of Slavic descent in the Arch
diocese, they pledged themselves to
procure the contributions necessary to
make their national chapel worthy of
the great apostles after whom it is
named and worthy of its setting in
the new Cathedral of St. Paul.
The following committee was ap
pointed to draft an appeal to the
Catholics interested in this project:
Right Reverend Mgr. Francis Tichy,
pastor of St. Joseph's Church, Silver
Lake, president Rev. John Rynda,
pastor of St. Stanislaus Church, St.
Paul, vice president and treasurer
Rev. Peter Roy, pastor of St Adal
bert's Church, St. Paul, secretary
ilrWW,!! /«(,"ff "K
... DOIEY
PICTURESQUE FIGURE IN THE
CHURCH IN CHICAGO PASSES
AWAY AFTER MORE THAN THIR­
TY YEARS' SERVICE IN ST. GA­
BRIEL'S PARISH—WAS KNOWN
AS "THE KING OF THE STOCK­
YARDS."
The Rev. Maurice J. Dorney, pastor
of the Church of St. Gabriel, Chicago,
died at Mercy Hospital in that city on
Sunday morning, March 15. He had
been seriously ill for several weeks,
but was believed to be improving
when he was stricken with paralysis.
His remains were brought to the par
ish house on Sunday afternoon, where
they were viewed by thousands of his
devoted friends and parishioners.
The funeral took place from the
Church of St. Gabriel on Wednesday
morning. The Office of the Dead was
chanted at half past nine o'clock, and
at its conclusion a Pontifical Mass of
Requiem was celebrated by Arch
bishop Quigley. The remains were in
terred in Mount Olivet cemetery.
Father Dorney was one of the most
picturesque figures in the Church in
Chicago. He was beloved by all, both
Catholics and non-Catholics. He was
known as the "King of the Stock
yards." When he came to St. Ga
briel's parish more than thirty years
ago the stockyards were just begin
ning to be an institution. At that
time the territory embraced only a
few thousand people of all creeds. To
day there are fifty thousand people
in the district, and it is to the credit
of Father Dorney that throughout that
territory there are no saloons except
on Halsted Street. Many times men
have tried to start saloons in his par
ish, but Father Dorney always success
fully opposed them. He exercised a
great influence over the saloon ele
ment and those engaged in the busi
ness would do anything for him. His
parish was well equipped and all its
institutions are free from debt.
COLORED MifOlU GATKOLIG
BATTERSEA, ENGLAND, HAS
FIRST COLORED MAYOR IN
BRITISH ISLES.
The first colored mayor of Great
Britain, Mr. Archer, is a Catholic.
He is mayor of Battersea, and at
tended High Mass in state after his
election. His predecessor was also a
Catholic. Battersea is a great work
ing-man constituency, made famous
by its connection with John Burns.
SISTERSJOLLECE
CONTRACT LET FOR NEW INSTI­
TUTION AT THE CATHOLIC
UNIVERSITY.
The contract for the erection of the
new Sisters' College at the Catholic
University, Washington, was awarded
recently to Cassidy & Co., for $35,000.
The building, which is designed by
Murphy & Olmsted, will be located to
the east of the Baltimore and Ohio
railroad track, just south of the Uni
versity grounds, where a fifty-seven
acre tract has been purchased for the
main buildings of the school, and for
the residences of the Sisters from the
communities. It is thought that every
teaching community in the country
will have a residence on the grounds
for the members of its Sisterhoods in
attendance at the school.
CYRIL AND.METHODIUS
Rev. Henry Jajeski, pastor of St. Casi
mir's Church, St. Paul Rev. Ambrose
Kryjewski, pastor of Holy Cross
Church, Minneapolis Rev. J. Cermak,
pastor of St. Wenceslaus Church, New
Prague Rev. Mathias Savs, pastor of
St. Peter's Church, Delano Rev. John
Seliskar and Rev. Aloysius Ziskovsky
of St. Paul Seminary.
It is but fitting that Catholics of
Slavic descent should show their ven
eration and love for their patron
saints by equiping in a suitable man
ner the chapel dedicated to them in
the new Cathedral. Saints Cyril and
Methodius were the Apostles of the
Slavic race: they renounced worldly
honors in order that they might de
vote themselves to the propagation of
the Gospel. In response to a request
from the Moravians for a Christian
missionary, they undertook the task of
preaching the Gospel among them,
and in order to facilitate their work
they translated the Bible into the
Slavonic tongue and obtained permis
sion from Rome to use this language
in the liturgical services of the
Church. For this they were bitterly
assailed by their enemies but were
sustained by the Pope whenever an
appeal was made to him. After a few
years of missionary activity St. Cyril
died but his co-laborer, Methodius, was
destined to suffer many years of per
secution and exile before his earthly
career closed. Their labors on behalf
of the Church entitles them to the
honor and veneration not only of the
Slavic race but also of all Catholics.
1
»-\u-
Twenty-six Young Women Received
ST. JOSEPH'S NOVITIATE
ANNUAL RECEPTION OF POSTU­
LANTS INTO THE CONGREGA­
TION OF THE SISTERS OF ST.
JOSEPH.
the Habit of the Order—The Most
Reverend Archbishop Officiated and
Preached—Mass Celebrated by Fa­
ther Kenny—Names of the New Nov­
ices.
The annual reception of postulants
into the Congregation of the Sisters
of St. Joseph took place at St. Jo
seph's Novitiate, St. Paul, on March
19, the Feast of St. Joseph, patron of
the Order. The ceremony began at half
past nine o'clock. Prior to that hour
the twenty-six postulants who had com
pleted their term of probation entered
the chapel in procession, dressed in
bridal robes of silk or satin and car
rying bouquets. As soon as they were
seated, the Most Reverend Archbishop,
accompanied by the visiting clergy, en
tered and took the places reserved for
them. Mass was then celebrated by
the Rev. Patrick Kenny, pastor of the
Church of St. Anthony of Padua, Min
neapolis.
At the end of Mass the Most Rever
end Archbishop preached a sermon on
the religious life, and at its conclusion
the postulants proceeded to the sanc
tuary rail where they knelt and ex
pressed their desire to consecrate
themselves entirely to the service of
God and the cause of religion. They
answered the questions prescribed by
the ceremonial of reception, and hav
ing satisfied the Most Reverend Arch
bishop of their sincerity in seeking
admission to the Congregation, they
withdrew for a time to lay aside their
worldly robes and don the habit of
the Sisterhood of St. Joseph.
On their return to the chapel they
knelt for a few moments before the
altar to give expression to the senti
ments of joy and gratitude which
thrilled their souls and then the Most
Reverend Archbishop invoked on them
the blessing of heaven.
This class of postulants, twenty-six
in number, was the largest, with one
AMONG MAORI CATHOLICS
CEREMONIOUS PRESENTATION
OF PAPAL FLAG BY ARCHBISH­
OP REDWOOD—ITS RELIGIOUS
SIGNIFICANCE—MARKING A MIS­
SIONARY'S GRAVE—A MAORI
O O O O U E S A
UNIQUE ASSEMBLY UNDER THE
SOUTHERN CROSS.
We have received from the Most
Reverend Archbishop Redwood of
Wellington, New Zealand, the follow
ing account of an event of no little
significance to the Maori Catholics of
his Archdiocese, and of its religious
setting. It gives an insight into some
of the distinctive traits and peculiar
customs of the aborigines of that far
distant island, many of whom have
embraced the Catholic faith.
A Maori Mission.
At our arrival in the station at Ota
ki, about forty-five miles from Wel
lington, two motor cars, in one of
which was Father Martin, S. M., met
Very Rev. Dean Regnault, S. M., and
myself, and we were rapidly driven
about two miles to the Catholic Mis
sion establishment at Pukekaraka,
consisting of the Church, the school,
the convent and the Maori guest
houses. These latter are large wood
en buildings arranged for the accom
modation of hundreds of Maoris, on
occasions like the present, when vis
itors flock from far and near, from
the East, West and North of the North
Island. Attached to these guest
houses are extensive buildings in
which, out of the rain, in wet weather,
the cooking can.be done and the re
pasts prepared for any large gather
ing. The occasion of my visit was
the public and solemn presentation to
the Maori Catholics from various
parts of the Dominion, of a fine silk
Papal flag, in the two papal colors,
white and yellow, adorned with the
emblems of the Popes, the keys and
the tiara, perfectly wrought in gold
in the middle of the flag, which meas
ures six yards in length and about
two yards in breadth. In my last visit
to Rome I had caused this handsome
and valuable flag to be made, and now
I came to offer it with fitting solem
nity to the Maori Catholic tribes. A
gathering of between three and five
hundred Maoris, almost all Catholics,
was the result of the announcement,
made some months ago, that such a
precious and deep-meaning present
was going to be made, on behalf of
His Holiness, to the Catholic Maoris
—a present of unspeakable value in
their eyes, as coming from the high
est and most august authority on
earth, the Pope of Rome, successor
of St. Peter, and the Vicar of Christ.
Accordingly all the solemnity, which
the Maoris, following their old and
sacred customs, were able to display,
was prepared for this unique occa
sion. All the assembled crowd were
consequently in the tiptoe of earnest
nhrfirt* fc,, I... •,, n.. f. ..v tSH
UHInHfeSO^"* 1
y JHIOM
Number 12
exception, ever received into the Or
der at .one time. Last year, at the
formal opening of the new Novitiate,
thirty-eight postulants were clothed
with the religious habit.
After the ceremony dinner was
served to the visiting clergy and
prelates, and in the afternoon the
young novices received their relatives
and friends who came to congratulate
them on their entrance into the relig
ious life.
The Novices.
The following are the names of the
newly received novices, together with
the names by which they will hence
forth be known in religion:
Miss Lois Hengel, Sioux Falls, S.
Dw Sister Regina Clare Miss Eliza
beth Callahan, Minto, N. D., Sister
Mary Marcus Miss Blanche Scanlaii,
White Bear, Minn., Sister Helen Lo
cile Miss Greta Baker, New Annan,
P. E. I., Can., Sister Mary Naomi Miss
Ella Whelan, Kildare, P. E. I., Can.,
Sister Mary Arilda Miss Mary Daniel,
Chapeau, Quebec, Sister Marie Arse
na Miss Cecilia Costello, Passaic, N.
J., Sister Anna Celeste Miss Marie
Courteau, St. Paul, Minn., Sister Lou
ise Joseph Miss Emelie Turgeon,
Mineapolis, Minn., Sister Therese Ma
rie Miss Gertrude Curry, Dassel,
Minn., Sister Mary Agnella Miss
Frances Polzer, St. Paul, Minn., Sister
Mary Faustina Miss Christine Novae,
St. Paul, Minn., Sister Mary Tatiana
Miss Marie Blanchard, Minneapolis,
Minn., Sister Mary Camille Miss Mar
tina Wenzl, Little Falls, Minn., Sister
Mary Alta Miss Anna Krybus, Brow
erville, Minn., Sister Mary Cortilia
Miss Florence Shiely, St. Paul, Minn.,
Sister Mary Everista Miss Elsie Meyer,
Sioux City, Iowa, Sister Anna Marie
Miss Florence Murphy, Conway, P. E.
I., Can., Sister Mary Felix Miss Mabel
Waters, St. Paul, Minn., Sister Mary
Jeannette Miss Jeanette La Joie, Cal
loway, Minn., Sister Mary Viola Miss
Helen Butler, St. Paul, Minn., Sister
Mary Bertrand Miss Myrtle Frank,
Minneapolis, Minn., Sister Mary Es
peranza Miss Florence Fetherspil, St.
Paul, Minn., Sister Mary Ethel Miss
Albina Grenier, Hugo, Minn., Sister
Mary Narcisse Miss Catherine Clan
cy, Waterville, Minn., Sister Mary
Fanchea Miss Mary Donnelly, Minne
ota, Minn., Sister Mary Cathaldus.
expectation. The spot lent itself ad
mirably to such a pageant. On Kara
ka Hill, surmounted by a fine statue
of St. Peter on a solid pedestal of
stone, stands a large cross, about
thirty feet high, overlooking the build
ings and grassy lawn below. A fine
terrace is formed by a substantial
concrete wall with right and left slop
ing approaches, at the top of which
appears the artificial grotto of Our
Lady of Lourdes, and a zigzag path
leads up to the summit of the hill,
and this path is adorned with num
bers of pretty waving bannerettes, ter
minated by a large flag, the gift of a
late Maori chieftainess, Major Kemp's
daughter, a distinguished convert,
whom death took to her reward some
time ago at Wanganui. At the foot of
the approaches to the hill there is a
grassy space, with flower-beds and
shrubs round it, able to accommodate
a large number of visitors—in fact,
a spot created and embellished espe
cially for that purpose, and used on
several former occasions. Here seats
for the clergy and myself were set
in front of the principal guest-house,
the entrance of which is ornamented
with an appropriate inscription dedi
cating it to the Immaculate Virgin,
Mother of God, Queen of the whole
world. Here the principal Maoris had
assembled, men and women, to the
number of over three hundred. All
were in holiday attire set off with
special mats and garments of Maori
manufacture suited to the day. Each
man and woman had a green laurel
branch in the right hand.
Presentation of Papal Pfafl.
At some yards from the entrance
gate, gracefully decked with fluttering
bannerettes, we stopped, and, follow
ing Maori etiquette, got out of the
cars and waited for the sign to ad
vance. First we saw shawls waved by
the women In the distance and heard
the Maori cry of haere e... .e e
mai, the greater the interval between
the long-drawn mai and the haere, the
warmer the welcome. We advance
with slow and solemn tread, we near
the gate and instantly a crowd of men
and women, fine specimens of
strength and vigor, wave the green
branches above their heads, stamp
the ground in measured dance and
loudly sing the poetic song of welcome
"Paddle, paddle, rush the canoe, quick
ly bring our band of friends to land."
The air rings, the earth trembles un
der the united fall of many feet in
perfect time and cadence. Again we
stop, again we advance, and the cries
and the song and the dance are re
peated with redoubled zest and vigor.
It would warm and gladden the cold
est heart, the most unfeeling temperar
ment. At last the movements cease
and we are within the animated circle
of men, women and children a few
steps lead us to our seats. The cere
mony of the presentation of the Papal
flag is about to begin. First, several
chiefs slowly spread on the turf be
fore us, for the reception of the flag,
(Continued on Page 8)
V

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