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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, February 20, 1915, Image 6

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90060976/1915-02-20/ed-1/seq-6/

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HOLY
*t-I" £&*-
/GOOD TEST! MO NY
WHAT, WOULD THEY DO TO US?
In his .recei)t semton on' the ques
tion :0 Hi RcUsinus People.. (of Dif
foront lloliffs) h«» Friends?". tho.Itov.
Dr. WasJiington -il:uUlon,.saui
"Many 1'rot.GSiants, are entirety fa^
and r&iisonable in their! treatment
Catholics./ lint-there is a large num
ber Mwv Tieem to h» incapable rtf
friondliuoKs who .thiuK tlvat.. Ro.mab
Catholics must) be recpgnizerf
mies aficb tro&ted accorflirisiy, Wliart
would those belligerent Protestants dc
with the C'atholies if' they had the
power? Would they exterminate
them or expatriate them? Not.many
of them consciously favor, a policy so
drastic. The anti-Catholic agitators of
20 years ago bodily proposed to de
prive Roman Catholics of their liveli
hood by refusing them employment,
but the atrocity of that policy was so
apparent to all decent people that it
has not, so far as I know, been re
vived by the leaders of the present
agitation. We have here a consider
able gain over the moral status of
the last agitation. Let us be thank
ful.
"Shall we then disfranchise the
Catholics? This seems to lie the poli
cy advocated and practiced in the
present agitation. It is proposed that
they be excluded from office, andr de
nied all power in the making and'en
forcement of laws, so that they shall
be a subject class in the community.
'.'It is needless to say that such a
policy sets at defiance the central
principles "on which our government
is founded. The only tests which we
have any right to apply to a candi
date for office are these: Is he hon
est? Is he faithful? Is he loyal to
the commonwealth? To ask what
church he belongs to is treason
against American democracy. Nothing
in our institutions is more fundamen
tal than the absolute prohibition pf
religious tests in connection with citi
zenship."
MINISTER DEFENDS JESUITS.
Rev. Eugene Rodman Shippen, pas
tor of the First Unitarian church, De
troit, Mich., recently said:
"The common attitude of Protes
tants towards Jesuits is scandalous.
WHO WiVL HELP FR,,mt^UiX?M
Missionaries in all, parts of the
world aro now being oldiged to give
up some branches of their established
work, or some of the aids to their
apostolate. Schools are closing, or
phanages are shutting their doors, hos
pitals restricting the number of their
patients—all because there is no
money in the mission treasuries.
Father Joseph Birraux, P. F. M.,
sends from Tsu, Japan, an account of
a sacrifice he fears he may be called
on to make, and one that is going to
come very hard.
It seems that Father Birraux pos
sesses an especial treasure in the per
son of a female catechist. This wom
an has filled the position of infirmari
an for ten years. She goes every
where through the mission caring for
the sick, baptizing infants, and giving
instruction in the chief points of Cath
olic doctrine. Her work among the
Japanese women has been invaluable,
aftd although no longer young, her
zeal and devotion no signs of abating.
Though a jewel among her sex, the
catechist is human and must have the
means wherewith to live. Father Bir
raux pays her five dollars a month—
when ho lias it. The sum is a small
one, but the good priest sees every
prospect of losing his priceless as
sistant just because he cannot get. to
gether five paltry dollars every, four
weeks.
Describing himself as "a little
Savoyard missionary," Father Birraux
humbly asks some generous person to
lend him a helping hand, that the
threatened calamity may be averted.
A CRY OF DISTRE8S.
The poor missionaries In the Philip
pine islands, especially those who
looked to Belgium for support, are
panic stricken by the war. So many
workers in the Vineyard of that far
off land are from Belgium, and the
fate of Belgium has, of necessity, cut
off their incomes, and their revenues
have ceased.
The letters that have come in to the
officers of the Catholic Church Exten
sion Society from those poor afflicted
priests, half-starved, despairing and
broken-hearted, make the officials
wish they had a million to lavish on
the missions of each of these men.
The other day a letter came in from
Father Jurgens, a Philippine mission
ary. This man, too, is a Belgian and
it is for no small reason that his
heart is breaking. He has built up a
fine mission in a non-Christian Igorot
tribe. He has secured Sisters, apd
his spiritual children are making great
progress, and now the dissolution of
his mission seems inevitable.
"What a terrible affect on our mis
sions the war in Europe has," he
writes. "Belgium, the chief source of
our financial help is totally destroyed.
Where shall we .find ,help? We turn
hopefully towards America, because
_. we are working under the American
u i n
!s
as
ene
American Catholics do not
a
WITHOUT.
It presents bitterness, bigotry ari|d
ignorance. Prof.Rocltvm}.},, of Union
Theological aeminary. p^&iu that ho
really good history of tW Society"*of
-Jteuis has been Writer #?, any Eng
lish-speaking PTOte®fcat^^j|.l!(i contro
versial sfiirit trinraphiftj* *$ver thai jii
diVial or scholarly temper:
*It' is not true th^f^jSuits teach
that, 'the end' justifies tlw* means.' It
not true that the sm-iety is a vast
political "machine. J^iitism reprp
lehts simply: the cbnsie^^ttlve mission
ary propaganda, the ruling principle
which is the faith delivered to the
'athers and carried on by deiotedf}
trained in obedience to.the..authority
Df superiors.
"Many Jesuits have heen men of
exalted virtue, courage and self-sa,ciu
Ace The sins of the Jesuits?- have
"leen attributable to individual weak
ness and the character of th.Q timeft^
Let us do justice to those with wljbnv
we differ. Let the spirit of peace
and good-will obtain between Catho
86b -and Protestant s." 'texy
i
CATHOLIC BIRTH RATE.
Commenting upon the-birth-jat.fr. fn'
New York city, where it fs isltown that,
according to nationality-, iihe' Glatftdljic
birth rate is the highest in the city,
the New York Sun said recently. &
"Another interesting point ,-in: t?iis
report is of sociological significance,
since it illustrates most forcibly the
influence of religious training. In the
'Summary of Number of Births, Ac
cording to Nationalities,' the follow
ing figures are instructive: The birth
rate among Germans was 11.61, among
French 1:1.45, among English 17.09,
among Irish 20.95, among Italians
78.12, among Russians and Poles 47.C2,
among Austro-Hungarians 45.53 a
thousand families. These figures
show conclusively that parents of
Catholic nationalities furnish the
larger increment of population in this
city. The difference is so large, the
average being 49.50 among the Cath
olic to 14.05 among the Protestant na^
tionalities, that it must prove of the
utmost significance to the social and
political economist, especially if the
comparative infrequency of divorce
among the former class be consid
ered."
MISSION FIELDS.
help us, then indeed we must abandon
our work. Please have mercy on our
Christian Igorots! Have mercy On
these 500,000 pagans who live in
American dominions. Our means ate
nearly all used up, and if we da-not
get something soon wo must close Otir
school and send away our boys and
our girls. Oh! it is terrible to thirik
of. Please, by the mercy of Our Lord,
have mercy on us, and raise some in
terest in our missions. 1
"The Protestants in this town aftd
in our neighborhood spend thousands
and thousands of dollars, erect stone
buildings* and try hard to make con
verts amongst the people. Oh, that
your charity, your generosity would
enable us to keep thfese souls for the
one true Church!"
Father Jurgens says that the main
tenance of one girl or .o'ne bay. costs
about $50 a year.
The Society would take great pleas
ure in being able to send this noble
missionary twenty thousand dollars
but will be glad to send hira -whatever
you give him. His cry of "have mercy
on us" is surely for all who read this
The donations for this afflicted mis
sionary may be sent into the offices
of the Catholic Church Extension So
ciety, McCormick Building, Chicago,
and they will be promptly forwarded
to hifn. v
CHINESE FAMILY OF F^LlGilOyS,
Rev. Leo Ting, a native Chirkse
priest, has written to friends in tliis
country that he wishes to show uis a
proof of the surpassing mAcy of (fod,
Who in "His goodness has grhftted 'the
grace of a religious vocation to Tour
out of eight children.
"Are not the words of the King of
Prophets truly applicable in our case?"
he asks. 'Raising up the needjr from
the earth, that he may place hini^tith
the princes of the people.* We hkve
been Christians on my father's fftfie
for three generations, and on ifty
mother's for more than ten. Jjly
father- died ten years "ago-and rpx
mother is now 6fi years, old. Four of
their children have haft''ff&rhappiness
of entering the service--orf,,(|^i They
are as follows: .j-'
"I, Leo Ting, the secon^ ajde^f, wa^
ordained to the priesthood' in 190S.
My brother, Luke Ting, tfte third' old
est, became a priest in- 136?,. ^d is
now a professor at the Preparatory
Seminary at Hang-chow. oldest
sister, Theresa, became 4 religious
and died three years ago after a life
spent in good works. Anotlier sister,
Mary Scholastica, is a nun of the' So
ciety of Purgatory, and tras^l^ii'in
this
order for 19 years,"
order not to miss recfetylftg
"flilJll.*"--irr
Recently .-two biViUiofw who, rare
0h}lgedif/0 go to .vC'ork early and cai
mot.sin. consequence attend.. .Mass,'
came to him "at nine O'clock in tl|e
evening,-after fasting all day, and
asked if they tttigbt receive "Com*
n i o n -i
Ik)'e^ not devotion such as this
fJiHiif^^he Mush of i shame ,t'o some
diij»(.readerH i who, often miss an oppon
tunity.of rpceiving our Ixird for some
trivial reason,, and 'who claim that
iheifc hen 1th ip injured by fasting a
few- hourfi.? Think §f the, sacritie^s.
tbes^ To»r Chinese, are willing to
rpake, and then see how your raaity
foolish objections,.wilt-dwindle awtii..:
In reparation to the Sacved Heart f'fi
f»ast. indifference -.you might Keut) a
iittle offering to Father Ouang to, help
him en largo hia church eo that the enr
iipe. .pongreaation.ot. 0/)0 might hp ac-.
-o.mnioUued, At, present there is
room fo-r but 300, gnd the renaainder
fh^vc to iiear Mass outside.in- the. yard.
SlftfGiNG ENLIVENS THE ESKI
V1 MO'S DAYS.' v I
Some touch of gaiety is given to-the
dreary life of-the Eskimos by the faft
'•flint they -love to sing. This they-do
from morning till night, even chant
ing the Ie^soris: the missionary gives
tftemi
TTh&r
Melodies &*e strange land
somewhat weirdy but as they haVe
never heard the rag-time of othfcr
{Countries *t-hfey are- 'quite1 coritentad
with "their1 musical
ISil S
*i
FERVENT CHINESE CATHOLICS."
Father Joseph Ouang, a Chinese
priest, has some fervent Christians in
his little flock. They are especial
ly devoted to the Sacred flea#, pf-'
ten on the First Friday. iThe is" aw'ay
administering the last Sacraments aind
cannot say Mass, he find^ oh his Re
turn many who have tasted all day, In"
:«iffortg
and find
them enlivening*
Eskimos are docile aftd childlilq?.
-Thev love the priest that comes t®r
evangeliae them, and readily accefit
lii's precepts. Putting these precepTS
into actual practice is another matteV.
To do this they need the.Help of Chris
tian commhnity life. When gathered
together near the mission, with a
church large enough to hold men,
-women and children at the same serv-.
ice, they do very well, but when scat
tered in isolated settlements they nat
urally'feel less enthusiasm for the re
strictions o$ Chi'istian doctrine.
PLAIN frACiTS FROM THE PH1L1P
v, PINES.
From Father Nysters, of the Sdcr^d
Heart.missionaries in Suri'gao^P.
comes an accouht Of the material coji
Xlitiqn of those islands. Since the war
the price of food-Stuffs and almost all
necessities has increased twenty per
cent,,and except fpr the fact that the
government interposed, unscrupulous"
rherchajits would haje-'taken advan
tage 'bf the 'crisis to false their prices
even higjhor. The'"great Export" t'rafje
of lremp Iras ^tso diminished.
To add to these misfortutics last
summer was an exceptionally dry one,
and the ^harvest of maize, and the
sweet "Trot a'trr crop were much "smaller
than usual. The result is that the na
tives, never accustomed to provide for
the future,- are how in a state of great
distress.-
Five mission posts in the diocese of
-|.,ipta 'have- 4-Peen abandoned, and he
-priests have come to Surfc'fio,- which
Wakes the number1 of Sacred IJ^aa't
missionaries^ there '-ftbw, -thirty-four
priests and fifteen Iay-bfothers This
ia- a large family to care for in "war
times.
JAPANESE PRIESTS.
J^ishop Combaz, P. F. M., says, that
the celebration of the fiftieth anniv^
sary of the finding of Japan's Chris
tians will be celebrated at Nagasaki
yfcLa
sogjewhat less joyous mood tlian!
w,as anticipated, on account, of the
shadow cast, pn the missions by the
war. .. ."V.r .".
In connection with the absence pf
many missionaries and the prospect bf
a Jack of European apostles for sortie
time to" come,' he" speaks 'with enthus
iasm of the native, priests who will he
^.ble to,cqme. to 'the rescue of the Jaip-
anesja jnis'sions in this critical houf
"liow wise were my predecessors,"
he ejicl%ims,"'who at tfie cost of I a
thousand sacrifices started the lornja
tion of a native clergy! Their fore
thought will'be Source of spiritual,
riches to us in Our time of need". If
alt goes well thirty-ohe Japanese
•priests will soqn be ready to fill the
places* left vacant by the death ot.
airsenct '"of the original clergy. And
we must- not", forget the benefactor a
whose generosity permitted the edu
cation of these young men. They will
'receive and merit a share in all the
graces obtained by our Japanese apos
tles." i*-'
If you have a had temper, be ^rate
ful for it. .:You have something: to
tvercome."Who. knows but with the
grace of God you may succeed as. ad
mirably as-did Saint Francis de Sales.
He had a very bad temper, but by
prayer, and by practice in restraining
it, he overcame it, until now the name
of. this great saint is only another tertn
for gentleness. The geotle. Saint
Francis, he is called.
You are, after nil, "what you are.
DeV^K yourself a-wig with a -thou-:
tfrrtnl fdeks^ ensconce'-your legs'in brfs
kins a yard high, you still remain just,
what ypu are, and no more.
.ufl_bear jn mind this, troth—
that on the bed of death, and in the
day of, judgment, to Jiave saved one
soul will be not only better than to
have won a kingdom, but will ov.er-paLy
by an exceeding great reward all the
pains and toils of the longest and most
(oilsome life.—Cardinal Manning.
'3H W. Lake St., Minfieapidli, Minn.
A SCHOOL IS tfVOWN by the kind of work
its graduates can
do.
c«t*lcsuf«
THE CATHOLIC BULLETIN, FEB. 20, 1915.
rs*jr
AT LAST.
"O spotless maiden, hail to thee,"
ra»g"fitit itr rich, full tones from the
muatrt .i'oom. Joseph Harrington
paused.on thH stairs to listen. Never
had'ho, hoard a voice so sweet, alid
he wondered who the singer could be.
it was One-of'the last re.heai'sals for
tin^W.ineeiitiftA~:':lIospita-l'' benefit con
cert. Jose|)h'had come 1n late and
was on his way to Father Stephen's
joom for a book he had left there.
There liad been much, contusion
Ills, last \v?eek, caused by the sudden
illness of the soprano. The manager
had tl^Snaimd of finding a -substitute
iit i so late an hour. :.
Ev«U-iit!y they had at last.'.&ucceed
tMl,..aBd Joe 13arvington was more than
«la4 of the golden promise in.that rare
younff voii e.- They had all worked too
•hard for- fhfs concert to:see R: a fail
ure.r .. ,.:
He entered the music room a little
curious. .to see -the new acquisition.
Saniles greete'd him on all sides, for
he was a general favorite,. Smiling,
in return, lie .glanced from face to
face, seeking "the'stranger. When he.
found -what he sought !i« caught his
breath in sharp surprise.
jQver- by the organ, facing hin, a
itaiiy slender^girl was standing, listen-,
ing' attentively.jio the instructions of
the organist. Her face was as rare
ly lovely as. s©me .pictured saint,
clear-cut oval in-its frame of dark
hair.f' Byt- jt was not her beauty
alone
which so caught and held the
attention. There looked, from those
•sad, clear eyes a white young .sou1!,
troubled, but unsullied.
A lev? -prelude on the orga,n and that
yqi'.e rajig. out again, ..filling the room
With its thrilling' sweetness.
firsV .?.
i-0
spot­
less maiden, hail to thee, "who deign'st
our guiding, star to be." The breath
less hush was the best applause. The
face of the singer was lifted up, and
her eyes saw some lovely vj'sion... "To
point to ileaven's follc-ity."'
As the "last low "Ave Maria" died
softly away the listeners came back
to earth with a sigh.
.. A.fter the rehearsal Joseph Harri.ng
ton* was presented to, the fair young
singer, and talked with her a while',
to his surprise he found that she was
not a Catholic. She had been edu
caied..aOmniacnlate' Conception Acad
ehiy, she..said, and, to th.tt fac.t. \vas
due jver. presence there that evening.
To his-cousih, Sister Ifehatia, teach
er or miisic" at the academy, Father
Stephen had written of his dilemma
about" a sopfano for the concert.
Sifter Ignjatia liad told him 'of this
old pupil of hers, who had graduated
some years before, and whose home
was but a short distance from f?t.
John's Cathedral.
'MarjC Kingsley proved to be -an
earnest,'eager worker, as anxious for
the success of the concert as those
who had been interested from "the
,. ..
I^ifi'ng ttic. rehearsal and in the
days th.it followed Joseph Harrington
met her i*ref iltfntly. As he came to
know her better he found'-that- the
admiration lie-felt from the first, was
more" fhairi justified/ Her beartty of
face was no mere accidental physical
perfection, "but the outward semblance
Of "tfre-^eawtif^niin. j:
-Tlmrw—was- a nasnelessr myat-erious
somethipg. about her which he found
himself constantly trying to solve.
She was so frankly fond of pleasure,
soi girlishly ,gay and light-hearted, yet
reserved .and 'quaintly dignified. But
it was not that, either. "It was an
unfathomable something, a .fleeting
seriousness o| expression, a' look in
|ier eyes, now there, now gone,
u z z i n y a
Her voice as he .'h^ii. firsC heard it
rang ever in his ears. lie had heard
others sing that "Ave Maria," but no
one else put into that indefinable ex
pression of childlike confidence and
loving tenderness tl)at made", it a
yei'itable prayer,
He -never- saw
yTier,
5
Call and let urn show
you complimentary letters received from
those who have wrtpfeyed our students. Many i
cf tfa® Urges* business firms o£ (In Northwest
their office kefpTroa thll *ch«ot. Write
look quite so
Jovely as she did when sl\e sang, that
song. He asked her once "what it
jfasi sh.o saw. that made her face
light up and her eyes grow bright.
Was it some girlish dream of
"heaven's felicity?'' She smiled and
shook her.head. Her answer was as
puzzling as everything else about her.
"I see a iittle convent chapel,"dimly
lit and shadow-filled a flower-decked
shrine and a statue of a lovply, slender
woman, crowned with stars, a cres
cent moon beneath iier feet. I sing
to her. Do you know, Mr. Harrington^
na flowers have ever smelt so sweet
as the flowers in that shrine.. Their
fragrance conies back as I sing."
"But you are riot a Catholifc, Miss
kingsley."
"No,"" slowly, was it regretfully?
"And tliere came into her eyes that
lpok he' could not understand. Words
failed before it, and for a time they
were silent. Then they spoke of other
things. He would not force' her con
fidence,
Suddenly one day he realized that
he,Joved her. She had not been out
of his thoughts once since that even
ing" "he entered the music room, seek
ing the owner of that lovely voice.
'When he asked her to marry him
and she accepted he half hoped that
she wotfld speak of their difference of
religion, but she' did not. Looking
into fhose ^ur?, earnest eyes, he was
Willing to wait, confident that in a
Ji SEfJD FOR CATALOGUES'-
MUSIC
3
COR. NICOLLET
T1
short timeu there, would. be no differ
e n e
,:^1ifeif' he-\ 0i)tke 6'f 'hfk religion h
found rib occasion 'for* argument br
'dispute. Mary listened" aYtentively,
sometimes" ejigerl^ and seemed as
conversant with the subject as he was.
lie often thought that she was go
ing to surprise him by telling him she
was already a Catholic, hut their wed
ding day passed and his hope was
unrealized.
Nor did she avail herself of the
inariy opportunities that presented
themselves during the first five years
of lifer married life, iier home Hfc
was peaceful iand happy, but she her
self was often restless and discontent
ed. She tried'to conceal it from her
"husband, but. his lovin
than she. "thbughf
.So it was that wheri a mission
was giv^n at St. John's "in the Septem
ber of the fifth year after" they were
married he urged her more than was
his wont to attend .the exercises. She
put him off from day to day, and when
the flight of the closing service canie
was.apparently still indifferent.
lg eyes saw more
....
4-::
He found it hard to leave her alone
that evening, lingering as long as he
could," hoping to the last moment that
she would change her mind. She felt
the silent pleading in his parting kiss,
and. when lie was gone sank down
for .*i moment into the nearest chair
in an "abandon "bf bitter thought.
All about her were the evidences
of his care for her comfort, luxuries
even that lie. delighted in giving her.
What were all these to a troubled
spirit?
Across the glOoiriy silence stole
the sound of a bell, ringing out, its
tuneful summons from the tower of
St. John's: Mary arose hastily and
went to the piano. Her fingers ran
rapidly over "the keys in aii ac
companiment, and shb tried to sing:
It was no use. The words ended in
a sob. Rising again, she paced up and
down the room. Suddenly the signs
of struggle vanished from her face,
replaced by the calm of decision.
Hastily donnihjj? her wraps, she hur
ried to the church.11
She entered and sank breathless
into the last pew, just as her husband
began to sing the "Veni Creator."
She listened with mingled feelings of
pride and pleasure to his rich bari
tone, and the words of the hymri had
a new meaning for her.
"What doth it profit a man if ho
gain the Whole world and'lose his
soul?"
Mary started. She leaned forward
and drank in eagerly the words of
the priest. She forgot the crowds
of people about her, forgot all things
saVe the burning message straight
front the Tips of the speaker to her
own heart. It. was no flowery flight
of eloqirenCe, Tiut an earnest forceful
appeal from a true soldier of Christ.
Behind his word's lay the Strength of
a life lived in the manner he present
ed to his hearers as the only one
worth while.
Mary Harrington's doubts and fears
fell avvay from her, and her restless
ness and agrtaHrm were, stilled to a
firm and holy, purpose 'v:-• •.
As Joseph came down the stairs
from the choir loft, still thrilled with
the^ ^eauty of _v%e services .juat -con
cluded, h.is eyes fell on an upturned
face in the outsurging crowd below—
the beautiful, eager- fs^ce of .his wife.
With a little cry of surprise he hur
ried to her.
"Mary, you here—alone?" ..
"Take^ me to him, Joseph, now, this
very night. I must speak, to him." :.
"Take you to whom, dear-*-to-—to^-"
he began,, doubtingly.
"To that priest who preached. It
is not to late. Don't you think we can
see him tonight?"
Wondering, but rejoicing, he led
the way to the sacristy. They found
that Father Casgrain had gone to the
rectory, so they followed, and in a
few moments he joined them in the
reception-room.
Mary found his presence, as inspir
ing as his words had been, and the
3ilence of years was broken.
She told him that she had known
the Catholic Church to be the true
one since she was a girl at school,
but had not had the strength to put
her belief into practice.
Seeing the look of surprise
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oji
BEST OF EVERYTHING IN MUSIC
A N A FOR CHURCH, HOME OR CONCERT USE
i mef-D jj"%a" mTQ- VioHns,
Mandolin*,
Mt ii 1 O" Cornets, lute*, Clarinets, and other Wind instruments.
Muaic Stands, Music Rolls and Ba?s, at Lowest Prices Consistent with Quality.
"'PAUL A. "5CHM1TT, Music Dealer
AVE. AND
8th ST.
*.t
urnMfr.
'i ft
'*Wr
fi
fkWi
1 8
her
husband's face, and the very evident
interest of the priest, she told at once
the story of what. Ji&d so long been
her he^tt's secret.
"I shall have to go hack many
years to make-JClpar^to.yon both the
influence and' circumstances that have
shaped my life.
"You have often heard mo speak,
Joseph, of the time our home, up'to
that so happy, was broken up by fny
father's disappearance. He had gone
to California, the gold fever being
then at its height. He had great
hopes of increasing his fortune.
"For a time we heard from him
regularly, then suddenly his letters
ceased. All mother's efforts to learn
of his whereabouts were fruitless.
She was heartbroken. I was only
twelve, but I remember it all as if it
were but yesterday!
"That my sister Angela and myself
might not be neglected during the
many times mother was necessarily
absent from home, she placed u$ at.
ifafiinaculate Conception Academy.
/Continued on Page 7.)fr I
Gviitarj and other String Instrumsints,
DAY
I
I
Address, THE SECRETARY
4
'r'OL!\
MINN.
-'..•jyjsh'C i""'
CAT
A CATHOLIC COLLEGE FOR GIRLS
"v JSstredited
by the
Minnesota State Board of Public
several prominent Universities.
Seventy Acre Campui.Flre«Proof Bulldlntffc.
COMPLETE COURSES IN THESE DEPARTMENTS
The Collegiate, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts— The Academic
or College Preparatory— Music and Painting in their various branches
Domestic Art, Household Science and Cooking. vf:
The College enjoys the patronage of Archbishop Ireland.
Year Book on Application Addreis the Secretary
LEARN WIRELESS TELEGRAPHY
obtained. Rfiilrfind and
pcrieuced trjiin dispatcher.
CJ:ifi eurn bo:ird.
AMERICAN TELEGRAPH COLLEGE
810 Produce Exchange BlcJg., First Avenue North and Sixth Street MINNEAPOLIS
ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY
Telephone Dale
A DAY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
A thoroughly equipped High School. Graduates admitted to the University of Minne
sota without examination.
All branches of music taught on the plan of the best Classical Conservatories.
Diplomas conferred on Students who complete the prescribed course in piano or violin.
Students may enter the Department of Music at any time.
354
SOLID PROGRESS—NO FADS
The man who learns is the man who earns. What of your
•oa? Do not experiment on hira.
ST. JOHN'S UNIVERSITY
COLLEGEVILLE, MINN.
a Cathollo hoarding school for young men and boys can help
you shape his manhood. Turns out successful men. Recognized
for its splendid location, moral standard, enlightened course of
•tudles, healthy family spirit, the attachment of Its alumni, Its
kindly parental Interest in each young man.
Two lakes. 800 acres of timbered rolling woodland. Pure
country air. Pure spring water. 291,253 square feet of floor
space. All modern improvements. Culinary Department sup
plied from the Institution's farms and gardens. Opportunity for
•very young man to enjoy every form of sport. Courses: Short
hand and Typewriting, Music, Drawing, Preparatory, Commer
cial, High School, College, Science, Philosophy, Theology.
Terms moderate. Petty extravagances discouraged. Limited
"'dumber only accepted each year. A personal visit heartily wel
comed. For catalogue, address
ix.
1 llUidPtlV
Very Rev. B. Held, O. 3. B., Rector
College of Saint Tliomas
SAINT PAUL, MINNESOTA
Under the Control and Direction of Archbishop Ireland
A CATHOLIC MILITARY COLLEGE
Collegiate Commercial Academic Preparatory
Careful Mental, Moral and Religious Training
Six Hundred nnd Eighty Students from Eighteen States Registered
Last Year. For illustrated catalogue address
Very Rev. IT. MOYNITTAN, D. DPresident,
St. Benedict's College and Academy
ST. JOSEPH. MINNESOTA
A Boarding School for Girls and Yoong Ladles
With which is connected a Boarding- School far Little Boys
between the
ages
of six and twelve years.
Accredited to the State University of Minnesota. Collegiate, Academic,
Commercial, Preparatory and Primary Departments. Special advantages in
Needlework, Art, Expression And Domestic Science.
PREPARE FOR BUSINESS
AND NIGHT SCHOOL
INDIVIDUAL INSTRUCTION
Bookkeeping, Accounting. Banking, Shorthand.
Typewriting, and every subject pertaining to a
thorough business education. Students should en
roll now. Get catalog we have no solicitors.
Only Accredited Business Scbcol k ti Ful.
PRACTICAL BUSINESS SCHOOL
WALTER RASMUSSEN. Prop.
••B Minnesota Street St. Pan I. JHInaMota
For Particulars Address ST',TER DIRECTRESS
St. Clara College and Academy for Young Women
4 SCHOOL OF MUSIC, ART AND EXPRESSION
Conducted
by the SISTERS OF THE ORDER OF SAINT
SINSINAWA, CRANT COUNTY, WISCONSIN
College Course leading to A. B. ond B. S. Degree*.
Teaehern* Life Certificates granted to College Graduates by the WIseotMltt Oe
partnient of Education upon the fulfilment of the State requirements. Endorsed
by other States.
Diplomas nnd Teachers* Certificates gTon':ed in the following Departments!
MUSIC, ART, COMMERCIAL, HOME ECONOMICS, DRAMATIC AR'£.JUJP£il
VISORS' COURSE IN SCHOOL MUSIC.
Academy course of four years prepares for College.
Healthful location, well-equipped building*, forty-aerpcampus.
The Co!let e and Academy are affiliated to the Catholic University of Amml y
and to the University of Wisconsin.
SHIP YOUR LIVE STOCK TO
W E S E N O I S S I O N O
SOUTH ST. PAUL, MINN. AND CHICAGO. ILL.
Paul
MINN
Instruction ant
by
nrirler inslruiHioi'i of i'overnmcnt
nin-li-Rs oiM-rsitoi-. Thrrn
tiim-s :is tiinriy wir«-Uss .pimtors
jtrt* no"'(lfr] fur ships asvan now
commercifi) tpfcKr.apliy also thoronahly (might under instruction cx-
Sisters of St. Jo8eph
ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL
TRAIMMG SCHOOL FOR NURSES
Classes Open Jan. 1st, March 1st and Oct. 1st
Applicants'for training plcasn correspond pre
vious to these (latos with the Principal of Trainintf
•Sultuol,
S!lort hours
railroad wires—expert instructors—can earn board. Write for catalog B.
BARRY'S TELEGRAPH INSTITUTE
840 Hennepin Avenue MINNEAPOLIS
ST. JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL, St. Paul. Hlnn.
pleasant work—good pay—
I great demand. 1,500 graduates working-
DOMINIC
For Catalogue or information, oddress /,
THE SECRETARY, SAINT CLARA COLLEGE, SINSINAWA, WIS. 1
Reference:
SIX SALESMCIS—THAT SATISFY Stock Yards Nat. Bank, So. St. Paul. Minn.
A

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