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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, February 27, 1915, Image 1

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Volume 5
1
IECTURE BYJUOGE WILLIS
HE DESCRIBES THE ORIGIN OF
RELIGIOUS LIBERTY IN THE
UNITED STATES BEFORE THE
CARROLLTON CLUB—PAPER BY
S A A E U S I A
PROGRAM.
At the regular monthly meeting of
the Carroll ton Club, held in the
Knights of Columbus auditorium last
Tuesday e.vtfiing, the Hon. John W.
Willie gave a very interesting address
C/rt ''The Origin of Religious Liberty
in the United States." After showing
that no persecution or civil disability
U\i account of religion was tolerated
in the parts of the New World settled
by the French and Spaniards, he de
scribed the establishment of the first
English colonies on the Eastern sea
board in New England, Virginia and
Maryland. The colonies in New Eng
land at Plymouth and Massachusetts
Way were founded by the Puritans.
The Virginia colony was settled by
members of the Church of England.
In these colonies there was no re
ligious toleration and Catholics were
subjected to all sorts of persecution
and civil disability because of their
religion.
In contrast to this he pointed out
that religious liberty in the full sense
of the word found its first home in
the New World, if not in the entire
world, in the Maryland Colony estab
lished by George Calvert, Lord Balti
more, a convert to the Church, and his
Hon and successor who received their
patents from King James the First.
This colony was established in 1
The early records of its legislation
have been lost, but in 1649 the laws
then on the statute book allowed full
est liberty of conscience to all and
Maryland became the home of the op
pressed. He then cited other facts to
show that the Catholic Church has
ever been the foremost advocate of
religious liberty and never seeks to
coerce the individual conscience into
accepting any form of religious be
lief. After the lecture, several ques
tions were asked which brought out
more fully the important, role v iic.
the Church has played in safeguard
ing religious liberty.
In addition to the lecture, Mrs. P.
J. Gallagher, formerly connected with
the Immigration Bureau of New York,
read a paper on "How the Alien Is Re
ceived in New York," which proved
very instructive to the large audience.
Miss Margaret Masek furnished the
musical program for the evening.
The next meeting of the Carrollton
Club will be held on the evening of
March 11, and the principal address
will be given by Albert W. White,
Senior Professor of History at the Uni
versity of Minnesota. His subject will
be "Ireland and the Beginning of Mod
ern Civilization." The meetings of the
Carrollton Club are open to the public
and all who desire to attend may do
so without the payment of any mem
bership fee.
SERBIA iO THE IIITIIl
KING PETER APPOINTS MINISTER
TO THE HOLY SEE.
In fulfillment of the Concordat con
cluded last year between the Holy
See and Serbia, the Government of
King Peter has appointed as Minister
to the Vatican Michael Gravilovic,
who is at present Serbian Minister
to Montenegro, and who has an inter
national reputation for historical writ
ings. In reality, the appointment of
a diplomatic representative does not
form one of the conditions of the Con
cordat, but as that act provides for
the settlement of controverted ques
tions by amicable arrangement be
tween the Holy See and the Serbian
Government, the presence of a Ser
bian Minister at the Vatican is a dis
tinct advantage to both parties to it.
His appointment furnishes an addi
tional example of the importance
which the Powers of Europe attribute
to the moderating influence of the
Holy See in the world, and the as
sistance it
may
render them towards
tho maintenance of peace in the fu
ture. Besides, such representation
preserves internal harmony between
the government and the Catholics in
the countries represented.
NEW IELGII! ESVOT
M. VANDEN HEUVEL SUCCEEDS
BARON D'ERP AT THE VATICAN.
It is explained semiofficially in
Vatican circles that the resignation
of Baron D'Erp, the Belgian minister
accredited to the Holy See. should not
be interpreted as evidence of a lack
of cordiality between the Church and
the Belgian government. Mgr. Tacci,
the Papal Nuncio to Belgium, is re
maining at his post, while Belgium is
sending to Rome to take the place
of Baron D'Erp, M. Vanden Heuvel, a
well known statesman who is persona
grata to the
Papacy.
Diocese of St. Paul:
Beloved Brethren:
The annual collection for Home and
Foreign Missions will be taken up in
the churches of the Diocese of St. Paul
on the third Sunday of Lent, March
7th.
The collection of last year amounted
to the sum of $4,489.44. This sum was
given over to the Society of the Propa
gation of the Faith in Paris and the
Negro and Indian Missions in the
United States—a small part going to
impoverished parishes in the Diocese
of St. Paul itself.
In view of the present direful situa
tion of the missions in foreign lands—
mostly heathen—it is proposed that,
this year, in the distribution of the pro
ceeds of the collection, the Society of
the Propagation of the Faith, upon
which depends the maintenance of
those missions, shall be the main bene
ficiary—the whole surplus over the
sums usually given to other purposes,
going to this Society.
Wars in Europe have made nearly
penniless the Society of the Propaga
tion of the Faith. Countries, hereto
fore its chief support, are themselves
reduced to piteous misery and can do
nothing to replenish its treasury. The
consequence is that today the most
serious problem confronts the Missions
of the Church in heathen lands—one of
life or death. Today, in Asia and
Africa, in the Islands of Oceanica,
thousands of missionaries are on the
verge of starvation thousands of mis
sionary stations, schools and asylums,
are in deplorable penury. The most
distressing appeals, we are told, are
reaching the offices of the Society of
the Propagation of the Faith, hitherto
the sure-refuge of the Catholic aposto
late'.1* "Sgence, however, in its. present
situation, no relief is to be had.
The Catholic Church must not allow
the pall of death to spread over its
missions to heathen lands. Those
missions are its glory, the evidence of
its divinely-given universality. Some
where and somehow the remedy to
menacing misfortune must be found.
Catholics in Europe can do nothing:
Catholics in large-hearted America
will be the saviour of the Church in
its missionary work.
In America we are blest. No war
shatters our cities or desolates our
plains. Our harvests are plentiful:
our industries thrive. Wars in other
lands bring us even greater prosper
ity, than might otherwise have been
ours. Let us show our gratitude to
Almighty God by returning to Him,
in service to charity and religion, a
generous portion of the gifts with
which His bounty has endowed us.
Shall we say—We have burthens 0f
our own—missionaries of our own to
support, churches to build, works of
religion and charity to uphold? True
this may be: true it is. But shall we
see only ourselves and our limited
confines, when elsewhere the Church
WHAT THE LEAGUE OF CATHOLIC
ANNUAL COLLECTION FOR HOME AND FOREIGN MISSIONS
SPECIAL APPEAL IN BEHALF OF
THE SOCIETY OF THE PROPA­
GATION OF THE FAITH.
To the Clergy and the Laity of the
WOMEN IS DOING FOR THE
SYRIAN AND ITALIAN CHILDREN
—KINDERGAR TEN—SEWING
CLASSES—NEIGHBORHOOD VIS­
ITING—SOCIAL WORK—A DE­
SERVING CHARITY.
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
Rev. E. F. Casey.)
A visit to the little flame building
at the rear of the Italian Cliurch, 625
Main Street, Northeast, Minneapolis,
is well worth while to any one inter
ested in the care and training of the
city's poorer children. It is here that
the Minneapolis League of Catholic
Women is engaged in settlement work
among the Syrian families of the
neighborhood. The quarters have be
come too small for the number of
children who attend the kindergarten,
the sewing classes, the gymnasium,
millinery
and choral classes. In charge
of the work is Mrs. G. C.
Barry,
gradually
their disposal permitted.
Baron D'Erp
is advanced in years and it is felt that
more could be accomplished in this
post by a younger statesman.
as­
sisted by a committee of nine Catholic
women of the city. For two years
the work has been steadily progress
ing while the women have enlarged
its scope
as tho funds at
The Kindergarten.
The directress of the kindergarten
is Miss Otilla Ackerson. She is as
sisted by three teachers from the Min
neapolis kindergarten training class.
Every morning from nine to twelve
the little tots, aged from three to six
years, gather in their class rooms for
systematic work and play and prayer.
There are more than eighty of them
this year, mostly Syrians, with sev
eral Polish and a few German chil­
of God is in suffering? When extra
ordinary needs arise, shall we be in
capable of extraordinary sacrifice?
The foreign missions of the Church
:nust be safeguarded: unless we do
Dur part, they will perish. What else
shall we say, but that our part will be
done—done cheerfully and generous
ly?
Nor must we forget that help from
the Catholics of America to the So
ciety of the Propagation of the Faith
is not only an act of religion and of
charity: it is, too, an act of strict jus
tice. In the early days of its history,
when its children were few and poor,
the Church in America received mun
ficent contributions from the Society
of the Propagation of the Faith. It
was indebted to that Society for its
life, for the foundations of the pros
perity which later came to it. In
deed, the fact is not to be overlooked
that the Society was first established
in the City of Lyons, under the sug
gestion of the Bishop of New Orleans,
with the express purpose of lending
assistance to missions in the United
States of America. Year by year it
was most liberal to those missions—
its gifts reaching into the millions.
Our own Diocese of St. Paul was its
beneficiary to the amount of tens of
thousands of dollars. The Society of
the Propagation of the Faith support
ed our early priests, maintained their
missions among Indians and pioneer
colonists: it assisted in building in St.
Paul the Cathedral to which lately we
hade farewell—three-fourths of the
cost of this Cathedral being derived
from the gifts of the Society.
So far, our debt to the Society of
the Propagation of the Faith has been
repaid only in small part. Let us be
more just towards it. The present
day is the opportune time to remem
ber its favors. The Society is in sor
est straits: countries, its long-time
friends and benefactors, are devasta-
l.ed
by wars. Unless other countries
—notably the United States of Amer
ca—come to its assistance, its great
md holy, work, the missions of the
Church in heathen lands, is doomed to
suffering, if not to death.
This letter will be read at the sev
eral Masses in the churches of the
Diocese of St. Paul, on the Second
Sunday of Lent, February 28th and
on the following Sunday, the Third
Sunday of Lent, March 7th, the col
lection will be taken up, as hereby
prescribed—the proceeds to be sent
without unnecessary delay to the Dio
cesan Chancery Office.
Tho total sum collected on this
Third Sunday of Lent will be remitted
to the Chancery office—no deductions
for ordinary parish expenditures be
ing allowed.
I pray the Almighty God to bless
the priests ai\d the laity of the Dio
cese of St. Paul.
JOHN IRELAND,
Archbishop of St. Paul.
St. Paul, February 25th, 1915.
A detailed report of the collection
for the Home and Foreign Missions
in the parishes of the Diocese of St.
Paul for the year 1914 is given on
page 5.
dren. On Saturday afternoon, Miss
Tellish conducts a "story hour," be
ginning at two o'clock. Instruction in
gymnastics is given to a class of fifty
girls on two afternoons in the week
from four o'clock to five. A millinery
class for the larger girls is held one
evening of the week from seven
o'clock to nine. A choral club also has
been organized among the school girls
and has its weekly hour for singing.
Sewing Class.
Perhaps the most useful and prac
tical class of all is the sewing class
in which a hundred young girls of the
district are enrolled. These girls
range in age from nine years to fifteen
and are divided into two grades ac
cording to age. Those from nine to
eleven are taught the rudiments of
needle work, while those from eleven
to fifteen compose what is called the
garment class. They are taught prac
tical dress-making with a view to en
abling them to make their own gar
ments and aid their mothers in the
family sewing and mending. The ear
nestness and enthusiasm with which
many of these young daughters of the
poor pursue this work is delightful to
one who realizes that this interest in
their lives, while giving to them skill
in one of the most useful of the house
hold arts, preserves them from the
vicious amusements about them and
cultivates a taste for the wholesome,
sober and useful things of life. Their
eagerness, too, speaks much for the
skill and sympathy of the volunteer
teachers.—eleven young women who
freely give their services every Satur
day morning for three hours to this
work.
The progress made by the members
of the sewing and other classes is of
deepest interest to their mothers and
in order to stimulate this interest Mrs
(Continued on page 8.)
liatfi li ulIcT:
nJ
ST. PAUL, MINN., FEBRUARY 27, 1915.
MHIST F1IJBSIEHEIIED
VERY REVEREND 0. RENAUDIER,
S. M., PROVINCIAL TREASURER
OF THE SOCIETY DIES AT THE
MARIST COLLEGE, WASHING­
TON, D. C.
The Very Reverend Onesimus Renau
dier, S. M., Provincial Treasurer of
the Society of Mary, commonly known
as the Marists, died at the Provincial
House and Scholasticate of the Socie
ty, Brookland, near Washington, D. C.,
on February 20, in the seventy-eighth
year of his age and the fifty-third of
his religious profession. His funeral
took place from the Marist College last
Monday.
Father Renaudierl was b9rn in
France and came to tlie United States
over fifty years ago. After his ordi
nation he was pastor of a parish in
Louisiana for twenty years. He was
then transferred to San Francisco,
where he built the Church of Notre
Dame des Victoires. Later on he was
appointed pastor of tl|e Marist Church
in Boston, where lio? remained until
about ten years ago when he became
Provincial Treasurer of the Society.
He bought the property near the Cath
olic University, Washington, D. C.,
and erected the present Scholasticate
and was active in the management of
the affairs of the Society until the
end.
FATHER GANNON OF "THE TRUE
VOICE," OMAHA, ASSUMES PAS­
TORATE OF ST. PATRICK'S
CHURCH.
The Ilev. Peter C. Gannon, editor of
"The True Voice," Omaha, Nebr., has
been appointed pastor of the Church
of St. Patrick in that city in succes
sion .o the late Father Smith. He
will retain the editorship of "The True
Voice" for the present at least. An
associate editor has? been appointed in
the person of Rev. 'P^X Moran.
Father Gannon is a native of Grand
Junction, la., where he was born in
1873. He gradautcd from Creighton
University, Omaha, in 1S98, and en
tered the St. Paul Seminary, where
lie was ordained June 5, 1913. In the
following September he was appointed
editor of "The True Voice" and has
succeeded in making it one of the
best known Catholic papers in the
West.
GREEK MELGHITE CHURCH
NEW CHURCH FOR SYRIANS
BLESSED BY MGR. LAVELLE
OF NEW YORK.
A new chapel, the first of its kind
in New York for the Catholic Syrian
community of the Greek rite, known
as the Melchites, was opened on Feb
ruary 14. This community, in whose
religious history the event marks a
new era, has been established in
lower Manhattan about twenty-five
years, during whicli time its pastor,
the Very Rev. Abraham Bechawatee,
has been holding services in the base
ment of St. Peter's Church, Barclay
street.
The new chapel occupies the upper
floor of a business building located in
the very heart of the Syrian colony.
It is well lighted and roomy, measur
ing twenty-two by seventy-five feet.
\Vith the aid of generous contribu
tions from many members of this
community, and the help and assis
tance of many American friends from
among the Catholic clergy of New
York, it has been made possible to
have the chapel beautifully refitted,
painted, decorated and very neatly
and artistically furnished. The sanc
tuary with« its beautiful Greek iconos
tasis and altars is also appropriately
fitted up. The chapel is dedicated to
St. George, who is greatly venerated
by the Christians of the East
In the presence of a large con
course of Syrians from New York and
Brooklyn the new chapel was blessed
by the Right Rev. Monsignor Lavelle,
assisted by the Rev. Dr. Oussani, of
St. Joseph's Seminary, and the Rev.
Father Wakim, pastor of the Mar
onites. Solemn Mass in the Greek
Melchite rite was celebrated by the
Very Rev. Father Abraham Bechewa
tee, Economos and Archimandrite,
ably assisted by six cantors.
SMEMMRJ QUEBEC
HON. P, LeBLANC SUCCEEDS
THE LATE SIR F. LANGELIER.
Hon. Pierre Evariste LeBlanc, K. C.,
of Montreal, former leader of the
Conservative Party in Quebec, and ex
Speaker of the Legislative Assembly,
has been appointed Lieutenant-Gov
ernor of that Province in succession
to the late Sir Francois Langelier.
A FEW NOTES ON THE POSITION
ASSUMED BY EX-PRESIDENT
ELIOT
OF' HARVARD UNIVER-
SITY.
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
Rev. C. F. McGinnis.)
Among the many questions aroused
by the present great upheaval in Eu
rope that concerning the part played
by Christianity seems to stand forth
most conspicuously. We are told by
a certain class of unbelievers and dis
believers that the fact of the terrible
war now raging beyond the Atlantic is
incontestable proof that Christianity
with all its boasted teachings on char
ity and brotherly love, its leng his
tory adown the ages, and its vaunted
beliefs in universal brotherhood—that
Christianity is a self-confessed and a
dismal failure. Mr. Charles Eliot, for
mer president of Harvard University,
following along the lines laid down by
himself some time ago for the regen
eration and purification of Christian
ity, seizes upon the present catas
trophe as a triumphant argument of
the truth of his contention. Christian
ity has failed, for "the present holo
caust has been planned deliberately
with the utmost intelligence and fore
sight, and is being carried on with
terrible efficiency by the nation which
is chiefly responsible for it—a Chris
tian nation."
Moreover, "during fifty years past,
Christian nations in Europe have giv
en their best efforts to devising and
storing up the means of making war
in the most destructive manner and on
an unprecedented scale." Let us sec
if Christianity should bear the burden
of wrongs and ills that follow from a
contest at arms between two belliger
ent states.
The Right of War a Natural Right.
The right of war usually is consid
ered to be a natural right. The psy
chology and the ethics of war lie
deep and latent in the very main
springs of human nature. They are
based intrinsically on the law of self
preservation, whether this law be ap
plied to the individual as such, or to
the collective units of the nation.
Personal liberty in this country, as
upheld in the Declaration of Indepen
dence and guaranteed by the Constitu
tion, is nothing more than a simple
application of the natural law which
affords every human being the right
to be "born free and equal," yea, and
to enjoy freedom and equality with
other human beings.
This law of self-preservation with
regard to the individual is inherent in
his physical and his moral nature.
For existence when applied to a hu
man being pre-supposes the right to a
continuance of that existence, unless
a higher law intervenes. Moreover,
this right is both positive and nega
tive, that is, it justifies the individual
in using the lawful means necessary
to preserve his existence, and it per
mits him to repel those forces or agen
cies which threaten the unlawful de
struction of that same existence.
As a corollary from this law there
flows the right to protect his family,
his dependents, and his other posses
sions. When these are menaced by an
enemy, domestic or foreign, one who
does not represent a higher law, such
a person is within his lawful rights if
he seeks to remove that enemy. Mul
tiply that individual right by the popu
lation of a country, and you have the
foundation of a civic virtue which has
been called patriotism. When the col
lective rights of a nation are threatened
by a foe, the individual certainly is as
fully justified in assisting his fellows
to repel the common enemy as he is
in putting forth his hand to crush the
enemy
of his own fireside and family.
War, therefore, is but the combined
effort of many units acting in harmony
and unison to repel the invader of the
individual as well as of the national
rights.
v
National Defence.
In the present state of society the
leaders of a nation are presumed to ex
ercise for the common weal the right
of defense. This right naturally
passes to the State, represented by its
rulers, as the only ones who are In a
position efficaciously to enforce the
law of self-protection for the multi
tude as well as for the individual citi
zen. It may sometimes happen, as
past records evidence, that a war is
unjust: in fact, war itself would seem
to indicate injustice somewhere. The
multitude is swayed by the arguments
©f its leaders, and immediately acts in
self-defense. Even supposing that the
war is most unjust: this fact will not
deprive the inhabitants of an invaded
country of the right to defend them
selves from attack. No one is justified
in upholding wrong but the injustice
of the leaders cannot compel the citi
zens to submit to the destruction of
their lives and property. Generally
speaking, it may be conceded that in
every war each party is convinced of
the justice of his cause: hence he is
not to be blamed if he prays for suc
cess and victory: in much the same
way that two parties to a law-suit may
adopt every lawful means to insure a
successful issue of the case.
IS CHRISTIANITY A FAILURE? IHTH DIIKOTi MISSIONART
Christianity Not An Issue fit Present
War.
Now, Mr. Eliot contends that Chris
tianity has failed inasmuch as Chris
tianity has not prevented warfare. In
the first place it may be remarked that
Mr. Eliot's idea of the Christian re
ligion, and of religion in general, is a
concept based on the modern interpre
tation of religion. Christ did not come
to build up a kingdom in this world:
"My kingdom is not of this world,"
He emphatically declared. Chris
tianity is not, nor can it be, an issue
in the question of armed conflict. The
counsels interspersed throughout the
Scriptures pointing to meekness and
submission have no bearing on the
present question. Suffering endured
with Christian fortitude is fraught
with merit: persecution borne in the
cause of Faith, when Faith is at stake,
a incumbent as a duty upon the be
ever. But- the shielding one's life
from hostile attack outside the realm
of religion is but the exercise of a
natural right. Will Mr. Eliot admit
that our forefathers acted wrongly in
seeking to preserve their independence
-and their liberties, unhampered by un
just restraint? Was the war of the
Revolution a proof that Christianity
had failed up to that particular epoch?
Is the present existence of this coun
try, the haven for the oppressed of
all nations, merely the result of a fail
ure of Christianity when put to the
test during the dark and bitter days
of Valley Forge? The historical fact
is, that Christianity in itself had noth
ing whatever to do with the whole
matter, as an antecedent, concomit
ant, or subsequent factor.
Eliot's Naturalisnt.
The fundamental error in Mr. Eliot's
reasoning is derived from a form of
Naturalism, so prevalent at the pres
ent time. He cannot see any distinc
tion between the soul eudowed and
enriched with divine grace, and the
cultured pagan living according to
purely natural laws and ideals. In
other words, Christianity is and al
ways has been dogmatic: true Chris
tianity always- will -be dogmatic.
When the flood-gates of irreligion
were opened wide in the sixteenth
century, the crux of the upheaval was
found to be the spirit of rebellion
against authority. Dogmatism palled
upon the human spirit that had been
chafing under restraint. The firmness
of the divine law, the uncomprising
attitude of the Christian Church with
regard to her doctrines furnished a
plausible pretext for those of her chil
dren who yearned for greener pas
tures, for untasted springs, for more
delectable mental pabulum. The in
flexible sameness of the manna spread
ever before them nauseated their
vitiated appetites, and they fain would
(Continued on page 4.)
mOOESJCHOUil
AMBROSE A. PAOLI SECURES DIS­
TINCTION FOR PRINCE EDWARD
ISLAND—E N I E S HIM TO
THREE YEARS AT OXFORD UNI­
VERSITY.
Mr. Ambrose A. Paoli has been ap
pointed Rhodes Scholar for Prince Ed
ward Island, Canada. This scholar
ship is worth $1,500 a year for three
years, during which the holder pur
sues a course of studies at Oxford
University, England.
Mr. Paoli is a native of Charlotte
town, where he was born twenty-two
years ago. After graduating from
Prince of Wales College he taught
English at St. John's College, Riviere
du Loup, Quebec, and then entered
Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.,
from which he will graduate this year
with the B. A. degree. He is an all
around athlete and a non-commis
sioned officer in the Fifth Field Com
pany Canadian Engineers. He will en
ter Oxford University next September
and will continue the study of civil
engineering. Mr. Paoli is the fourth
Catholic Rhodes Scholar from Prince
Edward Island.
PRIEST'S SJjflDEH
DEATH
FATHER DILLON OF LOUISVILLE
FOUND DEAD IN BED.
Rev. Michael Dillon, sixty-five years
old, was fdund dead in his bed at St.
Thomas Orphanage, Louisville, Ky.,
on February 13. He had been in ill
health a number of years, but was not
under the care of a physician. Death
was due to pneumonia.
Father Dillon was a native of Ire
land, coming to this country when
about four years old. He was edu
cated for the priesthood at St.
Thomas College, Bardstown.
spent most of his life
lie
as
a teacher,
for a number of years being a mem
ber of the faculty of the Preston Park
Seminary,
which
is
now St. Thomas
Orphanage. Later he was chaplain at
the O'Leary Home on Barret avenue.
He retired five years ago. No im
mediate relatives survive.
V
MINNESOTA
HISTORICAL,
SOOIEL Y.-
Number 9
FATHER BELCOURT'S W O
OF SECULAR NEWSPAPER.
K
AMONG THE INDIANS—TRIBUTE
Among the missionary priests of the
great Dakota territory no single man,
says the "Devil's Lake Journal," stands
forth more prominently than Father
Belcourt, famous for his great work
with the Indians, particularly the
Chippewas. In 1849 he was a mis
sionary at Pembina and later at St.
Joseph (Walhalla). Major Woods of
the United States army during the
31st congress was sent' to Pembina
to investigate the conditions in Da
kota, and his report of the work of
Father Belcourt is full of the high
est praise for the work of the mis
sionary. Father Belcourt performed
the valuable service of compiling a
dictionary of the Chippewa language,
spending many a weary day question
ing the Indians and learning the mul
titude of words used in the Chippe
wa tongue. At the time Major
Woods was at Pembina Father Bel
court asked for assistance from the
government to publish the dictionary
he had prepared.
The work done by these early mis
sionaries cannot be too highly re
garded. Theirs was the task of driv
ing the entering wedge of civiliza
tion into the wilderness of the
prairies and this task they nobly per
formed. The fact that they kept faith
with the Indians, never deceived
them, and always endeavored to see
that justice was done them, made it.
possible for the missionaries to pene
trate the wilds of the Dakotas and
safely go among the warring tribes
when no other white man could do so
with impunity. Some day North Da
kota will recognize the service per
formed by these men who gave their
lives to teacli the savage civilization
and Christianity.
FAUCI! CHURCH DEDICHTtD
NEW YORK CHURCH WILL BE A
PLACE OF PILGRIMAGE—WILL
COST $500,000—A GOTRtC BTmflST*"*
TURE WITH DOME.
The beautiful Chapel of Notre Damo
de Lourdcs, erected by Ihe French
Catholics of New York under the di
rection of the Fathers of Mercy as &
shrine to Our Lady and a place of pil
grimage, was solemnly dedicated by
His Eminence Cardinal Farley on
Thursday, February 11, the feast of
Our Lady of Lourdes. French people
from all parts of the city filled the
edifice and a large number of priest*
attended.
After the blessing of the exterior
and the interior of the edifice by the
Cardinal, a Solemn High Mass was
celebrated by the Right. Rev. Patrick
J. Hayes, Auxiliary Bishop of the
Archdiocese, with the Cardinal presid
ing. The music of the Mass was ren
dered by a choir composed of 100 little
boys and girls from the French Or
phan Asylum of St. Vincent de Paul.
The sermon was preached by the
Right Rev. Monsignor Joseph F.
Mooney, V. G.
Although the edifice is not finished,
lack of funds preventing the complo
tion of the magnificent dome, the
church is one of the finest in the city.
The total cost will be about $500,000*
of which more than $350,000 has been
thus far expended.
The style of the new church Is
French Gothic. The walls are of
Caen stone and marble. The dome
when completed will be 56 feet in
diameter and 215 feet in height. The
church has wide aisles and a coverfed
cloister particularly designed to ac
commodate pilgrimages and' contains
a baptistry and five chapels, in addi
tion to the grotto chapel. Forming a
part of the church and conforming
to it in architectural design, is the
chapel containing a grotto of Lourdes.
which for the past four weeks has
been a place of pilgrimage for devout
Catholics of all nationalities, but es
pecially of French-Americans.
With the dedication of the 'church
Notre Dame becomes a new parish.
Heretofore it has been a part of the
St.. Vincent de Paul parish. M|a
(eraldyn Redmond gave a large part
of the money thus far expended.
THREE PRIESTS PERISH
REDEMPTORI8T FATHERS KILLE0
BY ITALIAN EARTHQUAKE.
Six Redemptorist Fathers of thfl
Roman province were conducting mis
sions at Cerchio and Orluchio, and
were hearing confessions when the
earthquake occurred which demolish
ed the churches and buried the mis
sionaries in the ruins. One father
escaped unhurt, two others wore
slightly injured, but three of th#B|
perished.
The dead are Fathers Anthony Mira
bella and Emilius Annessi, who met
their death at Cerchio, and Father
Alexius D'Arpino, who perished at Or
luchio.

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