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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, September 04, 1915, Image 1

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Volume 5
CATHOLIC SCHOOLS PARISH
SCHOOLS, HIGH-SCHOOLS,
COLLEGES.
To the Clergy and the Laity of the
Diocese of St. Paul:
Beloved Brethren: I address to
day the Catholics of the Diocese of
St. Paul, far less with the intention
of inviting them to esteem and to
patronize Catholic schools, than with
that of congratulating them on their
present attitude in this regard. The
I day was, perhaps, when it was oppor
i tune, if not necessary, to argue in
favor of the Catholic school for the
Catholic child. Not so at the present
time: nought now remains as the duty
of the shepherd of the flock but to
bless and to praise.
Catholics value too highly the treas
ure of their Catholic faith not to be
resolved to transmit it strong and
untainted to their children, not to be
prompt in every sacrifice needed that
those whose salvation is their chief
responsibility be guarded against all
such peril as might lead to the loss
of that one inheritance for which
the gaining of the world's richest
promise provides no substitution, of
fers no compensation.
It is the command of the Saviour—
"Suffer little children to come unto
me, and forbid them not." Schools in
which access to Christ is denied give
not to the child the food of soul
willed by Christ. Atmospheres
charged with unbelief in the super
natural and the divine are not the fit
breathings for the little ones, whose
minds and hearts Christ seeks to as
similate with His own mind and heart.
It is, also, the saying of the Saviour—
"He that shall scandalize one of these
little ones that believe in me, it were
better for him that a millstone be
hanged about his neck and that he
should be drowned in the depths of
the sea." To give scandal is to place
a stumbling-block in the way of eter
nal salvation. A stumbling-block "to
the little ones" is the exclusion of the
religion preached by Christ, of the
spiritual life lived by Him, and the
implication, if not the overt f^zees
tion, thit instfeiwi oi' tfttjoo, a/vd
the things of earth be m&iie' the all
ruling law, the final purpose of human
existence. Parents that are Catholics
will not bring upon themselves the
malediction of the Saviour, by put
ting before their children the scandal,
the stumbling-block, of an unreligious
education, always so perilous, often so
fatal to the preservation of Catholic
1 faith. All this has been preached
again and again to our Catholic peo
ple: all this they know and firmly
hold as the rule they should follow in
the education of their children. We
repeat our praise and our congratula
tion.
LETTER OF THE MOST REVERERD ARCHBISHOP
The progress in the cause of Catho-
I 11c education in the Diocese of St.
Paul within recent years is simply
marvellous. On every sida new
school-houses are being built: olden
ones are being refitted and enlarged:
so fast as room is made for pupils,
pupils rush thither to fill it. And the
financial means required in this happy
amelioration of conditions are willing
ly and generously put at the disposal
of the parish-treasury. Priests and
people understand, as never before,
that the vital work of religion, pre
ceding in importance its other works,
is to supply to the children of the
church the education which, fitting
them in every line for the secular
life, safeguards them against peril to
their Christian faith and morals. To
day we can look forward to a time in
the near future when, if at all there is
the possibility, a Catholic school will
be the cherished possession of every
Catholic community in the Diocese of
St. Paul—and then the diocese will
have reached its highest glory and
Its surest claim to be deserving of
Heaven's best blessings.
As the Catholic schools open their
doors at the beginning of this new
scholastic year, let there be no hesi
tation on the part of Catholic fathers
and mothers in sending thither their
children. The choice of the one
school or of the other is the privilege
of the parent. It matters not to re
ligion which be the school, provided
it be a Catholic school.
A special word is needed in regard
to our high-schools and colleges.
There is, we fear, still lurking among
a few Catholics the notion that, the
course in the grade or grammar
school completed, youths may be en
trusted with safety to the non-Catho
lic high school or college. The notion
is most pernicious. The course in the
grade or grammar school completed,
the age has come to the child when
the mind and the heart are most re
ceptive of thought and guidance, when
the utmost care should be used to
ward off peril and increase the health
making factors in the processes of
education. To those who take obser
vation of passing conditions, the high
school and the college are subjects of
very special concern. We need the
oil and the other. Our Catholic
youth, young men and young women,
Should find before them the avenues
to best wordly success: nothing legiti
mate is there in this to which they are
entitled, nothing of which they
are not capable. Parents, whose lot
In life permits, should by all means
give to their children fullest oppor
tunities of education. They win be
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in the years of their later career at a
serious disadvantage if the grade or
grammar school was the beginning
and the ending of their education. It
is a truism, beyond discussion, that
knowledge is powpr: the deeper, the
more thorough the knowledge, the
easier for the man and for the woman
to ascend among their fellows, to take
to themselves their due proportion of
the rewards of labor and good-will.
Yet, on the other hand, to what will
serve worldly success, if in reaching
towards it the spiritual life has been
thwarted in growth, if, when worldly
rewards have been won, Christian
faith is found to have suffered ship
wreck. Yes, the high school and the
college, for Catholic youth, when
either is possible: but, by all means,
let it be the Catholic high school, the
Catholic college, where the Gospel
rule is inculcated—"Seek first the
Kingdom of Heaven and His justice,
and all these (other) things shall be
added unto you."
As for the primary school, so for
the high school and the college: the
choice in the case of the one or of
the other is the privilege of the par
ent. Which the school or the college
shall be, is a matter of freedom of
choice with the parent, provided it be
a Catholic high school, a Catholic
college.
Again, in the Diocfese of St. Paul*
we are fortunate: high schools and
colleges are within easy reach. Out
side the cities of St. Paul and of Min
neapolis, several parish schools have
annexed to their classes a high schgol
department and there are two excel
lent high schools, both open to day
pupils and to boarders, Villa Maria in
Frontenac, and Bethlehem Academy
in Faribault. In St. Paul there are
two high schools for girls—the Visi
tation Convent and the Academy of
St. Joseph and in Minneapolis—the
Academy of St. Margaret. For boys
we have in St. Paul the Cretin High
School, and in Minneapolis the De
La Salle Institute—both undjsr the
charge of the Brothers of the Chris
tian Schools. Then we have in St.
Paul our two colleges, in which with
good reason this diocese takes partic
ular pride—the College of St. Cather
ine for young woihen, and the College
of St. Thomas for young men—each
having both academic and collegiate
courses—the collegiate course in each
being complete and thorough in organ
ization, and so well equipped in all
departments and all appurtenances,
as to be able to fulfill all possible re
quirements and to merit from those
who are conversant with scholastic
work the highest encomiums. With
all the above named institutions we
are well acquainted: we commend
them in unmeasured terms to the
priests and to the Catholic people of
the Diocese of St. Paul.
We pray from our hearts for God's
blessing upon our parish schools, our
Catholic high schools and our colleges,
as, also, upon the Catholic parents
who by their patronage of them prove
that they take earnestly to heart the
welfare of their children in time and
in eternity.
This letter will be read at the sev
eral Masses, on Sunday next, in all
the churches of the Diocese of St,
Paul.
JOHN IRELAND,
Archbishop of St. Paul.
St. Paul, September 1,1915.
II
E CHAPEL
BUILT pF MOUNTAIN STONE—
TOURISTS HELP TO
SUPPORT IT.
High up on the Wat Chung Moun
in New Jersey, in a magnificent setting
of picturesque scenery, at a spot
known as Mount Bethel, is a kittle
chapel that arrests the attentiojn of
many automobile tourists in that
region. The chapel is built entirely of
mountain stones. Father Ditjtrich,
formerly of Bound Brook and noW pas
tor of th$ Church of the Holy Spirit at
Atlantic City, started the chapel.
For a long while the little chapel
found it hard, financially, to get along.
The Catholics there are few in num
ber, and they are poor, but they kept
the chapel going. Lately, some pleople
from other sections have invested in
Mount Bethel property, and Miss Cath
erine Van Worth, has taken the initi
ative in bringing the parishioners in
closer contact for social intercourse
and also for the purpose of assisting
club,
the
the chapel. She has started a
known as the Club of the Lady
Mount. The members will organize a
choir and will actively look aft^r the
welfare of the little chapel.
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MEMORIM. TO THE LUTE
ARCHBISHOP RIORDAH
K. OF C. OF SAN FRANCISCO
E E O N Z E E O I A
WHICH WILL BE DEDICATED
NEXT SUNDAY —ARCHBISHOP
HANNA WILL OFFICIATE.
On Sunday, September 5* the Most
Reverend Archbishop Hanna, will ac
cept and dedicate the costly memorial
to the late Archbishop Patrick W.
Riordan, of San Francisco, which has
been erected in the Knights of Colum
bus Building.
The bas-relief is the work of Sculp
tor Joseph Mora of that city, who has
been engaged in its production for
abo.ut six months. It is cast in endur
ing bronze, and is supported by an
ornamental stand holding an open
book in which are engrossed the reso
lutions adopted by the Knights to
mark the passing of this noble man.
The sculptor has perpetuated the
features of the late Archbishop with
consummate skill, and surrounded his
profile with prayerful angels. In the
arch fit the top is represented the
burial of our Lord in the tomb, and
below, in Latin, are inscribed the
official ecclesiastical titles of Arch
bishop Riordan.
The dedicatory exercises will be
held in the upper rooms of the Knights
of Columbus Building next Sunday,
September 5, commencing at 3 p. m.
Archbishop Hanna will deliver the
eulogy and dedicate the memorial.
SWISS 1ISI1P DEM
BISHOP BOVET OF GENEVA DID
MUCH TO ALLEVIATE THE CON
DITION OF PRISONERS OF WAR.
Catholic Switzerland mourns the
death of Bishop Bovet, of Lausanne
and Geneva, who succumbed on Au
gust 17 to a cardiac seizure at his
residence in Fribourg. When the
Sovereign Pontiff designated him for
the position, Monsignor Bovet was pro
fessor of dogma at the diocesan sem
inary of Fribourg. His first mission
was id iHiteuehatel, but the Fribourg
Council of State soon appointed him
professor of the College of St. Mich
ael, and from thence he went to be
professor of dogma at the Fribourg
seminary. His "hobby" was always
the defense of Christian doctrine—in
deed, he won his doctorate in theology
by a fine thesis which treated of the
science of Jesus Christ. Since the
war began he rendered immense serv
ices to the prisoners by the institu
tions he founded, which formed the
nucleus of the Swiss Catholic mis
sions to the prisoners from whence
has grown the Holy Father's inter
vention, and the development of Switz
erland as a convalescent home of gi
gantic proportions for wounded sol
diers of all the belligerents.
DRUNKEN SOLDIERS ASSAULTED
TWO CHRISTIAN BROTHERS
AND ARE SENT TO PRISON FOR
TWO MONTHS.
A great deal of indignation has been
aroused in Ireland by the publication
of particulars of a wanton and cow
ardly attack made on the Christian
Brothers by soldiers of the Ninth Bat
talion Inniskilling Fusiliers (Ulster Di
vision), at present encamped at Clare
Park, Ballycastle. The case against
the soldiers—Private C. E. Gillespie,
Private Betts, and Private Quinn, was
heard at the Ballycastle Petty Ses
sions, when they were charged with
assaulting the Brothers.
It appears from evidence given by
Brother Craven, Brother Conway, and
others, that as the Brothers were out
walking on Saturday evening, July 24,
they were set upon by a number of the
soldiers, who had been singing "Dolly's
Brae" and cursing the Pope. Brother
Craven received a swinging and delib
erate blow on the face from one, and
four others also struck at him. He
bled so copiously that his clothes were
saturated. A soldier took up a stone
to throw at him, but was prevented
from throwing it by another who came
up. Brother Conway was similarly ill
treated.
.Captain Wilson, on behalf of the
Commanding Officer, expressed regret
for the dastardly outrage, which was
due to drink. The magistrate unani
mously decided to sentence Private
Betts and Private Gillespie to two
months' imprisonment with hard labor.
JOIIBF Dec IHOlEOiSCML OF JSiWU
A bronze statue of Joan of Arc, de
signed by Anna Haughn Hyatt, will be
erected at Riverside Drive and 93rd
street. New York City. It will rest
upon a pedestal made from the stones
of her prison at Rouen, France. The
cost of the monument will be about
$25,000 and has been raised entirely
by private subscription. The section
of the dungeon of the Heroine of
France purchased and brought here,
includes 229 blocks of limestono.
OPENED IN VISITATION ACADEMY,
WHEELING, W. VA.
A school of journalism will be estab
lished at Mount de Chantal Academy,
two miles east of Wheeling, W. Va.,
when school is resumed in September.
This will be the first girls' school to
establish a department of journalism.
Mount de Chantal is a girls' boarding
school in charge of the Visitation Sis
ters,
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ATTACKED
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1
THE CECILim SOCIETY
JLUINNEiraUS
MUSICAL SOCIETY ORGANIZED IN
ST. LAWRENCE PARISH FOR
THE PROPER RENDITION OF
CHURCH MUSIC PROGRAM,
MEMBERSHIP AND OFFICERS.
The Cecilian Society of the parish of
St. Lawrence, Minneapolis, the out
growth of a volunteer choir, was or
ganized July 2, 1915, for the proper
rendition of ecclesiastical music and
the cultivation and appreciation of the
art in all its branches. It has a mem
bership of sixty-two, of whom forty
three are active and the others asso
ciate members. The requirements for
active membership are regular attend
ance at rehearsals and the payment
of twenty-five cents a month for the
support of the Society. The associate
members are required to contribute at
least one dollar a year. Each member
receives a ticket which entitles the
holder to admission to all meetings
and concerts given by the Society.
The membership is not confined to the
parish of St. Lawrence.
The Society meets monthly to dis
cuss musical and kindred subjects.
The program of studies during this
year deals with the development of
ecclesiastical music. Papers and dis
cussions by members of the Society
will be supplemented by lectures on
topics of general interest and recitals
by prominent musicians.
The officers of the Society are:
President, Miss Bessie Chute vice
president, Mr. Charles Gorman secre
tary, Miss Josephine Littel treasurer,
Miss Teresa Archer auditor, Mr.
Joseph Prenevost librarian, Miss Eve
lyn Morin master critic, Rev. T. R.
Talbot moderator, the pastor of St.
Lawrence Church.
At the August meeting of the Soci
ety, which was held at the home of
Mrs. S. H. Chute, 1024 University Ave.
S. E., Minneapolis,, an address was
given by Professor Leopold Bruenner
of St. Paul, who traced the origin and
development of Gregorian Chant and
showed its fitness for liturgical pur
poses.
On September i^ »&e*/"Valerius
Nelles, O. F. M., of ma Sacred Heart
parish, St. Paul, will give an address
on "The Practicability of Church Mu
sic," at the home of Mrs. Chute, and
will illustrate it with his own church
choir.
RA SISTERS HOSPITAL
NON-CATHOLICS' GENEROUS CON
TRIBUTIONS FOR THE PUR
CHASE OF A HOSPITAL FOR THE
SISTERS IN SEDALIA,.MO.
Last week the Sisters of the Incar
nate Word, whose Motherhouse is lo
cated at San Antonio, Texas, came into
possession of the "Maywood Hospital,"
Sedalia, Mo., which they will conduct
as an up-to-date institution for the
care of the sick. The purchase price
of $40,000 was raised by a committee
of citizens who solicited the funds, the
largest donations being given by non
Catholics, among whom were Dr. W.
J. Ferguson, who gave $10,000, and Dr.
E. A. Wood, former owner of the May
wood Hospital, who gave $5,000.
Four months ago Dr. Ferguson pur
chased a spacious residence for the
purpose of presenting it to the Sisters
for a hospital as a memorial to his in
fant son. It was found that the build
ing and its surroundings would be in
adequate for an institution such as the
Sisters proposed to conduct, and so
negotiations were set on foot for the
purchase of the Maywood Hospital.
PDIESTJPHED
FATHER TOBIN OF LEWISTPN,
III.' Y., WAS ORDAINED
1JN 1909.
The Rev. Michael J. Tobin, thirty
one years old, rector of St. Peter's
Church, Lewiston, N. Y., was drowned
on August 23, while swimming in Lake
Ontario at Fort Niagara Beach. He
was seized with cramps and sank be
fore help could reach him.
Father Tobin was born in Ireland
and came to this country twelve years
ago. He was graduated from Niagara
University and was ordained in 1909,
being assigned to St. Peter's parish in
Lewiston, where he had since been
rector.
I UlEMIIiyiiSSIDIIK
FATHER DANDURAND, O. M. I., IS
S7 AND QUITE ACTIVE IN
THE MINISTRY.
Another missionary priest who is
nearing the century mark is Father
Dandurand, O. M. I-» of St. Boniface,
Manitoba. This venerable missionary
is now nearly ninety-seven years old,
but
he continues
his
lain
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WV
IFFE
ST. PAUL, MINN., SEPTEMBER 4, 1915.
duties
of the
EIKIII
as chap­
Youville
pital,
St,
Convent and hos­
Boniface.
Father Dandu
rand was formerly secretary to Bishop
Bourget of
Montreal,
ed
Bishop
and later assist­
Guigues,
Bisfeop Ok
O. M. I., first
FRI1GIS JDSEPI
CELEBRATED 85TH BIRTHDAY—67
YEARS ON THE THRONE—LONG
EST REIGN IN HISTORY.
Austria-Hungary and Germany re
cently united in celebrating the eighty
fifth birthday of Emperor Francis
Joseph. Of these eighty-five years he
has spent sixty-seven as a ruler, one
of the longest reigns in the world's
history, the longest of an actual ruler
in the history of modern Europe. He
ascended the throne in 1848, eleven
years after Queen Victoria's-' succes
sion, and he has survived her almost
fifteen years. Louis XIV, was King of
France for seventy-two years, but for
eighteen of these years he reigned but
did not rule. Francis Joseph succeed
ed to the Haps burg throne at nineteen
and was called upon to solve some of
the most serious problems of state
that ever confronted a monarch.
fSICESS EITEH5 CONVENT
''-•J"''
SISTER Of AUSTRIA'S FUTURE
EMPRESS BECOMES A NOVICE
IN ENGLAND.
The Princess Francesca di Bourbon
Parma made her profession as a nun
at the Benedictine Convent of St. Ce
cilia at Ryde, Isle of Wight, on Au
gust 15, in the presence of the Bishop
of Portsmouth.
Prince Sixte and Prince Xavier, her
brothers, who are serving as officers
in the Belgian army in Flanders, made
a special visit to Ryde to attend the
ceremony.
Princess Francesca In entering a
convent joins her sister, Princess Ade
laide, who is already known as Sister
Maria Benedicta.
THEOIOSICMEMIIIIIT
ARCHBISHOP BLENK WILL ESTAB
LISH ONE IN NEW
ORLEANS.
-V
The establishment in New Orleans
of a .major seminary for the teaching
of theology and the full preparation of
students for the priesthood is pro
posed by Archbishop Blenk of that
See, in a pastoral letter to the
clergy and laity of the diocese. In
the letter the Archbishop makes it
clear that the founding in New Or
leans of a great institution for the
training of young men for the work of
the Church has been one of his life
long ambitions. He believes the time
is now ripe for the broaching of the
project.
The communication of the Arch
bishop treats of the general question
of educational facilities for the sons
and daughters of Catholic families and
recounts unsuccessful attempts to es
tablish in New Orleans the higher in
stitution for the education of students
for the priesthood.
LIST OF PlflllES
FATHER O'KEEFE, O. F. M., PASSES
AWAY IN SAN FRANCISCO.
California's most loved and vener
able Franciscan Father, the Rev.
Joseph J. O'Keefe, passed away oh
Friday, August 13, at St. Joseph's Hos
pital, San Francisco.
He was perhaps the best known
priest in California, and the last link
left between the old Spanish missioh
days and the present.
Born in Mallow, County Cork, Ire
land, on November 8, 1843, Father
O'Keefe came to California in boyhood.
His first studies for the priesthood
were made at the old and long-van
Jished Seminary of St. Thomas at old
Mission Dolores, and it was at Santa
Barbara that he was received into the
Franciscan Order. Trained by the
Spanish padres, Father O'Keefe quick
ly became a proficient Spanish mis
sionary, and his adventures in those
early days of sparse settlements and
open country were numerous. He
spent much of his time in the saddle,
and underwent many hardships and
privations.
His monutnefitS.! work is the restora
tion of the Mission of San'Luis Rey.
Today this monastery with its fifty
rooms is a haven for the Franciscans
who have been banished from Mexico.
The remains of the venerable Fran
ciscan were taken to Santa Barbara,
where the funeral was held and he was
laid away in the monastery graveyard
beside the dust of the padres of the
olden days of the missions' glory.
Father O'Keefe may be called the
last of the Spanish Franciscans. It
was from them he received the habit
of the order. He labored much among
the Spaniards of Southern California
and he spoke the language fluently.
Father O'Keefe was intimately as
sociated with Father Sanchez, the
"Padre Salvierderra" of "Ramona."
Indeed, Mrs. Jackson obtained much
of her information respecting scenes
and characters from Father O'Keefe,
whose knowledge of California it need
not be said, was surpassed toy no
other's knowledge.
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SHOT THROUGH THE LUNG BY
DEMENTED PRIEST—PATIENT
IN GRAVE DANGER FOR A TIME
—DQQTOR& DECLARE CRISIS
PAST.
The Right Reverend P. fe. Heffron,
Bishop of Winona, Minn., who was
seriously wounded by a bullet from
a 22-caliber revolver in the hands of
the Rev. L. M. Lesches, a priest of
the Diocese, who is said to be men
tally deranged, is making satisfactory
progress towards recovery. For a
time the prelate's condition caused no
small amount of anxiety because of
the serious nature of the wound, and
the danger of septic poisoning but
the latest reports from the doctors in
harge are to the effect that the dis
inguished patient is practically out
Of danger. This is good news to
Bishop Heffron's host of friends, not
only in the Northwest but throughout
the country, who have anxiously read
the bulletins issued by the dgqtors
and have offered up, many prayers for
his speedy recovery.
The story of the shooting, as far
as it can be gathered from the most
reliable witnesses is as follows: As
Bishop Heffron was concluding Mass
in the chapel of St. Mary's College,
which adjoins the episcopal residence,
on Friday, August 27, Father Lesches
entered the oratory and without warn
ing fired a number of shots at the
Bishop, two of which took effect, one
lodging in the hip and the other pass
ing through the right breast and
piercing the lung. This was received,
no doubt, wheil the Bishop, startled
by the crack of the revolver, turned
round to ascertain ,the cause.
There seems to be no doubt that
Father Lesches, who fired the shots,
is merttally unbalanced. For some
years, owing to ill-health and peculiar
temperament, he has not been in
charge of a parish in the Diocese but
has helped his brother priests from
time to time in parochial duties. Last
WELL-KNOWN NURSE AT ST.
JOSEPH'S HOSPITAL SUCCUMBS
The funeral obsequies took place in
the New Cathedral of St. Paul on Fri
day, August 27, and were attended by
nearly a score of priests, over two hun
dred Sisters and a large number of
friends, among whom were many of
the doctors and nurses connected tWth
St. Joseph's Hospital.
The Solemn Mass of Requiem was
HOME AID COUNTRY"
MSZiSE BAIISIIPT
(t
CATHOLIC PUBLISHING COMPANY
IN HANDS OF A RECEIVER—
PRACTICALLY NO ASSETS—AN­
OTHER UNSUCCESSFUL VEN
TURE.
The announcement that application
had been made for the appointment of
a receiver for the Home and Country
Publishing Company, of Lincoln Inn
Court Building, Cincinnati, Ohio, was
no news to those who have had deal
ings with it during the past six months.
The suit was filed in the Ohio Superior
Court on August 18, by the Farmers'
State Bank of Camden, Ind.
The company was capitalized at
$1,500,000, and it is said that* nearly
all the capital stock has been sold to
women investors throughout the Unit
ed States. It is estimated that about
100,000 women are holders of paid-up
stock certificates or stock installment
contracts. It is alleged that, notwith
standing this, a judgment for $459 for
the services of girl stenographers and
printers, given in the Municipal Court
of Cincinnati in July, remains unpaid
because no leviable property possessed
by the company cap be found in that
City, the only assets Of the concern,
apparently, being a few records and
the furnishings of the office -it occu
pies.
The officers of the company are:
President, F. X. Piatt, Cincinnati vice
president, S.» H. Wyss, Alton, 111.
secretary,
D. A. Frazer, Cincinnati.
The magazine, which aspired to he a
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BISHOP HEFFRON SERIOUSLY WOUNDED
•HWWf-SOt*
1 HISTORICAL
SOCIETY.
As already stated, the condition of
Bishop Heffron is so satisfactory at
the present writing that the doctors
have the greatest hopes of his com
plete recovery. Of course, he is not
yet entirely out of danger, but the
crisis is past and if no unforesefen
complications arise the Bishop will
undoubtedly recover, though in aJU
probability he will carry the bullet to
the grave. After the shooting Father
Lesches was taken in charge by the
authorities and lodged in the jail,
where he will remain until the case
is finally disposed of.
The new8*of the tragedy came as a
shock to the people of St. Paul, espe
cially, among whom Bishop Heffron
labored until his appointment to the
See of Winona in 1910, in succession
to the late Bishop Cotter. Bishop
Heffron was pastor of the Cathedral
in St. Paul from 1889 to 1896, when
he was appointed Vice-Rector of St.
Paul Seminary. He became Rector
the following year on the death of the
Right Rev. Mgr. Calliet, a position
which he occupied until his consecra
tion as Bishop of Winona in May,
1910.
DEATH OF SISTER AIDA
AFTER LONG ILLNESS IN THE
26TH YEAR OF HER RELIGIOUS
LIFE FUNERAL FROM CATHE
DRAL OF ST. PAUL WAS LARGE
LY ATTENDED—DR. MOYNIHAN
OFFICIATED AND PREACHED.
More than a year of patient suffer
ing, without a ray of hope to cheer the
weary days and months, was brought
to a close on Wednesday, August 25,
when Sister M. Aida, a nurse at St.
Joseph's Hospital, St. Paul, breathed
her last. JTor more than twenty years
she had ministered to the sick and dy
ing in that institution and had won
the loving admiration of a host of
friends by her unwearying fidelity to
duty, her patient care of those who
were ill, and her uniform kindness to
all with whom she came into contact.
celebrated by the Very Rev. H. Moynl-'
han, D. D., President of the College of
St. Thomas, assisted by the Rev. J. M.
Reardon as deacon, the Rev. John Duii
phy as subdeacon, and the Rev. J. A.
Cullinan as master of ceremonies.
The sermon preached by Dr. Moyni
han was a fitting tribute to one whote
religious life had been spent in help
ful ministration among the sich, with
out a thought of self. The final abso
lution was given by Dr. Moynihan and
the remains were interred in Calvary"
Cemetery in the new plot recently
opened for the burial of the Sisters
of St. Joseph. Six of Sister Aida's
cousins in religion acted as pall
bearers, and Father Cullinan per
formed the services at the grave.
Sister Aida, known in the world ft*
Margaret Geary, was born in Fee
neagh, County Limerick, Ireland, on
April 7, 1871. At the age of seventeen
she came to St.*Paul and entered the
Novitiate of the Sisters of St. Joseph
at St. Joseph's Academy. On the
completion of her novitiate she was
sent to St. Joseph's Hospital, where
she received her training as a nurse,
and all the years of her religious life
were spent in that institution. She
is survived by a brother and three
sisters, one of whom, Sister M. B!an
dina of St. Paul, is also a -trained
nurse.
Catholic "Ladies' Home Journal," has
not been issued for several months and
people who subscribed for it will now
learn the reason they have not re
ceived it.
For a time the company had an
office in Minneapolis and last winter
several of the agents sent out to solicit
subscriptions secured notes from pros*
pective subscribers by fraudulent
means. These notes were discounted
at the local banks in different parts of
this state and, no doubt, those who
signed them will have to pay, although
they have not received any v^lue
therefor.
9
PRIEST SETTLES STKE
______
FATHER DEMPSEY SETTLED T^f
^7i t#AMSTER8' STRI|tf IN
.! ST. LOUIS. 7
The strike of 1,500 teamsters and
chauffeurs, which started in St. Loois
recently was settled when the strik
ers were granted an increase of fifty
cents weekly, a deduction of one
hour, in the day's work and bet
ter working conditions. The wage
increases, according to the team own
ers, will aggregate $60,000 a year,
where as the original demands of the
men called for increases totalling
$100,000.
The settlement was brought about
by Father Timothy Dempsey, who in
duced leaders of both sides to agree
to a joint meeting. All day and far
into the night the two sides were in a
tangle, but failed to reach an agree
ment until after a personal appeal
the priest.
'U'~-
-j
4
Number 36
week he came to Winona to interview
the Bishop and ascertain what provi
sion was to be made for his future.
After the interview Father Lesches
remained at St. Mary's College, and
brooding over the situation probably
aggravated his mental ailment a&4
led to the tragedy which was enacted
in the College chapel.
The sound of the shots brought as
sistance to the Bishop, who, after un
vesting, walked to his residence, when
medical assistance was summoned
and a call sent to Rochester for Dr.
William Mayo, who arrived as soon
as possible after the shooting. The
following days were days of anxiety
regarding the outcome of the injury.
The patient's condition was such aa
to render a thorough examination im
possible and no attempt was made to
remove the bullet which probably
lodged in the lung.
v
*t i
ftiSi

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