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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, March 03, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90060976/1917-03-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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Volume 7
To the Clergy and the Laity of the
Diocese of St. Paul:
Beloved Brethren:
1 take as the theme of my letter for
the Lenten season of 1917—The
Church, Founded by Christ, the In
fallible Interpreter of His Revelation.
Solemn duties rest upon us in our
attitude towards the Church: those we
do not understand to the fullness of
their bearings, unless we have pon
dered well over the origin of the
Church in Christ's own love and
power, and understand well the sov
ereign authority with which its Found
er has invested it.
I rehearse the act of faith, a part
of our morning and evening prayer:
I"© my God, I firmly believe that thou
art one God in three Divine Persons,
Father, Son, and Holy Ghost. I be
lieve that thy Divine Son became man,
and died for our sins, and that He will
come to judge the living and the dead.
I believe these and all the truths
which the Holy Catholic Church
teaches, because Thou hast revealed
them, who canst neither deceive nor
be deceived."
The ultimate, the fundamental rea
son of our act of faith is the supreme
veracity of God: because God has
spoken who can neither deceive nor
be deceived. The immediate, the near
at-hand reason is the Church—the
Church, established by the Incarnate
God, guided and guarded by Him in
its interpretation of the teachings
that went forth to the ears of men,
nineteen hundred years ago, in the
cities and across the plains of Samaria
and Judea.
Admitted that the Teacher of nine
teen li'.mdred yrrrs the Sin
of God, who neither deceives nor is
deceived, the question is urgent—IIow
•we, so distant from Him, may know
with moral certainty, what He did
teach, what He did command.
The mandate is conspicuous in the
clarity of its terms: "He that believ
eth and is baptized shall be saved: he
that believeth not shall be con
demned." But that we may believe,
we must have the knowledge, positive
and unmistakeable of the things that
are to be believed.
A link manifestly there is bringing
us into contact with the Teacher, who
was the Son of God, a channel through
which His words descend to us, a
means by which we may know what
He did say, what He did command
us to believe. A proximate rule of
faith there must be, by which and
through which we listen to Him, and
are made morally sure that we are
hearing His teachings, pure and un
defiled, as they were when first
spoken by Himself. Else our obedi
ence were without reason: our faith
were a vague, uncertain assent, un
worthy of the human mind, incapable
of begetting the resolve that He ex
acts from us, of transmuting His
teachings into the deep fibre of our
manner of life, and adhering to them
even unto the martyrdom of blood.
LETTER OF THE HOST REVEREND ARCHBISHOP
THE CHURCH —FO U N DE BY
I ST COMMISSIONED AS
THE INFALLIBLE INTERPRETER
This link, this proximate rule of
faith, we must at once presume, was
established by Christ himself. The
matter was too important, too vital to
our faith to have been left to human
device or ingenuity. The revelation
promulgated by Christ was itself so
Important that He, the Eternal Word,
bad descended from Heaven to speak
it to the children of men. But what
could have been the meaning of this
great act of condescension, if at the
same time unmistakeable means were
not taken by which the revelation
should reach those for whom it was
intended? And who else than the Re
vealer himself could be trusted to pro
vide such means—means adequate in
all measure to the purpose it was to
fulfill?
FOR THE LENTEN SEASON OF 1917.
OF HIS REVELATION—DUTIES
TOWARDS THE CHURCH CONSE
QUENT UPON THE AUTHORITY
WITH WHICH IT IS INVESTED.
And so was the occurrence. He
•who first promulgated the revelation,
provided for Its preservation and per
petuation.
Christ, the Founder of the Church.
Christ founded a Church, a society,
human in its visible elements, divine
in its inner soul, to be the custodian
and the expounder of His revelation,
to endure upon earth so long as His
revelation was to be the source of
supernal light to the children of men
—"All days even unto the consumma
tion of the world."
We open the authentic book of his
tory, the volume known as the New
Testament. Two supreme facts illum
ine its pages—the first, that Christ
was the Teacher the next, this other
fact, that He founded a Church as the
means of repeating to all times the
i truths of which He had been the
Teacher.
He announced that He should found
a Church: "And I say to thee: That
thou art Peter: and upon this rock I
will build my Church, and the gates
of Hell shall not prevail against it."
"I will build my Church": language
could not be plainer. A Church was
to be built, built by Christ Himself
tot:.
Catholic
a Church to be Christ's very own: I
will build my Church." And as befit
ting a church, which was to be His
own immediate work, the Church was
to last despite the warrings of potent
and ferocious adversaries. "On this
rock I will build my Church." He
built it, not on moving sand, not on
floating waters, but on "the rock" that
endures the ages, and defies the
powers of destruction, the gates them
selves of Hell: "And the gates of Hell
shall not prevail against it.''
Christ actually founded the Church:
"And Jesus coming spoke to them
(the Apostles), saying: 'All power
is given to me in Heaven and on
earth. Going, therefore, teach all na
tions: baptizing them in the name of
the Father, and of the Son, and of the
Holy Ghost: teaching them to observe
all things whatsoever I have com
manded you: and behold I am with
you all days, even to tjie consumma
tion of the world' Go ye into
the whole world, and.^reach the (Jos
pel to every creature. He that b®-i
lieveth and is baptized shall be saved:
but he that believeth not shall be con
demned." The Church is founded:
it is a fact plain to the eye. It rushes
forth from the warm lips of omnip
otence, equipped for the great work
assigned to it, invested thereunto with
the power and the authority inherent
in the Divine Founder: "And behold
I am with you all days even unto the
consummation of the world." Here all
the elements of a well-organized so
ciety are duly provided for: the mem
bership is here—those who believe
and are baptized—and so is the gov
ernment—those who are chosen into
the apostolate, the eleven who stood
by Him while He spoke, who were to
live in their successors "even unto
the consummation of the world."
The Church was founded, and so
soon as Christ withdrew from earth
His visible presence, it vested itself
with its divine armor and set itself
to its appointed work, never to halt,
never to cease, so long as men there
were to be baptized, so long as natjgris
there were to be taught the trntks of
the newly-given revelation.
The Ghttfeh, the Teacher of Christ's
Revelation.
The rule of faith, the authoritative
means through which men were to
know the teachings of Christ was the
Church of Christ, the social organism
which He Himself had created and
commissioned. The command to the
apostles was to teach, to teach what
its Founder had taught, all that He
had taught, nothing that He had not
taught: "Preach the Gospel to every
creature" .- "Going ye therefore,
teach all nations Teaching
them to observe all things whatsoever
I have commanded you." It was the
command of the Divine Teacher him
self, from whom no one has the right
to dissent, against whom no one
should dare rebel. A teacher there
always must be, so long as men there
are to be taught. While Christ was
on earth, He himself was the Teach
er. Now He withdraws from earth:*
and the Church in its apostles becomes
the teacher, teaching in His name and
with His authority, and so teaching
through their legally appointed suc
cessors, "until the consummation of
the world."
The authority of the agent is the
authority of the principal. The prin
cipal is Christ: the agent is the
Church. To those who were to be
spokesmen of the Church, He once had,
said: "He that heareth you heareth
me: and he that despiseth you de
spiseth me: and he that despiseth me
despiseth Him that sent me." And
now in the final commission given on
Mount Olivet, He pronounces a judg
ment of ire upon those who refuse to
obey those spokesmen—judgment so
dreadful, that its sole justification re
sides in their office as the agents of
His own very self. "Preach the Gos
pel," He said to the apostles, "to every
creature. He that believeth and is
baptized shall be saved: he that be
lieveth not shall be condemned."
The Church, Infallible in its Teaching
"He that believeth not shall be con
demned": therefore the Church, the
agent of Christ, henceforward the
proximate teacher of His revelation,
is infallible in its promulgations of
the things which He had taught. In
matters of faith and morals, the
Church cannot err. So, the Catholic
Church asserts through its Catechism:
so in very deed must the Church of
Christ be, since in very deed it is—
in its preachings—the agent of Christ
Himself, since to refuse belief in its
teachings is to merit condemnation.
The Church, infallible, incapable of
erring in matters of faith and morals!
But is not the Church a society made
up of men and are not men by nature
liable to mistake and to deception?
Yes, in its visible elements, the
Church is made up of men: to those
visible elements we ascribe no privi
lege of infallibility. But in the Church
there is, in no lesser reality, the invis
ible element which is the divine
Christ and His Holy Spirit: and this
the element in the Church to which
infallibility belongs. The fatal mis
take of those who see the Church as
organism liable to error, is that
(Continued on
page
mm ft?#-.
FOR THE LITHUANIANS
THE POPE'S SOLICITUDE FOR
THEM ON ACCOUNT OF THEIR
SUFFERINGS.
Pope Benedict has written a letter
to Bishop Karavic of Samagfzia ex
pressing his cordial sympathy with
the Lithuanian people in their terri
ble sufferings through the war, and
enclosing a personal contribution of
twenty thousand francs ($4,000), from
his diminished treasury. Ilis Holiness
also authorizes the Lithuanian epis
copate to appeal to the Bishops
throughout the world in behalf of
their afflicted flocks, and to ask them
to appoint a day on which prayers
are to be offered and subscriptions
taken up for the Lithuanians, he him
self suggesting the Sunday in the
octave of the feast of the Ascension.
LAY MISSIONARIES
PLAN DISSEMINATION OF
CHURCH LITERATURE AMONG
FELLOW WORKMEN.
The Loyola club of Sacred Heart
parish, of Denver, Colo., has evolved
a plan for the dissemination of knowl
edge about Catholicity among non
Catholics. The club has about fifty
young men, drawn almost entirely
from the working classes, and many
of them laboring side by side with
men who hold Catholicity in anything
but esteem. Each young man is to be
given literature, written by a non
Catholic, in defense of the Church, and
is to be asked to present it to a fellow
workingman who has the poorest
opinion of the Church. The Catholic,
first of all, will familiarize himself
with what the literature contains, so
that he can discuss it intelligently.\
From this literature, written by non
Catholics, it is proposed to work up,
until Catholic literature can be placed
in the hands of the non-Catholic.
The Church in Scotland
THE MEMBERS OF THE CHURCH
IN SCOTLAND NUMBER 547,969.
The Scottish Catholic Directory,
which has just been issued, estimates
the Catholic population of Scotland at
47,969, distributed among the differ
ent dioceses as follows: Glasgow,
400,000 Galloway, 20,469 Dunkeld,
33,000 Argyl and the Isles, 12,500
Edinburgh, 70,000. There are two
Archbishops, four Bishops, 489 secular
priests, 93 regular priests, and four
Belgian refugee priests. The number
of missions and chaplaincies is 256.
There are 432 churches, chapels, and
stations, 62 convents, 60 charitable
and educational institutions, and 262
schools. In the diocese of Argyl and
the Isles, 28 of the 35 day schools are
board schools under the direction of
Catholic teachers. In the other dio
ceses the teaching is carried on in
schools built by Catholics themselves
ithout assistance from the educa
tional authorities. These schools are
aided by government grants, but they
receive no help from the local school
boards. Notwithstanding the difficul
ties created by the lack of sufficient
funds, the schools are, on the whole,
well-equipped, and the teaching is well
up to the standard of the board
schools.
RISH CATHOLIC COLONY
W E N Y E I O U S A N
ACRES PURCHASED FOR THE
COLONISTS.
Thomas Maloney, president of a
realty company, of Omaha, Neb., has
purchased a tract containing' 28,962
acres of land on which to establish an
Irish Catholic colony.
Mr. Maloney is former treasurer of
the Hibernians, but has been spending
a good many years in colonization
work, with headquarters at Omaha,
Neb. He was a former mayor of Coun
cil Bluffs, and is a man of consider
able prominence. He says the colony
to be established will be composed of
the very highest class of citizens, agri
culturists and business men, and will
come from many sections of the old
country, and from different sections
of the United States.
It is first proposed to build a town
to be named "Casement" in honor of
the memory of Sir Roger Casement,
who was executed last year charged
with conspiracy and treason, and com
plicity in an alleged Irish uprising
plan. The colonization company will
lay out the town, build churches and
schools, grade the streets and build
homes and business structures for the
colonists. I
CARDINAL TONTI
Cardinal Tpnti has been appointed
by the IToly Father Prefect of the
Sacred Congregation for the Affairs
of Religious, in the place of the late
Cardinal Falconio.
3. 'L&S- Srf
ST. PAUL, MINN., MARCH 3, 1917
Death of Father Knafelz
HE WAS ORDAINED IN DIOCESE
OF ST. PAUL, AND DIED
IH COLORADO.
On Monday, February 26, Rev. J. C.
Knafelz died at St. Francis Hospital,
Colorado Springs, Colo. He had been
ill for some time. The burial took
place at Pueblo, Colo.
Rev. J. C. Knafelzr w&j born in Car
niola, Austria, oh May 19,1872. As a
young man he came to this country
and completed his studies in philos
ophy and theology in the St. Paul Sem
inary, where he was ordained on No
vember 11, 1896, for the Diocese of St.
Paul. For several months he was as
sistant at the Church of St. Francis de
Sales in this city. He was then ap
pointed pastor of the church at St.
Stephen, in the Diocese of St. Cloud,
where he remained for four years. He
then returned to the Diocese of St.
Paul and was stationed at Richfield,
Minn., for six months, going from
there to take charge of the parish at
Comfrey, with the attached mission of
Leavenworth, where he was in charge
for one year. For some time he was
also assistant at Sleepy Eye, Minn. In
1904, ill health compelled him to go
West.
A CATHOLIC CENSUS
THE UNITED 8TATES GOVERN-
MENT WILL TAKE AN ENUMER­
ATION OF THE RELIGIOUS
BODIES OF THE COUNTRY.
The Federal Bureau, under author
ity of Congress, is taking a census of
Religious Bodies. It is similar in
scope to the census taken as for 1906,
but in two respects it accords more
closely than did that to the situation
in the Catholic churches. The total
memberhip, as reported by the
churches, will be presented without
any reduction because of age, and the
question as to the seating capacity of
churches has been omitted.
Several of the Hierarchy have been
consulted on the subject and have
given it their most cordial and hearty
support. Under the method adopted
by the Bureau, a church schedule will
be sent to each Catholic Church in the
United States, listed in the official
Directory, and also a schedule to each
Catholic priest, listed in the same
Directory, both to be returned to the
Census Bureau. It will be to the in
terest of all concerned if every priest
to whom a schedule is sent will fill out
and return this schedule in order that
the Catholic population of the country
may appear in its full strength.
DEATH OF MOTHER
PHILOMENA
WAS FORMER MOTHER-GENERAL
OF THE SISTERS OF CHRIS­
TIAN CHARITY.
Rev. Mother Philomena Schmittdiel,
of the Sisters of Christian Charity,
died recently at Weidenbruch, West
phalia, Germany. She was former
Mother-General of the Order, and a re
ligious widely known throughout the
United States, where she spent many
years of earnest labor. At the time of
her death, Mother Philomena was in
the eightieth year of her age and the
fifty-eighth of her religious profession.
For many years she was Mother Pro
vincial of the Order in the United
States, guiding the work of more than
eight hundred Sisters. In 1893, she
was recalled to Germany, where she
was chosen Mother-General, residing
at the Motherhouse in Paderborn,
Westphalia. In 1905, failing health
compelled her to refuse re-election.
The Sisters of Christian Charity con
duct establishments in seventeen dif
ferent dioceses of this country. The
Order was founded in Paderborn, by
Pauline Mallinckrodt, who became the
first Mother-General, and w£o died a
few years ago.
A MODEL WILL
PRIEST'S LAST TESTAMENT
'SHOWS PRINCIPLES FOL
LOWED IN LIFE.
All the worldly possessions of Rev.
Clement Lowrey, whose death oc
curred two weeks ago, in Iowa, were
divided among his friends, relatives
and the church he served for a half
century. A feature of the will was the
clause in which he requested that all
laudatory remarks in the funeral ser
mon pertaining to his life be omitted
After providing for the payment of
all just debts and devising remem
brances to relatives and friends, his
will provides for the payment of $500
"to one or more priests for the bene
fit of my indigent soul to the Ex
tension Society $600 for the most
needy mission offerings to those min
istering at his funeral Mass, and the
xesidue of his estate to Mefrcy
pita! of Cedar Rapids, lowa,-
*•.
v
fllSSSPfl
BIG CATHOLIC CONGRESS
HELD IN ZURICH, SWITZERLAND,
TWO WEEKS AGO.
A largely attended Catholic Con
gress, with representatives from
Germany, Austria, Hungary, Poland,
Spain and Switzerland was held at
Zurich, Switzerland beginning on
Thursday, February 15. Much impor
tant business was transacted, and a
message of loyalty and devotion to the
Holy See was telegraphed to Pope
Benedict XV, who graciously replied,
bestowing the papal blessing ou all
present.
Blessed Virgin's Chapel
Fund
THE MEETING HELD LAST TUES
DAY WAS WELL ATTENDED.
Last Tuesday afternoon a meeting
was held at the St. Paul Hotel for the
promoters of ihe fund for the Chapel
of the Blessed Virgin in the new Ca
thedral. About forty promoters were
present. Mrs. J. W. Bishop presided,
and Rev. Lawrence Ryan addressed
the meeting. Father Ryan suggested
various ways in which the promoters
might make their work successful dur
ing Lent, and he also asked them to
call upon various persons who had
pledged certain amounts towards the
fund but had not yet given their dona
tion. The plan suggested some time
ago of collecting small offerings from
the young ladies of the Diocese has
worked out very successfully. Mrs.
Hannah Agnew, treasurer of the com
mittee, read the financial report. The
total proceeds collected since the last
meeting amount to $795. Since last
December, two checks of one hundred
dollars each have been received from
friends, who made this offering in
memory of the late Very Rev. Thomas
J. Gibbons who, at the time of his
death, was in charge of this commit
tee. The next meeting will be held
at the St. Paul Hotel on the fourth
Tuesday of this month, March 27, at
2:30 P. M.
Bishop-Elect McCloskey
SOLEMN CEREMONIES WILL BE
HELD IN THE CATHEDRAL AT
PHILADELPHIA ON THE OCCA­
SION OF HIS CONSECRATION.
Announcement has been made that
the Right Rev. Monsignor James P.
McCloskey, Bishop-elect of the Diocese
of Zambcango, Philippine Islands, will
be consecrated in the Cathedral on
May 1. The Right Rev. Philip R. Mc
Devitt, D. D., Bishop of Harrisburg,
will preach the sermon.
BOYS' WELFARE SOCIETY
IMPORTANT CATHOLIC WORK
LAUNCHED BY ARCHBISHOP
HANNA.
Archbishop Hannfc, of San Fran
cisco, has formed and launched a
new organization to carry on social
service work of the greatest impor
tance, work which will have a pro
found effect for good now and in the
future. This organization is the
Boys' Welfare Society of California
strong and constantly increasing
group of the most prominent and effi
cient Catholic laymen of San Francis
co is co-operating with the Arch
bishop. Primarily Catholic in its
idea, its spirit, its plan, nevertheless
the new society is of a nature to co
operate most heartily and effectively
with all existing organizations, civic,
State and private, which deal with the
great and ever-increasing problems
affecting the welfare of boys and
young men.
Many a youth is turned loose from
state and charitable institutions at the
age of fourteen, and cannot work, ex
cept at certain things and under cer
tain conditions, until he is sixteen.
Meanwhile he is left to shift for him
self, and many drift to the cities and
become failures, who might, if taken
in hand, prove valuable citizens. It is
this and similar work which the Arch
bishop desires taken up, and the re
sult of the efforts of the society, dur
ing the short time since its start,
justifies his belief in its future suc
cess, and the great possibilities be
foriit. i
iullefin
SOME 1917 DATES
February 21, Ash Wednesday
March 17, St. Patrick's day March 19,
St. Joseph's day March 25, Passion
Sunday, and Annunciation of Our
Lady April 1, Palm Sunday April 5,
Holy Thursday April 6, Good Friday
April 7, Holy Saturday April 8, Eas
ter Sunday May 17, Ascension Thurs
day April 27, Pentecost Sunday June
Trinity Sunday June 10, Corpus
Christi June 15, Feast of the Sacred
Hos-|Heart
October 7, Rosary Sunday,
December 2, first Sunday of Advent.
Of late the slanderers have not
been quite so bold, some even ventur
ing to say that the people of Quebec
were all right only for the hierarchy!
Poor, blind, ignorant bigots! The
hierarchy is a terrible eyesore to
them. Even a child of tender years
would know that the brave, industri
ous, virtuous, courteous, sober, intel
ligent, Christian people of Canada's
largest province reflected the teach
ings of the priests of their beloved
Church.
It is but simple truth to say that
Quebec is the model province of Can
ada. It is likewise simple truth to
say that 92 per cent of the people in
eastern Canada are native-born, thus
giving that Quebec's grand qualities
are a native product*
The Criminal Record.
The following table shows Quebec
to have fewer criminals in proportion
to population than any large province:
MORALITI IN QUEBEC AND ONTARIO
STATISTICS ARE QUOTED TO
SHOW THAT CATHOLIC PROV­
INCE IS MOST MORAL AND LAW
ABIDING IN CANADA.
A writer in the Canadian Freeman
of Kingston, Ont., quotes statistics at
length to disprove the slanderous al
legations against the Province of
Quebec made especially by certain
ministers and Orange followers of On
tario. He uses the government's of
ficial facts and figures to prove that
the Province of Quebec is the most
crimeless of the large provinces of
Canada has the greatest percentage
of its children attending school, and
that #2 per cent of the inhabitants
are native born, showing that Que
bec's fine record is a native product.
The author of the special article
says:
GEORGIA CONVENT INSPECTION
GRAND JURORS THROUGHOUT
THE STATE ARE COMPLIMEN­
TARY IN THEIR ATTITUDE—IT
SEEMS PROBABLE THAT THE
LAW WILL BE REPEALED.
In obedience to the infamous
Georgia law for the inspection of con
vents and religious institutions, the
various grand juries of the state,
whose members are all Protestants
of sundry ilk, recently made their
first annual visitation and inspection
of the Catholic institutions of the dio
cese of Savannah. Beginning in the
city of Savannah the inquisitors
called successively &t the various
convents and academies. In none of
them did the grand jurors find "dark
cells" or any imprisoned Sisters or
inmates, but in all of them they found
perfect sanitary and other arrange
ments and all the inmates happy and
content. No criticism was possible
and the visiting officials withdrew
with profuse apologies and compli
ments to the Sisters for their ex
cellent management.
At Macon the grand inrors desig
nated six of their number to visit
Mount de Sales convent and academy
of the Sisters of Mercy, where twen
ty-one Sisters are in charge of a large
boarding and day school, not a few
of the children coming from promi
nent Protestant families. The spokes
man of the six apologized to Rev.
Mother Alphonsus for the law that
compelled them to pay such a visit
LIVERED PRINCIPAL ADDRESS
ON WASHINGTON'S BIRTHDAY.
Hon. John W. Willis, the well known
St. Paul attorney, delivered the
address of the occasion at the K. of
C. celebration in Davenport, Iowa, last
week. The affair was held in the
Burtis Opera house, which was packed.
Mr. L. J. Dougherty, Master of the
Fourth Degree for the State of Iowa,
presided. Governor W. J. Harding, of
Iowa, also spoke. Among other things,
Mr. Willis said:
After the British flag went down to
defeat at Yorktown, Virginia, and the
surrender of October 18, 1781, had in
dicated, unerringly, the achievement
of independence which was finally
consummated by the Treaty of Peace
in the year 1783, the governmental
affairs of America were found to be in
a state of almost absolute chaos. In
deed, the condition was referred to by
many political sages of that time as
anarchy. A stronger and more highly
organized government was impera
tively needed. The interests of
America demanded anew the united
action and supreme effort of heart,
conscience and intellect. A plan for
a new government was formulated at
a convention held in Philadelphia
during the year 1787, and was actual
ly set in operation, is the year 178&
MINNESOTA
HISTORICAL
SOCK: Y
Number 9
Convictions Population
Total Census
PROVINCE 1914 1911
Prince Edward Island. 523 93,728
Xova Scotia 7,379 492,338
Xew Brunswick .... 3,101 351,889
Quebec 34,149 2,063,232
Ontario 05,800 2,523,274
Manitoba 16,334 455,614
Saskatchewan 13,782 492,432
Alberta 19,043 374,66"
British Columbia ... 22.094 392,-ISO
Yukon & N. W. Ter.. 224 26,993
Totals 183,035 7,206,643
Ontario is said to be the premier
province of Canada, so comparison of
convictions there and in Quebec will
illustrate the standing of each as to
morality.
A glance through the statistics
shows very few female and juvenile
offenders compared with the rest of
Canada. Of divorces, Quebec had
three and the rest, of Canada 50! Be
for the passage of prohibition as a
war measure in Ontario, Quebec had
most "dry" municipalities. The aver
age attendance of pupils at school
shows:
Quebec, 1914 75.67%
Ontario, 1915 66.69%
As for births in Canada, here is a
statement of the excess of births, over
deaths, and the rate per 1000 living,
for the Province:
Per Excess
1,000 over
Living Deaths
Quebec, 1914' 38.00 44,359
Ontario, 1914 24.21 33,785
There is no need to point out that
race-suicide is unknown in moral
Quebec, the largest province in square
miles in Canada.
In 1911, 39.31 per cent of Canada's
population of 7,206,643 was Catholic.
and said that he really was ashamed
to come on such an errand. With a
touch of true Southern chivalry the
grand jurors declined to accept the
nuns' offer to have them go through
the convent, and, instead, courteously
requested the privilege of meeting the
Sisters and pupils in the assembly
hall.
This was readily accorded and soon
the whole community and the acad
emy pupils were assembled in the
large study hall and the grand jurors
were assigned seats on the platform.
The children sang some of their songs
and to the gratified surprise of the
Sisters the leader of the grand jurors
asked permission to say a few words.
He then referred to the unjust and un
necessary law in no very complimen
tary terms and launched into an elo
quent address in which he eulogized
the Sisters of Mercy, their heroic
deeds during the Civil War, their
noble lives and the grand educational
work for poor or rich in which they
are engaged.
The same grand jurors next paid a
visit of inspection to St. Stanislaus
Novitiate of the Jesuits at Vinville, a
suburb of the city. There they posi
tively refused to go further than the
parlors and the reception room.
Father E. Mattern, the rector, as
sembled the community and presented
the visitors, who again were deeply
humiliated and made abject apologies
for the unpleasant duty imposed upon
them. Then they withdrew.
The leading Georgia papers now
say the law will be repealed.
K. OF C. AT DAVENPORT
JUDGE WILLIS OF ST. PAUL DE­
1
This government, which has continued
ever since, has grown constantly in
power and Importance. The govern
ment to which we all owe filial respect
and political allegiance finds its de
scription and its grant of authority in
the document promulgated by the con
vention of 1787 under the name of the
Constitution of the United States of
America. Although many statesmen
of eminence co-operated in efforts to
have a convention held and in the
formulation of the immortal document
to which it gave utterance, George
Washington may be appropriately
termed the chief architect of the Con
stitution. Employing to the utmost
and with untiring zeal the vast influ
ence among his countryment which he
possessed by reason of his lofty char
acter, pure and unselfish motives, per
sonal sacrifices and military glory, h»
conducted a correspondence with th»
governors of the several states and
with private individuals in all parts of
the country, urging a reformation of
the governmental system. To this
fact, more than to any other condition,
is due the final harmonizing of local
and sectional jealousies, the adjust
ment of disputes arising from personal
ambition, the banishment of unfound
ed apprehensions, and the reassurance
of the timid, which eventually led to
the assembling of the convention an|
to the happy result of its labors,
(GoaUuu«d on pagq 8,}
iMnfk

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