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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, March 10, 1917, Image 1

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Volume 7
LOCAL INSTITUTION COMMEMO­
A synopsis of the brilliant discourse
follows:
Amongst the long line of those who
have fought to extend Christ's king
dom the doctor saints stand prom
inent whose special prerogative it is
to give bold witness to truth, and de
fend the deposit of faith. And amongst
the doctor saints towers aloft the
learned patron of your college—
Thomas of Aquin, the Angel of the
schools. In him we have united the
massive mind with heroic sanctity, the
saint and the scholar. Endowed with
an intelligence second to none, he was
humble as the least of the brethren
of his order. Firm as a rock when
defending the sacred cause of truth,
he was meek as a child and a model
of obedience. Never for a moment
did he pride himself on the gifts God
had given him, rather following the
example of St. Paul, he looked upon
himself as a servant, drawing but a
little from the vast storehouse of un
profitable knowledge. Never did he
sit down to study, his biographers as
sure us, without recommending him
self to the God of wisdom to enlighten
his understanding. If a doubt or a
difficulty occurred, he solved it on
his knees before tb'
-croV.fix, oi1 pros
trate before the Blessed Sacrament.
He cared little for the praises of men.
The God-man alone he strove to
please. And as we look upon the vast
number of his works, one alone of
which would seem to be the labor of
a lifetime, we cannot help thinking
that this almost superhuman success
must in a large measure have been
due to the silent prayers, and the mid
night vigils which no one heard or
saw but God. The precious legacy of
learning which he lias bequeathed the
•world was hoarded up by the dim
light of the tabernacle lamp no less
than over his books in the lonely cell.
The commentary most frequently con
sulted was the cross.
And here, my dear young brothers,
draw a lesson from the life of your
saint. Giant though he was in intel
lect, clear as crystal in understanding,
learned as none other of his day, he
realized that talents without virtue
are worse than useless. Unless the
Lord buildeth the house in vain does
man labor. Let a young man be what
he will, unless he is possessed of a
solid Christian piety, unless he has
FEAST OF SAINT THOMAS
RATES THE NAME AND GLORY
OF ITS PATRON—COLLEGE OR­
CHESTRA ASSISTS CHOIR.
The Patronal Feast of the College
of St. Thomas was celebrated on
Thursday, March 8. Archbishop Ire
land and a large number of guests hon
ored the occasion with their presence.
At High Mass, which was celebrated
at ten o'clock, Rev. James O'llara of
the Cathedral was celebrant. He was
assisted by Rev. William Coughlin,
Deacon, and Rev. Leo Meade, Subdea
con. The panegyric was preached by
Rev. Paul Waldron of the St. Paul
Seminary. The College choir of forty
voiccs rendered Muller's Mass. It
was accompanied by the full College
orchestra. The Veni Creator was
composed by Mr. Charles P. Jochem, a
member of the St. Thomas faculty.
deep down in his heart the love of
God, and the spirit of obedience to
God's commands, he is a failure. And
,you who are gathered in this Catholic
college, remember you are here for a
two-fold purpose. You must fit your
selves for the various pursuits to
which God may have called you, but
you are also bound while within these
hallowed walls, to foster the Christian
virtues, especially a lively faith and
sincere love of God and His Holy
Church. Now, while you are young,
lay broad and deep the foundations
which will stand strong when in later
years you will be assailed by the
temptations of a wicked and godless
world.
It was the holiness of life of St.
Thomas that enabled him to move
safely through the shoals and quick
sands that beset the intellectual world
of his day. He recognized that the
natural powers of man are limited.
He saw that however noble they may
be, there are mysteries which they
cannot fathom, there are truths they
cannot comprehend. While reason can
take us far on the road to knowledge,
there comes a point when if we would
walk safely, we must have a higher
and a better light. It is this admir
able harmony of the seeming contra
dictory principles of the natural and
supernatural which has earned for the
great Dominican the title of Doctor of
the Church. He was ever ready to
give to God the things that are God's.
When Thomas went to Paris he
threw himself with all the ardour of
a vigorous and youthful mind, against
the chaos of rationalistic thought he
found there. The task was not an
easy one. He was engaged with an
enemy long and carefully prepared
sharp-witted scholars learned profes
sors deep thinkers men of every class
and kind were ranged against him.
But truth has never lacked a cham
pion. One hundred years before,' the
Almighty raised up a Bernard before
whom Abelard, the proud and arrog
ant, fell like an idol of clay. Now, an
other leader was needed. That leader
was found in the young Dominican.
Exceptionally gifted by nature, a past
master in the of reasoning, quick
to sieze upon the weak points' of iiis
opponents, with one glance of his
eagle eye he swept the field, and then
bore down with crushing force on
their sophisms and fallacies. As the
clouds and mists when pierced by the
golden rays of the morning sun, scat
ter and disappear to make way for
the fair form of light, even so the
clouds and mists of error which had
long hung around that ancient seat of
learning were pierced and broken by
the dazzling brilliancy of this almost
angel mind. Truth once more illum
ined the lecture halls of Paris. False
principles are probed. Fallacies are
shown. Error disguised as truth is
laid bare. Nor is this all. The genius
of Aquinas is not merely destructive.
It is also pre-eminently constructive.
He not only pulls to pieces this pagan
philosophy and clears away the ruin,
but in its place he raises up a noble
temple built on solid and unshakable
pillars. And herein is revealed his
true greatness. The licentiousness of
reason he opposed. He now points
out how that noble faculty when right
ly used is not an enemy, but a hand
maid of faith.
THE MODERN DANCE
DR. WALSH, IN AMERICA, SHOWS
HOW THE MODERN DANCE IS
INJURIOUS TO HEALTH—CABA­
RET DANCING AND THE DINNER-
DANCE PRODUCTIVE OF VARI­
OUS FORMS OF ILLNESS.
It is a matter of common knowledge
that the American public is obsessed
with the fad of dancing. Young and
old dance, as they say, in the morning,
in the late afternoon and far into the
night but my own observation in
many cities has led me to the conclu
sion that the term dancing, as applied
to the movements in vogue in restau
rants and cabarets, is a misnomer. The
so-called dancers, as far as I have been
able to observe, merely walk about
the room, wrapped as closely as pos
sible in each other's arms. They
move, it is true, to the accompani
ment of music, give occasional wrig
gles, retard their progress now and
then with hesitations, and go through
fantastic "gyrations" of the shoulders.
But it is only by a gross misuse of
the term that such procedures can
be called dancing.
The same trivializing tendency has
affected music as well. "Ragtime"
alone is popular. It furnishes certain
recurrent emphases that are distinct
ly remiiiiscent of Indian and savage
music, of tom-toms and other rude in
struments. Rubbed sticks and brushes
and curious cacophonies of other
kinds are coming back into vogue
and the rule of our day seems to be
anything for novelty and anything to
attract attention through sense. All
sorts of savage elements, Hawaiian,
Patagonian, Argentine-Indian, have
been introduced into the music. Nor
is this strange. The dances are ex
otic and come from distant barbar
ous or semi-barbarous sources, and it
is not surprising that the music
should have come with them.
One of the excuses given for the
present passion for dancing is that
it furnishes an opportunity for ex
ercise to those who are much in the
house and live very sedentary lives
The dancing-exercise, however, as I
have seen It, is taken under the
worst possible conditions. Where
dancing takes place, smoking is al
most universally allowed. After an
hour or two the air is so thick that
one cou.d almost cut it, and occa
sionally one has the feeling when the
drors for a moment are opened wide,
that large blocks of atmosphere are
being pushed out by the waiters. At
the beginning of the evening there is
little dust in the room, but as people
come in from the street and scrape
their shoes on the floor, they grind
the dirt into fine particles, and it floats
about, making a very undesirable at
mospheric element.
Prevalence of Colds.
We have wondered why "colds
spread so rapidly nowaday^, and
mean so much but any physician will
readily understand that the rather
rapid breathing induced by the exer
cise, moderate though it may be, in
such an overheated atmosphere, with
the inspiration of irritative particles
of dust, tobacco-smoke and the like
cannot but cause in the mucous mem
brane of the lungs a definite conges
tive irritation that constitutes a pre
disposition for any infection. If
among those present there are any
suffering from a cold, and at almost
any season of the year in a large
group of persons there will be -such
an excellent opportunity will be afford
ed the cold to spread. The conditions
of the cabaret are even better for its
dissemination than the crowded car
or the crowded moving-picture theatef
(Continued on page 8.)
i jiSfe-yinA
bwaiafeai^teift^^
FIDELITY OF TROOPS
BISHOP SCHULER, S. J., OF
PASO PRAISES SOLDIER
BOYS.
EL
Last Sunday I had only a hundred
at my service. The Catholics were on
their knees by the thousand close by,
and nothing impressed me more than
the piety and devotion manifested."
So spoke a few weeks ago a Prot
estant army chaplain home on fur
lough to a priest of his acquaintance,
and so hundreds of others must con
fess who have been witnesses to
things and events on the border for
months past. Bishop Schuler says:
To my mind their loyalty to their re
ligion is simply splendid. I confi
dently assert that one of the greatest
benefits resulting from the call of the
troops to the border is the remark
able religious spirit evidenced on all
sides and by all—in goodly measure
by soldiers of the various denomina
tions—but especially and in an un
usual degree by the Catholic boys
wearing the uniform, so much so that
the chaplain quoted above actually
wished he was a Catholic priest."
Mingling with men of no creed and
every kind of creed, Catholics have
had their faith challenged and they
have fearlessly and nobly accepted the
challenge. In the test they have
shown themselves the worthy scions
of the martyrs and the soldiers of the
Cross of other days. Catholic regi
ments were the first to answer the
call of the president and they have
ever been in the formost ranks when
duty called. Wherever their services
are required they are on hand,promptly.
This sense of duty is revealed in a
particular manner in the practice of
their Catholic religion. Spontaneously
and without coercion they come to the
feet of the priest to confess their sins,
in humility and sorrow, and proudly
they kneel in devout throngs at the
altar rail to receive into their manly
e&rts the God of Armies.
PRIESTS ON THE LACONIA
FORMER ASSISTANT PRIEST OF
BALTIMORE ON ILL-FATED
SHIP.
Rev. Joseph F. Wareing, until three
weeks ago assistant pastor of St.
Barnabas Church, Baltimore, Md., was
one of the passengers on board the
Cunard liner Laconia, which was sunk
by a submarine. Father Wareing, ac
cording to the dispatch, was on his
way to Liverpool to visit his sister,
who is a nun is the order of the Good
Shepherd, lie was born in England,
but lived for some years in this coun
try and is an American citizen. He
came to St. Barnabas Church about a
ear ago and was formerly stationed
in Norfolk.
Another priest, Rev. F. Funstan,
Sargent of Grenada, British West In
dies, was on board, and administered
the last rites to seven persons who
perished.
A Somewhat Novel Will
PROVIDES FOR PRIEST, RABBI
AND PREACHER AS
TRUSTEES.
The will of Randolph McMullen, a
wealthy farmer of Tyrone township,
Blair County, Pa., probated at Hol
lidaysburg on February 2G, directs
that his estate be divided under the
supervision of three trustees, to be
appointed by the court, consisting of
Protestant clergyman, a Catholic
priest and a Jewish rabbi. The rea
son, the will says, for this unique re
quest is that each trustee will watch
the other, and that money given to
charity will be rightly applied. The
estate, estimated to be worth $100,000,
will be divided among the poor of
Blair, Huntingdon and Cambria Coun
ties.
MGR. DE WAAL DEAD
WAS ONE THE MOST NOTED
ARCHAEOLOGISTS fit ROME.
Right Rev. Monsignor Anthony De
Waal, aged 80, rector of the German
Hospice, the Camposanto Teutonico
adjoining St. Peter's, died on February
10. He was an authority on Christian
archaeology, and was one of the orig
inal founders of the Collegium Cul
torum Martyrum. For fifty years he
had been a resident of Rome, being
allowed by the Italian government to
remain here despite the war. He
was a member of the commissions on
archaeology and on historical studies.
PAPAL APPOINTMENTS
The Holy Father has appointed
Archbishop John Baptist Marenco,
Internuncio-Apostolic to Costa Rica,
Nicaragua and Honduras.
Very Rev. Father Rey-Lemos,
Deflnitor-General of the Order of
Friars Minor, has been nominated by
ihe Holy Father Titular Bishop of
Ajnatfc, ,v
9
ST. PAUL, MINN., MARCH 10, 1917
NEGRO HOLY NAME MEN
IN NEW ORLEANS—THE FIRST
DEMONSTRATION OF ITS
KIND EVER HELD.
A wonderful impression was recent
ly made on the citizens of
Ncav
Or­
leans when approximately one thou
sand colored men, pledged to the in
terests of all the great aims and
ideals for which the Holy Name So
ciety stands, helJ their first demon
stration and rally under the auspices
of the Diocesan Union of Holy Name
Societies. Their earnest mien, manly
bearing and deep respect as they bore
aloft the banners of God showed their
earnest conviction and the ti ue pur
poses animating their lives.
The marchers filed into St. Kath
erinc's Church, where were held the
solemn religious services in honor of
the Holy Name of God. Rt. Rev. J.
M. Laval, D. D., Auxiliary Bishop of
New Orleans, representing the Arch
bishop, presided. The sermon was by
Rev. J. H. Dorsey, S. S. J., a negro
priest who has been giving a mission
especially for negroes in the Church of
the Blessed Sacrament.
BEQUESTS TO CHARITY
WILL
OF MRS. McKINNEY
VIDES FOR LOCAL
PRO-
BENEFITS.
Four Catholic institutions are bene
fited to the extent of $7,500 by the
will of Mrs. Sarah McKinney, pioneer
resident of St. Paul, filed for probate
last week. The petition filed for the
appointment of Miss Kate Devaney, a
sister and principal heir, as adminis
tratrix, values the estate at $135,000.
A bequest of $5,000 is made to Right
Reverend J. J. Lawler of Lead, S. D.,
to be used fo establish places of wor
ship and pastoral ministration. To
the Little Sisters of the Poor is given
$1,000 a $1,000 gift is made to the
St. Paul Catholic Orphan Asylum, and
of $500 to the St:•Paul diocese for
the Chapel of the Blessed Virgin in
the new Cathedral. Rev. James C.
Byrne, pastor of St: Lake's Church, is
given $500, and Rev. John P. Cleary,
assistant pastor, $200,' for Masses.
The remainder of the estate is left to
relatives.
A scholarship for poor children at
St. Mary's academy, St. Joseph coun
ty, Indiana, is provided for in the
will of Mrs. Emily H. Bradley, for
mer principal of the Baker school, St.
Paul. The scholarship is to be main
tained from a $6,000 bequest. Officials
of the academy, of which the teacher
was a graduate, are to make the
award, unless some one of the chil
dren of the founder's brothers or sis
ters apply for it.
WINS FIRST PLACE
CATHOLIC STUDENT OF BUFFALO
LEADS IN ORATORICAL
CONTEST.
A Catholic student, Joseph Leberer,
representing St. Joseph's Collegiate
Institute of Buffalo, N. Y., won first
place in the Columbia University ora
torical content last week. The contest,
was held at Hutchinson High School.
Mr. Leberer spoke on "Is Arbitration
Possibility?" For the first prize
Leberer received $50 and represented
his district of the state in the final
contest which was held at Columbia
University on March 2.
Allies in Religious Act
ORGANIZING PILGRIMAGE TO
PARAY-LE-MONIAL.
The Catholics of several of the
Allied countries are organizing a pil
grimage to the shrine of the Sacred
Heart at Paray-le-Monial, France, to
take place on March 11, when repre
sentatives of each nation will solemn
ly place its flag on the altar of the
Sacred Heart in the famous basilica
there. Cardinal Bourne, representing
the Catholics of the British Empire,
will take part in the ceremony on his
way home from the Eternal City.
Swiss Guard at the Vatican
THE HOLY FATHER HAS GIVEN
PERMISSION TO RETURN
TO THEIR COUNTRY.
The new Swiss mobilization order
makes no difference to the Swiss
Guard at the Vatican, the Swiss Coun
cil having exempted them at the be
ginning of the war, although the Holy
Father has put no difficulties in the
way of any members who might de
sire to leave Rome to serve their
country. The mobilization order
having been for purely precautionary
measures the Swiss Guard at the Vat
ican remains as before, nor is it
thought here that it is likely to lose
any of its members, as a serious pur
pose on the part of either side to
violate Swiss neutrality is not thought
of, while the republic's desire to take
every precaution against accidents is
applauded.
& i
A Remarkable Campaign
$100,000 IS RAISED IN TEN DAYS
FOR PAROCHIAL SCHOOL.
A campaign conducted by Mr. Shef
field, who is well-known for his work
in the Northwest, to raise $100,000 in
ten days, has just been concluded in
Washington, D. C. The object was to
obtain funds for the erection of a
girls' parochial school in the parish
of St. Aloysius. The actual amount
raised was more than the goal of
$100,000. A remarkable part of the
work was that eighty-five per cent of
the entire amount was contributed by
members of St. Aloysius parish,
which, it seems, is not composed of
wealthy people.
Very Rev. Fr. Murphy
PROVINCIAL OF THE AUGUSTIN
IAN ORDER DEAD.
Very Rev. Nicholas J. Murphy, Pro
vincial of the Augustinian Order in
the United States, died last week in
the rectory of the Church of St. Nich
olas of 'Tolentine, New York City,
where he had served as rector since
1910.
He was born In New York City in
1855. He was ordained in 1877, and
served as rector in churches at
Schaghticoke, N. Y., and Philadelphia.
He founded the Church of Our Lady
of Good Counsel at Tompkinsvillc,
S. I., where he served as pastor for
eleven years. In 1914 he was elevated
to the head of the Augustinian Order.
The Very Rev. Charles M. Driscoll,
O. S. A., rector of the Church of St.
Rita, Philadelphia, has been raised to
the position of Provincial, through the
death of Father Murphy. Elected
to the provincialship of the order
about twenty-five years ago, he
now becomes head of the Augustinians
in this country, as well as of their mis
sions in Cuba and the Philippines.
Pope Benedict Praises
Portuguese
The Pope has addressed a letter to
the Patriarch of Lisbon and the
Archbishops and Bishops of Portugal
in high terms of praise. His Holiness
says that he appreciates greatly the
work of the Portuguese episcopate in
applying itself to protect and foster
the union of Catholics and exhorting
their people to keep up amongst them
the practical fervor of the Christian
life.
ST. MICHAEL'S SCHOOL
FIRE CAUSED DAMAGE TO THE
AMOUNT OF $2,500.
Fire was discovered in St. Michael's
School, Colorado and Parnell Streets,
St. Paul, last Monday night. The fire
burned its way from basement to at
tic. The cause of the blaze was prob
ably accidental. Four rooms in the
school were burned out. The books,
maps and other articles in those
rooms, were totally destroyed. The
loss to the building was covered by
insurance.
THE CATHOLIC CADETS
NEW "SAVE THE BOY" MOVE
MENT DEVELOPING IN
BALTIMORE.
The Catholic Cadet Corps of Balti
more "mustered in" a company of new
recruits at Calvert Hall in Baltimore
recently. These cadets, who are stu
dents at the Cathedral School and Cal
vert Hall College, number in all about
100. The Catholic Cadet Corps is
growing, and there are now CO or
more companies, approximating 1,500
members.
See of Grand Island, Neb.
Negotiations were closed last week,
whereby the residence of Mrs. John
Schwynn will become the property of
Right Reverend James A. Duffy of the
Diocese of Kearney, and with his occu
pancy Grand Island will become the
See of the districL A movement for
such location of the See was inaug
urated months ago, but a suitable
residence was not available.
Course in Aeronautics
IT WILL BE ESTABLISHED AT THE
UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME.
A course in the science of aeronau
ts will be| added to the curriculum
at the University of Notre Dame if
plans are accepted by the faculty as
outlined by Alan R. Hawley, president
of the Aero club of America. Rev
Matthew Schumacher, director of
studies, is in favor of the course and
has accepted the Aero club's offer of
two medals of merit to be awarded to
the students of Notre Dame who
write the best essays on the aero
nautical subjects assigned
jv%: .4 r«y."
REV. BERNARD O'REILLY WRITES
IN THE BALTIMORE SUN HIS
VIEWS OF CARRANZA'S LATEST
EFFORT.
Mexico has a new Constitution. Its
literary style is excellent. It is the
classic Castilian of old Spain and
makes good reading. It is difficult to
understand just why Mexico needed a
new Constitution as it had two per
fectly good ones. Thf first Constitu
tion was adopted in 1824 and served
its purpose well until the ascendancy
of the cut-throat Juarez, who promul
gated in 1857 the Constitution which
has since mis-governed beautiful, un
happy Mexico.
As we learned our lesson, Mr. Car
ranza was elected the head of the Con
stitutionalists. This title has been a
genuine asset. It seems strange that
if he was fighting for a Constitution
he should have seen the necessity for
a new one. His friends explain the
vital necessity of laws for land re
form. All these could have been ac
complished through administrative
processes. The new Constitution has
seriously impaired the value of the
Carranza claim to Constitutionalist.
Yet when we consider the facility
with which the work was accomplish
ed, it would be no trouble to get up
a new Constitution any day to relieve
the monotony of the dry season. Mu
nicipal elections were quietly held.
Few knew that they were being held.
In all cases the Carranza ticket was
chosen. The uniformity of the re
turns did not give convincing evidence
of the existence of popular govern
ment in Mexico, but it did show that
Carranza followers nobly did their
duty. The step was to "elect" dele
gates to the Constitutional Conven
tion. The work was accomplished as
silently and as systematically as the
municipal elections. The Carranza
delegates were "elected" and a ready
made Constitution adopted by a
marvelous unanimity. The whole
thing was almost too easy under the
present military dictatorship. It was
so simple it is hardly interesting.
Our secular press comments on the
new charter of Mexican liberties have
been few and shcrt. Even the papers
that are friendly to Carranza find lit
tle in the document to praise. They
seem to realize that the prominent
purpose of the new Constitution
would not find favor with the Ameri
can public. While a few clauses of
the document deal with the real
grievances of tne Mexican people, the
principal result is to strengthen the
existing tyrannical laws against re
ligion. Few Americans seem to know
the conditions under which the Church
has tried to work in Mexico for the
past half a century. Ignorant and
vicious writers have alike blamed the
Church for the evils that have cursed
unfortunate Mexico. The surprising
thing is that there is no Christianity
or culture in the country. The Church
has been harassed and persecuted at
every turn. She has not enjoyed the
liberty that is accorded her in
Turkey. The history of the progress
of Constitutional Government in Mex
ico is a story of official robbery and
suppression of natural rights. If
Americans only knew its history they
MINNESOTA
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY
NEW MEXICAN CONSTITUTION
CATHOLICS AND ART
MURAL PAINTINGS IN THE BOS­
TON PUBLIC LIBRARY FORM A
BEAUTIFUL TRIBUTE TO THE
HARMONY THAT HAS ALWAYS
EXISTED BETWEEN THE CATH
OLIC CHURCH AND ART.
In a recent number of America, Dr.
James J. Walsh presents an inter
esting article on the paintings re
cently unveiled in the Boston Public
Library. One of them is a beautiful
Madonna. This in itself will scarcely
shock good Protestants, since they
are accustomed to have in their
homes copies of the old masterpieces
depicting the Blessed Virgin at dif
ferent periods of her life. One pic
ture portrays Our Lady of Sorrows
as a beautiful majestic woman with
a crown and aureole, and seven
swbrds piercing the heart. The face
hai the look of one bearing the sor
rows of the world.
The public hall in which the paint
ings are found strongly suggests an
cient church architecture and, there
fore, the subjects Mr. John S. Sargent
has chosen for its decoration are ex
tremely effective. The place itself is
suited to express Catholic ideas
breathing love and devotioii to the
Mother of God.
There is also a series of ten panels
growing out of the idea of the Ma
donna and the Mother of Sorrows.
They are all there, joyful, sorrowful,
and glorious. The paintings of our
greatest living American artist will
gradually educate our friends into
realizing that when we Catholics say
our rosary we are meditating on
some of the most beautiful and sig
nificant of Christian religious mys
teries. The poor, most forlorn and
ignorant
old
woman who tells her
Number 10
would blush that they ever called
Mexico a sister republic.
During the presidency of Ignacio
Commonfort the Constitution of 1857
was adopted, which declared the
separation of Church and State. In
the years following innumerable laws
systematized the provisions of the
Constitution enforcing the separation
and gradually deprived the Church of
every vestige of her rights or privi
leges. In 1860 a law was promulgated
which forbade public officials in their
official capacity to assist at any re
ligious ceremony or entertainment in
honor of a clergyman no matter how
high in rank ne might be.. In Ihe same
year all male religious orders, what
ever their name or purposes, were
suppressed throughout the whole re
public, as also all confraternities, con
gregations or sisterhoodsi annexed to
the religious communities, to cathe
drals, or any other churches. The
foundation or erection of new con
vents, under whatever form or name,
wa3 prohibited. The religious were
forbidden to wear the garb or habit
of their order. The books and manu
scripts, the paintings and any other
works of art belonging to religious
communities were confiscated and
placed in the public museums. By a
law passed in the same year all prop
erty which under whatever title had
been administered by the secular or
regular clergy became the property of
the State. From that time no relig
ious institution was permitted to ac
quire property or derive revenue frOm
any property.
In 1873 an article was added to the
Constitution which forbade religiour
rites or demonstrations of any kind
whatsoever to take place outside of
the church building in any part of
the republic. Officials of the republic
were forbidden to recognize in their
official capacity any religious solemn
ities. The priests and religious were
forbidden to wear in public a special
dress or insignia which would char
acterize them in any way. Conviction
cf violation of this law carried with
it a fine up to two hundred dollars.
A year later it was decreed that lega
cies made in favor of ministers of re
ligion or their relatives to the fourth
degree, who had rendered spiritual
aid to testators in their last illness,
or who had been their spiritual direc
tors, were null and void. Two years
later all the hospitals and charitablo
institutions under ecclesiastical au
thority or managed by religious cor
porations were secularized and placed
under the immediate supervision of
the civil authorities. This law was
strengthened by an act of 1904, which
prohibited priests or religious from
being directors, administrators, or
even patrons of any charity.
The whole history of Constitutional
Government in Mexico was a-systema
tized effort to wipe out of the country
every vestige of religion. In spite of
this we hear the charge that the Cath
olic Church is responsible for the un
happy conditions in Mexico. Now a
sacrilegious bandit completes the
work of infamy. After sacking
churches, looting convents, torturing
and killing priests, debauching nuns,
forgetting every instinct of decency
and morality, the followers of Carran
za adopt a Constitution that will con
tinue the work, and they call their
Government a Republic.
church is dwelling on the sublime
subjects that a great artist has fouled
worthiest texts for his magnificent
decorations. The general impression
of the whole work is such that but
one thing is lacking to make it per
fect, namely, that the hall should be
dedicated to divine worship.
Another great artist, •whoso pk5«
tures adorned the Library, wheii
seeking a fitting subject for his worik,
found that he would not do better
than to go back to the old times, thO
old beliefs, and the old practices.
Mr. Henry Abbey chose the story
of
the Holy Grail. The Quest of the
Holy Grail has a particularly strong
appeal, for it embodies the inspira
tion and the emotions that spring
from the heart of men. The story
of the Holy Grail with.its appeal to
brave, pure hearts is one of the sul
limest ever told to man. In our own.
time Wagner chose it as the subject
for what he fondly hoped would be
the greatest musical drama ever wffiU
ten.
Cathollcistn and art are JnextrlcaMy
interwoven whenever there is ques
tion, in the Christian era, of supreme
ly great arL Where Catholicism
dwindles, art disappears. Protestant
ism ruined the art of Europe. Now
that art is coming b&ek, th* old CaUk
olic subjects return with it.
CATHOLICS ON BORDER
Twenty-two per cent
I
Auditorium
beads in the obscure corner o| a birthday patriotic
of
the
to
rtPMi
who have been doing soldier duty
on
the Mexican border are members
of
the Catholic Church. John H. Reddin,
supreme master of the Fourth degree,
K. of C., stated this before the o,500
Denverites who gathered at the
attend WaahingtQg'f
'-gT

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