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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, March 17, 1917, Image 1

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Volume 7
INVIOLABILITY OF PRIESTS
The inviolability of communications
between clergymen and their clients,
even outside of the confessional, has
been upheld in the Superior Court of
California. A decision just rendered
by Judge Wood of that court, sitting
in Los Angeles, is one of great impor
tance to Catholics throughout the
country. The decision was occasioned
by a subpoena issued to Mgr. Hart
nett, of Los Angeles, as witness in a
divorce case. The priest's refusal to
answer a question, on the ground that
bis knowledge was confidential, was
upheld by the court.
Some years ago, a young man ar
rived from the East who was separat
ed from his wife. He became ac
quainted with Monsignor Hartnett and
requested him to write to his wife in
the hope of affecting a reconciliation
between them. At his request Monsig
nor wrote to the lady in question re
questing her to come to California and
assume the marital relations with her
husband. A reply was received the
nature of which was communicated to
her husband. Years passed and the
parties remained apart—his wife evi
dently refusing to be reconciled. In
order to protect his property interests,
the husband entered suit for divorce
and subpoenaed Monsignor Hartnett to
appear as a witness.
Priest Declines to Answer.
The case was tried before Judge
Wood, who rendered a decision in the
case. The question having been pro
pounded as tb the nature of the Com
munication received from the es
tranged wife, Monsignor Hartnett de
clined to answer the question, stating
that the principle involved was of a
iserious nature and that he did not
Historians are agreed on the fact
that previous to the coming of St.
Patrick the Irish bards had a com
plete system of musical notation, and
some musical authorities, among them
Dr. William H. Cummings, one of the
most eminent of English musicians,
declare that the bards had the dia
tonic scale as we have it today.
Father Bewerunge, Professor of Mu
sical Chant in Maynooth College, in
sists that the Irish melodies belong
to a stage of musical development
very much anterior to that of Gre
gorian chant. He claims that being
based fundamentally on a pentatonic
scale, they reach back to a period al
together previous to the dawn of mu
sical history.
Sedulius, the Irish poet, musician
and theologian, who flourished in
Rome in the fifth century was, per
haps, the* first Irish churchman to
achieve distinction outside of his own
country. His Carmen Paschale has
been called the first* great Christian
epic worthy of the name. Dr. Flood,
in his History of Irish Music says:
"From a musical point of view, the
beautiful Introit of the Mass of the
Blessed Virgin—'Salve Sancta Parens
enixa Puerpcra Regem'—which is still
sung throughout the western church,
is the most glowing tribute to the es
timation in which this worthy Irish
man's compositions were held by the
compilers of the Roman' Missal and
Gradual. Again in the Roman Liturgy
we find our Irish composer's abcediren
liymn commencing
'A
A MOST IMPORTANT DECISION
KNOWLEDGE IS UPHELD IN CAL
IFORNIA COURT —RIGHT TO
WITHHOLD INFORMATION GAIN
ED IN PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY
AN IMPORTANT MATTER.
Solis ortus
cardine' and as Dr. Healy writes:
'Several other expressions in the Di
vine Office are borrowed from the
Carmen Paschale of Sedulius."
Germany owes its music to the Irish
monks, for musical science was utter
ly unknown in that country until the
founding of the monastery of St. Gall
in the year 612 by the Irish saint
Cellacli, whose name has been Latin
ized Gallus or Gall. Cellach came
from the college at Bangor, Co. Down,
and was the friend and disciple of
St. Columbanus, the founder of the
monastery at Bobbio, Italy. During
Cellach's lifetime the monastery of
St. Gall became famous for its music,
and later on, in the end of the eighth
century. Pope Adrian sent two famous
Roman singers, Peter and Romanus
(authors of the Romanian notation),
|o the Irish monastery at St. Gall's
i ii br .tV1'i
feel justified in answering the ques
tion unless obliged to do so by the
court. His relations with the woman
referred to were of a confidential na
ture, such as the relations of Catholic
priests with Catholic persons often
arc in similar circumstances.
Mgr. Hartnett maintained that it
was to the interest of the community
that he be not obliged to answer the
question. The statute in the case was
lead by the judge. J. Wiseman Mac
donald, Esq., the lawyer for the Mon
signor, maintained that the question
should not be answered. He admitted
that there was no question of Sacra
mental Confession, which undoubted
ly was safeguarded by law, but stren
uously maintained that there was ques
tion of another kind of confession
which also should be held inviolate.
The case was similar to the case of
a man in jail, who in order to obtain
relief acknowledged his guilt to some
private
individual In
fidence.
SOME FAMOUS IRISH MUSICIANS
ILLUSTRIOUS NAMES IN THE
WORLD OF MUSIC.
The world's musical dcbl to Ireland
is greater than can ever be estimated.
While there are extant enough histori
cal facto to prove the value of the
achievements of the musicians of the
Land of Song," still there can be no
doubt that much valuable data has
been lost in the troublous centuries
intervening between the early ages
and the present day. The Norsemen
destroyed thousands of valuable
manuscripts in their raids on the
monasteries and churches, and, later
on, the Anglo-Normans added to the
destruction.
whom lie
had
con­
Not Acting as Private Individual.
The same statute .which refers to
Confession was evidently the one
which safeguarded communications to
non-Catholic ministers in dealing with
their people. The judge, having in
quire .j of Monsignor Hartnett if he, as
a private individual, could not have ob
tained the information from the afore
said lady, received the reply that as a
private individual he would not have
written her because he would not have
expected a reply to his letter. It hav
ing been definitely stated to the court
that the Church is opposed to divorce,
and that in accordance with her or
dinances a priest is supposed to do
all in his power to effect a reconcilia
tion between husband and wife when
estranged, the judge rendered a de
cision sustaining Monsignor Hartnett
in his contention. He thereby declared
that confidential relations between
priests and people, even though these
relations have no reference to Sacra
mental Confession, are nevertheless to
be regarded as sacred and inviolate.
to obtain a faithful copy of the Gre
gorian Antiphonarium. Moengal, an
Irish monk, was made headmaster of
the Music School of St. Gall in the
year 870, and under this rule it be
came "the wonder and delight of
Europe." The copying of music be
came such a feature of the work done
at St. Gall's that the scribes of this
monastery provided all Germany with
MSS. books of Gregorian chant, all
beautifully illuminated. At Moengal's
death he was succeeded by his Irish
disciple Tuathal, Latinized Tutilo,
who became even more famous than
his master.
About the year 653, St. Gertrude of
Brabant, abbess of Nivelle, in Brabant,
sent for two brothers, St. Foillan and
St. Ultan to teach psalmody to her
nuns. The two Irish monks complied
with her request and built an adjoin
ing monastery at Fosse, near Liege.
All northern Europe must acknowl
edge its indebtedness to Ireland more
or less, for wherever the Irish monks
went they brought the science of
music with them. The learned Kes
sel, writing of our early ecclesiastics,
says: "Every province in Germany
proclaims this race as its benefactor.
Austria celebrates St. Colman, St. Vir
gilius, St. Modestus and others. To
whom but the ancient Scots (Irish)
was due the famous 'Schottenkloster'
of Vienna? Salsburg, Ratisbon and
all Bavaria honor St. Virgilius as their
apostle. Burgundy, Alsace, Helvetia,
Suevia with one voice proclaim the
glory of Columbanus, Gall, Fridolin,
Arbogast, Florentius, Trudpert, who
first preached the true religion
amongst them. Who were the found
ers of the monasteries of St. Thomas
at Strasburg and of St. Nicholas at
Memmingen, but these same Scots.
The Saxons and the tribes of northern
Germany are indebted to them to an
extent that may be judged by the fact
that the first ten Bishops who occu
pied the See of Verden belonged to
that race."
The first to introduce the Roman
chant in Cologne was the Irish St.
Helias, a native of the Co. Monaghan,
who was elected Abbot of Cologne, in
Germany in 1015. It was to him that
Berno of Reichenau dedicated his cele
brated work, "The Laws of Symphony
and Tone."
One of the greatest musical theor
ists of the thirteenth century was
John Garland, of the Co. Louth. He
went to France, studied in Paris and
taught in Toulouse, where he wrote
his famous treatise on De Musica
Mensurabili Positio. The street in
which he taught in Paris was named
in his honor, the "Clos de Garlande."
The nrsr treatise on music written
in the English language is credited to
Lionel Power, a native of Waterford,
and can now be found among the Lans
downe MSS. in the British Museum.
He established the use of sixths and
thirds, prohibited consecutive unisons,
fifths and octaves and was the in
ventor of figured bass. Many of his
compositions are still extant. His
treatise was -written about the year
1390. i
4
(Continued on page 8.)
s£2L.t*». i vvtU i
REV. THOMAS P. HAYES
ASSISTANT PASTOR OF THE
CHURCH OF ST. JAMES DIED
THIS WEEK—THE FUNERAL
WAS HELD ON WEDNESDAY.
Rev. Thomas P. Hayes, assistant
pastor of the Church of St. James, of
this city, and chaplain at the City Hos
pital, died last Sunday night at St
Joseph's Hospital, St. Paul, following
an operation for appendicitis and gall
stones. He had been ill for the past
two or three weeks.
The funeral was held Wednesday
morning, March 14, at ten o'clock,
from the Church of St. James. A
large number of the clergy of the dio
cese said the Office for the Dead at
half past nine o clock preceding the
Mass. The Soleran Mass of Requiem
was sung by the Rev. Jeremiah O'Con
nor, pastor of the church. The deacon
was Rev. Edmund O'Connor, and the
subdeacon, Rev. Father Barry. Mas
ter of ceremonies, Rev. James Moyni
han. The acolytes were Mr. Casey
and Mr. Pilger, of the St. Paul Sem
inary, and the thurifer, Rev. John
O'Neill. Rev.
F. k.
Bajec was in
charge of the priests' choir. The pall
bearers were former classmates of
Father Hayes. A touching eulogy on
the work and character of Father
Hayes was delivered by the Very Rev.
James C. Byrne, V. G., who also pro
nounced the absolution. Burial was
in Calvary cemetery.
Rev. Thomas P. Hayes
was born in
Hayesville, Killmallock, County Lim
erick, Ireland, on February 19, 1887.
He completed his classical studies in
Rockwell College, Cashel, County Tip
perary. He pursued his studies in phil
osophy in St. Patrick's College at
Carlow, and was ordained on June 8,
1915. Immediately- after his ordina
tion he was appointed assistant at St.
James Church and was also assigned
as Chaplain to the City Hospital, St.
Paul.
During the short period of his priest
hood, Father Hayes gave great prom
ise of future excellent work in the
service of God. His zeal and sincer
ity, as well as his untiring work and
ceaseless efforts for the good of souls,
rked him at really a man of God.
His cheerful disposition and affable
character endeared him to all, and
his loss will be deeply regretted and
keenly felt by all those who enjoyed
either his friendship
or
ministrations.
his priestly
DUBUQUE TRAPPIST
MONASTERY
IOWA COMMUNITY OF SILENT
BROTHERHOOD MAY BE
E E W I K E N U K Y
BRANCH OF ORDER.
The
recent death
of
Riglit
Rev.
Alberic Dunlea, O. C. R., Abbot, which
took place at New Melleray Trappist
Abbey, about twelve miles from Du
buque, removed from the scene of his
labors a most interesting character.
The death of the venerable monk fol
lowed a brief illness due to the in
firmities of age.
It is thought by some that the death
of Abbot Alberic may possibly result
in the dissolution of the Trappist mon
astery of New Melleray and its coali
tion with some other branch of the
Cistercian Order, possibly that of
Gethsemane in Kentucky. The mon
astery was founded in 1848, through
the ihstrumentality of Bishop Loras,
who donated the property on which
the Abbey stands, but there are only
about twenty-five members in the com
munity at present.
PARAY-LE M0N1AL
PILGRIMAGE OF ALLIES TO
FRENCH SHRINE POSTPONED
WHEN CARDINAL BOURNS IS
DETAINED.
The great pilgrimage that is being
organized by the Catholics of several
of the Allied countries to the famous
shrine of the Sacred Heart at Paray
le-Monial, France, which had been
fixed to take place on Sunday, March
11, has been postponed until March 24.
Cardinal Bourne, who intends to take
a prominent part in it, as the special
representative of the British Empire,
will remain in Rome till theti
DOMINICAN. GENERAL
FATHER THEISSELING LEAVES
ROME FOR SPAIN WHENCE HE
WILL SAIL FOR UNITED STATES.
Very Rev. Father Theisseling,
General of the Dominican order,
companied by the
Horn.
*L
the
is
pre­
paring to go to Spain for the purpose
of formally visiting the houses of his
Order in that country. From Spain he
hopes to be able to proceed to America
to make a.lengthy visitation tour on
that continent, where the Dominican
houses have not been officially vis
ited for a long
time.
He will be ac­
Very Rev. Father
i i
ST. PAUL, MJNNL, MARCH 17, 1917
A SOCIALIST EFFORT
FRENCH PRIESTS FORCED INTO
ACTIVE MILITARY SERVICE.
Rome follows with great interest
anything which touches the politico
religious situation in France just now,
and last week's incident in the cham
ber there has caused some disgust,
though not much surprise, as it only
confirms the view of the situation
already held there. It seems that a
Socialist deputy proposed the aboli
tion of the partial exemption of the
clergy from active service. Priests
are given the opportunity when pos
sible to serve in hospitals and other
auxiliary services, but as a matter of
fact hundreds, if not thousands, have
already lost their lives in the firing
line and all France admires sincere
ly the self-sacrifice and heroism of
the clergy and is more than grateful
for its moral effect. All France, it
seems, except a few politicians. A
Catholic deputy protested strongly,
mentioning en passant that no less
than 120 of the 660 Jesuits enrolled
had lost their lives. Still the pro
posal was carried, 337 to 152.
Many Catholic Diplomats
SEVERAL MEMBERS OF CHURCH
REPRESENT UNITED STATES
IN FOREIGN COUNTRIES.
If the United States should sever
diplomatic relations with the other
Central Powers, the following Catho
lic diplomats will return to America:
Frederic Courtland Penfield,
CATHOLICSJN THE LEAD
TWO CATHOLIC COLLEGE STU­
DENTS SECURE HIGHEST AVER
AGE IN NAVY EXAMINATION.
Two boys from St. John Preparatory
School, Danvers, Mass., won the ap
pointments for the Naval Academy at
Annaipolis, receiving the two highest
places in the competitive examinations
for appointment. The examinations
were conducted by the Civil Service
Board in the Post Office building in
Boston.
Francis J. Riley, Roxbury, Mass., fin
ished first with a ranking of 91.6 per
cent, and Louis G. McGlone, also of
Roxbury, finished second with the fine
average of 90.6 per cent. The third
rating was 75.5 per cent, or a margin
of over 15 per cent between the sec
ond
and
third.
Becomes a Peace-maker
PRIEST STOPS BATTLE OF POLICE
AND STRIKERS.
A force of fifty police and private
detectives answering a riot call at
Niagara Falls last week exchanged
shots with armed men in a mob of 400
strikers at three local plants and their
sympathizers. Michael Eotty, a strik
er, was shot and fatally wounded and
John Curry, chief of police, and two
policemen suffered scalp wounds. Rev.
Thomas Stabenau, a Polish priest,
succeeded in restoring order by ap
pealing
to
the strikers to disperse,
Sister of the Late Pope
Dies in Rome
M&Jime Ptrfelhi, sister of the late
Pope Pius X, died in Rome on Tues
day, March 6. The late Pope had three
sisters who kept house for him in
Venice. When he wa§ elected Pope
they came to Rome and took up their
residence near the Vatican. The eld
est of the sisters diod nearly four
years ago.
-jf-r-
U.
Ambassador to Austria-Hungary.
Charles
J.
S.
Vopicka, U. S. Minister
to the Balkan States (including Bul
garia).
Dominic I. Murphy, formerly editor
of The New Century, Washington,
Consul-General at Sofia, Bulgaria.
Julius Garesche Lay, Consul-General
at Berlin, who accompanied Ambas
sador Gerard hack to
this country,
also a Catholic.
is
SEMINARY IS DESTROYED
EUDIST FATHERS IN CANADA SUS
TAIN SEVERE LOSS.
On Tuesday morning, March 6, fire
destroyed the magnificent seminary
of the Eudist^ Fathers situated at
West Bathurst in the Diocese of
Chatham, Province of Halifax, Canada.
This loss is a particularly hard blow
in view of the fact that last year the
college building at Caraquet was de
stroyed by fire. The loss by Tues
day's fire is estimated at $150,000, with
insurance of only $14,000. Since the
destruction of the college last year the
seminary has been used by the Eudist
Fathers as a college, and at the time
of the fire had one hundred and fifty
students on the roll. The students all
made their escape, but lost all their
belongings.
:v
Annuario Ecclesiastico
LAST OF CHANGES IN DIPLO
MATIC CORPS FOLLOWING CON
SISTORY SENDS NEW SALESIAN
NUNCIO TO AMERICA.
The last of the changes in diplo
matic representation consequent on
the Consistory has now been made.
Mgr. Marenco had been named In
ternuncio to Costa Rico, Nicaragua
and Honduras. This is the position
held by Cardinal Cagliero, and the new
Internuncio is also a Salesian, the tra
dition and the spirit thus remaining
unchanged, doubtless to the great joy
of the faithful there. There is a dif
ference, however, now. In the old days
this used to be an Apostolic Delega
tion it has now changed with the
others, on the principle put in force by
Pope Benedict XV that all Papal repre
sentatives to any state shall come un
der the category of nuncios or inter
nuncios, the Apostolic Delegates being
purely religious representatives of the
Pope. So, in the new "Annuario Ec
clesiastico" there is an increase in
the first category and a decrease in
the second. There are nuncios to
Spain and Austria (these of the first
class), of the second to $he Argentine,
Bavaria, Belgium, Brazil (its status
raised), Chile (similarly), while Bo
livia has no name. Internuncios are
listed to Colombia, Costa Rico, Nica
ragua and Honduras, Haiti, Holland,
•Peru, Venezuela, while San Domingo,
Ecuador, San Salvador, Switzerland,
Uruguay and Paraguay have no names.
France remains on the book, but with
out a name, and Portugal, too, but with
an Auditor of Nunciature.
EDUCATION IN HOLLAND
NUMBER OF CATHOLIC PUPILS IS
INCREASING.
Official information states that the
number of pupils in the Catholic
schools of Holland is notably increas
ing. During the school years of 1915
1916, the increase was more than 5,000.
The total number of schools is 1,057,
with 6,280 teachers, and 84,734 boys,
133,337 girls an increase in the past
twelve months of twenty-three schools
and seventy-five teachers. Plainly the
perilous position of Holland during the
war has not dampened Catholic zeal
for the training of children. It is con
fidently hoped that some changes in
the national school law will soon be
made, materially lessening the finan
cial burdens of Catholic education.
Meanwhile there is good provision of
Catholic high schools, and the next
step is to be the founding of a Catho
lic .University.
THE NEW AGE
MASONS ISSUE AN ANTI-CATHO
LIC MAGAZINE.
The New Age is' a! monthly
y ,^^
lullefim
maga­
zine conducted from the headquarters
of Free Masonry in Washington, D. C.
One of the late numbers is equal to
the Missouri viper in bitterness to
wards Catholics. It has an article de
nouncing the friars who conducted the
old Franciscan missions to the Indians
in California. It represents the Indians
as slaves forced to toil, and the
priests reaping the fruit of their
labors. It has other strongly anti
Catholic articles. Yet Masons tell us
that Masonry is not anti-Catholic and
has nothing to do with religion. Let
any one read that publication, issued
by authority of the supreme officials
of Masonry, and decide, according to
the axiom that actions speak louder
than words.
GEORGIA PATRIOTISM
VETERANS DENY BISHOP KEILEY
RIGHT TO SPEAK.
A number of Confederate veteran i
of Macon, Ga., have become so bigoted
that they have .demanded that Bishop
Keiley be withdrawn by the Daugh
ters of the Confederacy as the chief
speaker in the coming memorial exer
cises in that city. The Bishop was
born in Georgia and is a Confederate
veteran of the Civil war.
Army Chaplains Assigned
Rev. E. J. Griflin, chaplain U. S. A.,
has been assigned to Fort Totten,
N.
Y.
Rev.
S.
J. Babst, recently appointed
chaplain, tT. S. A., has been ordered
to report at Ft. Bliss, Texas, and will
be attached to the 13th Infantry.
Becomes Papal Countess
Mrs. Catherine Cudahy, of Chicago,
111., widow of Michael Cudahy, meat
packer, has been made a papal count
ess by Pope Benedict XIV., it was an
nounced officially. The only other
woman in the United States with this
distinction is the Countess Leary of
New York, on whom the honor was
conferred
bZ
THERE ARE NOW 25,436,136 CATH­
OLICS UNDER THE AMERICAN
FLAG—19,983 PRIESTS IN THE
'UNITED STATES—1,537,644 CHIL­
DREN IN PAROCHIAL SCHOOLS.
With the appearance of the 1917 edi
tion of 'The Official Catholic Direc
tory," published and copyrighted by
P. J. Kenedy & Sons of 44 Barclay
street, New York, attention ought to
be called to the fact that one hundred
years have elapsed since the issuance
of the first directory, for in 1817 "The
Laity's Directory to the Church Serv
ice" was published and sold in New
York by Matthew Field.
According to the Centenary Edition
of "The Official Catholic Directory"
there are 17,022,879 Catholics in the
United States (not including our Is
land possessions). With sixty-four
archdioceses and doceses reporting in
creases, four showing decreases, thir
ty-three archdioceses and dioceses
making no change in the population
figure the increase in the number of
Catholics during the yeiar 1916 is
shown to be 458,770. It must be re
membered in this connection, however,
that the great archdioceses, such as
New York, Chicago and Boston do not
take a new census each year.
According to Joseph H. Meier, the
directory compiler, the figure 17,022,
879 is very conservative, including, as
it does, only the figures submitted by
the Chancery Officials. Taking into
consideration the "floating" Catholic
population and the fact that some im
portant archdioceses and dioceses take
up a census only at intervals of ten
years, Mr. Meier feels that he is
safe in saying that the Catholic popu
lation of the United States is at pres
ent nearly 19,000,000.
Island Possessions.
Looking over that section of "The
Official Catholic Directory" which con
tains the data for our Island posses
sions one finds that there are 7,342,
262 Catholics in the Philippines and
adding to thkse Philippine Catholics
the number reported for Alaska, the
Canal Zone, Guam, our possessions in
Samoa, the Hawaiian Islands and Por
to Rico the total number amounts to
8,413,257. This figure does not include
the Catholics of the three recently ac
quired Danish West Indies.
There are, therefore, under the
United States fiag 25,436,136 Catholics
divided as follows: Continental Unit
ed States 17,022,879 foreign posses
sions of the United States, 8,413,257.
The Centenary Edition of "The Of
ficial Catholic Directory" bristles with
facts and figures- showing the prog
ress of the Catholic Church. Accord
ing to the 1917 volume there are four
teen Archbishops, ninety-six Bishops
and 19,983 Catholic clergymen in con
tinental United States. Of these 19,
983 clergymen 14,002 are secular
priests and 5,381 are priests of re
ligious orders. Comparing the 1917
SOLDIERS—HE TAKES A PER
SONAL INTEREST IN THE MANY
CASES.
The Literary Digest reminds us that
every day the Pope receives about
two hundred letters "from distracted
parents, wives, and sweethearts in
all of the belligerent nations, plead
ing that he use his good offices to
learn whether their loved ones, about
whom they are unable to learn any
thing, are dead, wounded, sick or
prisoners." And, as we learn from an
Associated Press dispatch from Rome
printed in The Intermountain Catho
lic (Salt Lake City), he reads every
one of the letters himself. Of course,
he cannot investigate every case per
sonally. But after reading an appeal,
he makes a memorandum on its en
velope and sends it to the department
of lost soldiers, which has been
established in the Vatican, and em
ploys some thirty clerks under the
supervision of one Father Huisman.
The work of this office is described
as follows:
'The department has access to offi
cial records transmitted by the Prus
sian Minister of War to the Holy See
at Lugano, Switzerland, and has
offices at Paris, Constantinople,
Vierfna, Brussels, and Padeborn, West
phalia, Germany, with several minor
branches in other countries.
"The department has become one
of the most highly organized
of any
in the Vatican. It writes several
hundred letters a day, and to date
such letters have run up to a total
of more than five million.
H&2
CATHOLIC GROWTH IN THE UNITED STATES
As
at
Pope Leo XIII
•t
the de­
partment returns all money enclosed
in
letters of appeal, and as
a
person
writing from England can not well
enclose Italian stamps for inter
national correspondence, the stamp
bill alone of the department has been
upward
two hundred thousand
dollars.
"After making an official demand
on the Government of the country
where the lost soldier is supposed to
be, the department causes each new
name to he posted up in the military
prison-camps, bj the aid 9l a Catho- named
1—
MINNESOTA
HISTORICAL
SOCIETY
Number 11
and 1916 editions it is seen, therefore,
that the number of Catholic clergy
men has increased by 411. The direc
tory further shows that there are 15,
520 Catholic parishes in this country,
of which 10,190 have resident clergy
men, 5,330 being mission parishes,
that is, the churches being supplied
from a neighboring parish. It is seen
from these figures that 357 new par
ishes were organized last year.
Other figures taken from the 1917
publication show that there are 102
seminaries in the States, with 6,898
young men studying' for the priest
hood 216 colleges for boys 676 acad
emies for girls 293 orphan asylums
106 homes for the aged, as well as
5,687 parochial schools with an enroll
ment of 1,537,644 children.
States With 100,000 Catholics or Over.
Further delving into the new edition
of "Kenedy's Official Catholic Direc
tory" reveals the fact that there are
twenty-seven states in the Union hav
ing a Catholic population of 100,000 or
over. The state of New Jersey has
been gaining steadily in recent years
and during 191G passed Michigan in
the list of "banner" states. New Jer
sey is now comfortably located in
sixth place, Michigan being seventh.
Wisconsin has passed from ninth to
eightn place, overcoming the lead for
merly held by Louisiana, and Missouri,
also, takes a step forward going into
tenth plaCe and crowding California
into the eleventh row.
A table showing the position of the
twenty-seven states having a Catho
lic population of over 100,000 has been
specially prepared for the Catholic
Press and is herewith appended:
1—New York 2,962,9ft
2—Pennsylvania 1,865,000
2—Illinois 1,482,587
4—Massachusetts 1,406,91:!
6—Ohio 832,894
6—New Jersey 712,000
7—Michigan 631,000
8—Wisconsin 586,857
9—Louisiana 549,700
10—Missour i 531,000
11—California 524,233
12—Connecticut 508,498
13—Minnesota 478,335
14—Texas 411,790
15—Maryland (Incl. Dist.
of Col.) 278,000
16—Rhode Island 275,000
17—Iowa 263,431
18—Indiana 255,255
19—Kentuck y 181,686
20—New Mexico 150,573
21—New Hampshire .... 134,009
22—Maine 133,627
23—Kansas 131,128
24—Nebrask a 115,433
25—Colorado 110,987
26—North Dakota 104,371
27—Montan
a ,. 101,200
By comparing the 72-page volume
published in 1817 with the bulky vol
ume which is being sent to its sub
scribers in 1917 it will be seen at a
glance that the Catholic Church in the
United States has progressed remark
ably.
SEARCHING FOR THE MISSING
HOW THE POPE TRACES LOST
lie chaplain always present, in the
hope that some of the lost soldier's
comrades may see the name and offer
some clue that will lead to his loca
tion. Several thousands of such lists
have been printed. There are one
hundred and ten lists, each contain
ing two hundred names, for the Ital
ian Army alone, making thus a total
of twenty-two thousand lost Italian
soldiers. Aside from this, the depart
ment has copies of the official army
prisoner lists, arranged by nations,
and it immediately searches these
lists carefully for the name of the lost
soldier.
"Despite the difficulties of the task,
the department has so far been able
to find more than ten thousand lost
soldiers, and the Pope has received
a treasured collection of letters of
thanks from families, often from little
children, who address him as 'Mister,'
or who give him the title-names of
popes dead many hundreds of years.
"The correspondent of the Associ
ated Press on a visit to the depart
ment saw a bundle of letters that had
been just sent by the Pope, possibly
seventy-five in number, and on the
envelope of each one in his own hand
writing were written directions con
cerning its disposition. Among the
heap was a letter from his sister, the
Countess Persico della Chiesa, of
Genoa, the Pope's home city, asking
that a search be made for a certain
soldier of Genoa. 'The Countess begs
attention again,' the Pope had writ
ten on the letter. Another one of the
letters was one of thanks from
French family whose son, Jeaai
Laforgue, had been for two years in
the Orient without being able to send
news to his family of himself, but th&
Pope had been able to discover thifc
lost' son at Samsam, in distant
Turkey."
Next Consistory March 22.
The date of the next consistory, ao»
cording to dispatches, has been fixed
by Pope Benedict as March 22. It will
be held only for the appointment of
Bishops. No new Cardinals .wjil bo

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