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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, May 08, 1920, Image 1

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Volume 9
Maronites under Egypt.
Before Archbishop Khouri really
starts on his visit of inspection he will
go to Baltimore and pay his respects
to His Eminence James Cardinal Gib
bons and to Washington where he will
visit Archbishop Bonzano, the Aposto
lic Delegate, to take up matters rela
tive to relief work in Syria both as
to its past and future administration.
As a matter of church law, the Mar
onites in this country are under the
jurisdiction of the See of Egypt, which
is a Vicar Patriarchate, but Arch
bishop Kliouri was the highest prelate
in the Church who could be spared for
this visit. He is the highest dignitary
ol the Maronite rite who has ever
visited this country, and he has thus
far met with a most affectionate and
nthusiastic welcome from his fellow
countrymen whom circumstances has
brought to this country.
A representative of the National
Catholic Welfare Council news serv
ice found the Archbishop a most de
lightful personage. He is a man of
fine dignity.
Losses In War.
"How many of your people fell vic
tims to the war?" the Archbishop was
asked.
"We lost about 175,000 by starva
tion and our numbers have now been
i educed to about 375,000. But the
elimination of the Turk from the con
trol of Syria is a wonderful recom
pense for our years of suffering. With
conditions as they are we are content.
Fiance has the mandate for Syria and
France has always been the firm
friend of the Maronites. Even when
i lie French government was persecut
ing the French Catholic clergy they
protected us against the rapacity of
lie Turks, and we were not as much
oppressed as were the Christians of
Armenia, where the Turk seems al
ways to have a free hand. Our people
look to France as our really great
lriend, and the fact that we are thus
officially placed under her protection
has proven of the utmost satisfaction
to our people and clergy alike.
"My trip to this country has been
to make a study of conditions here. I
K. C. STATE
The Minnesota State Convention of
the Knights of Columbus will be held
in the Radisson hotel in Minneapolis
on Tuesday, May 11. Election of offi
cers will take place.
GflTHOLlG LAYMEN
Archbishop of the Maronites
TYRE'S ARCHBISHOP ARRIVES TO
TOUR UNITED STATES—SAYS
FRANCE HAS BEEN FIRM FRIEND
OF MARONITES LOSSES IN
WAR—ELIMINATION OF TURK
FROM SYRIA RECOMPENSE FOR
SUFFERING—CUSTOMS OF MAR
ONITE PEOPLE.
As noted in our lust issue, the Most
Rev. Archbishop Chekrallah Kliouri,
Roman Catholic Maronite Metropoli
tan of the diocese of Tyre and Sidon
in Syria, is in New York as the start
ing point on a tour of the United
States in which he will visit the Mar
onite parishes of this country, number
ing about 150,000 souls. After that
lie will go to South America to visit
his co-religionists in that great con
tinent. lie is here with the permis
sion of His Holiness, Pope Benedict
XV, and on his return to his See, will
stop in Rome and give a detailed re
port of his journey to the Holy Father.
NATIONAL COUNCIL DELEGATES
MET THIS WEEK IN CHICAGO.
Delegates from more than thirty
great Catholic societies, representing
more than two million members, met
in Chicago on May 5 at the call of the
Rt. Rev. Joseph Schrembs, Bishop of
Toledo, and chairman of the Depart
ment of Lay Organizations of the Na
tional Catholic Welfare Council.
The conference was entered into
•with greater enthusiasm than any
held previously by Catholic laymen
of America. A large number of the
societies that were represented were
engaged in war work, and their repre
sentatives will take hold of the
problems that the conference at
tempted to solve with a judgment
ripened by the varied experiences of
the past few years.
Among the episcopal appointments
announced at the secret consistory,
which followed the ceremonies attend
ing the formal pleading of the causes
of canonization, was that of Bishop
Nussbaum, C. P., of Corpus Christ i,
Texas, to the Titular see of Gerasa.
Ill health has rendered the Bishop un
able to take active care of the affairs
of his diocese.
lUsi'iV'*:
Catholic
wish to go among our people and en
courage them spiritually and to see
that they keep the faith as pure in this
air of freedom as it has been kept for
the centuries in the face of oppres
sion."
The Archbishop did not know just
how long he would be in this country.
"Our people," he said, "do not know
much of the United States and they
will learn many things when I get
back that will prove amazing to them."
Asked as to the number of churches
in the Lebanon, His Grace said:
"There are about 1,000 villages, and
each has at least one church. The
more populous ones have more, but
there is always at least one. Our
population is about 65 per cent Mar
onite, the rest being made up of
Greek Orthodox, Greek Melchite, Mos
lems, etc."
Persecuted By Turks.
"But have not the Maronites been
able to maintain some form of auton
omy under the Turkish Government?"
"Yes. The Turks have never been
able to overwhelm us and though they
have tried it for ages, in modern times
they seem to have given it up as hope
less. In our mountainous country we
were not so easy to get at as the
Armenians, so those unfortunate
Christians suffered most from the
savagery of the Turks. The Turkish
government has sought from time to
time to exercise a veto power over
the appointment and assignment of
Maronite clergy, but we have always
ignored any orders of that kind and
Turkey has not sought to resort to
force to compel us to bow to the Sul
tan's will. In the matter of inherit
ance we have been given full freedom
and also freedom in the matter of mar
riages. Where the care of orphans
came up, the Turkish government was
guided by our wishes and gave us a
free hand. But our liberties were al
ways on sufferance and were made
possible by the unbending support of
France upon which we could always
rely. It is because of this that our
people are so elated at the Peace Con
ference having confided our destinies
HC
-{.ur old friend. England and the
United States are, of course, richer
countries, and maybe from the ma
terial viewpoint our development
would be more rapid had one of these
two great peoples taken the mandate,
but our people have not given thought
to that. They know France, and they
want France."
Are Real Catholics.
There are many Catholics who
know little or nothing of the Maronite
Church, or even that it is a Catholic
Church under the dominion of the
Holy Father. The only real difference
between the Maronite and the Latin
Church is that the liturgical language
of the Maronites is Syriac, where that
of the Catholic Church generally is
Latin. The Maronites hear the gospel
read in an Arabic dialect, the language
of the people, just as we have it in
English in this country. Then the
Maronites have a married clergy, to
the extent that a married man may be
ordained a priest, but a single priest
may not be married. Archbishop
Khouri himself is a firm believer in a
celibate clergy.
PRINTERS' MASS FOUNDER
Robert H. Deery, for many years
superintendent of the composing room
of the New York World, was the man
at whose suggestion the practice of
holding an early morning Mass for
printers and newspaper men was in
augurated at St. Andrew's Church,
City Hall Place and Duane Street.
His memory was commemorated at a
solemn Requiem High Mass sung at
2:30 a. m. last Saturday in St. An
drew's by the Very Rev. Monsignor
Luke J. Evers. A special musical
program was arranged for the service,
which was attended by many employes
of the New York dailies.
Bin io
TEN-ACRE TRACT GIVEN TO K. OF
C. IN OREGON.
Samuel J. Gorman of Edmonton
Alberta, Canada, has given to the
Portland, Oregon, Council, Knights of
Columbus, a tract of land on Colum
bia Highway, comprising ten acres
The only consideration required by
Mr. Gorman is that the property be
utilized within a reasonable time by
the Knights as a summer home and
club house.
The property is very beautifully sit
uated on the Highway, about thirty
five miles from Portland, directly op
posite Beacon Rock in the shadow of
the two peaks known as St. Peter's
Dome and Cathedral Point.
It is hoped to build a church on the
property in the near future, and other
plans to make the location a Catholic
center are being formulated.
5W!
LAWYERS BEC1E PRIESTS
FORMER LAW PARTNERS ENTER
PRIESTHOOD REV. FATHERS
MURPHY AND BROWNE WERE
ORDAINED IN CHIPPEWA FALLS
MAY 1.
Great preparations were made by
Goldsmith Council, 974, Knights of
Columbus, of Chippewa Falls, Wis.,
for the ordination to the Catholic
priesthood in that city Saturday, May
1, of the Rev. Fathers J. R. Murphy
and J. Howard Browne.
Fathers Murphy and Browne are
known to many New Richmond and
Somerset people. They were special
friends of the late Rev. M. E. Boyce
and also of the Rev. Eugene Caron,
formerly of Somerset. Wis., now sta
tioned in Detroit, Mich. They were
formerly engaged in practicing law in
Chippewa Falls—they were partners—
and both gave up their profession—
Father Browne is a convert, by the
way—and entered on their studies
to prepare for the priesthood.
The ceremonies of ordination took
place at 9 a. in Notre Dame Church
in Chippewa Falls. Father Murphy's
first Mass was at 10 a. m. May 4, and
Father Browne's first Mass was at 10
a. m. May 5.
The K. of C. tendered Fathers Mur
phy and Browne a reception followed
by lunch and smoker on the evening
of May (. Each of these events was
made the occasion of a large gathering
of the Knights of Columbus, in which
order both Fathers Murphy and
Browne were active factors before
taking up their studies for the priest
hood.
May 24 will mark the tenth anni
versary of the installation of the Rt.
Rev. P. R. Heffron as the Bishop of
Winona. The clergy and laity of the
diocese are making plans for the ap
propriate observance of the occasion.
The schools and institutions will have
special exercises before the close of
the school year.
THREE BISHOPS
PREPARE TO FIGHT ANTI-CATH
OLIC SCHOOL BILL.
Bishop Gallagher of Detroit, Bishop
Kelly of Grand Rapids and Bishop
Eis of Marquette are organizing cam
paigns against the proposed school
amendment to abolish Catholic
schools in Michigan. Bishop Gal
lagher has committees circulating lit
erature and has legal representatives
at Lansing, the state capitol. Bishop
Kelly has held an organization meet
ing of all the priests of the diocese
and has issued a pastoral to the
laity condemning the bigoted move
ment. Bishop Eis is planning similar
action. The measure will be voted on
in November.
FRANCE MIL VATICAN
The diplomatic conversations, look
ing to the restoration of official rela
tions between France and the Holy
See, are proceeding satisfactorily. It
is now practically certain that France
will be represented at the canoniza
tion of Joan of Arc by an ambassador,
probably M. Jonnart. It is expected
that M. Jonnart will come on this spe
cial mission, and that, later, he will be
replaced by a permanent representa
tive.
COL. JOHN JIM
DEMOCRATIC LEADER GIVEN
LAST RITES ON TRAIN.
The last rites of the Church were
administered to Colonel John T. Mc
Graw, Democratic National Commit
teeman from West Virginia, who died
aboard a train en route from New
York City to Grafton, W. Va., while
near Baltimore, April 29. The Very
Rev. John F. Fenlon of the Catholic
University, who was a fellow pas
senger with Colonel McGraw, was
summoned when the aged political
leader, who was hurrying to his home
after being stricken in New York,
collapsed. Father Fenlon attended
him in his last minutes.
GREAIJROWD
SECOND CANONIZATION CONSIS
TORY ATTRACTS LARGE NUM
BER OF PEOPLE.
The second of the three consis
tories, in connection with the canoni
zation of Blessed Gabriel dell' Addol
orata, Blessed Margaret Mary Ala
coque and Blessed Joan of Arc, took
place Thursday, April 27.
The Sala Regia of the Vatican was
crowded to capacity with Cardinals,
members of the diplomatic corps,
prelates and some privileged visitors.
A great number of others on the out
side cheered the Holy Father, as he
was carried processionally to the Sala
Regia in the sedia gestatoria.
ST. PAUL, MINN., MAY 8, 1920
HOSPITAL MEETING
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION TO AS
SEMBLE HERE IN ST. THOMAS
COLLEGE.
The Catholic Hospital Association
of the United Stales and Canada will
hold its fifth annual convention in St.
Paul June 22-24. All sessions will be
held in the auditorium of St. Thomas
College. The visiting delegates,
about one thousand in number, will be
quartered in the College of St.
Thomas, St. Paul Seminary and St.
Catherine's College.
Preparations in charge of a local
committee are now being made for
the reception and entertainment of
the delegates. The armory of St.
Thomas College will be used as an
exhibit hall. Many firms throughout
the country, dealing in hospital sup
plies, have already engaged booths.
Applications for exhibits are being re
ceived by Rev. M. I. J. Griffin, treas
urer of St. Thomas College.
THE NATIONAL SHRINE
THE APOSTOLIC DELEGATE WILL
BLESS THE SITE OF WASHING
TON CHURCH IN HONOR OF THE
BLESSED VIRGIN.
The Apostolic Delegate Archbishop
Bonzano will bless the site of the Na
tional Shrine of the Immaculate Con
ception in Washington, D. C., on Sun
day, May 10. If the weather is favor
able, he will celebrate Mass on the
spot upon which will be reared the
magnificent high altar of the great
church. More than a thousand
Knights of Columbus of New York and
vicinity will come to Washington to
attend the ceremony and to visit the
Catholic University. If the weather is
inclement Mass will be said by Arch
bishop Bonzano in the new gymnasium
of the University, where accommoda
tions for more than 3,000 people will
be provided.
Following the ceremony of blessing
the ground and the celebration of
Mass, the visiting Knights will be the
guests of BishSp Shahan at a
luncheon. Bishop Shahan will address
them on the great work of planning
and building the Shrine, which is to
be one of the largest churches in the
world. It is the present intention to
include in the ceremonies the marking
of the site with stakes and cord so
that some of the dimensions of the
great edifice will be impressed on the
minds of the visitors. One of the
Knights of Columbus will be selected
to perform this part of the ceremony.
CATHOLIC MEDICAL SCHOOLS
REPORT PLACES ALL OUR MEDI
CAL INSTITUTIONS IN
CLASS "A."
Very gratifying, indeed, from a
Catholic standpoint is the report of
the Council of Medical Education as
published in the Journal of the Ameri
can Medical Association for April 17.
This report is interesting from at least
two phases, for it gives the rating on
the one hand of the different medical
schools of the country, and on the
other the results of the different state
board examinations for last year.
As revealed by this report, all the
Catholic medical schools in the coun
try are placed in class "A." Among
the Catholic medical schools, Creigh
ton, Georgetown, Marquette, and
Saint Louis Universities stand with
out a failure in the examination,
while Loyola in Chicago had three
failures out of a class of seventy-two.
Fordham University in New York City
had a smaller percentage of failures
than any other medical school in the
City of New York. These facts show
indisputably the efficiency of the
Catholic schools even when handi
capped, as they generally are, by the
want of sufficient resources.
SI. KASn^ COLLEGE
CHRISTIAN BROTHERS TO HAVE
NEW SET OF BUILDINGS.
The new St. Mary's College at Oak
land, Calif., is to have fifteen build
ings, embodying the latest ideas in
university planning and construction
John J. Donavan, official architect tor
the city, will supervise construction of
the newer St. Mary's College at San
Leandro, a suburb of Oakland. The
great pile of handsome buildings will
replace the College burned down some
time ago. St. Mary's College is under
the able management of the Christian
Brothers.
NEW OMAN HOHI
On Sunday, May 9, Arclilbishop
Dougherty of Philadelphia will dedi
cate the magnificent new St. Vincent's
Home, an institution that will accom
modate 700 orphan boys and girls.
State official, prelates and one hun
dred thousand people are expected.
IENERABLE PLIMETT
IRISH CEREMONY TO BE HELD IN
ROME.
Notable religious festivities in the
Church of St. Agatha, in Suburra,
which is attached to the Irish College
in Rome, will follow the beatification
of the Ven. Oliver Plunkett on May 23.
Cardinal Logue will head a delegation
of Irish prelates who will be there
for the ceremonies. It is at St.
Agatha's that the monument contain
ing the heart of Daniel O'Connell, the
great Irish patriot, is erected. In
accordance with the wish of O'Con
nell, who died in Genoa, his heart
was taken to Rome and his body to
Ireland, where it is interred in Glas
nevin Cemetery, Dublin.
CATHOLIC W0I« MEET
NATIONAL CATHOLIC WOMEN'S
BOARD GATHERED IN
CHICAGO.
Members of the board of directors
of the National Council of Catholic
Women, elected at the conference of
Catholic women of America held last
March, met for their first executive
session in Chicago on May 7.
The meeting, which was held at
Hotel Blackstone, started the ma
chinery which is to put into effect
plans outlined at the first conference
of the organization, which represents
more than one million Catholic women
in all parts of the United States. In
cluded among the projects that were
discussed was affiliation with the
Catholic women of Europe and South
America. Cooperation with the work
of the International Association for
the Protection of Young Women,
which has branches in every large
European country, had a prominent
place in the discussion. The chair
man of the board is Mrs. Michael
Gavin of New York, a daughter of the
late James J. Hill of St. Paul.
THE FRIARS MINOR
Cardinal Giorgi has been appointed
Protector' of the Franciscan Friars
Minor, to fill the vacancy left by the
death of Cardinal Giustini.
Through a friendly agreement be
tween the Vatican and the Italian
government, the famous custom of
conducting the devotion of the Stations
of the Cross inside the Roman
Coliseum is about to be revived.
Never since the loss of the Pope's
temporal power has the devotion been
publicly celebrated within the Coli
seum precincts, and in commemora
tion of the event the Holy Father has
appointed a special Cardinal Legate
to preside in his name.
AMERICAN IS ELECTED
The Very Rev. Charles M. Driscoll,
O. S. A., pastor of St. Rita's Church,
Philadelphia, was appointed Procura
tor General of the Augustinian Order,
at the conference in Rome last week.
Father Driscoll left for Rome on
March 8 to attend the conclave held
by the General Chapter to supply the
vacancy caused by the death of the
late General, the Most Rev. Thomas
ftodriguez, O. S. A. At the conclave
the Most Rev. Thomas Giachetti, O. S.
A., D. D., was elected Superior Gen
eral and immediately appointed Father
Driscoll his assistat.
ENDOWMENT IS SOUGHT
More than one thousand requests
for admission to St. Mary's Industrial
School in Baltimore, one of the few
institutions of its character, specializ
ing in instruction of boys between 18
and 21, have been refused since
January 1, according to the Rev.
Brother Paul, director of the institu
tion, who is head of the campaign to
raise $2,500,000 for the school. Re
quests for admission have come from
thirty-five States of the Union and
many South American countries.
A WELCOME CHANGE
NEW JERSEY MEASURE FORBIDS
RELIGIOUS TEST.
Di#eftttiination in the employment
of teachers by New Jersey local
boards of education, because of re
ligious beliefs, is prohibited under the
provisions of a bill enacted into law
by the signature of Governor Edwards
last week. The measure was spon
sored by Senator Brown, the minority
leader, and was based upon numerous
complaints made to the State Board
of Education through the year, prin
cipally from points in the southern
section of the state.
Recently the Church purchased a
big site at Area, about 40 miles from
Chicago. Upon this site will be built
a college to be known as St. Mary's of
the Lake, which is to include a school
of philosophy, and of theology.
This institution is to cost from $3,
000,000 to $5,000,000. Along with De
Paul, Loyola, St. Ignatius, St. Stanis
laus', St. Rita's and a score or more
of lesser institutions controlled by the
Catholic Church in the Chicago dis
trict, it is to be a part of the one groat
university, a name for which has not
yet been selected.
In commenting on the plan to amal
gamate several Catholic institutions
Is the Turk a Conqueror?
Monsignor Grosch invited his hear
ers to go forward in imagination to
3950 or I960, and see the children of a
future generation reading the history
of today. They would read of whole
Christian nations being blotted out in
blood—men, women, and children.
They would ask, was this in the great
war? And the answer, of truth, would
have to be, it was before the great
war, during the great war, and after
the great war and then the children
would ask, was the Turk then master
of the world had the Turk conquered
the world, with England and France
lying at the foot of Turkey and Italy,
and the millions of America, were
they all conquered? And the answer
would have to be, No! The British
NEW CATHOLIC UNIVERSITY
GIFT OF HALF MILLION DOLLARS
TO BE USED AS NUCLEUS OF
FUND—INSTITUTION WILL COM­
PRISE COMPLETE DEPART­
MENTS OF EDUCATION.
With the announcement of a $500,
000 donation by Edward Hines in
memory of his son, Edward Jr., who
died in France, comes the news that
the Chicago Archdiocese is to organ
ize the largest institution of learning
in the United States. It will be on
the Oxford plan of grouping institu
tions, which preserve their autonomy
while they operate under one controll
ing head.
Who Won War: Turks or
BITTER ARRAIGNMENT OF DI
PLOMACY WHICH PERMITS MAS
SACRE OF CHRISTIANS IN AR­
MENIA BRITISH CATHOLICS
DENOUNCE ATROCITIES.
Addressing a meeting in Trafalgar
Square, London, last month, on be
half of the persecuted Armenians, the
Right Reverend Monsignor Grosch
asked who is going to be held respon
sible for these crimes against human
ity, which are defiling the history of
the human race in the 20th century.
This was obviously a question more
easily asked than answered, but he
took it as the meaning of that dem
onstration, that the citizens of London
were determined that no part of the
responsibility should rest upon them.
He understood that the meeting that
afternoon was to give voice to their
determination that as far as they,
the citizens of London, could effect
it, these things must stop. The crim
inals must be brought to justice, and
such crimes must be made impossible
for the future.
ROYALTY CONTRIBUTES TO
HELP MEMORIAL.
Catholics of the diocese of Notting
ham, England, who remember the late
Bishop Brindle, were interested re
cently to learn that a special donation
to the fund which is being raised to
provide a memorial for him in St.
Barnabas' Cathedral has been received
from the king and queen of Spain.
Bishop Brindle instructed the queen
of Spain in the truths of the Catholic
faith and received her into the Church.
TO BOILDJpAIIAGE
PLANS TO ERECT INSTITUTION
NEAR JOLIET, ILL.
Two of the greatest events in the
Catholic history of two Illinois coun
ties were announced last week by the
Archbishop of Chicago, in his confer
ence with twenty-three priests of Will
and Grundy counties in St. Mary's
Rectory, Joliet.
A plan to erect a $500,000 orphan
age for children of the two counties
on 100 acres of land to be purchased
close to Joliet was endorsed by the
clergy following its presentation by
the Archbishop.
Committees were also named and
an organization perfected for the larg
est Catholic demonstration ever held
in the community in commemoration
of the diamond jubilee of the Arch
diocese of Chicago and the silver ju
bilee of the ordination of Archbishop
Mundelein. It will be held June 12.
Number 19
under one head. Archbishop Munde
lein said:
"We have many Catholic institutions
for higher education, but there has
been no bond of union between them.
Each has its own state charter, and
each struggles along the best it can.
We have one faculty in medicine, two
in law, one in engineering, four or
five in arts, and so on in fact, two
thirds of the departments of a univer
sity.
"In addition we have splendid pre
paratory schools, all ready to co-op
erate. Almost all the material for a
university is already here. What we
need is the assembling of it, the ad
dition of new departments and then
the consistent effort to perfect the
whole, under a plan aiding each finan
cially from a central fund, while bind
ing all together under one scholastic
standard, one degree-giving board."
The archbishop further announced
that the clergy of the diocese are
erecting a hall of philosophy at Area
for 200 resident students. "The arch
diocese will erect the hall of theology
for the same number." His Grace
has assigned Mr. Hines' gift to the
building of the chapel in the heart "of
the divinity group at ^rea.
other department.'
cago, with the possible exception of
two or three affiliated colleges in oth
er parts of the State of Illinois."
mp at Area. "The
ts will all be in Chi-
iies:
Empire, France, America were victo
rious, and yet the Turks slaughtered
innocent men and women by tens of
thousands only because they were
Christians.
A Story of Shame.
Is this the story of shame and dis
grace, the speaker asked, which was
to go down to future generations? If
the 20th century saw the reproach to
Christendom of the sacred spots con
secrated by the life and death of the
Savior of mankind blotted out by the
valor of allied soldiers, was it too
much to expect that the stream of
Christian blood shed by the haters of
the Cross and of Christianity, should
be stayed by allied diplomacy, should
secure the other. The people demand
it in the name of God and of Chris
tianity and humanity. But they de
mand something more.
Bring Criminals to Justice.
The great men of the world have
spent a great deal of time, we are
told, in preparing a list of war crim
inals with a view to bringing them to
justice. But are the criminals who
slaughtered whole provinces in cold
blood to go scot free? The speaker
did not know if the Sultan represent
ed a friendly or a hostile power one
thing he did know, he represented a
criminal power steeped to its eyes in
Christian blood. The great question
seemed to be whether the Sultan
should be permitted to remain in Con
stantinople, or to shift across the Bos
phorus he did not think he should be
allowed to do either, but should be
made by the great statesmen in the
world to take his place in the murder
er's dock, to be judged by the con
science of Christendom. The speaker
had heard it said that the Sultan was
not himself guilty, but his ministers.
Then hang his ministers. It was no
use looking for the Turkish con
science.
A
COUNCIL IS ORGANIZED FOR GEN-
ERAL WELFARE WOftK.
At a meeting of the pastors of the
city held at the Bishop's House on
Tuesday afternoon of last week, it
was unanimously decided to establish
the Denver Catholic Welfare Council
for the promotion of social, charitable
and economic welfare work among
the people of Denver. The plan out
lined by the laymen for the securing
of a minimum of 5,000 members at an
annual membership of $2.00 was in
dorsed. Each pastor present agreed
to see to it that his parish will fur
nish its quota of membership. The of
ficers of the society will confer with
the pastors as to the method of solicit
ing membership. The third Sunday in
May will probably be the date for the
general membership drive.
TWO VAIJANJ HEROES
Miss Gladys Vaughan of Minne
apolis, Minn., an American Red Cross
worker, and Francis E. Fronczak of
Buffalo, N. Y., of the Knights of Co
lumbus, have succeeded in bringing
2,300 refugees out of Southern Russia,
according to advices to Red Cross
headquarters.
Fleeing before the advance of
Soviet forces, the Americans had many
adventures in taking their charges
across the Dnieper river. Lifeboats
were used in threading a perilous way
through floes of ice. and one boat was
crushed [email protected]
ice and sunk in mid*
stream.

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