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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, August 07, 1920, Image 1

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Volume 10
APOSTOLIC DELEGATE SANG SOL-
tne lirst time that tiie papal Utiegate
has pontificated at a K. C. conven
tion in York. Monsignor Bonzano de
1, v.•,, .I !., the Knights a message from
t!
i welcoming the tourists who
uuii- .i !.•• the Vatican and France 011
Augu
Tue
1 1 .•«! only behold for your
ives iiie uiuusand miseries whiten
overwhelm the professional classes in
Germany, we know your hearts would
keenly touched, and your svm
would flow towards us. Our
•u 1 it,*" v.-011 Ul work with fervent zeal
if they v-ere only given the opportu
nity. V. il you help these Christian
artists who are knocking at your
hearts and church doors?"
THE K. OF C. CONVENTION
TMN MASS—EXHIBIT OF RE­
CONSTRUCTION WORK HELD IN
INirW YORK.
_\ i clibishop Patrick J. Ilayes direct
ed that the solemn Mass with which
atl rupreme conventions of the
Knights of Columbus are opened, be
held in St. Patrick's Cathedral when
i!:« thirty-eighth annual K. C. eon
lion opened in Now Yon
The Most Reverend John lionzano,
apostolic delegate to the United
States, went to Xew York to ceie
.Mass. which all K. of C.
i.:i tit
1
gations
attended. 1' was
The Mass was held on
August 3, and was followed
r.f•! OGNE ARTISTS ASK AMERI­
CANS FOR COMMISSIONS—MU­
TUAL PROFIT IN NEW ORGAN­
ISATION.
,r,•'! uni 1 ii'S tcr American atlio
churches, religious communities
individuals to obtain some of the
products of lea dim* German paint
sculpt•!•.-. engravers, goldsmiths,
•., vers am. decorators. are offered
by the new Institute for Ecclesiastical
Art, recently organized in Cologne
with the approval of Archbishop
Schui1 At ihe sann- time, it is
point- oi:\ American patronage of
these artists will help them recuver
lrom the detriment which they and
their professions have suffered as a
oh Oi' the w .r.
i ,.v. Frederick W'fue. head
of the Institute, who lias appealed to
the episcopacy and clergy of the
Tiiiled States lor their support, says:
i! :. lie men and women of
N
This new Institute has enlisted in
IRISH CATHOLIC POLICE RESIGN
LICE COMMISSIONER.
Commissioner Smyth of the Royal
i,i ii Constabulary, whose speech to
!,i
i policemen counseling violence
:M:i murder caused several of the con
•:.Mes to resign, as related in the
1 :towing correspondence, was killed
lie County Club of Cork, July 17.
1 i»\v of Commissioner Smyth's as
v ination the full text of his speech
to the policemen as published by the
organ of (he Sinn Fein will be read
with interest.
Resignations oi Catholics from the
ice
force in Ireland were an easily
1 :«'seen result of the astounding pub
lication made by the Sinn Fein Gov
ernment regarding what transpired
on Jane 17, at Listowel police bar
racks, County of Kerry. Ireland is
now divided into four police areas by
the British authorities. The area in
ch Listowel is situated is com
manded bv one Commissioner Smyth.
Accompanied by the head of the po
lice and military forces of Ireland, Mr.
Smyth visited Listowel barracks on
!h- date mentioned, assembled the po
lio in the day room, and addressed
hem. Part of his address, according
tu i,he divulged account, ran:
The Speech.
"I have something of interest to tell
you, something that I am sure you
would not wish your wives to hear.
Sinn Fein has had all the sport up to
the present. We are going to have
the sport now. We must take the of
fensive. Martial law covering all Ire
land is to come into operation imme
diately. I am promised as many
troops from England as I require.
Thousands are coming daily. If a po
lice barracks is burned, or if the bar
racks already occupied is not suitable,
then the best house in the locality is
to be commandeered, the occupants
thrown out in the gutter. Let them
die there—the more the merrier. Po^
lice are to lie in ambush and when
civilians are seen approaching shout.
•Hands up!' Should the order be not
immediately obeyed, shoot and shoot
•with effect. If the persons carry
their hands in their pockets, or are in
any way suspicious looking, shoot
them down. You may make mistakes
occasionally and innocent people may
be shot. That cannot be helped.
You
are bound to get the right parties
jtome time. The more you shoot the
Ii.
by the opening of the first executive
session of the convention. Board and
committee meetings began August 1.
O11 Monday, August 2, the K. C.
opened a public exhibition of their re
construction work which was held in
the grand ball room lobby at the Com
modore Hotel.
A reduced facsimile of the Lafay
ette statue and the bas-reliefs which
they will present to France formed
the center of the exhibit. The costly
baton to be given to Marshal Foch
also was on view, with the giant flag
with which Foch will unveil the La
fayette statue on August 21, when 250
Knights from all the States will at
tend the ceremony in Metz.
The exhibits included work from all
K. C. free night schools for former
service men and from the K. C. toy
'shop for shell-shocked soldiers in
Washington. Some of the 40,000 serv
ice men graduates of the schools were
present also to demonstrate their
training.
ECCLESIASTICAL ART
its membership and effort most of the
noteworthy artists of Cologne, has es
tablished its own workshops and mu
seum, and is endeavoring to procure
commissions for the execution of or
ders. The Institute is enabled to
produce monumental and mural paint
ing, glass painting, mosaics, weaving,
vestments, embroideries, engravings,
metal work and the like. Those at
the head of the Institute have guar
anteed that not only the true artistic
quality, but also the real religious
spirit shall be expressed in the work
undertaken.
Prices also are fixed by the Insti
tute. No overcharging is tolerated,
and there is no need to deal through
a middleman, Dr. Witte announces.
At the rates of exchange now pre
vailing, Americans can profit by the
decline of value in the German mark
in buying works of art from the In
stitute. It is the hope of the artists
in the Institute that they will be able
to execute orders and forward their
work to the United States at great
advantage both -to?- themselves and
their American patrons.
Cologne has for centuries been a
center of ecclesiastical art, and be
fore the war was renowned every
where for the number of its artists
and the excellence of their work.
Many of these artists and craftsmen
were killed or scattered by the war.
The rest have been reduced to the
most painful straits.
WHY IRISH POLICE QUIT
7/HEN INCITED TO MURDER—
STARTLING STATEMENT BY PO­
better I will like you. No policemen
will get into trouble for shooting any
man. An emigrant ship left an Irish
port lately with lots of Sinn Feiners
on board. I assure you, men, they will
never land.''
This extraordinary oration is stated
to have led to a scene of indignant
protest by the policemen present,
whereupon Mr. Smyth and his com
panion officers decamped. The police
men have made a vouched declara
tion of the facts, on the strength of
which the Sinn Fein executive has
given them to the world. The publi
cation is the sensation of the hour in
this countrv.
Still OF BISHOPS
WELFARE COUNCIL'S WORK IS
REVIEWED BY THE BISHOPS.
The work of the National Catholic
Welfare Council was reviewed and
plans were made for new progress dur
ing the coming year at a meeting of
the Administrative Committee of the
Council in Chicago on July 28-9.
Attending the sessions, which were
held in the Loyola University School
of Sociology in the Ashland block,
were the chairman, Most Rev. Arch
bishop Hanna, the vice-chairman,
Right Rev. Bishop Muldoon, Most Rev.
Archbishop Dowling, Right Rev. Bish
op Schrembs and Rev. Father John
Burke, C. S. P., the general secretary.
"We have just planned and sent out
some things for the coming year,"
said Father Burke. "These we will re
port to the meeting of the Hierarchy
in Washington September 22 to 24.
We also reviewed the work done so
far."
SEHRYJIWE
ROCHESTER INSTITUTION TO OB
SERVE ANNIVERSARY.
The fiftieth anniversary of the found
ing of St. Andrew's Preparatory Semi
nary of Rochester, N. Y., will be com
memorated in September. The sem
inary was established by Bishop Mc
Quaid after his return from the Vati
can Council and was opened on Sep
tember 15, 1870, with a small regis
tration of students.
Bishop Hiekey has appointed a com
mittee of priests to make the arrange
menttf for the jubilee celebration.
1
LAYMEN'S
HOLD
COUNCIL SOON TO
TS FIRST CONVEN
TION.
The call for the first convention of
the National Laymen's Council, to be
held in Washington the last week in
September, will be sent out this month
by the Board of Directors of that or
ganization and promises to bring to
gether delegates from all national
Catholic men's societies as well as
representative laymen appointed by
the spiritual heads of every archdio
cese in the United States. The board
of directors will meet early next
month to outline the complete pro
gram for the convention.
Edward .T. Tobin, of San Francisco,
who was recently appointed a mem
ber of the board of directors, has ex
pressed his conviction that the Lay
men's Council will bring about the liv
ing results so much desii-ed by active
Catholic laymen.
"In fact," said Mr. Tobin. "such an
organization has been a dream of
mine for years and I am pleased to
know that that dream is about lo be
realized."
Richmond Dean, chairman of the
board, has announced that John D.
Ryan, of New York, and George T.
Slade, of St. Paul, have accepted ap
pointments as members of the board
of directors of the organization.
A
CATHOLIC DESCENDANT OF
LUTHER APPOINTED PASTOR
IN COLORADO.
Rev. Alovsius Luther, O. S. B.. a de
scendant of Martin Luther, founder of
Protestantism, has been appointed
pastor of St. John the Baptist's
Church at Longmont. Colo., to succeed
Rev. Father Leo Eichenlaub, O. S. B.,
who has been transferred to Boulder.
The appointment of Father Luther
was made by the Right Rev. Abbot
Aurelius Stehle, O. S. B., of St. Vin
cent's arch-abbey, Beatty, Pa.
In various parts of Pennsylvania
there are many descendants o£ Luther.
Like Father Aloysius, they are Catho
lics.
POWER OF CATHOLIC DEPUTIES
IN NEW GERMAN REICHSTAG
TWO NEW GROUPS FORMED.
The power of the Catholic deputies
in the new German Reichstag is com
mented upon by Les Nouvelles Re
ligieuses in a recent article which
surveys the late elections from a
Catholic point of view and points out
that to the Center party's force of
sixty-eight votes must be added the
eighteen deputies of the Bavarian
Popular Party and five Hanovarians,
all of whom, in all great questions vi
tally affecting Catholics, would very
likely vote as one.
With this strength, it points out,
the Catholic elements form a compact
force of 93 out of 460 votes, which no
party can afford to ignore.
In the old parliament the Centrists
had 86 members, but the Bavarians,
who openly seceded as a protest
against tlit Socialist-Center coalition
policy of Former Minister of Finance
Mathias Erzberger, have recently
proved their strength by again gain
ing control of the Bavarian govern
ment, which the Socialists had dom
inated since the revolution. Herr von
Kahr, a Catholic and prominent mem
ber of the Bavarian Center, has been
made premier.
A pledge of unity of action was
adopted at a recent conference of the
Center party in Berlin, but despite
this, there have already been formed
two new groups, with policies of their
own—the Christian Middle Class
Union and the Catholic Nobility As
sociations.
SWISS CATHOLICS
PROGRESS IS NOTABLE IN PROT
ESTANT COUNTRY.
In 1873 the Church of the Augustin
ians, which was the only one pos
sessed by the Catholics of Zurich, was
taken away from them. Hardly half
a century has slipped away and Zu
rich can now boast of four Catholic
parishes the number of Catholics
has increased to such an extent that
the building of a fifth parochial
Church appears necessary.
In 1860 the Catholics in Zurich
numbered 2,547 in 1870, they were
3,377 and in 1880, they stood 4,771
Nowadays, out of the 208,000 in
habitants of the town, 70,000 are Cath
olics.
During the year 1919, the number of
Catholic Workers' unions jumped to
205, which shows an increase of 43
over the year 1918. The number of
the members rose at the same time
from 2,257 to 13,538.
On December 31, the Federation of
Catholic Workers' unions grouped to
gether 149 sections and 21,099 mem
bers, thereby showing as y*ue*se of
1,730 members.
1
ST. PAUL, MINN., AUGUST 7, 1920
WESTERN PRELATE
BUSY MONTH.
SPENDS
Right Rev. Bishop M. C. Lenihan,
Great Falls, Mont., has returned from
a trip to the southern part of his di
ocese. During his absence. Bishop
Lenihan dedicated ten new churches,
and rededicated two churches at Liv
ingston and Glendive that had been
enlarged. lie also blessed the Kather
ine Sheehan Fratt Memorial School at
Billings, erected two years ago at a
cost of $80,000. The bishop attended
the Catholic Indian Congress at Pop
lar, July 10, 11 and 12. He officiated
on Sunday, July 11, and administered
the sacracent of Confirmation to over
100 Indians. During his visit to St.
Xavier Mission, Piior agency, Bishop
Lenihan confirmed 172 Crow Indians.
WOMEN OPPOSE DIVORCE
CATHOLIC WOMEN OF ITALY
FACTOR IN FIGHT ON
DIVORCE.
Catholic women of Italy proved im
portant factors in the opposition to
the Marangoni divorce bill, which led
by the Italian Popular party has
forced the proponents of that measure
to admit the futility of attempting to
put it through the Chamber of Depu
ties at the present sessions and has
caused the postponement of further
action until the fall sessions.
The campaign waged by the League
of Catholic Women was founded on
the principle of pitiless publicity for
the measure. Every town and hamlet
of the country wras included in the
campaign, which was educational in
character and carried out by means of
posters published broadcast.
II
MEMORIAL SERVICES FOR DR.
MAGRUDER IN NATIONAL
CAPITAL.
Services were held in Washington,
D. C„ July 29, in St. Paul's Church
for the repose ofKhe soul of the late
Dr. Eriiest A. Magruder, former asso
ciate surgeon and professor of clinical
medicine at Georgetown University
hospital, whose remains were recently
brought back from Serbia, where he
died while laboring heroically in 1915.
Dr. Magruder was one of the first
American physicians to volunteer for
overseas work with the American Red
Cross. He was put in charge of thir
teen hundred patients in a Red Cross
hospital in Serbia. The hospital was
a huge tobacco factory, where the pa
ients had lain for months without
medical attention or sanitary arrange
ments and in the resultant typhus epi
demic Dr. Magruder wras stricken
down. Charged with the duty of send
ing supplies to Belgrade, he stood by
his post despite the illness, and when
finally induced to go to the city the
disease had advanced so far that he
soon died.
The Right Rev. Monsignor James F.
Mackin celebrated the Mass and the
Rev. John B. Creedon, president of
Georgetown University, preached the
sermon.
ST. CHRISTOPHER
AUTOISTS URGED TO ASK PRO
TECTION OF ANCIENT SAINT.
Devotion to St. Christopher, patron
of travelers, and now regarded as a
particular patron of automobilists,
wras urged upon the parishioners of
St. Philip and James' Catholic Church,
Baltimore, by the Rev. John E. Wade,
the pastor, on the occasion of the
Saint's feast day.
Father Wade urged the wearing of
medals of St. Christopher and the
placing of them in automobiles when
journeys were to be taken, and spe
cial intercession to the Saint, partic
ularly in times of danger on the road.
St. Christopher, according to a leg
end, was one day standing by a
stream when he saw a small boy
anxious to cross. Placing the lad on
his hack he bore him through the
stream. The boy proved to be the
Christ Child, whence came the name
Christopher, or Christ-bearer. Mem
bers of Father Wade's parish who
were aviators in the war carried St.
Christopher medals with them. Re
cently Our Lady of Loretto was des
ignated patroness of aviators.
CUT OFF jSUIT SON
The late Sir Henry Burdett, founder
of a medical journal, The Hospital,
whose will has just been proved, cut
off his son with 100 pounds on the
ground that he is a Jesuit. Father
Francis Heathcote Burdette, S. J., who
is stationed at Wardour Castle, Eng
land, is left 100 pounds and no more,
for, as his father's will says, "I have
not given him a share in my residu
ary estate by reason of his having be
come a member of the Roman Catho
lic society known as the Society of
Jesus, and knowing that such society
would claim mj sbare given to my
son,"
CATHOLIC YOUNG MEN'S NA
TIONAL UNION TO MEET.
Inspired by the thought that the
ideals toward which the organization
has been striving in the forty-five
years of its existence are bearing
fruit in the establishment of the Na
tional Catholic Laymen's Council, the
representatives of the 200,000 mem
bers of the Catholic Young Men's Na
tional Union will meet for their forty
sixth annual convention in New York
on August 28 and 29.
The sessions will be held at Hotel
Vanderbilt.
Plans and details of the manner in
which the annual Catholic Laymen's
Council hopes shortly to establish
Catholic civic centers for young men,
and a training school wherein young
men may be equipped for social serv
ice work, will be discussed at the
meeting.
Twenty-two states, in which the or
ganization has 693 branches, will be
represented at the convention. The
officers of the Young Men's Catholic
Union include the Most Rev. P. J.
Hayes, New York, spiritual director
Michael J. Slattery, LL.D., president
Edward R. Reagon, vice-president
Charles L. Euart, second vice-presi
dent, and Thomas J. Thornton, secre
tary-treasurer.
VENESABLE_PR!EST DEAD
DEATH OF CHINESE PRIEST AN
NOUNCED.
The Bishop of Hong Kong has an
nounced to the American Foreign
Missions of Maryknoll the death of a
venerable Chinese priest—Father An
drew Leong. Father Leong was S3
years old and had been a priest for
fifty-eight years.
The greater portion of his life was
spent in the evangelization of South
ern China, and he became familiar
with many dialects during his years
of travel.
Father Leong was much loved by
the residents of Hong Kong, where he
has recently lived. He was buried in
the Happy Valley cemetery, close to
the grave of America's first Apostle
to China—Reverend Thomas F. Price
of Maryknoll.
MOTHER GENERAL ELECTED
Rt. Rev. Joseph Chartrand, Bishop
of Indianapolis, presided on July 21,
at Terre Haute, Ind., at the installa
tion of Mother Mary Cleophas, who
was re-elected Mother-General of the
Sisters of Providence at St. Mary-of
the-Woods, Ind.
A GENEROUSJENEFACTOR
LEFT $8,000 FOR ERECTION OF
STATUES IN CATHOLIC
CHURCHES.
Executors of the will of the late
Bernard Conroy, of Washington, D. C.
have been directed to spend $8,000 for
the erection of statues in three Wash
ington Catholic churches, according to
the provisions of the will, recently
filed for probate, and they are empow
ered to select the churches in which
the statues will be erected. Bequests
are made in favor of several relatives
of the deceased and a sum of money
is set aside for the celebration of
Masses for the repose of his soul and
the souls of deceased relatives. After
all bequests are paid the remainder
of the estate is to be divided between
the Little Sisters of the Poor and St
Joseph's Asylum of Washington,
V&J
lullefin.
ING HERE
MANY ARE EXPECTED IN U. S. IN
NEAR FUTURE.
Heavy immigration of Belgians may
be expected within the next few
years, according to Monsignor J. F.
Stillemans, director of the Belgian
Bureau, which cares for Catholic im
migrants from Belgium and Holland.
"At present,'' said Father Stille
mans, "not many Belgians are arriv
ing in this country, owing to the dif
ficulties of obtaining passpoi'ts, and
the vise of the American consuls
abroad. Very few of the Belgian girls
now coming here are of the type that
will engage in housework. Most of
them are of the better educated class
and are admitably suited for govern
esses.
"But heavy immigration must be ex
pected in the future. So many people
in Belgium are so upset that they nat
urally look elsewhere for a new start
in life, and America's participation in
the war, as well as its splendid relief
work in Belgium, has caused them to
turn their eyes more and more to this
country.
"Another factor is that many Bel
ians who were in England during the
war learned the English language, and
therefore are better fitted to make
their way in this country."
THE CHURCH IN BOHEMIA
SLOVAKIA SCHISM HAS BEEN
QUELLED BY AUTHORITIES—
DR. VANCE, WHO AIDED ^SUP­
PRESSION, ACCORDED HONORS
—PRIESTS ARE IN DIRE DIS-
TRESS.
One incident in the stormy career
of the Catholic Church in Czecho-Slo
vakia has been closed by the depart
ure of the Rev. Dr. Vance, of the arch
diocese of Westminster in England,
who is leaving Prague after a resi
dence in the city of more than a year.
During his stay in the Republic, Dr.
Vance incurred the wrath of the anti
Catliolic faction by his stirring de
fense of the Church, both in the press
and in the pulpit, and his call to loyal
Catholics to rally to the defense of
their Church at a time when it was
sought to undermine their allegiance,
and to lead them away to the schis
matic faction, which has now been
ex-communicated by the Holy Office.
Honors to Dr. Vance.
On the eve of Dr. Vance's depart
ure for England, where he has been
recalled by his Ordinary, a banquet
was given in his honor. The chair
was taken by Prince Adolf Schwarzen
berg, and among the guests were the
Papal Nuncio, Mgr. Micara, and mem
bers of the British colony in Prague.
The Archbishop of Prague, Mgr. Kor
dac, had hoped to be present at the
function, but was prevented at the
last moment by sickness.
In recognition of the services to the
Catholic Church in Bohemia, Arch
bishop Kordac has conferred on Dr.
Vance the title of Counsellor of the
Consistory of Prague, which is the
highest honor at the disposal of the
Archbishop. The Faculty of Theology
of the University of Prague is also de
sirous of conferring some honor on
Dr. Vance, while a lengthy document,
signed by hundreds of Czech and Ger
man-Bohemian Catholics, has been
sent to the Holy Father, testifying to
the important work done by the Doc
tor during his stay in the Republic.
What the Catholic Church had to
contend with in Czecho-Slovakia is
well known now" to Catholics in every
part of the world. An insidious
movement was started that aimed at
Catholic Home-Finding Society
GIRL BABIES MOST SOUGHT SAY
HEADS OF CATHOLIC HOME
GREAT WORK BEING DONE BY
ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION FOUND
ED BY BISHOP MULDOON.
"Why is it that nobody wants the
boy babies, while the little girls are
at premium?"
The question was asked by Miss
Clara C. Hellman, of Chicago, assist
ant to Superintendent Edward Houli
an of the Catholic Home Finding
Association of Illinois, after three
women had left the association's of
fices, because they could not get the
sort of little girl children they sought.
Superintendant Houlihan, who is
state deputy of the Knights of Colum
bus, which order maintains the Home
Finding Association, is equally
anxious about the future of the boy
babies.
"We have applications on hand from
very fine Catholic family homes for
irl children, more applications than
we can find children in the institu
tions to supply, but the boy problem
is very trying at times. Sometimes
wre are able to convince a family that
applies for a girl that a boy is just as
good, but not always. Once in a
a while a man or woman looking for
a girl will be taken to some cunning
little lad in the orphanage, and that
settles the future of the boy. He will
have a good home.
"But I have often thought as I look
at the lonesome little chaps in the
orphanage that some family may be
missing a chance to give the world a
great man, by not taking them into
the family home where the oppor
tunity to expand mentally and spirit
ually, and to become independent
forceful citizens is present. However,
I am not a critic, for even during the
stress of the industrial unrest and the
high cost of living, 138 homes were
open last year to the homeless little
ones of our institutions."
The Catholic Home Finding Asso
ciation of Illinois, is a realization of
a vision of Rt. Rev. P. J. Muldoon,
bishop of Rockford, and chairman of
the board of administration of the
National Catholic War Council.
Bishop Muldoon is state chaplain of
the Knights of Columbus, and so
when he went into the state council
of the order about ten years ago and
related his vision he received prompt
support.
The state council began the founda
tion of the association by im
posing a small per capita tax on
the members of the order. Late
in the year 1914 this fund had
reached a size so as to insure the
financial support of the work, and the
organization plans were so far per
fected as to warrant the completion
of the association. A directorate repre
senting the Chicago Archdiocese, and
the dioceses of Alton, Rockford, Peo
ria and Belleville was selected and
U
**l$Tr^S°rA
Number 31
the establishment of a Czech National
Church, whose object was separation
from Rome. The movement would
have been serious enough had it been
confined entirely within ecclesiastical
limits. But when it became secretly
fostered by the social Democrats, who
managed to place themselves secure
ly within the government, the move
ment assumed proportions that, were
alarming for the Church. It was dur
ing these troublous times that Dr.
Vance, with the permission of Cardi
nal Bourne, went to Prague and
placed himself at the disposal of Arch
bishop Kordac, who was then newly
appointed to fill the archdiocese va
cated by Archbishop von I-Iuyn.
The troubles of the Church in this
Republic are far from ended. But the
air is cleared the Bull of Ex-commu
nication issued by the Holy O i e
showed exactly where the loyal Cath
olics and the schismatics stood, :u
in that direction there is now no lon
er any uncertainty. But the sot hi 1
Democrats are still strong, and tho
Czech Catholic Popular Party, al
though it won a decisive victory i n
the recent elections, has to bring i
its forces to bear on the anti-cleri a
and spoliatory measure which the So
cial Democrats, allied with the Radi
cals, are trying to force on the coun
try, to the e v i e n e i e n of e
Church.
Suffering of Bohemian Priests.
In Bohemia the Church is suffering
a great deal from poverty. The patri
mony of the Church has shrunk con
siderably on account of the fall in ex
change, and also by the confiscation
of much church property, which ha
been handed over to the ex-communi
cated schismatics. So that, the loyal
priests are suffering a great deal from
lack of food and clothing. Their an
nual stipend is now worth practically
nothing, and the prices of the necessi
ties of life have risen appallingly.
For example, if a needy priest desir-s
to provide himself with a new cassock
it would be necessary for him to de
vote every cent of his stipend for two
years to get the price of a cassoek.
In the meantime he would have noth
ing whatever to live on. So in order
to live—and bis living is of the scan
tiest—the unfortunate priest has to
wear rags. Such is the poverty of the
Czech Catholic clergy.
officers elected. A superintendent
was chosen and offices opened in Chi
cago. The association was a going
concern by March 1, 1915.
The number of placements went to
92 before March 1, 1919, and the to
a o 1 3 8 e a e a s y e a a v e e
promise of the great, future of the
work, which is supported wholly by
the Knights of Columbus, and in real*
ity costs but a pittance compared with
the great good accomplished and the
saving to the state.
BISHOP GIVES RETREAT
Rt. Rev. D. M. Gorman, Bishop of
Poise, Idaho, will conduct the annual
retreat of the clergy of the Portland,
Oregon, diocese, which will be held
this year at Columbia University,
Portland, beginning Monday, August
16, and closing Friday, August 20.
MJLiliCS
SANER ELEMENTS NOMINATE
PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATE.
The announcement from Mexico
City, received through official chan
nels, that Alfredo Roblez Dominguez
has been nominated by the recently
organized Republican Party, intro
duces a new speculative element in
the Mexican political situation. The
Republican Party, which is made up of
various scattered conservative groups,
gives promise of constituting in Mex
ico what the Catholic "Center" is in
Germany. It represents the first ef
fort of the Catholic element of the
population to formulate a civic pro
gram, and to counteract the political
activities of the radicals who flocked
to Mexico during the war and still ex
ercise a pronounced influence.
FOCH
In order to give the Catholic Athletic
Society a new testimonial of his great
sympathy, Marshal Foch promised to
preside over the Annual Celebrations
of the Sporting Societies of the Seine.
The Sporting Federation of Catholic
Societies, which group together near
ly 1,800 societies and 150,000 mem
bers, sent to the war 70,000 of its ad
herents, the greater part of them be
ing rewarded for their valor. A num
ber who started out as privates won
a commission on the battlefield. At
least 20,000 lost their lives on the
field of honor, following the example
of their general secretary, Charles Si
mon, who, although free from all mil
itary obligations on the front on ac
count of his age, enlisted in the in
fantry and died a hero at Neuvilta
Saint-Vast in 1915,
-i..

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