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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, August 07, 1920, Image 3

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AN OPEN LETTER TO OUR PROT
ESTANT FRIENDS.
Some time ago in order to correct
a rather widespread and very errone
ous impression anions Protestants in
respect of the teaching of the Catho
lic Church on Marriage, we published
a pamphlet on: "Catholics and Mar
riage, says the Catholic Laymen's
Association of Georgia. In this case,
as in all other matters of doctrine,
we arc convinced that if our Protes
tant friends only knew what the Cath
olic Church really teaches, much, if
not all, of the prejudice against her
would disappear. The Catholic Lay
men's Association was established for
the purpose of giving such informa
tion. We had had, we think, a just
cause of complaint, in the past, be
cause Protestants did not seek infor
mation from Catholics as to Ihe teach
ing of the Church, but believed every
thing they heard or read about us, no
matter how hostile to us may have
been the speaker or writer.
Now, we wish ourselves to avoid a
fault, which we have blamed in oth
ers, and hence I am writing this let
ter merely to ask for information from
our Protestant friends, regarding their
belief and practices on a question,
which is of very great importance.
Reforo stating the question, we beg
to observe that the State of Georgia
has nearly three million people, and
there are not quite twenty thousand
Catholics in the entire state hence
we may admit that Georgia is thor
oughly Protestant. The laws of the
state are the expression of the popu
lar will, and it is correct to say that
a law, which for a long period has
been on the Statute Rook of the state,
with no effort made to repeal it, rep
resents the will of the people. The
Georgia Statutes provide that for the
following -reasons men and women
may secure a separation from bonds
of wedlock, and. in the discretion of a
jury, contract other alliances.
Desertion for Threr Yeary.
Conviction of Felony.
i Cruelty.
Habitual Drunkenness.
Duress, Force or Fraud In Securing
Marriage.
Mental and Physical Incapacity.
Certain Relationships.
Adultery.
A Certain Delinquency on 1 lie Part
of the Woman.
Bible and Divorce.
It is well known by all that our
Protestant friends affirm that their re
ligion is founded on the Rihle. It
used to be said that "the Bible and
the Bible alone is the religion of
Protestants."
Now we read in the Rihle the fol
lowing on the subject of divorce: Our
Divine Saviour, as quoted in Saint
Mark's Gospel, Chapter X, says:
6. But from the beginning of cre
ation male and female He made them.
T. On account of this a man shall
leave his father and mother and shall
cleave to his wife.
8. And the two shall become one
flesh, so that they are no longer two,
but one flesh.
9. What God hath joined together
let not man put asunder.
11. And He said to them Whoso
ever shall put away his wife and mar
ry another commits adultery against
her.
12. But if she having put away her
husband marries another she commits
adultery.
In the Gospel of Saint Luke (Chap
ter XVI: 18) we read these words of
the Eternal Son of God:
"Every one who puts away his wife
and marries another commits adult
ery, and he who marries one put away
from her husband commits adultery.
In the Gospel according to St. Mat
thew, the following words of our Bless
ed Redeemer are given: (Chapter V,
Verse 32):
"But I say to ynu everyone putting
away his wife except for fornication
makes her commit adultery and who
soever marries her put away com
mits adultery."
It seems, therefore, very clear that
God says it is sinful for a divorced
person to marry again.
According to the law of Georgia,
however, the Courts have the right
to tell a divorced person that if cer
tain things are established to the sat
isfaction of a Jury, it is lawful to
marry again. But we do not find that
Christ made a distinction of any kind.
He did not say: Whosover puts away
his wife and marries another is guilty
of adultery, unless divorced by law.
Now our question is this: Will our
Protestant friends, who rely on the
Bible alone, tell us how they recon
cile their attitude on divorce with
the Gospel teaching? If they affirm
that they do not recognize the right
of Christ to interfere in this matter,
then we must admit that this is an
answer. But they will be slow to make
this defence. If, however, they recog
nize the right of God to forbid di
vorced persons to marry again, as we
feel they do, what is their attitude
toward the Law of Georgia that is in
conflict with God's Law?
The fact that we all know very well
a number of persons who stand high
in business, in society, and in some
Protestant churches, who though di
vorced, have re-married, is not an ans
wer. The fact that some may consid
er divorce and re-marriage the lesser
of two evils, is not an answer.
We have given Christ's words. We
have given Georgia's words. Christ
said in effect vou shall not grant di
vorces. Georgia says, I will.
The Lord said: "What God has
joined together let no man put asun
der." In marriages before a minister
these words are usually said. The
Courts, in spite of this, proceed to
grant a divorce. The same or another
minister performs another ceremony,
and perhaps says once more: "What
God has joined together let no man
put asunder."
Will our Protestant friends explain
DTURGICALA
how much things can be done by them
when they rely on the Bible and the
Bible alone?
FAMOUS "MADONNA" 18 PUR
CHASED FOR METRO
POLITAN.
Girolamo dei Libri's famous picture,
"Madonna and Child with Saints,"
painted for the Church of San Leon
ardo, near Verona, has been purchased
by the Metropolitan Museum of Art
in New York, and will be hung with
other Italian masterpieces on the
south wall of one of the principal gal
leries. The picture comes from Ham
ilton Palace, outside of Glasgow, Scot
land, where it was set in the stair
way. It has been the property of the
Duke of Hamilton for many years.
This Madonna is of great size and
has been regarded as one of the
chief works of dei Libri, and among
the masterpieces of Christian art. It
is 14 feet, 2 inches high and feet,
2 inches wide. The supposition is
that it was painted sometime prior to
1526.
The Madonna and Child are shown
sitting before a young laurel tree, at
the right of a dead tree upon whose
branches rests a peacock thus symbol
izing death and the resurrection. Be
low the central figures appear San
Leonardo, patron of prisoners, St.
Catherine, martyr, St. Augustine and
St. Apollonia. In the center of the
foreground three little girl angels are
kneeling.
Critics have long admired the rich
colors in this painting. In the drap
eries of the figure of the Madonna are
the richest greens and blues. San
Leonardo wears a dalmatic of cloth of
gold which is so brilliant that the very
materials seem to have been set in
the painting. The wings of the little
angels are colored like those of birds
—some soft gray, others in part of
bright red.
A MOTHER'S MONITORY MODEL,
The devotion of St. Anne, whose
feast the Church celebrates on July
2fi, is one that finds an echo above
all in the heart of every true Christian
mother. She and her husband Joa
chim were both of the royal house of
David, not a mixed marriage—and
their lives were wholly occupied in
prayer and good works. One thing
only was wanting to their union, they
were childless and this was consid
ered a bitter misfortune among the
Jews.—In modern times such misfor
tune is very frequently brought on
purposely even by Catholic husbands
and wives sometimes also by condi
tions for which owners of apartment
houses are responsible before man
and God!?!
At last, when St. Anne was an aged
woman, Mary was born, the fruit of
grace and prayer rather than of na
ture. And this child was destined to
be the Mother of God, our own sweet
Mother Mary. St. Anne took spectal
care of her she watched her every
movement with solicitous tenderness
and at the age of three years conse
crated her to the Lord in His holy
temple. Hence, St. Anne is glorious
among the Saints, not only as the
mother of Mary, but because she gave
her child back to God. May Christian
parents, especially mothers, learn
from her to reverence a divine voca
tion as the highest privilege, and to
sacrifice every natural tie, however
holy, at the call of God.
—Exchange.
VIRTUE AND KNOWLEDGE.
One may be a good critic in philos
ophy and a very poor judge of re
ligion or history, says Henri Didon.
Certain human sciences demand not
only the speculative mind but a long
experience.
Moral doctrines are much better
criticized even by the ignorant who
have experimented with virtue than
by the skeptic who doubts the austere
joys of sacrifice.
The saints who lived on the word
of Jesus will always understand Him
better than the exacting Pharisees
who rebelled Him and knew not the
Saviour. A delicate taste distinguish
es shadings which escape the chem
ist.
THE LOVE OF GOD.
Those who have learned to love
the Divine Heart are taught day by
day to appreciate more and more
the wondrous love that was mani
fested towards the human race when
Our Lord instituted the Holy
Eucharist. They learn, too, to form
a right estimate of the coldness and
indifference with which Our Lord is
treated in this Sacrament of His
love, and they are inspired with a
desire not merely to cultivate a
tender affection in their own hearts,
but to spread the devotion to all
mankind.
Attendance at daily Mass, and
Communion, if possible, or a daily
visit to the Blessed Sacrament, read
ing spiritual books, are means by
which we may foster devotion to the
Blessed Sacrament, and by the influ
ence of our example bring others to
a closer union with God. To num
berless Catholics in our day the
reproach of Our Lord might truth
fully be repeated: "There hath
stood One in the midst of you whom
you know not." So many act as if
they were unaware of the Sacred
Presence patiently waiting in the
tabernacle to receive \he homage and
love of His children.
His return to us on chir altars at
Mass, at Communion, is not simply
that we might worship, but that the
need we have of sweetness, in re
ligion might be amply supplied. We
must approach His presence, gather
about Hio^for refreshment of
our lives, to break down the hideous
monotony of our work, to add the
brightness of love to the gray streets
and grayer skies. Not holiness
alone, but the beauty of holiness is
required to bind our hearts, our
whole souls to God. The child,
which with its wistful trust demands
protection, asks for something more
than strong defense it needs also
the warm welcome of love. And
in so far are we all children we
need the gentleness and mercy of
God to be made manifest, else we
shall be too frightened to go on. If
religion is to mean much to me, I
must approach the altar of the
sweetness of God that giveth joy to
my youth.
SPENDING MONEY.
In one of the latest numbers of the
"Pathfinder" I happened upon the fol
lowing new fad, the fad of spending
money, says a writer in the Messenger
of the Precious Blood. In one of our
smaller cities there happened to be
two shoe-stores. They handled dif
ferent makes and brands, yet one
brand you could buy in either store.
One of the proprietors had a soft
heart toward his patrons, he did not
care to impose upon them and sold
that certain brand at $8.00 per pair.
The other, however, believed in mak
ing hay while the sun shines and de
manded twelve dollars for the same
shoes^ This continued for some time,
till one day a representative of the
factory appeared on the scene and
gave the sole agency to the latter
who had all his shoes sold out, while
the former had them nearly all on
hand. People want to spend money,
more money.
Does this also hold good when mon
ey is demanded for a good purpose,
for the church, for orphans, for the
poor of the parish, for the education
of poor students, for charity institu
tions, for Catholic papers and maga
zines?
HUMOROUS SIDE OF SPIRITISM.
In the recent ravings of Spiritism
one phase of it seems to have been
largely lost sight of by both sides to
the controversy over it. That is its
humorous side, says the Pilot.
In the midst of the emotional craze
to taste of the novelty of the "new
religion'' its supporters seem largely
to have overlooked the comic opera
side of it. And in their much needed
zeal to save men from the horrible
consequences of Spiritism, its oppo
nents also seem too much to have
missed the comedy element in it. Per
haps they were wise in so doing, for
even scorching satire is probably pow
erless to cure for many people evils
which enticingly tempt them.
Still the fact remains that Spiritism
has its comic side. What can be
more comic than some of the phenom
ena of "heavenly bliss" described by
some of Spiritism's alleged corre
spondents in—well, in what is the
Spiritist equivalent of Bedlam, per
haps? Is it not mildly diverting to be
told that the dear departed So-and-So
is still smoking some particular brand
of cigarettes, or quaffing some up-to
date brand of soda water, or whatever
may be the very earthly-sounding
brand of bliss to which the "spirit" is
addicted?
As Myles E. Connolly says in ah ar
ticle on the comic side of Spiritism in
the Catholic Weekly "America"
"Once, if a man declared that his dead
grandfather had made the library ta
ble dance for him, or that he was chat
ting with the soul of Bobbie Burns (as
a medium told the writer) and Bobbie
had said that they have beers and
light wines in heaven, he would have
been complimented for his imagina
tion and command over the incongru
ous by a hearty laugh. Today, he is
complimented for his sincerity and
sanity by a profound attention and a
serious and prolonged debate."
Or was the person who thus spoke
of the beers and light wines uttering
a high brand of comedy, or satirizing
the present condition of the dry
United States? Very likely the hu
mor was unconscious, but therefore
all the more laughable.
The serious opponents of Spiritism
have, of course, done a world of good.
They have done more good, probably,
than all the humor and satire on the
subject might do. Yet there is a
great power in humor and satire, for
those who understand it. And Spirit
ism would seem to be an excellent
field for them.
OPPORTUNITY FOR THE SPREAD
OF THE FAITH IN WALES.
The present condition of religion in
Wales offers a great opportunity for
Catholics to carry on propaganda
work in behalf of the true faith there,
in the opinion of a correspondent.
Now that the Welsh Church has
ceased to be a state church, and the
non-Anglicans have work cut out for
them to see that the Episcopal Church
does not become too national, the
time is looked upon by this" writer as
extremely opportune for the unlim
bering of Catholic apologetic guns.
In this connection the correspond
ent points out one great deficiency
among many Catholics which greatly
retards the spread of the faith among
even well-disposed non-Catholics.
Non-Conformists and Anglicans, he
says, are ready to listen to the Cath
olic case if Catholics will only cour
ageously go out and present it to
them. But non-Catholics complain
that when they broach the subject of
the Catholic religion to many Catho
lics, the latter refuse to discuss it, on
the ground that their belief is a "per
sonal matter."
This, the correspondent suggests, is
unfortunate. He urges that Welsh
Catholics should spread the light of
truth among non-Catholics. It is in
the factory and the workshop, in the
mine and in the field, he suggests,
that conversions are likely to take
place.
Humility is the foundation of every
virtue. There is pio better means
to obtain heavenly, gifts than humil
ity.—8t. Augustine,
THE CATHOLIC BULLETIN AUGUST 7, 1020
EDUCATIONAL
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Those monuments of man's creative
ability, which for centuries have been
the admiration of the world, and
which today are the architects' des
pair because their beauty cannot be
surpassed, were builded before the
Church was torn asunder, and conse
quently are purely Catholic, and in
spite of their infinite variety are fun
damentally alike. In the near East,
the Byzantine Style developed out of
the remains of Ancient Greece and
reached the highest development in
Santa Sophia at Constantinople, and
St. Mark's at Venice. A phase of this
beautiful style shoeing the influence
of contact with the Western world is
found in St. Vitale at Ravenna, and
Monreale at Palermo. Nearest akin
to the Byzantine architecture of the
East was the Romanesque of Western
Europe, and the Norman of England,
the best examples of which are St.
Gilles near Nimes in the Province of
Gard, St. Trophine at Aries. St.
Front at Perigeux, St. Paul at Is
soire, Notre Dame La Grande at Poi
tiers, and Peterborough and Dur
ham Cathedrals in'England. The most
brilliant architectural genius that our
country lias produced—H. -H* Kich-
PaiHngw and Closed
LATH, SHINGLES AND COAL
TRIBUTES ro
testimony
lATMl.
A NON-CATHOLIC'S REFLECTIONS
ON CATHOLIC ARCHITEC
TURE.
Eliminating the strictly classic
styles of Greece and Ancient Rome,
all of the other recognized architec
tural styles were originated, develop
ed and brought to highest prefection
in the period between the conversion
of Constantine A. D. 310, and the Ref
ormation. You will probably challenge
this statement by the question—What
of the Renaissance? but I answer that
query by the statement that the Re
naissance was never a distinct or
ganic architectural style, but only an
effort to revive the classicism of An
cient Rome.
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Gard,
St. Trophine at Aries, St.
Front at Perigeux, St. Paul at Is
ardson—tried to plant the Roman
esque style on American soil, and in
Trinity church, Boston, created one of
the very beautiful churches of the
world, but with his death his style
disappeared because it was an exotic
and could not take root in our soil
for reason which I will define. While
the Romanesque was flourishing in
France, Germany and England, and
with greater knowledge of mathema
tics developing into pure Gothic to
rival in exquisite beauty the highest
triumphs of Greek Art, the Italians of
Northern Italy were using the mate
rials which they had at hand to pro
duce the wonderful brick and terra
cotta architecture of Lombardy which
has left the world such monuments
as the Frari at Venice, destroyed alas
in the late war, Santa Maria Delia
Grazia and St. Ambrose at Milan, San
Zeno at Verona and the marvelous Cer
tosade Pavia. All of these buildings
were completed before the Reforma
tion and also before the architects of
the Renaissance had falsified the Cath
olic tradition by trying to produce
buildings classic in appearance, but
having no organic relationship to their
form of construction. This was the
period when the individual architect
appeared upon the scene, and as the
ancient Christians forgetting Christ,
declared themselves followers of Pet
er, or Paul, or Apollo et al, so the
builders of the 15th Century declared
themselves followers of Michael An
gelo, or Lamberti, or Bramante, and
countless others. The earlier build
ing which I have mentioned were
builded under the authority of the
Church and today we knew not who
designed them, because
"In the elder days of Art
Builders wrought with nicest care
Each, remote and hidden part
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and the individual was merged in his
work.
In speaking of the various styles
which flourished before the Renais
sance I have said that in spite of
their variety they were fundamental
ly alike. By that I mean that they
were created for the purposes of
Catholic worship. In those days men
looked to the Church as the fountain
of wisdom and authority, and the
Sacrament of the Eucharist as the
highest expression of human aspira
tion and worship. The building prin
ciple which the Church laid down
was the use always of the materials
at hand in each locality, and the type
of construction and labor available
for a truthful expression of the pur
pose of each building. The carrying
out of this soundest of all architec
tural principles caused the develop
ment of the different styles, and gave
to each country, and each locality, its
distinctive architecture.
Modern invention and modern life
with all the world in closest inter
communication make a return to such
conditions impossible, but while cus
toms and manners change, principles
do not, and I believe that by a return
to the fundamental principle laid
down by the Church when it was
Catholic, the one on-architecture, can
be produced under modern conditions
which* will express the modern world
and modern life as perfectly as Notre
Dame, or Chartres or Amiens ex
press the life of the world at the time
in which they were built, and express
it just as beautifully.
—Alfred G. Granger, In Sandap Visitor.
FLORENCE NIGHTINGALE AND
THE CHURCH.
The debt which Florence Nightin
gale, the famous Nurse of the Crimea
owed to Catholic nuns seems to have
been largely overlooked in references
to her work in connection with the
recent centenary of her birth. Yet it
stands out as one of the most impres
sive features of her accomplishments,
says a writer in The Pilot.
The inspiration which she drew
from nuns and the help she received
from them was well admitted by her
self.
Her
association with English and
Irish nuns is a thing which should not
be forgotten. When she went to the
•Crimea she was accompanied by Sis
ters of Mercy. T&ougb s&e was aom-
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228 East First St. Duluth, Mini
inally their leader, she was really
learning from them. They taught her
many things.
It is interesting to the Catholic to
be reminded that, during what has
been termed her "starved young wo
manhood," she wondered whether she
could be received into a Catholic con
vent without being a Catholic.
In connection with her Crimean
work, it is related that when some of
the Bermondsey nuns returned home.
Florence Nightingale wrote to the
Mother Superior, saying that she (the
Superior) had been far above herself
in fitness for the general superintend
ency, both in worldly talent of ad
ministration and, of course far more
so, in spiritual qualifications.
"Dearest Reverend Mother," she
wrote, "what you have done for the
work no one can ever say. My love
and gratitude will be yours wherever
you go."
These words ought to be enou?*
assure students of Florence Nightin
gale of what a great debt the work
owed to Catholic religious. It is a re
markable tribute to their ability, their
readiness to serve, and their capacity
for teaching others secrets of their
accomplishments. The place which
Catholic nuns held in this far famed
sphere of merciful activity is a his
toric monument to them. And what
better recognition could it have than
in the words to which reference has
just been made?
Indeed, the work of the Catholic
nuns in the Florence Nightingale
activity makes a story which adds an
other chapter to the long history of
Catholic benevolent work. Seemingly
it ought to be an inseparable part of
the story of the Nightingale achieve
ments.

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