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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, May 21, 1921, Image 7

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n e u A o N
^Sleaningst'
THE MAN WHO'S LIKED.
(Written
for The Catholic Bulletin
Cann."
He 'tends his church, he pays his
dues
Don't put ten dollars in new shoes.
"I've never thought." said Malachy,
"That God should work for nothing,
see!"
So, when he hears the plate go round,
A look on Malachy profound
Enthralls, enshrines, as down he goes
Into his well-kept Sunday clothes
And, no one has to stop and wait
Till he puts something on the plate.
Now, Malachy somehow "gets on,"
He shies the movies, cuts the lawn,
And always has a pleasant word—
Why, he's like hope full long deferred.
Some lake their cue from Malachy,
Some still go by like wrecks at sea
"The lan's in sight, I'll heave away
God gave what I'll not give away."
And many other gems of lore
Has wise ol^l Malachy in store.
The very finest, kind of man
Is little Malachy McCann.
JUST TWO KINDS OF PEOPLE.
There are two kinds of people on
earth today
Just two kinds of people, no more, I
say.
Not the sinner and the saint, for 'tis
tfell understood
The good are half bad and the bad
are half good.
Not the rich and the poor, for, to
count a man's wealth
You must first know the state of his
conscience and health
Not the humble and proud, for, in
life's span,
Who puts on vain airs is not counted
a man.
Not the happy and sad, foir th£ "swift
flying years
Bring each man his laughter and each
man his tears.
No, the two kinds of people on earth
that I mean,
Are the people who lift and the peo
ple who lean.
Wherever you go you win find the
world's masses
Are always divided in just two class
es
And. oddly enough, you will find too,
I ween,
There is only one lifter to twenty who
lean.
In which class are yon? Are you eas
ing the load
Of overtaxed lifters who toil down
the road?
Or are you a leaner, who lets others
bear
Your portion of labor and worry and
care?
—Henri) P. Loman- Wheaton
SONG'S MELODY WRITTEN
YEARS AFTER TEXT.
FOR THE FAMILY.
by
Dr. James Henderson.
A man who's liked by every
Is little Malachy McCann
It isn't he who'll grieve and pout
And turn the silver round about
That rides some cloud edge for his
sake
No, Malachy is give and take.
He's out from Ireland twenty year,
He's took up with the flag that's here,
He left his land in sorrow smart,
"But sure," said he, I'll do my part
To help the dear old Mother Isle
"Where first I saw an Irish smile.
I rode the waves across "the pond"
And never did my heart despond
The biggest cloud that looms today
I've learned to up and chase away."
He liked his neighbors every one,
Both Tony. Ikey, Gus and John.
The kids they cheer him like a man
Saying, "There comes Malachy Mc­
I can't afford to drop it,
And I find it doesn't pay
To do without a paper,
400
Centuries elapsed between the writ
ing of the "Stabat Mater" and the com
position of the melody that seems to
bring the music of the spheres to
earth.
An Italian monk. Brother Jacopone,
wrote the Latin text in the fourteenth
century.
Various halting attempts were made
by early composers to set the poem to
music. Four hundred years later an
other Italian was inspired to invent a
melody that was to become immortal.
It was Rossini, composer of "William
Tell," "Semiramis," and other famous
operas, who wrote the music to the
"Stabat Mater."
This was in 1842, during a period
of his career when he devoted his ge
nius to the composition of Masses and
other church music.
THE JINGO'S IDOL.
Britons are proud of their empire.
-They have made of it a god. They
"lave made it a sacrilege for any man
to say what any honest man must
say of their empire. They will par
don adultery and burglary and Mar
»c6ni share rigging, but woe betide the
man who will not take off his hat in
lienor of the empire. They are proud
of it. Is it a thing to be proud of?
In all Europe today the British em
pire is regarded as a gigantic and
shameless expression of hypocrisy.
Millions of men died because they
thought they were going to prevent
exactly such crimes as have now be
come the prerogative of Britain. It
Was after, not before, the deaths of
Millions of brave men that the Bri
tliun Dyer mowed down with machine
guns men, women, and children in
India. It was after, not before, the
Uictory of those who fought for small
Nations that a "government by
HBIrooks"—to quote a Tory Lord—or
ganized murder and robbery and ar
**n in order to crush a brave people
»twho only asked for that. right for
jVhieh Britain asked men to fight and
Nhe. "No foreign statesman could
fe'itfc safety to himself or his govern-
V **, i
WAYSIDE.tjt
ment trust the word of an English
Minister" that, according to a writer
in the Contemporary Review, is Eng
land's reputation today. That is the
proud pedestal on which stands the
empire that all true Jingoes fall down
and adore.
Far flung across the seas the great
empire stands today. It rests at
home on Marconi George, the head
of that "government by crooks" of
which Ixrd Welb^ spoke. It rests in
Australia on a howling, coarse, deceit
ful little Welsher named Hughes. It
rests in New Zealand on a man who
is ready to prostitute his office to
the commands of a horsewhipped cad.
It rests on such foundations. And
over it and through it is a cloud of
blood of murdered women and chil
dren crying day and night to the God
of Justice, against whom, more than
against the Irish people, such high
crimes are committed.
—New Zealand Tablet.
MUST HAVE THE PAPER.
Doa't stop my paper, printer
Don't strike my name off yet
You know the times are stringent,
And dollars hard to get
But tug a little harder
Is what I mean to do,
And scrape enough together—
Enough for me and you.
However others may.
I hate to ask my neighbors
To give me theirs on loan
They don't just say, but mean it,
"Why don't you have your own?"
You can't tell how we miss it
If it, by any fate,
Should happen not to reach Us,
Or come a little late
Then all is in a hubbub,
And things go all awry
And, printer, if you're married,
You'll know the reason why.
The children want those stories,
And wife is anxious too,
At first to glance it over
And then to read it through
And I read the editorials
And scan the local views,
And read the correspondence,
And every bit of news.
—Anon.
WE WANT OUR
PAY.
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
Dr. James Henderson.)
We wanted nothing yesterday
With Woodrow in the chair,
But, now we're wanting many things
Since Harding's over there—
Over there, in Washington,
And he won't come away,
But it is just as well we've struck
A fellow who will stay
Will stay right where he's 'lected to,
And hold the throttle down,
And not go chasing for Lloyd G.
To see if he's in town.
He wouldn't lose his fourteen points,
He'd keep them in his trunk,
And, should the Tiger snuffle them,
'Twould rouse'his Yankee spunk.
Well, anyway, we have a man
We think will fill the bill,
In guarding Yankee honors all,
As well's the Yankee till.
He's given notice to pay up,
We need it in our biz,
We can't get on without our due
Since everything has riz
We loaned our dollars here and there,
They took it as a joke,
And now, dead horses all around,
And every nation's broke.
Just give your Uncle Gamaliel
The backing to wade in,
He sure will get. his gaffs to work,
And he will land the tin
He'll keep the flag upon the seas,
For that's how we did vote
See how he strafed the pesky League,
There's no one gets jbis goat!
FAMOUS LAST WORDS.
"There's only one way to manage a
mule. Walk right up in back of him
and surprise him."
"That firecracker must have gone
out. I'll light it again."
"Watch me skate out past the 'Dan
ger' sign. I bet I can touch it."
"These traffic policemen think they
own the city. They can't stop me.
I'm going to cross the street now.
Let the chauffeurs look out for me."
"What a funny noise that snake
makes. I think I'll step on him."
"I've never driven a car in traffic
before. Bat they say it's perfectly
simple."
THE NEW STENOGRAPHER.
I have a new stenographer she game
to work today
She told me that she wrote the Gra
ham system
Two hundred words a minute seemed
to her, she said, like play.
And word for word at that she never
missed 'em.
I gave her some dictation, a letter to
a man,
And this, as I remember it» was how
the letter ran:
"Dear Sir: I have-your favor, and in
reply would state,
That I accept the offer in yours of
recent date.
I wish to state, however, that under
no condition
Can I afford to think of your free^ lance
proposition.
I shall begin tomorrow to, turn the
matter out
v
The copy will be ready by August 10th
about
Material of this nature should not be
rushed unduly.
Thanking you for your favor, I am,
yours very truly.**
She took it down in shorthand with
apparent ease and grace,
She didn't call me back all in a flurry
Thought I, "At last I have a girl
worth keeping round the place,"
Then said, "Now writ© it out, you
needn't hurry."
The typewriter she tackled, now and
then she struck a key,
And after thirty minutes this Is what
she handed me:
"Deer sir, I have the Feever and in a
Pile I sit
And I accept the Offer as you have
reasoned it
I wish to see however That under any
condition
Can I for to Think of a Free lunch
preposishum.
shall be in tomorrow To, turn the
mother out,
The cap will be red and will cost $10
about
Material of this nation should not rust
N. Dooley
Thinking you have the Feever,,
1 am
Yours very Truely."
THE WISDOM OF THE EAST.
Some Chinese proverbs collected
by Roy Chapman Andrews and hand
ed on by him to a recent meeting of
the Dutch Treat Club in New York
City:
If you bow at all, bow low.
A man thinks he knows—but a
woman knows better.
Free sitters at the play always grum
ble most.
I have seen not one who loves
virtue as he loves beauty.
Only imbeciles want credit for the
achievements of their ancestors.
The faults which a man condemns
out of office he commits when in.
No image-maker worships the gods.
He knows what they are made of.
It is not the wine which makes a
man drunk—it is the man himself.
If you suspect a man, don't em
ploy him—if you employ him. don't
suspect him.
OLD MAN NO GOOtl.
In a current Issue of tae Asia mag
azine is told an incident which throws
light on the humanly insurmountable
obstacles Catholic missionaries en
counter in the work of evangelizing
the uncivilized barbarians in foreign
lands. The writer of the article in
question, a Mr. Martin Johnson, at
tempts to give "Close Ups of a Can
nibal Chief" in the following way:
"Father Prim, a saintly old man, who
had spent the better part of a lifetime
in trying to make an impression upon
the people of the Island of Vao, in
the New Hebrides, told us that they
buried very old persons alive. Once,
after he had rescued ail old man from
death, the natives came in great num
bers to the mission clearing, and re
quested permission to make an exam
ination of their intended victim. They
looked at his teeth they fingered his
rough, withered skin they felt his
skinny limbs they lifted his frail,
helpless carcass in their arms and
finally burst into yells of laughter.
They said the missionary had been
fooled—there was not a single thing
about the old man worth saving!"
A JUDGE POINTS OUT THE NEED
OF CORPORAL PUNISHMENT.
Judge Wait, of Boston, recently
made a statement which the average
American parent would do well to read
and mark. The Judge said:
"Often when a boy gets into court,
his mother comes before me to plead
for him. The very trouble with the
boy is that his mother has been plead
ing for him all his life instead oi
spanking him. That mother has never
made her boy mind. She has been
doing what he told her all his life.
American children rule their parents
Our criminal population would be
greatly diminished if American fa
thers and mothers were not so weak.
Some people think whipping a child
is degrading and perhaps it is but it
is not more so than having a child
brought into court for larceny."'
It is not nearly so much so. In
point of fact, corporal punishment
that is judiciously administered by a
parent entirely free from passion, and
that is recognized by the culprit as
the inevitable consequence of wrong
doing, is no more essentially degrad
ing than are the painful stings which
the small boy suffers from his im
prudently stirring up a hornet's nest.
Treating children with unvarying in
dulgence,* emphasizing the benefits of
moral suasion, governing by love rath
er than fear, putting boys upon their
honor, etc., etc.—all this is excellent
as a general rule but where the proc
ess, as often proves the case, fails
to produce the desired results, cruelty
rather than kindness is shoton by the
father or mother who "spare the rod
and spoil the child."
LUCKY AND HONEST,.
"Luke McLuke," humorous writer
i{ the Cincinnati Enquirer, under the
caption, 'The Lucky Irish," says
facetiously that "It looks like you have
to have a bit of turf in your pocket
to look after Uncle Sam's money. Lfs
ten to this list of Collectors of Inter
nal Revenue: McGrath in Cincinnati
Grogan in Detroit Casey in Boston
McElliott in New York Walsh in
Hartford McNeel in Birmingham
Murphy in Dubuque Doyle in Grand
Rapids Lynch in St. Paul Moore
in St. Louis Whaley in Helena Duf
fy in Newark Riordan in Buffalo, and
O'Shaughnessy in Providence.
THE CHILDREN'S HOUR.
DICK'S MIDNIGHT VISITOR*
"Gosh!" was Dick Steadley's greet
ing to his five companions the second
morning they had .camped in the
mountains, "it was beastly cold last
night."
"Never noticed it. Slept like
top," responded Jimmy O'Neill.
"Yes siree," continued Dick, glad
at having secured on$ listener, •cold-
THE CATHOLIC BULLETIN, MAY 21,1921
est night I've ever experienced out
camping. I'm stiff yet."
"Ha! Ha! Ha!" laughed little Jack
Southern. "I reckon if you'd jump
around a bit, you wouldn't be stiff."
"Now you're talking, Jack," spoke
Bill Rickman. Then he added in a su
perior tone, "Here, Stead, get this
pail filled and see how soon you can
come back."
The boys spent the greatest part of
that day in' town, that is, the little
mountain village which was situated
five miles north of the camp.
Entering the sleepy little town they
were at once attracted by a large
crowd, all apparently talking at the
same time.
"Something's turned the place up
side down!" exclaimed Bobby Brink.
"Come on, fellows," called Jack, who
had hurried ahead, "some excitement
anyway."
They made their way through the
crowd and soon stood directly before
old Mr. Jackson, by occupation a hun
ter.
They were just in tiine to hear the
following remarks:
"And here it war, biggefn I ever
saw one. It war black an' before I
could turn t' gfet me rifle, it disap
peared."
"What did you see?" asked Jim
my.
"What was black?" cried Dick.
"What disappeared?" interrogated
Bob.
"The bear, of course!" sharply re
torted an old lady standing nearby,
However, they were not to be put
off by her. Surrounding Mr. Jacksdh,
they asked him to relate the story
again.
Yes, it was a bear and was seen
early that morning near Mr. Jack
son's hut, only a quarter of a mile
from the boys' camp.
"It war the first one I've seed for
nigh on two years in these parts," he
finished, shaking his head wisely.
The boys did not know whether to
take the bit of news seriously or as
a joke, and it was only when they re
turned home that they gave it any
consideration.
"I'm glad this 'bear episode' has
turned up," began Jimmy.
"Same here," spoke Bob. "I'll ad
mit I was rather disgusted with the
place yesterday,, but better luck is in
sight, no doubt."
"The girls are always bargaining
for something thrilling in the letters,"
laughed Dick. "Mebbe I'll satisfy 'em
in the near future."
"Gee, it's good to get home," sigh
ed Billy when they reached the camp.
"An* I want a little to eat before I
turn in I'm dead hungry," lamented
Jack.
"Boys," suddenlycalled Bill, "we'll
have to take our turns on watch to
night. It's the only right thing to
do."
"The* we can keep the fire going,"
added Jimmy with a wink at Dick.
This was agreed upon. Ever:* boy
was to guard the camp for one and
one-half hours.
Night came on and the guard com
menced.
"I say, Dick, wake up!" loudly whis
pered Jack. Then not getting any re
sponse, he walked over to Dick's cot
and, shaking him, called again, "Dick,
it's twelve bells your turn to guard.
Get up!"
"Brrr—gosh, it's cold!" Dick ex
claimed as soon as he had collected
his senses, but there was no one to
hear this exclamation, for Jack im
mediately sank down on his cot and
fell into a sound sleep.
The night was very dark. Black
shadows lurked in every
corner.
Glancing suspiciously around, Dick at
last sat down beside the fire.
He had sat thus ror some time when
suddenly he heard the sound of foot
steps. Yes, he was not mistaken.
Then some dry twigs broke. The
footsteps were approaching, slowly,
very slowly! Dick sat as if in a
trance. He could neither call nor
move. His eyes anxiously peered into
Again he heard the growl. This
time he arose, went into the tent and
quickly returned with the big rifle, the
only weapon the camp had.
nose,^adding
than the old lady across the aisle pre
sented itself.
"Did you ever see anything so fun
ny?" Pauline's whispers drew the at
tention of others in the' Pullman
coach. Pauline was fifteen, old enough,
one would suppose, to have outgrown
the giggling age. But she had not
learned that a sense of humor may
need control, as well as a quick tem
per, or a tendency to dissolve in tears
on every possible pretext.
The two girls laughed on, their
mirth becoming less and less con
trolled as the moments passed. Their
faces grew red, and their eyes were
suffused with tears. And if there
seemed a probability that the par
oxysm was decreasing in violence, a
glance in the direction of the uncon
scious object of their merriment was
enough to set them off again. The
other passengers were looking crossly
from them to the old lady, some of
them smiling as if in sympathy, and
others looking as if they found the
combination of bad manners and an
utter lack of self-control somewhat
tiresome.
When the old lady opened her eyes
suddenly, it happened to be when the
merriment was at its height. She
looked straight into two red, con
vulsed faces, turned her head and
saw that the attention of her fellow
passengers was focused on herself,
and the young people who apparently
were getting so much amusement out
of her .little nap. She straightened
herself, a slight flush showing in her
faded cheeks, put here eyeglasses in
their place, and resumed her reading.
It was noticeable that the giggling
immediately became subdued, and in
a minute or two ended altogether.
Meg and Pauline at once developed a
tremendous interest in the scenery.
The two were on their way to visit
a schoolmate, a charming girl whose
father was reputed wealthy, but who
had remained entirely unspoiled by
wealth and luxury. Meg and Pauline
were greatly excited by' the prospect,
of visiting in a home of a man many
times a millionaire, and were very
anxious that in such unaccustomed
surroundings, they should not fail to
do exactly the proper thing.
The train pulled at last into the at
tractive spot where Mr. Watt s sum
I mer home was situated. -There were
a number of people on the platform
and among them Meg recognized her
friend. "There's Eleanor now," she
I cried. "She's come to meet us. Oh,
how glad I am to see her again, the
I dear thing!"
But contrary to their expectations,!,
Eleanor did not fly to meet them the
moment they stepped up to the plat-1
form. Instead, she made an ecstatic
rush upon the old lady who had sat.
across the aisle, and who alighted
I from the train just ahead of the twos
girls.
"Grandmother! Oh, grandmother!".
The cry in Eleanor's eager voice sent
a cold chill to the hearts of the two
listeners. For a moment the old lady
a n e y o u n i e e a o e i n
a close embrace, and then Eleanor
drew away from her encircling arms.
I "Excuse me a minute, grandma,
darling. I expect some of my school
i friends on this train. Oh, here they
are," She ran to meet Meg and Paul
ine, her hands outstretched and her
face shining. But as for the two
travelers, no one would have suspect
ed them of such a thing as a giggle in
all their lives. Their faces were- pre
ternaturally solemn, and their looks'
but inadequately expressed the heavi
ness of their hearts.
Standing in the shadow of a neigh
boring mountain (the camp was situ
ated at the foot of a mountain), Dick
waited, every feature of his face
strained and fixed. Then, out of the Their visit was only half a success,
shadows, a large black form emerged. Eleanor was as sweet and friendly as
Closer and closer it came until there she could possibly be, and old Mrs.
was barely five feet between it and Watt magnanimously kept the secret
Dick. of the little episode on the Pullman
Dick's heart grieved for the unfor- but neither Meg nor Pauline could
tunate beast. If it would only turn
back, its life could be spared, but no,
the black form came on, directly to
ward the tents.
"For the sake of my pals!" Dick
cried in an unnatural voice, and fired.
Without a moan, the bear fell in a
When they climbed into the waiting
car, Eleanor performed the ceremony
o i n o u i o n e s e a e w o o y
school friends, grandmother, that I've
talked about so often, Meg Ward and
Pauline Noble." Then with a sudden
inspiration. "Oh, did you get ac*'
quainted on the train
Mrs. Watt took it on herself to an
swer that question. She was a jolly
old lady and though she had been an-
the darkfiess. All was silent for a noyed when she awoke from her nap
minute, then a low, deep growl was and found Meg and Pauline laughing
heard. Dick's brown eyes grew dark
er and wider as he sat there and
stared.
The echo of the shot still lingered.
in his ears when a number of voices
excitedly demanded. "What's the
trouble?" Then Jack's smooth drawl ness returned to them before the sum
could be heard, "I say, -Dick, are you mer was over, and their faces were
still alive?"
greatly 1o the
grotesqueness of her appearance.
"Just look," Meg whispered to Paul
ine, .and then both girls giggled con
vulsively. They were getting a lit
tle tired of the journey, to tell the
truth, and were on the lookout for
entertainment. At this particular
juncture, nothing more entertaining
at her, she did not hold a grudge and
had no wish to add to the girls' hu
miliation.
"We didn't speak, Nellie," she re-,
plied, "but we sat near one another,'
and I think we can count that as the
beginning of our acquaintance." Her
smile was perfectly good-natured, but
in spite of it, Meg and Pauline had
never felt so uncomfortable in their
lives.
forget that Eleanor's welcome would
not have been so cordial If she had
known all there was to know. And
when their stay came to an end, it
was a relief, on the whole. "We might
have had such a perfect time, if it
hadn't been for our making such a
heap, not three feet from where Dick! wrong start," Meg sighed, as they
stood, with the tears coursing down I
his cheeks'.
took the train for home, and Pauline's
assenting murmur came from her
heart.
It is a hopeful sign, to say the least,
that though the girls' light-hearted-
33
Finding his voice, Dick at last an- ever suffered from an attack of gig
swered, "It's all right, fellows. I had gling from that memorable afternoon
a visitor—and, as it was so late, I in
vited him—to. remain—until morning."
He finished up lamely with a half sob,
half sigh.
ELEANOR'S SCHOOL FRtCWOS—AM
ACCOUNT OF AN EPISODE ON
A PULLMAN CAR.
The old lady across the aisle had
fallen asleep again. Her book lay
open on her lap, and her head bobbed
so energetically that it seemed certain
that her eyeglasses would fly off. In
deed, they did slip down toward the
end of her
smiling as ever, neither one has
on the train, till the present,
cure, if not an agreeable one*
proved effective.-
THE COLLEGE
The
bas
THE DOLLY I LOVE BEST.
Last night when daddy came from
town,
He brought a doll for me,
One with a pink and shining gown,
As pretty as can be.
Her golden hair is curly too,
Her cheeks are rosy red,
And dolly's eyes so big and blue*
Close when she's put to bed.
4"
I've only got one dolly more,
An' she gets worse each day,
For Sawdust falls around the floor,
When with her I would play.
The puppy's torn most of her clothes,
An' jerked her all about
She has some putty for a nose,
'And both her eyes areoufe.
3-
College of Teresa^
WINONA, MINNESOTA
Registered for Teachers' License by the New York Board «f Regents.
Accredited by the Association of American Universities.
Holds Membership in the North Central Association of Colleges.
Standard degree courses in Arts and Science leading feMkiB degrees of
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.
ADDRESS THE SECRETARY
OF
A STANDARD COLLEGE FOB WOMEN
The earnest teaching, progressive methods and spies*
did equipment of this big school induce students to coma
from far and near.
To meet the great demand for graduates, the school
has day and evening sessions the entire year.
Students are enrolling now for spring and summer
term. Illustrated cataJor maiMI frw aa]ririt«re wyon re
quest. Phone Cedar 5333.
PRACTICAL BUSINESS SCHOOl
Under the
TBE COLLEGE—Offers
188 E. Fifth St., bet. Robert and Jnckaon St»
One of the largest and best equipped business
schools in America. WALTER RASMUSSEN. Proprietor
ST. AGATHA CONSERVATORY
OF MUSIC AND ART
Catalog mailed
G.
s.
STEPHENS,
President.
upon application
BOtitDHtB SCHOOL FOR
But Mary Jane (that's her, you know),
Is just as sweet and true,
As she was three long years ago
When Santa brought her, new.
I love the doll I got last night,
But—tho' in silk she's dress«d,
still hug Mary Jane real tight.
Because—I love her best.
s(\
1,.
i#'u? r'.y» *l«W#ylWi
DERHAM HALL
A COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA
ADDRESSt THE OFFICl OF THE DEAN
ST, JOSEPH'S ACADEMY
A thoroughly equipped High School for Girls
SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH
SAINT PAUL, MINN. Telephone Dale 0535
LARGEST SPRING GPEMING
In the History of Ua ItasKiussea School
28 EAST EXCHANGE: ST. COR. CEDAR, ST. PAUL
Piano, Harmony, Violin, Mandolin, Guitar, Zither, Banjo, Voice, Elocution,
Language, Painting, Drawing, China Decorating
1'upils may enter at nny time
Call or srnd for term* Lessnns given during ••ration
St. Benedict's College' and Academy
patronage of
ST. JOSEPH, MINNESOTA.
CONDUCTED BY THE SISTERS OF THE ORDER OF ST. BENEDICT.
the
a
Bachelor of Arts.
ST. CATHERINE 1
Right Reverend Joseph F. Busck, D. D.,
of St. Cloud.
•XCE1.L.ENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR TnK EDUCATION Or
A O I Y O U N W O E N
four yeara' course, leading to the degree
THE ACADEMY—Oilers a four years' course, preparing for College.
UNIVERSITY AFFILIATION.
to
"Sister
SAINT CLARE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
WINONA, MINNESOTA
An Institution for the Professional Training
•f Grade Teachers for Parochial Schools
Affiliated to the College of Saint Teresa
ADDRESS THE SECRETARY
Ambition Leads to Training
and training opens to you
the wide field of business
with its great opportun
ities.
Bishop
Directress.**
I
Decida today—new—to enroll
Day or Night School
GLOB
"Leaders in business Education"
rli-ld 4 V7S
2nd Floor Hamm Bidg., St. Paul, Minn,
Villa Maria Academy
FRONTENAC, MINN.
GiRtS
ACCREDITED IO THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
Conducted by the URSULINE NUNS
Send for Catalog and Complete Information.
T. F. KENNEDY,
Vice President.
YOUHG U31TC
AN
ACCREDITED TRAINING
SCHOOL FOR NURSES, at
V
ST. PAUL, MINN.
For particulars
Address: Snperiutendcnt of Nurses
You have troubles, it may be. So
have others. None is free from them
and perhaps it is as well that none
chould
—Ftincea Kam.
s£li£ &
be. They give sinew and tone
to life, fortitude and courage to man.
That would be a dull sea, and the
sailor would never acquire skill, where'
there was nothing to disturb the sur^
ftwse.' v •*1 ir u
.. 3?
A
Sj£t
I-
of

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