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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, July 02, 1921, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90060976/1921-07-02/ed-1/seq-1/

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Volume 11
HOLY FATHER ON IRELAND
POPE BENEDICT XV DEPLORES
8UFFERING AND VIOLENCE—
PRAYS FOR RECONCILIATION-
APOSTOLIC LETTER TO CAR
OINAL LOGUE—A PLEA FOR
PEACE—200,000 LIRE FOR WHITE
CROSS.
Following te a translation of "ttns
Holy Father's letter on Irish condi
tions. A part of this document was
Quoted recently.
Letter of Holy Fatfctr.
v
To Our Beloved Son, Michael,
Cardinal-Priest of the Holy Roman
Church, under the title of Santa
Maria della Pace, and Archoishop of
Armagh.
Benedict XV., Pope. Dsorly Be
loved Son, Health and Apostolic
Benediction.
"When, In the mysterious designs
of God We were raised to the Chair
of Peter, Europe was ablaze with
war. You' are aware that, with a
full consciousness of Our Apostolic
office, We endeavored to the ut
most of our power to remedy the
numerous and terrible evils be
gotten of this dreadful conflict, and
to reconcile men to peace. We are
grieved to say that, though We
left nothing undone to restore
peace. Our effoFts more than oriee
proved ineffectual.
"But, Indeed, as We have already
frequently said, nations will never
enjoy either at home or abroad, last
ing tranquility unless they return
to those Christian principles which
they have abandoned and which
the Church hands down by her
institution.
Oppressed Nations.
"Meanwhile We are filled with
anguish when We consider that
nations not a few are still opnressed
by the weight of woes produced by
the war. For although the clash
of arms has almost everywhere
ceased, vet on account of the ijShed
extreme scarcity of the necessaries
of -life many of every ae- *nd
s®x, an? those the 'innocent are
being cut off whilst everywhere
even amongst nations that have
emerged victorious from the con
flict, theKr are apparent signs of
solicitude and anxiety which com
pel all goad men to dread disaster
yet to come. It is. however, a
matter of some consolation to Us
that from contributions so liber
ally sent Us from all countries We
have been enabled more than once
to bring some measure of relief to
impoverished peoples.
The Reign of Terror.
"But while We are filled with
anxiety in regard to all nations We are
most especially concerned about the
condition of Ireland.
"Unflinching even v.nto the shed
ding of blood in her devotion to the
ancient Faith and in her reverence
to the Holy See, she is subjected
today to the indignity of devas
tation and slaughter.
"There is assuredly no( doubt that
harsh and cruel occurrences of this
kind are in great part attributes
From far and near friends came to
pay tribute to Father Miks whom they
had learned to love and revere durr
ing his pastorate of seventeen years
ftft St. Michael's.
At 10 o'clock Wednesday morning
the Very Reverend Jubilarian cele
brated solemn high Mass, assisted by
Rev. M. Savs as deacon, and the Rev.
Schumacher as subdeacon. Rev.
James Zachman was master Of cere
monies. The sermon was preached
by Right. Reverend Abbot Peter Engel,
O. S. B., of St. John's Abbey, College
•ille, Minn. The beautifi.l church
was crowded to overflowing. After
the Mass a banquet was served in the
church hall by the ladies of tlie parish
to over 600 persons. Thirty-three
J«tfe«ts were present at the ceremony.
At 3 o'clock in the afternoon the
school children presented a splendid
program in honor of their pastor. In
Ae evening another program of varied
numbers was rendered by talent from
the parish. An excellent address of
congratulation, delivered by Mr.
Albert Zachman of Marquette Univers
ity, a young man of St Micnael's
parish, brought the pleasing program
to an end. In his discourse Mr.
Zachman emphasized the qualities by
ffcfch Father Miksis well known to
to the recent war, for neither has
sufficient consideration been given
to the desires of nations nor have
the fruits of .peace which peoples
promised to themselves been
reaped.
Holy See's Attitude.
"But in the public strife whifch
is taking place in your country, it
is the deliberate counsel of the
Holy See, a counsel consistently
acted upon up to the present in
similar circumstances, to take sides
with neither of the contending
parties.
"Such neutrality, however, by no
means prevents Us from wishing
and desiring, nor even from pray
ing add beseeching, the contending
parties, that the frenzy of strife
may as" soon as possible subside and
that a lasting peace and a sincere
union of hearts may take the place
of this terrible enmity, for indeed
We do not perceive how this bitter
strife can profit either of the parties
when property and homes are being
ruthlessly and disgracefully laid
waste, when villages and farm
steads are being set aflame, when
neither sacred places nor sacred per
sons are spared, when on both sides
a war resulting in the death of un
armed people, even of the women and
children, is carried on.
An Effort for Peace.
"Mindful, therefore, of the
Apostolic office, and moved by
that charity which embraces all
men, We exhort English as well
as Irish to calmly consider whether
the time has not arrived to aban
don violence and treat of some
means of mutual agreement.
"For this end We think it would
be opportune if effect were given
to the plan recently suggested by
distinguished men as well as skilled
politicians, that is to say, that the
question at issue should be referred
for discussion to some body of men
selected by the whole Irish nation.
And when this conference has pub
its findings let the more
influential among both part'es meet
to^ethe4 fiikviftg ttt forward
and discussed the views and con
clusions arrived at on botlj sides,
let them determine by Qommen
consent on some means of settling
the question in a sincere iq#fit ^)4
peace and reconciliation.'
Relief of Sufferings.
SILVER JUBILEE OF FATHER MIKS
PASTOR AT ST. MICHAEL'S, MINN.,
CELEBRATES EVENT—KNOWN
AS ZEALOUS PRIEST—REMARK­
ABLE RELIGIOU8 RECORD OF
PARISH.
On Wednesday, June 22, Very Rev.
Anthony Miks, pastor of St. Michael's
Church, St. Michael, Minn., com
memorated the twenty-fifth anniver
sary of his ordination to the holy
priesthood. It was a day of great re
joicing for the people of this parish.
For weeks various committees were
busy preparing properly to celebrate
the anniversary of their beloved
pastor.
"Meanwhile We have heard ^ith
heartfelt pleasure that you, Our
beloved son, impelled by the char
ity which suffers no flelay and
com­i\lNUNCIOJOJMD
mands Us to lay aside all difference
of parties and opinions fcnd bring
aid to the afflicted and the needy,
have been at pains to establish and
zealous to foster an association
known as the White Cross, the
object of which is to collect alms
for the relief of those reduced to
straits by the devastation of prop
erty or other acts of violence. It
is no less a source of joy to Us that
many others differing in religion
and nationality have joined with
you in this union of love, and that
to your combined appeal great
numbers of generous men, not
(Continued on page 8.)
his friends, namely, a spirit of gentle
ness, and his zeal in fostering religi
ous vocations and instilling into the
minds of the younger members of his
parish the necessity of a higher
education. Father Miks was especial
ly commended for the excellent prog
ress of the parish during his in
cumbency.
St. Michael's parish comprise", about
ldO families. It enjoys the distinc
tion of having had twelve of its sons
enter the priesthood, Right Reverend
Abbot Peter Engel, O. S. B., being the
first and Mgr. Zachman of Adrian,
Minn., the second. Several other
young men are at present pursuing
studies for the priesthood. St.
Michael's parish has also given more
than sixty-five Sisters to the convent.
In one family alone seven daughters
became nuns, the seventh one being
named Sister Septima.
Father Miks is Dean of the St.
Michael's Deanery. He was born
June 6, 1871, in Ober Laibach, Krain,
Austria. He made his classical
course in Laibach, and completed his
philosophy and theology at S*. Thomas
Seminary and St. Paul Seminary, this
city. He was ordained by Archbishop
Ireland on December 28, 1895, and be
came assistant in the parish of St.
Francis de Sales, St. Paul. He held
pastorates at St. Peter and at Rich
field, Minn., heing appointed' in 1904,
to the parish of St. Michael, where he
has been in charge over since.
The following priests were present
on the occasion of Father Miks'
jubilee: Right Reverend Abbot Engel,
O. S. B., Right Reverend Mgr. Guillot,
Reverend Fathers: Savs, Bajec, Jager,
Jansen, Pettigrew, Doring Mamer,
Duhr, Bozja, Missia, Blum, Boerboom,
Wey, Schumacher, Ogulin, Vilman,
Bour, Schmitz, Talbot, Prendergast,
Skluzacek, Schiffrer, Gruden, Mac
Carthy, Dolphin, J. Zachman and
Pilfer.
'm
NEW K. C.
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES FOR
RURAL EX-SERVICE MEN—CHI
CAGO TO ENTERTAIN FOCH.
Establishment of a correspondence
school for ex-service men at New Hav
en, Conn., with an initial investment
of $1,000,000 was decided upon June
27 at a meeting in Chicago of the
board of directors of the Knights of
Columbus, composed of officials from
all sections of the United States and
Canada.
The school will provide free educa
tion for ex-service men from remote
and rural sections whose homes are
too far removed for them to attend
the Knights of Columbus schools al
ready established. The project will
be placed before the delegates to the
national convention in Auguflt at San
Francisco.
Foch in Chicago.
Formal announcement also was
made that Chicago will be the place
where the Knights of Columbus will
entertain Marshal Foch. The tenta
tive date set is November 6.
New History.
The board announced more than 100
professors of American histo:T in col
leges throughout the country have
pledged their aid to the organization's
campaign to make the history of the
United States propaganda proof. The
work of rewriting the histories is to be
launched soon with a fund of approxi
mately $1,000,000.
BISHOP OF PITTSBURGH
RIGHT REVEREND HUGH C. BOYLE
IS CONSECRATED.
Last Wednesday morning, Right
Reverend Hugh C. Boyle was con
secrated in the Cathedral of St. Paul,,
Pittsburgh, Pa., as Bishop of that
See. His Eminence Cardinal
Dougherty presided at the ceremony.
The consecrator was Most Reverend
J. F. Regis Caa^vin, TituW Arch
bishop of Pelusium, who recently re
tired as Bishop of Pittsburgh owing
to ill health. The co-consecrators
were the Right Reverend John J. Mc
Cort, Bishop of Altoona, Pa., and the
Right Reverend Philip R. McDevltt,
Bishop of Hamsburg, Pa. The sermon
was preached by Archbishop Munde
lein of Chicago.
Archbishop Lorenzo Lauri, Papal
Nuncio to Peru, was a passenger on
liner Essequibc which docked at New
York, June 20, from Valparaiso. He
is on his way to Warsaw to succeed
Cardinal Ratti as Nuncio to Poland.
Archbishop Laurix is a former pro
fessor of dogma in the University of
Propaganda at Rome in which many
American priests studied.
CATHOLIC MEN ORGANIZE IN ST.
CLOUD, MINN.
Right Rev. Joseph F. Busch, Bishop
of St. Cloud, presided all day over the
meeting of 400 delegates, including 75
priests, from the various parishes of
his diocese called Tuesday, June 21,
to organise the National Council of
Catholic Men. Every parish was rep
resented.
A program of activities in the
diocese of St. Cloud has been adopted
and officers have been elected to
direct the affairs of the Council
Bishop Busch has directed that the
women of the diocese be brought into
an organization under the auspices of
the National Catholic Welfare
Council.
Sixteen counties ate comprised in s
the Diocese of St. Cloud, so that the
large attendance was regarded as in
dicating the enthusiasm of the
response made by the Catholics under
Bishop Busch's pastoral direction to
his call for action.
SCH00LF0R KHf
DE PAUL INSTITUTE UNVEILS
MEMORIAL TO ITS FOUNDER.
On the occasion of the thirteenth
annual commencement of the De Paul
Institute, Pittsburgh, the board of di
rectors, faculty and students unveiled
a bronze memorial to Archbishop Can
evin, the founder and greatest bene
factor of the De Paul Institute, which
is today the largest and finest private
oral school for the deaf in the United
States. It has 100 pupils, 22 teachers,
and three magnificently equipped
buildings, in one of the most beauti
ful suburbs in Pittsburgh.
Archbishop Canevin and his suc
cessor Bishop Boyle attended the ex
ercises, and each made an address.
The school is today free of debt, large
ly through the efforts of Rev. Thomas
F. Coakley, who raised more than
|500,000 IN the last tela years. ^.
ST. PAUL, MINN., JULY 2,1921
HAD BEEN BISHOP OF SUPERIOR
SINCE 1913—WA^I THE AUTHOR
OF VARIOUS TEXT BOOKS FOR
SCHOOLS—EDITOR DF BOHEM
IAN PAPER IN 1882.
Bishop, Joseph M. Koudelka of the
diocese of Superior, Wis., died there
on June 24, after a long illness.
Joseph Maria Koudelka was born at
Chlistovo, Bohemia, December 8,1852.
He attended Klatten college, Bohemia,
but when sixteen years old came to
America and continued his studies at
St. Francis Seminary, Milwaukee. He
was ordained October $8, 18T5. by
Bishop Muller.
From 1875 to 1882 he was pastor of
St. Prokopius parish, Cleveland. He
was also editor of "Iflas" (Voice), a
Bohemian Catholic weekly paper at
St. Louis. In 1883 he was made pas
tor of St. Michael's parish at Cleve
land where he remained until 1907.
As author he prepared first, second
and third readers fo* Bohemian
schools in 1882. He also wrote a short
history of the Catholic cl:urch for
Catholic schools in 1905 and a prayer
book for adults and another for chil
dren.
When BiBhop Hortsmann was ap
pointed to succeed Bishop G?lmour of
the diocese of Cleveland in 1891, he
asked for an auxiliary bisnop with
jurisdiction over the foreign popula
tion, especially of the Slav races, in
the diocese. Father Koudelka, then
rector of St. Michael's church was
named bishop November 29, 1907, and
was consecrated February 25, 1908.
He was transferred as auxiliary to
Archbishop Messmer at Milwaukee,
September 4, 1911, and served there
two years.
August 1, 1913, Bishop Kondelku
was appointed head of the Superior
diocese succeeding Bishop Schinner,
who became Bishop of the Spokane
diocese.
Bishop Koudelka was appointed as
sistant at/ the pontifical throne July
13,1917.
Funeral services for the late Bishop
were held in the Sacred Heart Pro
Cathedral, 8trp«*iar, 3* A M. last
Tuesday.'
4
MAIN COME
The laying of the cornerstone for
the new library at Louvain University
has been set for July 28. Dr. Nicho
las Murray Butler, president of Colum
bia University, who will lay the cor
nerstone, is now on his way to Europe
Cardinal Mercier's cable added that
King Albert of Belgium and former
President Poincare of France had ac
cepted invitations to be present..
PRIEST ISJNVEfiTQR
MISSOURI PRIEST GETS PATENT
ON A TRACTOR.
Rev. John J. Martin, C. M., assist
ant at St. Vincent parish, Kansas City,
Mo., has received a patent on a tract
or invention, which he perfected a few
months ago, while stationed at Dallas,
Tex.
His invention is practically a revolu
tion in tractor construction and he
states it can be manufactured and op
erated more economically than any
tractor now on the market. The mo
tor is placed inside the drive wheel
and operates on the treadmill prin
ciple. He has also invented a railroad
rail set in concrete, that can be re
moved or renewed without disturbing
the roadbed and which dispenses with
the use of wood ties. Before joining
the army, as chaplain, he was working
on an idea for an automobile head
light dimmer, which he sold before it
was patented.
II msM-LomiHE
PROTEST AGAINST EFFORT*,.^
SECULARIZE SCHOOLS OF^
PROVINCES.
An impressive demonstration pro
test against the efforts of the French
Government to secularize the Cath
olic schools of Alsace-Lorraine was
recently held in Strassburg. More
than four thousand men and women
representing the Catholics of Alsace,
took part in the demonstration. Va
rious speakers dwelt upon the repeat
ed promises of the French Govern
ment not to change the laws concern
ing the Church and the schools, and
demanded that the rights of the Cath
olics of the. annexed provinces be re
spected.
GROWTH JFJCHURCH
There are now more than 2,000,000
Catholics in India, Burma and Ceylon
In seventy years the Catholic popula
tion has more than tripled in these
countries. The tables show that two
thirds of this increase is due to nat
ural ,growth and one-third .tc, conver-
FATHER DIETZ^ON LABOR
8 AYS PRIESTS SHOULD STUDY
NEEDS OF LABOR—FAVORS AS
SIGNMENT OF PRIEST IN EVERY
DIOCESE TO.WORK AMONG UN
ION MEN.
FatherPeter E. Diets, the founder
of the American Academy of Chris
tian Democracy in Cincinnati, who at
tended the annual convention of the
American Federation of Labor at. Den
ver, believes that a priest should be
assigned to work among the union
men in every diocese of the country.
Priests engaged in such work,'Father
Dietz contends, will be able to pre
vent many workingmen from becom
ing alienated from the Church and
can safeguard the Church from at
tacks on the part of those not favor
ably disposed toward religion.
Father Dietz has been devoting his
entire time to the interests of the
working classes for a number of years.
"It has -been my experience," Fath
er Dietz said, "tbat a priest is able
to offer many suggestions to men in
fluential in the labor movement, and
to have them' accepted. They are
men with whom one can reason. A
priest giving his attention to the un
ions, should not wait until there is
a strike before he investigates condi
tions, but should have a knowledge of
them -at all times, to be able to in
form the Bishop when any need
arises
CATHOLIC JOY SCOUTS
It is announced by the N. C. W. C.
that Rev. Daniel J. Daly, of the
Church of the Most Preciojus Blood,
Philadelphia, and George W. Boyle,
also of Philadelphia,- have been ap
pointed to go to France. They will
serve on a commission of which Fath
er Daly will be head in the interest of
the Catholic Boy Scout movement.
JM BALTIMORE FIRE'
JOSEPHITES ^FTE RAISING FUND
REBUILD BURJ!4§A
sfcMlNARV. */$ yr(
The rebuilding of .St. Joseph's
Seminary, Balfbnore, Which was
damaged by fire on June 16, is to be
undertaken by the Society of St.
Joseph (JosephiteS), the missionary
organization which has charge of the
institution. It is estimated that be
tween $50,000 and $100,000 will be
required to restore the building.
This college is conducted for the
training of priests for the missions
among American negroes. Unless
the work of reconstruction is finished
by the beginning of autumn the
studies of the seminarians wiil be
Interrupted. It is expected that Cath
olics everywhere in the country will
be asked to contribute to the cost of
repairing the damage.
In the last fifty years the Josephites
have extended their missionary labor*
to fifteen dioceses in thirteen states
The last report of Very Rev Louis
Pastorelli, superior of the society
showed that the Josephites were con
ducting 45 missions, each with a resi
dent priest. In seven years the mem
bership of their- churches had increas
ed 21,000,'of whom 5,000 were con
verts. In all, the Josephites have
the pastoral eare of some 40,000
colored Catholics.
AN EPISCOPAL JUBILEE
LARGE FUND PRESENTED TO
ARCHBISHOP GLENNON.
Catholic women of St. Louis
participated in the celebration of the
silver episcopal jubilee of the Most
Rev. Archbishop John J. Glennon on
June 29. The religious services to
commemorate the event were
Pontifical high Mass in the morning
spd pontifical Benediction in the
Cathedral, at 8 o'clock in the evening.
Following the benediction Arch
bishop Glennon received his priests
parishioners and friends on the lawn
of the Cathedral and delivered an
address.
Right Rev. John J. Tannrath, chair
man of the committee in charge of
arrangements for the ceiebration
presented the fund ri©f $200,000^ to
Archbishop Glennon.
A REMARKABLE CURE
The cure of an English woman, who
for many years had been unable to use
her arms or legs, is reported by mem
bers of a party which has just return
ed from a pilgrimage to Lourdes. It
is stated that the woman had suffered
for many years and had undergone
numerous operations without obtain
ing relief, but she was cured after
bathing in the waters at the Grotto
The Bishop of Brentwood, who con
ducted* the pilgrimage, has expressed
himself as convinced of the genuine
nesa oC the
Archbishop Dowling's Address
NEW OFFICERS ELECTED IN AS
SOCIATION—GENESIS AND GEN
IUS OF TRUE CHRISTIAN CHAR­
ITY—BRING BACK CHRIST TO
HOSPITALS, IS ARCHBISHOP'S
PLEA—HIS GRACE OF ST. PAUL
LAMENTS TENDENCY TO CATER
TO CROESUS.
Most Rev. Austin Dowling, Archbish
op of St Paul, was the principal speak
er at the sixth annual'convention of
the Catholic Hospital Association,
which closed in this city, June 24.
Delegates to the convention number
ed many hundreds," including members
of the clergy, distinguished physicians
and surgeons and mahy laymen. St.
Thomas College was headquarters for
the convention. Dr. W. J. Mayo, of
Rochester, Minn., delivered the ad
dress of welcome, following the 'serv
ices in St. Thomas' Chapel.
Archbishop Dowling's Address.,
Archbishop Dowling's address was,
in part, as follows:
"The word- 'hospital' is of a Chris
tian origin. It is built upon the Vul
gate text in which our Lord describes
the disguises He wears on earth. The
sick, the sore, the hungry, the naked,
the prisoner come and go in life and
He is one with all, His, the pinched
face of the famishing His, the groan
Of. them that faint with pain His, the
piteous plea of those in want who eat
the bitter bread of tears. The Chris
tian then may never turn aside from
the poor lest he may turn aside from
Christ, and Christians' long ago too1
care to make provision for Him whe
He came. The guest, the hospe?
should find his place prepared. Hence
the Hospitium, the hospice and its
+he
most part
are eminently successful.
"How did they do it? Where have
they found their funds?
Christ and Croesus.
"In the old days the Siste-s begged
for the poor—God's poor. They rare
ly do so now. They scarcely need to
do so now. For Croesus has become
their guest now—Croesus, who once
loathed hospitals as pest houses
Croesqs, who has money and pays his
bills and wants the best whatever it
costs. Croesus, when he falls ill, goes
to the hospital, frequently the Catho
lic hospital, and is our guest, our most
welcome guest, perhaps our only guest.
Christ even as of old languishes on
fevered cot, tosses about in the dingy
quarters of the poor. He has no
money to pay. His bills—to pay our
bills—and it comes high to minister
to Him today. Is it any wonder that
between the upper and the nether
millstone of debt and standards, sweet
charity is bruised and faints and dies
—dies in the house that stilt by name
recalls the Guest that has fled?
r'
Croesus is Particular.
"A Catholic hospital has this ad
vantage over other hospitals, that it
can 'pool' the piety, the devotion, the
consecration of the lives of its relig
ious manager and attendants. They
get as little comfort, as little relaxa
tion and enjoyment now that the opu
lent Croesus is their guest as when
they worked for the destitute Christ.
The money he pays goes to the debt,
got* toward fn-OTidtlig' turn •gnip*
£!?*i
*W.1£T»
Number
27r
ment and financing the capita? cost of
the expensive modern hospftaL The
Sisters could not work harder than
they do if they were working for
Christ.
"The change from the old to the
new hospital has come about so sud
denly that we have not noticed what
it has meant, or what losses it entail
ed. The staff of a hospital is inter*
ested in science, not In chirity So
also is every standardizing agency.
Croesus, our best paying guest, would
leave us if he heard us mention the
name of charity 1n connection with
our work, but deep down in the heart
of every nun devoted to this ministry
is the thought that she is ministering
to Christ and doing works of charity
."Who will bring back Cnrist, the
Guest, to our Catholic hospitals? Who
can do so but ourselves who are alone
interested in His service and skilled
in the charity by which alone
s e v e
Officers Elected.
Rev. Charles B. Moulinier S. J.,
Marquette university, Milwaukee, was
re-elected president of the Catholic
Hospital Association of the United
States and Canada, at the closing ses
sion of the convention on June 24.
Most Rev. S. G. Messmer of Milwau
kee was elected honorary president.
Following are officers and members
of the executive board elected: Rev.
P. G. Mahan, S. J., Chicago, active
vice president Dr. B. F. McGrath.
Milwaukee, secretary-treasurer ex
ecutive board, Dr. L. D. Morehead,
Chicago, Rev. M. F. Griffin, Youngs-
deri. ation, the hospital,' builded of old gt Mary's hospital, Minneapolis. Rev.
and long maintained for the Guest dis- .j Boland was elected supervisor
guised in the weeds of suffering. A of diocesan directors and Rev. George
Catholic hospital then has this hal- n Metzgar, Brooklyn, N. Y.. was elect
io wed origin, this challenging tradi-
e(
tion. It is not built for guests," but vincial conferences.
for the Guedt who would not be dis
guised could He be discovered by any
eye but thal -of faith.
hospitals for Poer*
"For centuries hospitals were bnilt
for no other guest but Christ. They
were the refuge of the poor, the sanc
tuary of charity, the playground of the
Saints who sought their Lord hidden
in the worn and weary bodies of out
casts.
'Almost till our day the hospital
had only Christ's poor for its guests.
But in the last half century, or rather
in the last thirty years, the prodigious
development of medical science and
practice has quite changed the char
acter of hospitals. Surgery has come
into its own. Marvelous operations
that were npt dreamt of a quarter of
a century ago are now the familiar
daily achievement of every modern
well-appointed hospital. Hospitals
have become places of research sci
entific laboratories where skillful phy
sicians dice with disease and death
and more often win than lose. But
schools are an expensive undertaking
and surgery comes high. To do surgi
cal work well demands ideal condi
tions undreamt of in the past new
and elaborately appointed buildings,
the .most modern and expensive instru
ments, the biost highly trained attend
ants.
"The old Catholic hospitals were
not slow to accept the challenge of
the new medical demands. They built
their new buildings, they provided
their expensive equipment they un
dertook to develop as highly trained
attendants as the new work of hos
pitals required. In a decade or two,
they have been made over. They are
in a fair way now to equal the best.
They enjoy the confidence of the med*
ical profession and for
Ohio, Mother M. Douglas, gray
~»freal, Can., Dr. F. S. Kelley,
Tc,
Wis., Sister M. Veron
hospital, Chicago, Sister
V •. Good Samaritan hospi
tal, iati and Sister Madelina,
director of state, district' and (Mo­
nttiniM siiiif
DE VALERA SAY* A FREE lftt
LAND WOUL3-! BE GREATEST
FOf^ENGLAtyQ*.
Christopher O'Sullivan, an Austra
lian correspondent, lib *n interview
with Eamon De Valera, Irish repub
lican leader, for an Australian news
agency, asked him whether Ireland
would accept a status similar to that
of the British overseas dominions, to
which Mr. De Valera replied:
"No such status has been offered
Ireland."
Asked what sotatio^ jie proposed,
he replied:
5
"A neutral Irish stale'whose invio
lability would be guaranteed by, say,
the "United States and states of the
British empire and any others that
could be secured as signatories. Free
Ireland would never allow its terri
tories or harbors to be made the basis
of an attack on England by an out
side power. A native Irish defense
force would be many times as effective
in keeping out an invader as any
force England could provide- her,
while in case of danger England's own
forces would still be available.
"Any pledge Ireland gives, Ireland
will keep. With an independent Ire
land beside her Great Britain would
be more safe than she is now from
foreign' attack."
i JAPANESE CATHOLIC
.Prominent among the ^member*
the suite of the Crown Prince of Ja
pan, is a Japanese Catholic, Mr. F.
Yamamoto. He was chosen to give
his royal pupil lessons in French be
fore he recently went to Europe, and
was retained in the imperial entour
age for his tour—an unexpected pro
motion for a Catholic. Mr. Yamamoto,
who is president of the Young Men's
Catholic Association at Tokio, has
worked hard there for the spread of
the Faith, and can reckon two hun
dred zealous members in his associa
tkm. -t .f
HOME FCS SISTERS
'V^MST AND RETREAT HOUSt
(BLESSED BY CARDINAL.
The greatest and one of the latest
benefactions to religion during the
lifetime of the late Thomas B. Flti
patrick, of Boston and Brookline, was
$100,000 for the building at Framing
ham, Mass., 6f a rest and retreat house
for the Sisters of St. Joseph cf the
Archdiocese of Boston.
The new convent is known as The
Bethany House, and will accomm^
date 125 religious. It has a spiendlfl
chapel, called the St Thomas Chapei,
in memory of Mr. Fitzpatriek.
His Eminence, the Cardinal 4rtfc
bishop of Boston, has just dediestai
the Chapel and -the convetftt
*-v. 1
y5

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