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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, December 10, 1921, Image 1

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Volume 11
'.J
Prelates at Obsequies.
On Monday evening, the community
of St. John's Abbey, with lighted ta
pers in their hands, received the body
of their dead leader at the doors of
the beautiful abbey church, and es
corted it to a place of honor in thp
sanctuary to the sad chant of the Mis
erere. Here the deceased prelate lay
in state until the morning of Thurs
day. On Thursday morning, the pro
cession of religious, priests and prel
ates formed in the abbey cloister and
slowly advanced to the abbey clnirch
where every available foot was crowd
ed with the friends of the deceased
Abbot. As many more were unable
to enter, but patiently waited outside
throughout the impressive pontifical
ceremonies which began at 10 o'clock.
JQverv prinst of the St. Cloud dioeee
who could possibly attend, was pres
ent. Among the other distinguished
visitors present in the sanctuary were
Most Reverend Austin Dowling, D. D.,
Archbishop of St. Paul Right Rev.
BURIAL OF ABBOT ENGEL
BELOVED HEAD OF ST. JOHN'S
ABBEY IS LAID TO REST AT
SCENE OF HIS LABORS—SUR­
ROUNDED BY MANY PRELATES
AND HUNDREDS OF PRIESTS-
BISHOP BUSCH SINGS PONTIFI
CAL MASS AND DELIVERS
TOUCHING EULOGY.
Beneath a large, drooping willow
planted by the good Abbot of St.
John's years ago, Father Abbot En
gel, president of St. John's universi
ty, Colleg^ville, Minn., the father of
his large community of St. John's
Abbey, and everybody's friend, was
laid to rest in the abbey cemetery
at 12:40 P. M. Thursday, December 1.
When the mortal remains of the great
arid good prelate reached its last rest
ing place, the huge funeral cortege
was still passing the institution over
which he had presided for twenty
seven years. Thousands of friends
from every part of Minnesota, and
distinuished prelates and clergymen
from all parts of the United States,
assembled to offer the last homage
to the humble abbot monk. Whose un
sullied life had shaped the careers
and influenced the characters of so
many leaders of men in the north
west. Other hundreds who wrere un
able to attend wired their condolences
to the beieaved community.
James Trobec, D. D., titular Bishop
of Lycopolis Right Rev. Patrick Heff
ron, D. D., '79, Bishop of Winona
Right Rev. Timothy Corbett, D. D.,
Bishop of Crookston Righ+ Rev. Vin
cent Wehrle, D. D., Bishop of Bis
marck Right Rev. John T. McNich
olas, O. P., D. D., Bishop of Duluth,
Right Rev. Michael Ott, O. S. B., Ph.
D., Abbot Ordinary of the diocese of
St. Peter, Canada Right Rev. Arch
Abbot Aurelius Stehle, O. S. B., of St.
Vincent's Arch-Abbey, Beatty, Penn.
Right Rev. Bernard Menges, O. S. B..
Abbot of St. Bernard's Abbey, Cull
man, Ala. Right Rev. Vincent Huber,
O. S. B., Abbot of St. Bede's Abbey,
Peru, 111. Right Rev. Oswald Baran,
a beloved father, and the diocese of
St. Cloud a very loyal friend. A few
days ago, a word or a gesture from
him was significant and carried with
it an effect of power today, his form
is rigid in the helplessness of death.
Wp have read a great deal of his sci
entific accomplishments, but all the
resources of science were unable to
stay the hand of Death. We see
about us many evidences of his suc
cessful management, but inlhis eyes
these had little value the only thing
of value to him now are the virtues
of his long and useful life. It is be
fitting that we speak of him with our
eyes on the things of faith. We can
profitably follow the virtues that
adorned him through his exemplary
career.
"Now these things stand perfectly
revealed to his own self. It is hard
for us to realize the condition of a
departed soul. The Church invites
us to represent to ourselves the con
ditions of a eoul that leaves this
earth. The prayers of the liturgy and
the ceremonies are not intended as
so many empty symbols of our own
grief they have a practical bearing,
and are employed as means to solicit
our sympathy for the departed. It
is hard for us, surrounded by the
distractions of this world, to realize
the supreme perfection of God, and
the many consequences of our sins
and neglected opportunities. It is
only when the soul sees itself reveal
ed in its true color and when it
stands in the august presence of God
that it thoroughly understands how
terrible are the things that stand be
tween it and its God. In the days
of faith people seemed to realize
fully, or at least better than we rea
lize today, the necessity of making
reparation for our sins and daily
shortcomings. On the one hand, the
soul feels that there is nothing that
can make it happy except the pres
ence of its God, and ion the other
hand, it realizes how unworthy it is
to stand before God. It shudders at
the thought of being revealed in all
its imperfections. Jit is these things
the Church helps us to realize on this
occasion.
"Hut then is also the virtue of hope*
'that gives us confidence. God has
promised that if we fulfill certain def
inite conditions, these will entitle us
to the beatific vision. If these have
been fulfilled in the life of the de
parted soui, it rests quietly and tran
quilly. Here it is hard for us to re
alize pain. The soul sees the neces
sity for equity, that it is the only
condition that will admit it to the
sight of God. Perhaps for the first
time in its life does it perceive the
value of virtue.
"Happily we can exercise the vir
tue of charity through our suffrages
and good works, which can assist the
soul in its trying ordeal. Death leads
us to appreciate the nobility of men's
lives and character, and the many
virtues of the departed Abbot pass
before our eyes as we pay the final
tribute of respect today. We recall
his meekness, his patienc-3, his kind
ness, his zeal for religion, his devoted
virtues which ennobled his
O. S. B., Abbot of St. Martin's Abbey,
Lacey, Wash. Right Rev. Valentine, piety,
O. S. B., Abbot of St. Procopius Al character and secured the approval
bey, Lisle, 111. Right Rev. C. Thie- of our hearts. God in His goodness
baut. Chancellor of the diocese has seen fit to hasten his flight to
of St. Cloud Right Rev. Augustine the possession of eternal happiness.
Plachta, of Royalton Very Rev. There are so many of his subjects
Humphrey Moynihan, D. D., Rector and friends who can offer up the sac
of St. Paul Seminary Very Rev. rifice of the Mass for him, which God
Thomas E. Cullen. Rector of St. will, no doubt, graciously accept in
Thomas College, St. Paul Very Rev. i lieu of personal sufferings in Purga
W. Van Dinter. O. S. C., of Blue i tory. But I would not be a true
Grass Very Rev. Paul Wit.zelsberger, friend of the departed Abbot if I
O. S. B., representing Conception Ab-. would not solicit your prayers for him
bey, Conception, Mo. Very Rev. and the other departed. Let us unite
Adalbert Kraft, O. S. B., Prior, rep- and continue our prayers that he, too,
resenting St. Mary's Abbey, Richard- may speedily be granted eternal rest,
ton, N. Dak. Rev. Gerard Heinz, O. I and that, the glory of the blessed may
S. B., representing St. Benedict's Ab- shine upon him. Remember him in
bev, Atchison, Kan. your prayers, and your suffrages, so
Surrounded by these dignitaries 1 that his soul may soon partake of
^pd distinguished visitors, Right Rev.
Bishop Busch, D. D., of tho diocese of
St. Cloud, a close friend of Abbot
Peter, sang the Pontifical Requiem.
The Mass was preceded by the sol
emn chant of the Office of the Dead
by all the clergymen present. It is
estimated that there were over two
hundred regular and secular priests
present.
Pontifical Mass.
At the Pontifical Mass of Requiem,
Bishop Busch was assisted by Right
Rev. C. Thiebaut, assisting priest
Jflath^r Othmar, O. S.. B, and Rev.
J.
Gaughan, '79,
of
Minneapolis,
6s deacons of honor Very Rev. Jo
seph Wurra, of the diocese of Crooks
ton. deacon of the Mass Rev. Dr.
Philip Kiley of the diocese of Duluth,
as subdeacon of the Mass Rever
ends Lambert and Basil, O. S. B., mas
ters of ceremonies Father Angels,
mitre bearer: Father Reinhart, book
bearer: Father Christopher, candle
bearer: assistants to the prelates:
Very Rev. Alphonse, O. S. B., Rever
«fHds James, Kilian, Severin, Danial,
Gilbert, Rembert, Wendelin, Hilde
brand, Virgil, Ignatius, Method, O.
& B.
After the Mass, Bishop Busch. con
Ifcious of the solemnity of the mo
tfcent, preached a short sermon that
Spoke his own feeling of affliction and
yent to the hearts of fete hearers.
He said, in part:
Bishop Busch's Sermon.
the death of Abbot Peter Engel,
the brder of St. Benedict loses an il
lustrious soh. the Abbey of St. John,
heaven's happiness and bliss.
Solemn Absolutions.
Then solemn absolutions over, tile
body were pronounced by
Busch, Archbishop Dowling, Bishop
Heffron, Bishop McXicholas and Bish
op Wehi-le. After this, the solemn
cortege of death slowly advanced to
the abbey cemetery where Abbot Pe
ter Engel was laid to rest among the
old pioneer priests of the abbey
Bishop Busch officiated at the obs#»
qui^s at the grave
Among the Benedictine Fathers of
St. John's abbey who gathered from
parishes in all parts of the country
were Fathers Gregory, William, Lud
ger, Othmer, Ildephonse. Martin, Al
fred, Thomas, Henry, Gerard, Paulin,
George, Herman, Adrian, Clement,
Agatho, Phillip, Benedict, Luke,
Charles, Ansgar, Otto, Fidelis, Ber
nard, Alto, Leonard, Anselm, Adolph
Edmund, Meinrad, Hugo, Raymond
Robert, Werner, Magnus, Bede, Pius
Hildebrand, Wilfrid, Edwin, Sebastian
Timothy, Victor, Odilo, Adalbert and
Celestine, O. S. B. The Minneapolis
Alumni were represented by Mr. Matt
Kummer, president, and Messrs. A1
fred Knaeble, A. Zachmann and
Noethen the St. Paul Alumni by Mr
Michael Weiskopf, branch president,
Space will not permit us to mention
the hundreds of other cle.'gvmen and
distinguished laymen present at this
the most solemn and impressive cer
emony witnessed in Stearns county !n
our recollection. May God be good
to His good servant mA our dear
friend, Abbot Peter.
GRE^T EVENT TO TAKE PLACE
IN ROME NEXt YEAR.
Preparations for the International
Eucharistic Congress to be held in
Rome from the 25th to the 29th of next
May are now in the hands of several
committees. It is announced that the
Holy Father will receive delegates to
the Congress in a great audience and
will celebrate Mass in St. Peter's for
them. It is planned that the delegates
will go in procession through the Vati
can Gardens at the opening of the
Congress.
Pontifical Mass will be celebrated
according to the various rites during
the Congress. The Roman committee
has been organized under the chair
manship of Archbishop Palica. Five
subsidiary committees have been ap
pointed to arrange for the religious
ceremonies of the Congress.
MORE CATHOLIC WINNERS
MARQUETTE AND CAMPION ARE
FIRST IN STATE CONTEST.
The Marqtfette Tribune, published
by students of Marquette university,
Milwaukee, was pronounced first
among Wisconsin college newspapers
by the Wisconsin Collegiate Press as
sociation at its convention in Beloit
December 2. The Beloit college
Round Table was voted second best
and the Lawrence college Appleton
Lawrentian, third. Fifty-five dele
gates, representing twenty-seven
schools, registered. The Campion,
published by students of Campion col
lege of Prairie du Chien, was adjudged
the best student magazine in the state.
Prizes were from the Medill and Pu
litzer schools of journalises
MURDERED PRIEST
BEQUEATHED MONEY FOR MASS
ES AND LIBRARY TO SEMI
NARY.
The last will and testament of the
late Rev. Patrick J. Heslin, murdered
pastor of Colma, Calif., has been filed
for probate. The will was executed
by Father Heslin in San Francisco on
March 12, 1914.
By the terms of the will, several
small bequests are left to a brothel
and sister. The sum of $1,000 is left
for funeral expenses of the deceased,
and $1,000 for Masses. His library
left to St. Patrick Seminary, at
Menlo Park, Calif.
UN lilSJUOMERT
EARL OF SHAFTESBURY, LORD
CHAMBERLAIN TO QUEEN
MARY, HAS BECOME A CATHO
LIC.
The announcement that the Earl of
Shaftesbury has become a Catholic,
marks one of the most notable con
versions in Ireland in many years.
His title is three hundred years old,
and its present holder is the ninth
earl. He is the chancellor of Queen's
university, Belfast, and lord chamber
lain to Queen Mary, as well as an ex
lord mayor of Belfast. He has oc
cupied high rank in the army, and
was entrusted with important state
duties in politics. A Liberal in poli
tics, every charitable cause has found
in him a generous supporter. A
predecessor of his was famed as a
philanthropist and zealous social re
former, and his name has been hon
orably associated with legislatipn for
the protection of women and chil
dren employed in factories.
The earl of Shaftesbury's Irish res
idence is at Belfast castle, and he is
the owner of extensive estates in Bel
fast and north Ireland.
CANON WACKER DEMI
DEATH REMOVES ABLE LEADER
CENTRISTS.
(By N. W. C. News Service.)
In the death of Canon Theodor
Wacker, parish priest of Zaehringen
the Centrist party has suffered the
loss of another of its ablest leaders
He follows to the grave those other
champions ot recent years—Groeber,
Trimborn, Burlage and Hilze.
Canon Wacker was born in 1845,
and was ordained, to the priesthood
in 1869. He won the name, "Lion of
Zaehringen," by his vigor and ability
as a defender of Catholic rights. Dur
ing the Kulturkampf, he did much
for the Catholics of Baden. He was
a fine orator and an able organizer.
He was several times elected to the
Landtag where he proved himself an
enemy much feared by the Liberals
and Socialists. His speeches were al
ways notable for their inexorable log?
ic and wealth of material
i
ST. PAUL, MINN., DECEMBER 10, 1921
LOCAL ACADEMY WINS
ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY OI\ ST.
PAUL AWARDED SECOND pWlZE
IN NATIONAL CONTEST.
On November 25 and 26, the Cen
tral Interscholastie Press Association
held its second annual convention at
Madison, Wis., under the auspices of
the students in journalism at the Uni
versity of Wisconsin. St. Joseph's
academy of St. Paul received an in
vitation to become affiliated with the
organization and to enter its maga
zine in" the contest held during the
convention. The November issue of
"The Academy" was submitted. It
was judged second best among the
quarterlies in the contest. The
judges were Professor William Bley
er, director of the course in journal
ism at the University of Wisconsin
Grant M. Hyde, associate professor,
and E. Marion Johnson, assistant pro
fessor, in the same department.
As there were publications from
all over the United States entered in
the C. I. P. A. contest, "The Acad
emy" is proud to have won this dis
tinction. The Catholic Bulletin joins
with all the friends of Catholic edu
cation in congratulating the faculty
and students of St. Joseph's academy
on their splendid achievement.
mESTJIECK
NEW YORK PRIEST IS KILLED BY
AUTOMOBILE.
Hev. Joseph P. McGinlev of St. Pat
rick's church, Long Island City, N.
Y., was fatally injured Monday even-'
ing, November 28, when an automo
bile in which he was riding with Rev.
Charles Sennett, of St. Rosalia's
church, Brooklyn, collided with a
heavy truck in Queen's Village.
ther McGinley died in an ambulance
on the way to the hospital. Father
Sennett and Mrs. Mary Dumas, his
cousin, were injured. 1
The party was on the
way
from
Father McGinley's residence to Brook
lyn when the accident befell them.
The night^was dark and rainy, and
the truck %ra& standing, without a
tail light, in the middle of Hillside av
enue. The impact overturned and
wrecked the small car, which was be
ing driven by Father Sennett.
Father McGinley was 67 years old
and had been pastor of St. Patrick's
church for some years. -v
SIR THOMAS ESHOE
CATHOLIC BARON OF IRELAND TO
ENGAGE IN U. S. INDUSTRY.
Sir Thomas Esmonde, Bart., one of
the few Catholics in Ireland who can
trace their title of nobility back
through centuries, and a chamberlain
of the Papal household, is about to
transfer some of his activities to
America.
1
He intends to take up the cultiva^
tion of sugar beets in Wyoming. Since
ceasing to be a member of the Brit
ish parliament in 1918, after having
held a seat for 33 years, during a
great part of which he was chief whip
to the Irish parliamentary party, Sir
Thomas has increased his industrial
activities and now occupies a leading
position in Irish railway and banking
enterprises.
His Baronetcy dates back to the
17th century. His mother was a grand
daughter of Henry Grattan, the Irish
patriot and orator with whose name
is associated the Irish parliament of
1782-1800. Sir Thomas has been
Papal chamberlain for twenty years,
has traveled extensively, written
much and is especially interested in
Irish folklore and antiquities.
FRIEND DF CARDINAL
The death of B. F. Shriver at Union
Mills, Md., removes from the Balti
more diocese one of its leading lay
men and one of the closest friends
of the late Cardinal Gibbons. Mr.
Shriver's home was honored for many
years by the visits of the Cardinal
who called it "The Upper House of
Parliament" to distinguish it from the
"Lower House of Parliament," the
home of the late General T. Herbert
Shriver, at which he was also a fre
quent guest. The funeral services
took place in St. John's church, West
minster, the Rev. Thomas E. McGui
gan celebrating the Mass of Requiem
and Bishop Owen B. Corrigan pro
nouncing absolution.
WIN
(fey & C, W. C. News Serviced
Christian Candidates overwhelming
ly defeated their Socialist and Com
munist opponents in the recent school
elections in Thueringen, where legal
advisers to parents were to be chos
en. Nearly everywhere in the dis
trict the Christian and confessional
schools, in which religious instruction
is given, were upheld, notwithstand
ing the Socialists had conducted a
very energetic propaganda in behalf
their own school program.
NOTEjJT WOMAN PHYSICIAN,
DAUGHTER OF MINISTER, BE
COMES SISTER OF CHARITY-
SAW CONSIDERABLE WAR SERV
ICE.
Dr. Jane Craven, at one time one Of
the leading women osteopathic phy
sicians of Pittsburgh, later the driver
of a motor ambulance with the French
armies and worker in a French field
hospital, has joined the Sisters of
Charity, having been received recent
ly into the order at its motherhouse
in the Rue de Bac in Paris.
Dr. Craven's father was a Metho
dist Episcopal missionary in India,
and she was of British birth. When
the world war broke out she was in
tensely interested in the cause of the
allies and, soon after the beginning of
the war, undertook to secure hospital
supplies for the armies in France and
Belgium. In 1915, she conceived the
idea of organizing a motor unit. She
enlisted the aid of many friends in
the enterprise, and in raising funds a
benefit concert was given at which
Mme. Melba sang. With the funds, a
well-equipped motor ambulance was
purchased, fitted out and taken to
France. This unit crossed to France
early in 1916 and was attached to
one of the French armies. Later, Dr.
Craven was assigned to a hospital at
Vitry-le-Francois, which was several
times bombed by the Germans.
For her work, Dr. Cravfen was
awarded the Croix de Guerre. It was
while working in this hospital that
Dr. Craven became imbued with the
idea of joining the Sisterhood on duty
there, and now, having completed her
novitiate, she is a member of- .the or
der. ».
DOCTOR HIKES TEACH
ING OF HYGIENE
Speaking as a medical man, I)r.
Schofield, well known-in England, had
some strong words to say about thp
so-called sex hygienic, whom Jjc
cused of trying to exalt eugenics,
mere physical hygiene, above spirit
ual or mental hygiene.
"What is the remedy?" faef asked.
"A nation can live only with an ideal
before it. Therefore, every attempt
must be made by the English people
to restore the ideal to their children
by teaching them the fear of God and
the truths of religion.
'Instead of spending so much time
in giving sex knowledge to the
young," Dr. Schofield concluded, "it
would be better. to teach them the
sacredness of their bodies and the
principles of religion."
PRINCE-PRIEST DEAI
NOBLE WHO BECAME DOMINICAN
DIES IN COLOGNE.
(By N. C. W. C. News Service.)
Prince Charles of Loewenstein, who
joined the Dominican Order at the
age of seventy and who a few years
later was ordained to the priesthood,
has died at the monastery in Cologne,
Germany. He was 87 years old. The
prince in recent years had been
known as Father Raymundus.
Before leaving the world for the
seclusion of the monastic life, Prince
Loewenstein was a leader of the Cath
olic forces. He had been commis
sioner of the Catholic assemblies in
Germany since 1872. With others he
helped to found the Centrist party
in 1671. When Bishop .Blum was
driven from his See in 1883, Prince
Loewenstein gave him refuge in his
castle at Haid, in Bohemia.
For years the prince was one. of
the leaders of the annual German pil
grimage to Rome. When be decided
to forsake the world, he went to Ven
loo, Holland, to become a Dominican
novice.
The prmce was born ita. 1834 in the
Loewenstein castle tit Kleinhea^&ch
LEFT 810,000 FOR CATHOLIC
S
Out of an estate of $500,000, Mrs.
Robert Bullen, widow of a Chicago
broker, left $10,000, to be distributed
among the following Catholic insti
tutions: Dominican College at Rome
Ecole Biblique, Jerusalem: Rev. M.
J. Fouquet, Angers, France the Do
minican convent, Albany the Domin
ican Sisters of Perpetual Rosary,
Summit, N. Stnd Bishop McNichol
as of the diocese of Duluth for the
benefit of the Holy Name society.
VICAR GENERAL DEA6
Monsignor Francois Xavier de la
Durantaye, vicar general of the arch
diocese of Montreal, died suddenly
last Sunday at the Hotel Dieu hospi
tal, that city» where ha. JuuL beea a
fattest."*'
"V i'
PEACE DAWNS THIS WEEK WHEN
ALL SEEMED LOST—ERIN TO
BE NUMBERED AMONG FREE
THE IRISH FREE STATE
STATES OF THE BRITISH EM
PIRE—DELEGATES AGREE.
Jb
spite
of the
dark
clouds that
threatened destruction to the peace
conference in London, a mutual agree
ment was reached by Irish and Eng
lish delegates at 2:30 o'clock last
Tuesday morning. The negotiations
were carried on in the offices of the'
British premier, in London
The treaty, which was signed by
seven delegates representing Eng
land, and six representatives on be
half of Ireland, contains eighteen ar
ticles with an annex. The substance
of the treaty is that Ireland is to
be known officially as the Irish Free
State, and it will enjoy the same con
stitutional status as Canada, Austra
lia, New Zealand and South Africa.
The question of allegiance was solved
by permitting the members of the
Irish parliament to swear allegiance
to the Constitution of the Irish Free
State and "be faithful to His Majes
ty, the King."
The terms of this agreement were
submitted to the Dail Eireann, the Ul
ster apd the Imperial parliaments.
The Imperial parliament will meet on
uecember 14, while Ulster apparently
DEPLORABLE CONDITIONS IN GER­
DAY FOR EACH NUN—SISTERS
STARVING BY THE THOUSANDS
IN GERMAN HOUSES.
Seventy thousand Catholic sisters,
in charge of German institutions giv
ing shelter and care to half a mil
lion sick men, women and children—
ippit'By de«t wad Uuuitr, itfmd, de
fectives and orphans—are confronted
with the necessity of forsaking their
merciful missions unless they receive
help from some quarter, writes Rev.
Dr. Von Capitaine.
The newspapers have been publish
ing accounts of the increase of dis
ease, poverty and suffering in Cath
olicj-and probably also in Protestant
welfare institutions. All the hos
pitals, homes, asylums, reformatories,
kindergartens and refuges have been
reduced to a condition of the most
serious distress, and it is not say
ing too much to declare that they
are now battling for existence.
If these nuns should be compelled
to quit their posts in these institu
tions it would be a calamitous loss to
the thousands of unfortunates of
Germany.
Food and all tlife necessities of life
are now ten or twenty times more
costly than heretofore, while the
revenue^ of such institutions have in
creased scarcely five-fold. The con
sequence is that the poor nuns and
STUDY SOCIAL QUESTIONS
CATHOLIC STUDY CLUBS ARE
FORMED IN MANY CITIES.
Establishment of Catholic social
study clubs in more than a score of
cities of the United States is an
nounced by the Departments of Social
Action of the National Catholic Wel
fare Council, which has been foster
ing the intensive study of the social
question by Catholic societies.
Many of the clubs formed have been
established under the auspices of dif
ferent councils of the National Coun
cil of Catholic Men. Colleges are also
taking a vital interest in the work, as
indicated by the formation of clubs at
Marquette University, in Milwaukee,
and by Catholic students at the Uni
versity of Wisconsin, at Madison.
Among the cities where organiza
tions have been formed are St. Paul
Providence Davenport, la. Burling
ton, 111. Elgin, 111. Boston, Milwau
kee, San Antonio, Jefferson City, Mo.,
Redwood, City, Calif., and St. Louis
There are three clubs established ia
Washington. y
WORKERSjmST
LOCAL "LOYALIST" ECHOES BISH
OP'S PLEA.
(Br
C. News Sendee.)
A prominent woman in Belfast
draws attention in a letter to a news
paper to the fact that girl employees
in that city work 12 hours daily and
14 hours on Saturdays. She asks if
the Christian citizens of Belfast will
remedy this crying evil. The citizens
should do their bit "to save the slaves
of greedy people." This letter was
written by one connected with a "loy
alist" institution.
Bishop MacRory and the priests
have frequently complained of fhe
harsh working conditions ill Belfast
Number 50
will go minutely into the document.
The terms of the historic document,
which was signed by the Irish dele
gates with their Gaelic names, are
briefly as follows:
Ireland, as a whole, is to be treated
as a free, legal state under the Em
pire. In case Ulster should refuse
acquiescence in this condition, the
special act of 1920, for the govern
ment of Ireland, will remain in force
with regard to the northern parlia
ment, but new boundaries for north
ern Ireland will be determined by a
special commission. In the event of
Ulster remaining out of the new Free
State, various provisions are made
assigning definite safeguards for both
parliaments and districts. Religious
endowment and religious disability
are not permitted in the work of ei
ther parliament.
A representative of the Crown, in
Ireland, shall be appointed in like
manner as the governor general of
Canada.
Various provisions are made with
regard to the defense of the Irish
coasts by the British navy until such
time as the Irish Free State can un
dertake this work. In case the Irish
Free State establishes a military de
fense force, this force must be based
upon the size of the British force in
proportion to population. All ports of
each country shall be freely opened
to the ships of the other country.
NUNS ARE STARVING
MAN CHARITABLE INSTITU­
TIONS—BREAKDOWN OF SYS­
TEM FEARED—ONE POTATO A
their charges are actually exposed to
hunger.
"Go to the cemetery of a mother
house. Look at the poor wooden
crosses and make a comparison. It
is a horrible story. The number of
deaths in 1920-21 has been fifty times
larger than in any previous year.
Such is the heroism of our good Cath
olic nuns who starve and die while
they are struggling to succor others.
Of 160 nuns in a Bavarian convent on
ly two are really well. On an aver
age two sisters die each month. They
know not where to get food. The def
icit has reached an aggregate oi 5*0,000
marks. None of these institutions is
able to pay from fifteen thousand to
twenty thousand marks for two hun
dred pounds of potatoes. And daily
bread? In one orphan asylum for
many months there has been one day
in every week on which there was
no bread at all. There was only one
potato for each sister. And potatoes
this year? Impossible!"
All this is true. I found the truth,
of this in all the monasteries which
I have been able to visit In recent
months in Cologne, Berlin, Aix-la
Chappelle, Potsdam, Remscheid—
everywhere. We must have help. An
English king once said that "people
need not starve if they have potatoes,"
but even potatoes are beyond the
reach of the poor of Germany now.
Millions are daily spent for pleasures,
plays and sports^ and Catholics do
and permit such things without offer
ing the least help! The Catholic peo
ple must find a way to save the nuns
and the inmates ot their convents and
asylums.
THE VHtGINISlAHDS
FATHER SCHRECK SUPERIOR OF
REDEMPTORISTS THERE.
Word has been received Of the ap
pointment of Rev. Andrew Henry
Schreck, C. SS. R., as superior over
the Redemptorists in the Virgin Is
lands.
Father Schreck was ordained in
1913, and since tfi&t time he has won
great fame as a preacher. He gave
many successful missions in Canada
and in the east. He was assistant
rector of St Mary's, Loretta, Pa., and
organised, the Knights ot St. John,
now one of the largest clubs in Buf
falo.
WIMIINfip WAY
HUNDREDS OF UNIVERSITY
MEN
WORK FOR TUITION.
One of every tour men at the Uni
versity of Notre Dame is working his
way through school, according to lat
est reports of the university employ
ment bureau. Two hundred and tea
men are working as waiters in th»
refectory, as library clerks, secre
taries, office men, book store clerk*
prefects, janitors, etc., while other
men, whom the report does not con
sider, are also earning part of theft*
expenses as waiters in city restau
rants, clerks in stores, night report
ers for newspapers, etc.
The university maintains its own
employment bureau and gives all poth
sible work about the university to stu
dents, so that it is possible for a stu
dent to earn the most part of his
ex
penses annually.
It is felt that men who work thettf
way through school are generally ttpg
better graduates because of their
struggle, and resulting better appre
ciation, of, and interest in, their st_uj|*
iefti- 'T •.
T. jy
i

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