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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, December 31, 1921, Image 7

Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90060976/1921-12-31/ed-1/seq-7/

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JGleanings^
MAN'S UNCONQUERABLE SOUL.
To the cynic all heroism is futile.
He sees man sooner or later over
borne by a relentless and victorious
Fate, no matter how bravely he may
fight, however patiently and persis
tently he may strive, however stoical
ly he may endure the stings and ar
rows of outrageous fortune. Yet to
all of us comes at times a strange in
ner assurance that no repulse is final
that we fall to rise again, are baf
fled to fight better. Walt Whitman
sang paeans not to victorious generals
only, he also honored "those who had
gone down in the fight, the defeated
and vanquished persons." And Low
ell's saying: "Not failure, but low aim
is crime," rings responsive in every
true soul.
The function of tragedy is purga
tive. Aeschylus tells us "the purifi
cation of the emotions through pity."
Dut his own tragedies meant more
than that. They pointed the same
great truth which W. E. Henley
voiced with such force in our own
day: the truth of man's unconquera
ble soul the soul which man cap
tains in his mastery of fate. This
theme of the old Greeks, evidently, is
given modern emphasis in Eugene
O'Neill's new play, "The Straw." His
portrayal of the girl dying with tu
berculosis, yet radiant with new plans
for happiness, stirs the heart to its
depths. The highest peak of trag
edy, after all, is not in death and its
apparent triumph. It is rather in the
often unconscious valor of the last
proud gesture of the captain going
down with his vessel in the cheery
good by of John Jacob As tor as he
placed his wife in the lifeboat of the
Titanic.
Happily, instances of this superior
ity of the soul to Fate are not excep
tional. One might well say that
they are the rule. Every day and in
every community, there are men and
women who hold to the ancient dig
nity of the race in the face of defeat
and disaster—men and women who
can smile "when everything goes
dead wrong." It is some dim con
sciousness of this supremacy of the
soul shown not only in supremely
dramatic crises, but also in the re
curring troubles and trials of com
monplace existence, that is our assur
ance of that something in the inmost
center in us all which makes Fate
powerless to harm us. We know we
are immortal and will go on.
"Unhurt amidst the war of elements,
The wrecks of matter, and the crush
of worlds."
—Dearborn Independent.
WHEN KELLY HEARD THE NEWS.
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
Dr. James Henderson.)
When Kelly heard the news, he jump
ed an' flung his hat in air,
An' Burke performed a jig to time
an' Shea leapt from his chair
An' said, "Boys, tho' I'm crippled bad
fr'm this old wound o* mine.
I've waited long for day like this an'
now th' jiggin's fine
He grabbed his musket as if it was
his dear old Colleen Bawn,
He swung it round as tho' he'd found
his old-time Irish brawn,
An' whoop an' yell went high in air,
an' Kelly yelled, "Hurroo!
In all our shindies 'bout th' world, I'd
give a fight or two—
This is the biggest fight, my boys,
that Irishmen have won,
Our battles all were Ireland's loss till
now th' thing is done
We're old an' crippled, cut an* scored
with lead till we are sick,
'Tis now a young lad shows th' way
an' Collins did the thrick
Yes, Collins with his Irish lads in
Kerry, Cork an' Trim
Sure, England is a wise old duck
when she's once rid o' him."
So Kelly, Burke an' Shea beat time
with soldier brogues the floor,
'Tis Kelly yells, "I'm done with wafr,
sure we will fight no more
I left an arm at Omdhurmaun, I've
fought both black and white,
I've did my best an' now I'll rest,
since Ireland's won her fight."
A soldier's tear filled Big Burke's eye,
he could not say a word
Until at last, "God rest her soul! If
mother could have heard."
And old Tim Shea he gave a sob an
fell on Kelly's breast,
An' Burke sat down, a wonderln'-like
—let some one tell th* rest.
THESE WERE AMERICANS.
The outcry in New Jersey against
naming a school for Gen. Steuben
Washington's close friend and the
drill sergeapt of the revolution, pre
supposes a vast ignorance on the part
of the modern generation. It assumes
that Americans are unable to distin
guist between a von Steuben and
•on Mach, says the New York Trib
une. It asperses the fame of
great American who was born in
Prussia, lived in. France and fought
and died in America. Even though
he swore in German, he fought in
our language. As instructor general
of the army, he proved himself inval
liable to Washington. Even his name
has been naturalized. It is not Stoy
ben but Stooben.
Herkimer, Muhlenberg, Sigel
Schurz—these names and thousands
of others are of good German origin
but they are also good American
names. To treat them as anathema
is most narrow.
NORTHERN LIGHTS.
The name "Aurora Borealis," was
first used by Cassendi, who, in 1621
observed one in France and wrote a
description of it. The ''aurora" is pe
riodic in its manifestations, the finest
display being at intervals of 60 years
and less marked ones at intervals of
10 or 11 years. It is asserted that
tbe greater and lesser displays cor-
THE
WAYSIDE.
respond with the increase and de
crease of spots on the sun. This
phenomenon is generally manifested
in the following way: A dim light ap
pears on the horizon shortly after twi
light and gradually assumes the shape
of an arch having a pale yellow color,
with its concave side turned earth
ward. From this arch streams of light
shoot forth, passing from yellow to
green and then to brilliant violeti
IRISH PROVERBS.
Such sayings in this collection as
may not be familiar to the general
reader are translations from the Irish,
but used by the now English-speaking
people in some other forms. They
have been selected from the copious
store to be found in the»excellent
Irish grammar written by the Rev.
Ulick J. Burke of St. Jarlath's college.
The greater part are as much the
property of Hindustanis, Persians,
Germans, Italians and Spaniards as
they are of the inhabitants of the
banks of the Liffey and Slaney. Rev.
Ulick Burke has as many in the na
tive Irish as would fill a good-sized
volume.
A burnt child dreads the fire.
A cat is able to look on a king.
A day in the bone is worth two in
the tally. (Rest is needful as work.)
A drink is shorter than a story.
(An excuse for a drink before the
Story ends.)
A gift horse is not to be looked at
in the teeth..
A good beginning is half the work.
A hen is heavy when carried far.
A light-heeled mother makes a
heavy-heeled daughter.
A living dog is better than a dead
lion.
Always rub your skirts to some one
better off than yourself.
A miss fs as good as a mile.
An alms from his own share is giv
en to a fool.
An empty vessel sounds loud.
An illiterate king is a crowned ass.
LAWS AGAINST PROFANITY.
Did you know that according to the
law of England, swearing is an offense
for which you may be convicted by a
"justice of the peace according to a
scale of penalties? And the higher up
you are in the social scale, the higher
the fine imposed. A day laborer, com
mon soldier or seaman forfeits one
shilling for every oath every other
person under the degree of gentleman,
two shillings, and above the degree of
gentleman, five shillings. For a sec
ond offense, it is double the sum for
a third, triple, etc. At any time, a
constable may arrest a profane swear
er and take him before a justice. On
one occasion, a man lost his temper
entirely and swore the same oath
twenty times before a justice. The
latter counted them and when the man
had finally stopped, fined him two
shillings for each repetition. There
is a similar law in Scotland.
fRISH HISTORIES.
The fairly good text-books of Irish
history'published in this country are
1. "Ireland's Story" by Charles
Johnston.
2. "A History of Ireland," by A. M.
Nolan.
Among many other concise Irish
history texts ara:
3. "Short History of Ireland," by
P. D. Joyce.
4. McCarthy's "Outline Of Irish
History."
5. Duffy's "Bird's Eye View of
Irish History." (Reprinted in Chlca
go by Father Hennebery.)
6. O'Connor's "A Historjr of the
Irish People."
7. Lawless' "The Story of Ireland
What is now generally considered
the best history of Ireland is that of
a learned Irish priest, Rev. E. A
D'Alton (three volumes). Canon
EfAlton completed his histor? in 1910
THE LAST DITCHER.
(Written for The Catholic Bulletin by
Df. James Henderson*)
He dug himself in and he dug himself
out,
And he dug till he couldn't dig longer,
And he dug all the day till he found
out at last
That digging wasn't making him
stronger.
He stayed In his ditch and he wouldn't
come out
To see what the world was a-doing,
And now It is plain at this very late
day
That that is just what he is rueing.
The fellow who sticks to the mud in
the ditch,
Is so like a hog in his wallow,
That he doesn't take stock in his
blinded career
Of what is most likely to follow.
He lolls and he rolls in his muddy es
tate
Till the world goes along and forgets
him.
"If the like is his taste,*' aU his neigh
bors will say,
"And hell be a "last ditcher/ why, let
him.**
A groveling hog makes a very poor
dish
When porkers and hogs are in train
ing.
Their habits and ways are a stench
in our nose
And need a whole lot of explaining,
The wise ones win favor by fighting It
out,
JOB' fighting It out In the open,
There's only a few tn their ditches to
day,
And Freedom is coming—here's hop-
v*•
HINTS FOR SPEAKERS.
Gladstone was once asked to give
some suggestions for platform aspi
i
v,
1VHECATHOLIC
rants and it is said that it was atten
tion to these rules which in no small
degree accounted for Gladstone's own
power in "swaying audiences":
1. Study plainness of language, al
ways preferring the simpler word.
£. Shortness of sentences.
3. Distinctness of articulation.
4. Test and question your own ar
guments beforehand, not waiting for
critics or opponent.
i r». Seek a thorough digestion of
and familiarity with your'subject, and
rely mainly on these to prompt the
proper words.
6. Remember that' if you are to
sway an audience, you must, besides
thinking out your matter, watch It all
along.
MUST LIVE ACCORDING TO GOD'S
MORAL LAWS.
Lawrefrce Hodgson, mayor of St.
Paul, says in the Winnebago Enter
prise- that "amazement is expressed
at the tremendous amount of crime
now rampant especially that which
involves young boys. But is it sur
prising, after all? Look at the ten
dencies of the last few years. How
little of the old-time moral discipline
do we have in the average American
home? How much genuine spirit of
worship do we have? We have been
leaving God out of our calculations.
We have been trying to get by on a
purely materialistic philosophy. We
have forgotten that the universe is
under moral order. We have lost the
ancient, landmarks and set up the rule
of selfishness, and the precepts of
frivolity. We have come to despise
honest toil to honor the pretenders
to pay tribute to vanity. We have
cared more tor gaudy dress than for
the garments of the soul to set store
rather by the fashions of society than
by the manners of the spirit. Of
course, wo have crime and scandal
and cheap living. Passing laws will
not- correct it. We will get back to
health when we become wise enough
to see that God's law is the only
law and that the life Of the world is
in the soul of man."
THAT HOME OF LONG AGO.
There's a little cot a'standing
Beside an old boreen,
With a hedge a'growing 'round ft,
And the grass so bright and green.
A thrush a'singing sweetly,
When the sun is sinking low,
Again I see in memory,
That home of long ago.
It was nothing much to look at,
Yet pleasing to my sight
An earthen floor an open fire
The turf a'burning bright.
While I sat and watched a colleen,
Her eyes with love aglow,
And we dreamed our golden day
dreams,
In that home of long ago.
The colleen still is with me,
With lads and lassies, too
In this land of peace and plenty,
All our golden dreams came true.
Over there is desolation,
Famine, grief and woe,
But somehow, I pray it's standing yet,
Tipft home erf long ago.
—James TV. Gibbons.
A MENTAL TEST FQR GENERAL
USE.
1. When was the War of 1812?
2.
From what province of France
was Joan of Arc?
3. Who is the author of Macaulay's
history of England?
4. What two countries were par
ticipants in the Spanish-American
War?
5. In what season of the year did
Washington spend his winter at Val
ley Forge?
6. Tell about the Swiss Navy.
Timer ta cried out upon as a: great
thief: it is people's own fault. Use
him wen, and you will get from his
hand far more than he will ever take
from yours.
THE CHILDREN'S HOUR.
THE PATCHWORK COW.
Pauline and her doll, Deborah, were
going to a lilac tea when they met
Stacy Poole and his patenwork cow,
Everyone called the Poole cow the
patchwork cow because of her gay
red-and-white coat. She had broken
out of the pasture only a few min
utes ago, and Stacy was driving her
back.
Pauline looked so fine that Stacy
stopped to stare. She had on her
homely old brown gingham, to be
sure, but over it she wore a long
double string of bright beads of all
sizes and colors.
Pauline looked pleased. "I found a
big box of beads lb the attic," she
exclaimed, "and made myself a neck
lace, because I hadn't any new dress
Citation Ex. of Final Account.
STATE OF MINNESOTA. COUNTY OF
Ramsey, ss. In Probate Court.
In the Matter of the Estate of James
E. Ryan, Decedent.
The State of Minnesota to All Whom It
May Concern:
On reading and filing the petition of
the representative of said estate, pray
ing- that he Court fix a time and place
for examining, adjusting and allowing
his Final Account, and for the assign
ment of the residue of said estate to
the persons thfereto entitled:
It is Ordered, That said petition be
heard and that all persons interested
tn said matter be cited and required
to appear before this Court, on Tues
day, the 17th day of January. 1922, at
10 o'clock A. M„ or as soon thereafter
as said matter can be heard, at the
Probate Court Rooms In the Court
House in the City of St. Paul, in said
County, and show cause, if any they
have, why said petition should not be
granted and that this citation be serv
ed by publication thereof in the Cath
olic Bulletin according to law, and by
mailing a copy of this citation at least
14 days before said day of hearing, to
each of the heirs, devisees and legatees
of said decedent whose names and ad
dresses appear from the files of this
Court..
Witness the Judge of said Court this
20th day of December, A. D. 1922.
A. E. DOE,
Judge of Probate of Washington Coun
ty, Minnesota, acting as and for
Judge of Probate of Ramsey County,
Minnesota.
(Seal of Probate Court.) ,•
Attest: i
F. W. GOSEWISCI1,
Clerk of Probate.
DOUGLAS, KENNEDY A KENNFinV.
Attorney*
BULLETIN, DECEMBER 3171921'
to wear to Norma Thurlow's lilac
tea."
"What's a lilac tea?" asked Stacy
as he examined the strings critically.
Look, Pauline how much will you
take for this big bead?" He put his
finger on a large bead of sparkling
green glass.
"I can't let anybody have that one,"
Pauline answered quickly. "O Stacy,
do make the patchwork cow behave
herself!"
The patchwork cow W9.8 leaning
down to chew a fold of Pauline's
dress in a way that pet cows have.
As Pauline pulled away from her she
threw up her head. The long neck
lace caught on one of her sharp horns,
and the string broke with a snap that
sent a shower of beads all the way
across the road.
'O dear!" wailed Pauline. "Look
what your cow has done, Stacy! I
haven't a single pretty thing now to
wear to the lilac tea."
Stacy began hurriedly to pick up
the beads. The patchwork cow calm
ly watched him.
"We'll find most of then), Pauline,"
Stacy said. "Look, here's a piece of
string with beads enough on it to
make a necklace for your doll, any
how."
He wound the piece of string round
Deborah's neck, and Pauline smiled
in spite of her grief when she saw
how pretty the beads looked against
the doll's blue dress.
There," she cried. don't be
lieve any of the girls ever thought of
necklaces for dolls! If I can find
beads enough, I'll make a string for
every doll at the lilac tea."
Stacy was much relieved he said
it was a fine idea. They managed to
find a good many of the beads in the
wide, hard road. Stacy found the
big green one he looked at it a lit
tle wistfully as he gave it back to
Pauline.
"Now, if you come with me to Nor
ma Thurlow's garden, you'll see what
a lilac tea is," Pauline told him.
And away they went up the road,
and the patchwork cow tagged along
behind,
In Norma's garden, six little girls
with their dolls were gathered round
a little tea table that was set out in
the shade of some blossoming lilac
bushes. The table was trimmed with
lilacs in the center was a large frost,
ed cake op a pink china platter.
Stacy looked at the cake ogt of the
corner of his eye. "If you say so,
Pauline," he suggested, "I'll help
string the beads. The cow will graze
round by herself near by without giv
ing any great trouble, I think."
"All right," Pauline agreed. Then
she turned to the other girls. "Who
wants a string of beads for her doll?"
Every girl there wanted one, and
said so at once. They were delighted.
"Stacy thought of the plan," Paul
ine said as she took her seat. "'And
so we must let him help us string
the beads."
They all fell to work with a will.
ORDER PATTERNS BY NUMBER
Waist 8831 Skirt 3377—A Style Good for Many
Occasions. A frock like thin may le worn at
formal and informal "functions." Marto of velvpt
and brocade, it Is amort as dlnnt*r gown. In
gabardine, with floss nilk embroidery, or in serge
with braid trimming, it is line for street or nt'ter
noon wear. The blouse hns be new wide sleeve.
Tile lines of the «klrt are straight, but provide
graceful fulnros. This design Is line for remodel
ing. Tho caie may be omitted.
The Waist. frit fern. 3S:S1. ii cut in ft Sizes: 34.
3R. 40, 42 and 44 inches bust measure. The Skirt
in 7 Sizes: 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, VA and 36
Inches waist measure. Tbe width of the skirt at
the foot is .14 inches. T» make this dress for a
medium size of one material, will require 6 yards of
.*!« Inch, material. To make as illustrated will re
quire 3tj| yards of plain, and 396 yards of figured
material, i!7 inches wide.
This Illustration ealit! for TWO separate patterns
which will he mailed to any address on receipt
of 10c FOR EACH pattern m* sUver or stamps.
3389—A Simple Dress for Street or Calling, i'at
tcrn :i8R0 was nsed to make this model. It is ent
in 7 Sizes: 34, 38, 3S, 40, 42. 44. and 4« inches
bust measure. A 3K Inch size will require 5%
yards of 40 inch material.
lJrown velveteen with bands of satin braided with
soutache would be effective, or duvetyn. serge, taf
feta with embroidery or stitching in self eolor.
The width of the skirt at the foot is about 174
yards.
A pattern of this illnsti'ntien mailed to any ad
dress on receipt of 10c in silver or stnmps.
3813—A New Dress for Mother's Girl. For school
or play 1 hj.s model has many attractions. The over
dress is sleeveless and is worn witfit a simple gulmpe
that may be finished- with long or short sleeve*.
Tli dress has smart pockets and good comfortable
lines.
The Pattern is cut !n 4 Sizes: 4, 8, 8, and 10
years. An 8 year size requires 1% yard of 27 inch
material for the gulmpe and 2ys yards for the
dress. Gingham was chosen for the dress and
crepe for the gulmpe. Either material is good for
both. Percale, serge, popllli, repp and gabaralse
also are desirable.
A jattern of this Illustration mailed to any ad
dress on receipt of. 10 cents in silver or stamps.
3833—A Pretty Frock for Many Occasions. Witli
short sleeves, and (he band trimming of Ince or era
broidery, this will be fine in organdy or voile..- Jt
is. also nice for foulard or taffeta with trimming
of contrasting material. In serge, gingham or
poplin, it makes a good style for a school dress,-
Th«» Pattern is cut in 4 Sizes: 0, 8. 10 ami 13
years. A 10 year size requites 3?4 yards of
inch material.
A pattern of this illustration mailed to any ad
dress or receipt of 10c in silver or stamps.
3819—A Splendid Version of a Popular Style.
A clever adaptation of the season's best, style.
For wear on any occasion, the blouse may be of
chiffon, crepe de chine or net. and the dress of
georgette, tricolette, taffeta, faille, or velvet. The
style is good for serge, velours, duvetyn, gabardine,
twill, and check or plaid suiting, with linen, silk oT
madras for the blouse.
The Pattern is cut In .1 Sizes: 10. 18,
T!u Pattern is cut in 4 Sizes: Small, 34-86:
Medium, SS-40 I^rge. 42-44 Extra Large,
inches bust measure. A Medium size will requll»
5 yards of 36 inch material.
A pattern of this illustration mailed to any ao- 3$29
dress on receipt Of 10c in silver or stamps.
3889—A Pretty Blouse. This is an excellent
model for combining velvet with chiffon, satin with
crepe, or taffeta with crepe de chine. Embroidery.
or stitchery are good for decoration. Black velvet
and crepe with jet beading is very attractive for
this style.
The Pattern 1s cut In 6 Sizes: 34. 30. 38. 40, 42'
and 44 inches bust measure. A 38 Inch size re
quires 2'yards of 36 inch material.
As fast as they finished the necklaces
they hung them up on the lilac bush
es to see them sparkle in the sun
shine. Now and then Stacy was
obliged to stop work to get the patch
work cow away from the pansy bed
or to shoo her out into the road when
she reached up to nibble at the lilac
bushes. But he managed to do a
good deal of work all the same.
At length, the task of stringing the
beads was done. Then, just as the
last doll had been decked out in a
sparkling new necklace, Pauline miss
ed the green glass bead. She had
strung it on a piece, of yellow ribbon
and hung it all by itself as high as
she could reach on the white lilac
bush—for something special, she said.
Now it was gone.
"You hid it to tease me, Stacy
Poole!" cried Pauline. Stacy looked
offended but made no reply.
They searched for the bead in the
grass but that was like looking for
a needle in a haystack because bead
and grass were almost of the same
shade. They did npt. find it.
"You've spoiled our lilac tea, Stacy
Poole!" scolded Pauline.
Stacy turned his back and walked
out to the roadside where the patch
work cow was eating grass. Norma
looked after him and felt sorry. Aft
er all, how did Pauline know that
Stacy had taken the bead?
"Come back, Stacy!" she called.
"We're just going to cut the frosted
cake."
"No, thank you," Stacy said stiffly.
He took the patchwork cow by the
horn and led her away. Then he gave
a shout that brought all the girls run
ning to see what the matter was.
Fitted nearly round one of the cow's
sharp little horns was a piece of yel
low ribbon, and on the ribbon spar
kled a green glass bead.
"It must have caught on-her horn
when she reached up to bite at the
white lilac tree!" cried Pauline.
"Take it, Stacy. I was saving it for
you all the time."
—Youth's Companion,
2 West Lake St. Minneapolis. Minn.
"The Year Is Going,
Let Him Go"
What will the New Year bring you—
Growth, Progress, Better Education.
Enlarged Opportunities? The choice
is yours. Make your decision now
by enrolling for special training that
will fit vou for successful work.
THIS IS* THE OPEN DOOR TO
BUSINESS ACTIVITY. Call in per
son or write for particulars.
January 3 to 9 are Enrollment Days
WE HAVE BOTH DAY AND EVEN-
ING CLASSES
Fully Accredited by the National
Association of Accredited Commer
cial Schools.
I
anil
20
years. An IS year size will require 2Vs yards of 3.
inch material for the Onimpe, and yards Of 44
inch material for the dress. The width of the
skirt is 2'i yards, at' the foot.
A pattern of this illustration mailed to any ad
dress on receipt of 10c In silver or stamps.
3821—A Pleating Apron Dress* This model sup
plies the place of a house dress and Is adantea
for ali housekeeping activities." It has comfortable
lines and ample pockets. Checked or striped giri),'-.
ham with pique for the facing* would he good for
this style. Voile, percale, poplin, cotton crewe,
chamhrey, linen and unbleached muslin are
good for this style.
A pattern of this illustration mailed to any aa»
dress on receipt of 10c in silver or stamps.
3825—A Good Style for a Tailored Skirt. Every Itett ordered wardrobe should s- of u
F.kirt of woolen or cloth for general wear or sports use. Tbe model here shown shows a splen
dfd two piece design with attractive set-in pockets, and wide tncks. The back extends In tab
ends over the front. Plaid woolen, twill, heather mixtures or serge could be used for this
The Pattern is cut in 6 Sizes: 24, 26. 28. 30, 32, and 34 inches waist measure. A 28 inr-h
r.ize will require 2% yards of 40 inch material. The width at the foot is about
yards with plaits extended.
MAILING INSTRUCTIONS
The patterns Illustrated on this page will be
mailed to any address on receipt of 10 cents,
in silver or stamps, for each pattern. In these
patterns allowance Is made for seams.
Order by nnmber and size and BMm money
with order. Write plainly.
Fill oat attached coupon tad tend to.tttt
OAtllOITI *0TI01
Send 15c in silver or •tamp* for oar XSf TO
DATE FALL AND WINTER 1921-1928 CATA
oGCTS, containing over 800 design* of Ladles',
Misses' snd Children's Patterns, a OONCIS®
AN!) COMPREHENSIVE ABTICLB OND BESS
MAKING, ALSO SOME POINTS TOB TBI
NEKDLK (Illustrating 80 of the vatloos, simple
•tltcbtt) all valuable to the home drewawker.
A pattern of this illustration mailed to any address on receipt of 10c In silver or stamps.
PATTERN COUPON
HO.. 81M.
HO^.»•«••••••»•••#•» 81M.
Maim
Addtiif
Bachelor of Arts.
1
G. S. STEPHEN?:
President.
There is a
.,10.,..
The Catholic Bulletin,
tt, Paul, Minn.
find enclosed cents for wblch please
•end to my addrea the following patterns:
Kote: At leest 30 days nut be allowed for
aendlng pattern*.
V"jr«r-,,vrc *'f *.f.
V
College of Saint Teresa
WINONA, MIMN£SOTA
Registered lor Teachers' License by tile N[ew York Board of Regent*
Accredited by the Association of American Universities. V
Holds Membership in the North Central Association of CollegM
Staodard degree courses in Arts and Science leadipg to iiM degrees df
pachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.
ADDRESS THE SECRETARY
Our 22nd Annual Winter Term Opens Tuesday, Jan. 3rd
DAY AND EVENING SCHOOL
Students are trained as Accountants. Bookkeeper*.
Private Secretaries, Ktonoffraphers, Billerfi, Dicta
phone Operators, Typists, Clerks, Salesmen, Calcu
lating Machine Operators, etc.
OtJR FRER KM PLiOYMEXT DEPARTMENT is at
the service of all graduate* and competent under
graduates.
The school is open every business day and Monday
and Thursday evenings. Superior equipment, large
faculty, individual instruction. Register now free
catalogue visitors always welcome. Phone Cedar
5333.
Poo&e Cedar
PRACTICAL BUSINESS SCHOOL
1SS K. Fifth St., between Robert and Jackson Sts.
One of the largest and hest equipped business!
schools in America.
St. Benedict's College and Academy
ST. JOSEPH, MINNESOTA
CONDUCTED BY THE SISTERS OF THE ORDER OF ST. BENEDICT.
Under the patronage of the flight Reverend Joseph F. Busch, D. D*
Bishop of St. Cloud.
BXCELLENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE EDUCATION OF
A O I Y O U N W O E N
THE COLLEGE—Offers a four years' course, leading to the degree of
THIS ACADEMY—Offers a four years' course, preparing for College
UNIVERSITY AFFILIATION.
Catalog mailed upon application to "Sister Directress."
Villa Maria Academy
FRONTENAC, MINN.
BflflROlKB SCHOOL FBI! GIRLS 10 Y00W0 LUES
ACCREDITED TO THE UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
Conducted by the URSULINE NUNS
Send for Catalog and Complete Information.
College of St. Scholastica
DULUTH, MINN.
University Affiliation Standard College Courses
High School, Commercial and Preparatory Courses,
Music, Art, Elocution
Mid-Winter Term Opens January 3rd
Decide Now,
To Become Trained
^"Leaders In Business Education
To stay in business for 37 years a school must render worth-while
service. To become the leader means still further proof of service.
Day or Night School
Come and see our splendidly
equipped school rooms.
Prospectus Upon Request fx
GLQBJ
Garfield 4378
Ibid Floor Hamm Bldg., St. Paul,
THE COLLEGE OF ST. CATHERINE
A STANDARD COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
DERHAM HALL
A COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
SAINT PAUL. :, MINNESOTA
ADDRESS: THE OFFICE ©F THE DEAN
oM»l»»H00000M00»M*M»000ll0l0IIHHf»M
ST. AGATHA CONSERVATORY
OF MUSIC AND ART
S8 BAST EXCHAJVG1S ST. COR. CEDAR, ST. PAUL
PtaMh Harmony, Violin, Mandolin, Guitar, Zither, Banjo, Volet* BlMllllli
Language, Painting, Drawing, China Decorating
Pupil* aajr eater at mnj time
CtM MMi far tenaa LeMona firei dartag
COURT REPORTING
position
always
wailing
writer. Our special speeel classes train you for this work. 'New
terms in both Day and Evening school starting Jan. 2.
Call, write or phone for farther information.
M/Ntf&iPOHS
Filly Accredited Hy the National Aaaeeiatlen ArrredlUd
Cemmerriai Seheeia.
NICOLLBT AT NINTH 8TRKKT MINNEAPOLIS, MIMWCtOTA
ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY
v
A thoroughly equipped High School for Girls
W SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH
SAINT PAUL, MINN. Tehpfc«« Mm OSU
-V
WALTER RACMTSSEX. Proprietor
r*
9
T. F. KENNEDY,
Vii
President
for the expert shorthand

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