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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, May 20, 1922, Image 7

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In stock.
HISTORICAL REVIEW OF ASHLAND, WIS.—Continued.
mine strike on, there is very likely to
be a serious fuel shortage next winter.
You should place your order at once
with this office. Prompt deliveries
are made on all orders, no matter how
large or small they may be, and
honest weights are guaranteed.
HANSON MILLING COMPANY.
One of the best industries of Ash
land is the Hanson Flour Mill. Here
Is ground the "Garland City Flour"
that is famous not only throughout
Ashland and the vicinity, but all over
this part of the northwest. This flour
runs uniform in quality, so that the
good cook and baker never knows
what it is to have bad luck in her
baking when she uses "Garland City
Flour." Only the very best and most
carefully selected spring wheat is
used in the mill. After careful wash
ing and cleaning it is ground under
the very latest process coming out a
fine, creamy flour that has made the
name of this mill famous wherever it
is used. The mill is kept busy at all
times keeping up with the demand for
Its products.
LIGHTNER'S CASH MARKET
Why pay fancy prices for tough
meats that you cannot eat, when you
can get the tenderest steaks and fine
tasting meats at Lightner's cash
market, 405 Second street E? In ad
dition to the big stocks of fresh meats,
the market always carries plenty of
smoked, salt and cured meats, smoked
and brine fish, fresh eggs, butter, but
ter substitutes, the finest kind of ket
tle rendered lard, canned goods, home
made sausage and homemade kraut
In season.
MALISZEWSKI'8.
The newest styles and lasts in shoes
for summer are now being shown at
fhe store of Maliszewski's on Second
street East. The pumps and low
shoes for summer for the ladies as
shown here now are decidedly attrac
tive. This store gives particular at
tention to the correct fitting of every
pair of shoes sold, and men will also
llnd comfortable and well wearing
shoes, and parents with romping chil
dren will do well to buy shoes for
ffaem here. First class shoe repairing
is done here. Mr. Maliszewski car
ries a complete line of gents' furnish
and it will pay you to look them
BU1CK GARAGE.
Vhether you drive a Buick car or
you want the best repairing and
'rhauling for your automobile or
ck and you can get it by sending
car to the Buick Garage, 811 Third
eet West. The latest types of ma
uinery for doing all kinds of repair
ag has been installed at the Buick
iarage in anticipation of your needs
md your v/ork will be done promptly.
Are you going to get a new car this
year? Probably it will be a Buick.
If so, you better put your order in for
It today, for this is going to be anoth
er Buick year and the early orders
Hje..the ones that are going to be fill
ed. You will find all of the attractive
1922 models at the Buick garage wait
ing for your inspection and ultimate
•election.
ED DINGMAN.
One of the best places to eat in Ash
land, and also the most satisfactory
Is the restaurant of Ed Dtngman, 407
Second street E. Our readers will
find that the meals served there are
well prepared and served in liberal
portions. In addition, there is main
tained a lunch counter where short
orders are served the day through.
Lunches are also put up for tourists
and travelers and a fine line of cigars,
tobacco, candles and frutt

carried
TONY LODLE.
Ghoes that wear well, look well ftnd
e comfortable, are always to be
found in the big stocks carried in the
shoe store of Tony Lodle, 111 Second
street W. A feature of the store is
the fact that one is always certain of
being correctly and properly fitted
here. The stocks are such that one
lean rely absolutely on the quality of
the materials, the workmanship and
the correctness of styles and lasts.
E. D. SCHINDLER.
The best meats in Ashland or
vicinity are to be found in the market
of K. D. Schindler, 601 Ellis avenue.
One always finds here the tenderest
steaks and the rich, juicy roasts and
other cuts of meat, and the prices are
reasonable. Once you taste some of
the hams or bacon, along with those
fresh eggs which are also handled
here, and the good butter and cheese,
you will agree with us that there is
nothing any better. One also finds
that this market is the place to. buy
your fresh dressed poultry, fish, game
oysters in season.
A. F. PENN & SON.
Now is the time to invest in real
estate. There is no better or safer
form of investment than well located
real estate and you will find some of
the very best bargains listed with A.
F. Penn & Son, 113 Second street W.,
one of the best known real estate
dealers and insurance representatives
in Ashland and vicinity. This.office
also has first real estate mortgages
for sale and negotiates loans of all
kinds promptly. If you need insur
ance of any kind, you will find that
this office represents son^e of the
largest and most responsible insur
ance companies in business.
LEW ANDERSON.
The line stocks of men's furnish
one finds at the modern clothing
store of Lew Anderson, 315 Second
street W„ makes the store an ideal
shopping center. The men of Ashland
and vicinity who take pride in their ap
pearance, can always find a large and
carefully selected stock of suits, over
coats, trousers, hats and other furnish
ings here made from the very best of
woolens and other fabrics and in the
latest styles. A fine line of light
weight underwear, summer shirts,
neckwear, hats and caps is also in
atock.
HUB 3H0E STORE.
Every lady likes to see a well dress
ed foot, and those who buy their shoes
from the Hub Shoe Store are always
well pleased with the stylish looking
shoes they find there. The new stocks
for the summer of 1922 are now on
display at the Hub Shoe Store, 117
Second street W., and are meeting with
the approval of the ladies of Ashland
and vicinity. The men of Ashland
and vicinity can always find what they
want in real service-giving shoes
when they patronize this stove. And
the prices are reasonable.
NORTHERN NATIONAL BANK.
There is nothing that succeeds like
success and there is nothing that
grows faster and more satisfactorily
than the savings account of a man or
woman who has learned the value of
systematic saving. The officials of the
Northern National Bank, 319 Second
street W., will be glad to* discuss with
our readers the value of opening a
savings account in that institution.
The men who head this bank are ex
perienced business men, well known
in this community for their judgment
and integrity, and they have brought
the large measure of success to the
%ank that it enjoys.
ASHLAND LAUNDRY.
Oar Service—a help that will sim
plify your particular wash day prob
lems. The flat pieces like towels, bed
clothes and table linen we iron. Many
of the undergarments we dry so nice
ly in our tumbler system of drying,
that they need no ironing. We do
fully 80 per cent of the heavy work,
leaving for you but a few of the light
er details. This service costs 8c a
pound and is surprisingly moderate,
your time, fuel and supplies consid
ered. The men will appreciate the
velvet edge put on their collars if they
send them to the Ashland Laundry,
907 W. 3rd street.
WILLIAM A. REINHARDT.
Before you let the contract for your
new building be sure that the plumb
ing and heating installation is to be
done by William A. Reinhardt, 219
Seventh ave. W., Ashland's best known
plumber and steam fitter. He is an
expert in these matters and employs
only expert workmen, so that one is
absolutely assured the work will be
done according to the contract and
specifications. Whether you want a
steam, or a hot water plant, you will
find the best makes on the market
here. Also electrical work and house
wiring done by expert electricians. Au
thorized distributor of the Laun-DRY
ette Electric Washer that has no
wringer, and needs none.
F. G. MAY.
The men and young men of Ashland
and vicinity, who take pride in ap
pearing well dressed invariably make
the clothing store of F. G. May, 303
Second street W., their shopping head
quarters because the May store is the
Ashland home of the famous line of
Hart, Schaffner & Marx clothes. With
out doubt this store is showing the
most complete stock of men's quality
suits, overcoats and furnishings of all
kinds ever brought to Ashland, and
the prices on them are right, too.
Some fine displays of new shirts,
neckwear, hats and caps, hosiery and
palm beach suits are here waiting for
your selection.
ASHLAND LIGHT, POWER AND
STREET RAILWAY CO.
A history of Catholicity in Ashland
and its consequent mention of the
business firms and houses and other
industrial activities would not be com
plete without a short mention of the
Ashland Light, Power & Street Rail
way Co. The street cars of Ashland
and the suburban lines get their
power and the entire system is opera
ted by the Ashland Light, Power &
Street Railway Co. The business, in
dustrial and home life of this entire
community depend for their conven
iences, necessities and luxuries on
this utility. It has a modern and
/«gUCTRgADlN^^C
^3aLEANINGS
JO5S£5W
JAMIE WAS 'NOT RELIGIOUS.
A correspondent of the New York
Herald, writing from Dublin, tells
what sort of man is regarded as a
"religious" man in Belfast. To make
his meaning clear he tells a story or
two:
In a fit of fiery indignation a young
Orangeman once smashed the window
of a shop where crucifixes were dis
played, and to the amazement of all
loyalists, he was sent to prison for a
month. "If that," declared his proud
and tearful mother, "isn't sufferin'
for his religion, I'd like to know what
is."
Another Belfast Orangeman had
been called to the court as a witness
to the peaceful disposition of a friend.
"What sort of a man," asked the
counsel, "would you say Jamie Wil
liamson is?"
"A quiet, dacent man," was the
reply.
"Is he the sort of man that would
be likely to break windows?"
"No man less likely."
"Is he the sort of man you would
expect to find at the head of a mob
shouting 'To hell with the Pope'?"
Witness (with great emphasis):
"No. Certainly not. Jamie was never
any ways a 'religious' man."
FINDING THINGS.
Finding things seems to some of
you an especial art, for which you
lack the gift. If you want anything
in a hurry, your gloves or last night's
paper, or your watch, you have to
call for assistance. "Mother, do you
know where I put my watch?" "Let
ty, you haven't noticed a pair of white
gloves lying around, have you?" Or
perhaps the inquiry takes a faultfind
ing tone: "You never can find any
thing in this house." The peculiar
thing is. that while you cannot find
your own things, someone else can.
Mother has noticed your watch on the
splendidly equipped plant, and pro
vides
a 1H*e
service
rates.
at
reasonable
HOPPENYAN'S DRUG STORE.
Hoppenyan's Drug Store offers to
Its patrons and the people of Ashland
a complete stock of drugs, medicines,
novelties and the like. A specialty is
made of prescription filling by its pro
prietor, and one always gets prompt,
accurate and intelligent service at all
times. The ladies know the store
as the headquarters of toilet articles
and accessories of all kinds, also a
fine line of confectionery, novelties,
kodaks and fountain pens.
C. N. CRAMER CO.
One of the largest and best known
wholesale grocery firms in Northern
Wisconsin is that of C. N. Cramer Co.,
whose offices and warehouses are in
Commercial Row. The name Cramer
stands for quality in good things to
eat throughout this community, be
cause Mr. Cramer has always made it
a fixed business policy to handle only
the very best goods on the market.
Mr. Salem Olson, General Manager of
the Company, gives his personal at
tention to the selection and the pur
chase of most of his stocks. The ware
houses are always well stocked so
that all orders can be filled promptly
no matter how large they may be.
JOSEPH THIBODEAU.
When you are shopping in Ashland
these hot summer days just remember
you can get those refreshing ice
cream sodas and other soft drinks at
the confectionery store and ice cream
parlors of Joseph Thibodeau, 611
Second street E. Ice cream makes an
ideal Sunday dessert, especially in
the heated weather of the summer.
Have you tried the delicious choco
lates and other sweets carried in stock
here? You have missed something
good if you have not, for the candies
here are wholesome and pure, and
reasonably priced.
THE STYLE SHOP.
The Style Shop, 415 Second street
West, is the best shopping center in
Ashland and vicinity, for the ladies
who really desire to appear correctly
dressed. It is doubtful if a larger or
more carefully selected stock of wear
ing apparel has ever been brought to
Ashland than is now on display there.
The values are there, too, as well as
the latest styles and effects, and all of
the newest fabrics and authentic
colors are represented in the stocks
now being shown. The workmanship
on all of these stocks is of the best
and is as fully high class as are the
artistic lines and effects shown in
them.
CHRIS LOKKEN.
How about a good, tender fowl for
your Sunday dinner? You will find a
fine lot of fresh dressed chickens,
ducks and geese at the market of
Chris Lokken, 1420 Third street W.
In addition to the big stocks of fresh
meats, the market always carries
plenty of smoked, salt and cured
meats, smoked and brine fish, fresh
eggs, butter, butter substitutes, the
finest kind of kettle rendered lard,
canned goods, homemade sausage
and homemade kraut in season. Mr.
Lokken also deals in live stock of all
kinds, including horses.
M.G. Jr. & B. J. Hoppenyan
Undertakers
302 2nd St. E.
Ashland Wis.
FOR THE FAMILY^
IIMYSIDEZ*
mantel. Letty picked up your gloves
from the floor where you dropped
them, and put them in your drawer.
The newspaper comes to light when
someone else looks for it. And since
there is no magic about finding things,
your inability goes to show that you
are careless, unobservant, and by pay
ing close attention you can find what
you lose, as well as someone else can
find it for you.
JOKE ON MAGISTRATE.
In an East African district a doc
tor acts as understudy to the magis
trate. Recently, when each was con
scious of having broken the law by
riding at night without a light, they
agreed that the majesty of the law
would best be vindicated by each ap
pearing before the other. The mag
istrate, taking precedence, tried the
doctor and fined him £5. Then the
doctor tried the magistrate and fined
him £20, justifying his severity by
pointing out that since this was the
second case that day, obviously the
offense was becoming far too com
mon.
HEALTH VALUE OF TOMATOES.
One ot the easiest ways to be sure
of getting sufficient amounts of vita
mine is to eat tomatoes rather regu
larly, perhaps every day, or to make
it a practice to put tomato juice in
some of the dishes that we are pre
paring for the family, says the Unit
ed States department of agriculture.
The remarkable part about the to
mato with relation to this particular
vitamine is that it still seems to be
efficient in preventing scurvy after
the tomato has been heated or dried,
which is not true of all foods which
possess it in the raw state. This is
probably due to the fact that the to
mato contains such large amounts of
vitamine that part of it survives the
heating process*
.THE CATHOLIC BULLETIN, MAY 20, 1922
...THE...
CHILDREN'S HOUR
IDA'S "IFS."
Ida Endrees stood at the sitting
room window looking out ruefully.
It had rained nearly all night and had
lapsed into a steady and dreary driz
zle. Ida's face was as cheerless as
the weather. She gave a little sigh
as she turned to her sister Edna and
said:
"If it hadn't rained so we would
be miles away on that automobile trip
we were to have had today."
"Well, it did rain," said Edna with
calm acceptance of the inevitable.
"I know, but if it hadn't we'd have
had our lovely ride over to Taylor
Woods and around the lake, and
luncheon at the Pine Cone House and
all sorts of delightful things that we
could have had if the weather had
been good."
"Which of these two pieces of lace
would you use on this shirt waist?"
asked Edna with the evident inten
tion of changing the subject, but the
new subject also had its "if."
"That reminds me," said Ida. "If
I had only known of that special sale
of shirt waists at Brown's last week,
I could have bought a perfect beauty
of a waist for three dollars. Helen
Lane got one for three dollars that
is much finer material and prettier
than the one I paid five dollars for.
If I had only known about that
sale!"
"But you didn't," said Edna as she
took her scissors and cut off a piece
of the lace she had decided that she
would use.
Having lapsed into the realm of
bargains, Ida discovered still another
"if" to give rise to new complaint.
"If I had not been too dark to wear
pale blue I could have bought the
prettiest little housedress at White's'
yesterday for seven dollars. But they
had them only in "white and pale blue,
and I already have two white dresses.
If I could only have worn pale blue or
if they had had them in other col
ors!"
Edna made no comment on this 'If"
but began to hum a tune cheerfully
as she stitched away on her waist. At
that moment Mrs. Endrees came into
the room and said:
"This rain will do a world of good.
It has broken a long drouth and will
be worth thousands of dollars to the
gardeners and farmers."
"But if it had held off another day
we could have had our auto ride,"
said Ida with the note of resentment
still in her voice. Ted, the boy of
the family, had been lying on a lounge
reading. He now came to the front
with his pertinent contribution to the
conversation:
"Ida, what's the good of all your
'ifing'? It's just 'if 'if 'if' with you
from morning until night. Father and
mother ought to change your name
from Ida to 'If.' How would yon like
to be known as 'If Endrees?' We al
ways expect you to come to the front
with a useless 'if about a dozen times
a day. Ever know one of your 'ifs'
to do any good or change matters any?
Your 'ifing' puts you in the same class
with the people who cry over spilled
milk. You haven't said an 'if this
morning that did not have to do with
things that nothing in the world can
change. You'd better change by drop
ping every one of your useless 'ifs.'"
"Good advice, Ida," said her mother.
"Better think it over," said Edna.
Ida was not lacking in common
sense nor reasonableness. She was
very quiet for a few minutes. Evi
dently she was taking the advice Edna
had given her. Suddenly she started
to leave the room. At the door she
turned and said:
"I defy any of you to catch me
dropping into the useless 'if for a
week. If I do—but I don't intend to.
I guess it isn't worth while."
"Hold fast to that idea, dear," said
Mrs. Endrees. "If you do, you will
save yourself much useless complaint
and add to the happiness of your
home."
DON'T GIVE UP.
If you've tried and have not woo,
Never stop for1 crying:
All that's great and good is done
Just by patient trying.
Though young birds, in flying fall,
Still their wings grow stronger
And the next time they can keep
Up a little longer.
Though the sturdy oak has known
Many a blast that bowed her,
She has risen again and grown
Loftier and prouder.
If by easy work you beat,
Who the more will prize yon?
Gaining victory from defeat,
That's the test that tries yoti.
A PAINFUL SHOWER BATH.
A story is told in the World's Work
of a youth who, partly from ignorance,
partly from a spirit of foolhardy ad
venture, put his life in jeopardy. He
and his companion were spending a
vacation in the Yosemite Valley and
had been fishing for mountain trout
on the Illilouette.
"Tomorrow," he said, "I shall take
a shower-bath under the seventeen
hundred-foot fall."
"You are a fool!" said his compan
ion.
"Not at all," came the reply. "The
river is very low. What there is of it
turns to spray in the first hundred
feet it will simply come down like
rain. Why, you'd go under the Bridal
Veil yourself! Only that's prosaic.
This is something big. Come on."
"Not I."
But I was there to see. The water,
as he had said, came down, a consid
erable part of it, in rain and spray
that flew out on the wind incredible
distances. But to crawl down, dress
ed in a bathing suit, closer to the
main stream that falls to the pool and
upon the rocks, with a murderous
swish in the air and a roar in the ears
like a railway train, was daring to
looUwrdiness. At any moment,
veering wind might swing the whole
mass upon the tall, slim figure back
ing tentatively on all fours down the
jagged talus slope,, his eye-glasses
glinting cheerfully. A steady breeze
kept the fall swung out a little the
other way and the spray burgeoned
out far up the other slope. The roar
was deafening.
All at once the wind shifted. The
water swung back and in a flash the
human figure was blotted out in a
deluge that turned me sick. For a
second, that seemed an hour, it play
ed on the spot fiendishly, it seemed
to me, standing horrified there, and
then slowly it swept away.
And then there was a movement, a
painful, crawling movement, down
there on the slope, and I scrambled
down the slippery rocks to help a
blinking, creeping, much-surprised
youth, bleeding from a hundred cuts,
up to where his clothes lay. He was
still too dazed to Speak. When his
breath returned and his extra glasses
were perched again on his nose, he
said:
"The oceans fell upon me. Come
back to New England."
DECORATING THE OAy!
Aunt Linda deftly manipulated her
pie dough as she listened to Sue's
glowing description of the hike that
she and Madge had taken the day pre
vious. No experience was ever quite
complete with Sue until she had
shared it with Aunt Linda.
"And, oh, I almost didn't put in
one of the loveliest things about the
day!" exclaimed Sue, happiness danc
ing through her tones. "While we sat
on the log in the bit of woods eating
our lunch, there was a beautiful rain
bow. The end of it just dropped down
on the fringe of trees at the edge of
the meadow, and made them look like
a brilliant bouquet. Think of it, Aunt
Linda—our day was even decorated
with a rainbow!"
"A day decorated with a rainbow!"
repeated Aunt Linda smilingly, as she
transferred the last plump pie from
the baking board to the oven. "You
know, Sue, your saying that reminds
me of something that happened years
ago when mother and I lived in a lit
tle cottage at Eastman's Corners."
"Oh, tell me about it," begged Sue
eagerly, for well she knew what in
teresting experiences Aunt Linda
brought forth when she delved back
into the past.
Aunt Linda seated herself in the
broad-armed rocker near the window
where the geraniums bloomed, and, a
remembering light in her soft brown
eyes, began her story.
"Whenever 1 heard of anything new
in the cookery line I always wanted
to try it. Mother never minded my
fussing around, so I usually tried out
pretty nearly all the new recipes the
neighbors told me about. Sometimes
when my experiments turned out
extra good, I'd take a bit over to our
across-the-road neighbors, Mr. and
Mrs. Drugan. They were quite old
folks, with all their six children grown
and living some distance away from
them. All the neighbors were friend
ly to these old folks, and ready to do
any little things they could to help
them. And they always seemed just
as happy and cheerful whenever one
ran into their house."
Aunt Linda interrupted herse!f to
take a look at her pies. Returning to
her chair, she went on:
"One morning I tried a pudding that
certainly turned out wonderful. I
got down one of mother's prettiest
glass dishes, and put some of the pud
ding in it. A little later I slipped over
to the Drugan's with it, letting myself
in the back way, as I often did. But
just as I reached the doorway into
the living room, I stopped short. Some
one in there was crying—not loud,
but the way folks cry when they feel
pretty sad about something. I almost
turned around and came back home
without letting anyone know I was
there. But then I took a second
thought. I set the pudding down on
the table in the kitchen, and stepped
quietly into the living room. In her
little old rocker was Mrs. Drugan,
bowed over, her face in her hands,
sobbing. I dropped down beside her,
and put an arm around her. After
a while she grew quiet and told me
what the trouble was. A letter had
come that morning with bad news.
When I finally came away, she came
through the rooms with me. In the
kitchen she noticed the pudding, so I
told her about it. At the door she
held my hand tight as she said, "It's
been a long dreary day with us, but
you with your dear neighborliness
have put a rainbow into it.' So," con
cluded Aunt Linda as again she took
a peep at her beautifully browning
pies, "when you spoke of your day
being decorated with a rainbow, I
straightway recollected that other day
of which I've told you."
There was a very thoughtful ex
pression in Sue's eyes as she watched
Aunt Linda take the pies from the
oven and place them with careful
hands on the kitchen table. Finally
she spoke, "I never thought about
rainbows in just that way," she said
slowly, looking over at Aunt Linda
who was busy putting coal on the fire.
Dropping the shovel back into the
scuttle, Aunt Linda said, "Weil, I
never had either before Mrs. Drngan
said that to me. After that—"
"Yes—after that?" asked Sue eager
ly. "Did you—did what Mrs. Drugan
said sort of keep you reminded to put
rainbows in other folks' days that
needed such brightening?"
"Yes," responded Aunt Linda, soft
ly. "Yes—her words have kept me
sort of reminded through all the years,
I hope."
"And now—-" There was a tender lit
tle inflection in Sue's tones though her
eyes smiled ever so little as they met
Aunt Linda's brown ones. "And now
you're passing the little reminder on
to me so that I, too, may know the
joy of decorating days with rain
bows?"
"Exactly," confessed Aunt Linda, a
kindly twinkle in her eyes as the
spoke.
The child which has cost its motti
the most tears is the dearest to &- i
Heart
MUSIC THE
AND MUSICAL
Mlttie
Stands,
College of Saint Teresa
WINONA, MINNESOTA
Registered fop Teachers' License by the New York Board of
Regents.
Accredited by the Association of American Universities.
Holds Membership in the North Central Association of Colleges.
Standard degree courses in Arts and Science leading to the
degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.
ADDRESS THE SECRETARY
College of St. Scholastica
DULUTH, MINN.
University Affiliation Standard College Courses
High Schoolf Commercial and Preparatory Courses,
Music, Art, Elocution
Sacred Heart Academy
Mount Marty, Yankton, South Dakota
Conducted by the Sisters of St. Benedict. Offers four courses of High School
Work. Each course covers a period of four years.
ADDRESS: THE SECRETARY
Music Rolls
taft most of your opportunity.
PRACTICAL BUSINESS SCHOOL
ill B. Fifth St., between Robert and Jickira Sta.
On#
of
the
largest and best equipped
G. S. STEPHENS
President.
1 THE COLLEGE
BEST OF EVERYTHING IN MUSIC
°R ™URC"\HOMF °R «N«RT
11 violins, Mandolins, Guitars and other String Instruments
ISlKUmtll la Cornets, Flutes, Clarinets and other Wind Instruments
and Bags at Lowest
PAUL A. SCHMITT, Music Dealer
COR. NICOLLET AVE. AND 8th ST. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.
Who is Stealing Your Opportunity?
"Whether you realize it or not, every day Opportunity is yours. If you
are not read to grasp it, some other fellow is #oing to steal it from you
and later on in life, this other fellow will he living on the income that
might have been yours. What will you be living on?
*UM °"f
classes next
M/MIAPOL'S
Fully Accredited by the National Anaoclatlon of Accredited
Commercial Schools.
Nicollet at Ninth Street. Minneapolis, DVfmtemrta.
ST. AGATHA CONSERVATORY
OF MUSIC AND ART
28 BAST EXCHANGE ST. COR. CEDAR, ST. PAUL
piano. Harmony, Violin, Mandolin, Guitar, Zither, Banjo, Voice. SIlOOUtlOB.
.Language, Painting, Drawing, China Decorating
Pupils may enter at any time
_or *or Lewwona gtven dnrlnff TiMtloa
The School Where Every Hour Counts
and
Where Worth-WhileBusinessCourses
Are Given By Expert Teachers
That's
bmineii
schools in America.
SL Benedict's College
EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE EDUCATION O
A O I Y O U N W O E N
THE COLLEGE—Offers a four years' course leading to the degree of
Bachelor of Arts.
THE ACADEMY—OfFers a four years' course, preparing fop College.
UNIVERSITY AFFILIATION
Catalog mailed upon aipplication to "Sister Directress."
ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY
A thoroughly equipped High School for Girb
SISTERS OF ST. JOSEPH
SAINT PAUL, MINN. Telephone Dale Q5S5
BUSINESS TRAINING
is your best investment.
Start your training now.
Say and Evening Classes
Prospectus Upon Bequest
GLOB,
''Leaders in Business Education."
Ga rfield 4878
2nd Floor Hamm Bids., St. Paul, Mltm.
OF
USE
Prices
Consistent
with
Quality
Monday and begin now to make
WALTKK KASMUSSKN, Proprietor
and
ST. JOSEPH, MINNESOTA
CONDUCTED BY THE SISTERS OF THE ORDER OF ST. BENEDICT
Under the patronage of the Right Reverend Joseph F. Busch. D. D..
Bishop of St. Cloud. i
Academy,
1
T. F. Kl
Vice Fr
ST. CATHERINE
A STANDARD COLLEGE FOR WOMEN
DERHAM HALL,
A COLLEGE PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOR GIRLS
SAINT PAUL MINNESOTA
ADDRESSl THE OFFiet OF THE DEAN
i&stiifustafiki'ui
General Printing and
U V E K E O A N Y
14* fEAST FIFTH STREET 5T. PAUL. MINN
Bookbinding

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