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The Catholic bulletin. [volume] (St. Paul, Minn.) 1911-1995, December 02, 1922, Image 5

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ARCHDIOCESE of ST.PAUL
FORTY HOURS' DEVOTION.
First Sunday in Advent, December 3.
Pro-Cathedral, Minneapolis.
St. Boniface, Hastings.
St. Boniface, St. Boniface.
Second Sunday in Advent.
St. Augustine, So. St. Paul.
St. John, Hugo.
immaculate Conception, St FeUjr.
ST. PAUL
Cathedral Parish: A card and
dance social will be given at the
Cathedral school, Third and College,
next Friday, December 1st, under the
St. Paul Seminary: At the request
of ihe St. Paul Seminary Mission So
ciety, Reverend George Kaufman of
St. Matthew's parish, St. Paul, gave
a simple but interesting talk to the
Seminarians last Sunday evening.
Father Kaufman had eleven years'
missionary experience in India, and
by no means exhausted his repertoire
of interesting missionary stories Sun
day evening.
As Father Kaufman said, India has
a population of 330,000,000 of which
70.000,000
are Mohammedans, 230,000,
0ii are Brahmans, 2,500,000 are
Protestants and 2,500,000 are Catho
lics, the rest being divided among
petty religions. Father Kaufman la
bored in the southern part of India,
chiefly among the Brahmans. He
briefly explained this religion. They
have three gods, Brahma, the head
.uo.i, v.-ho is never worshipped a Posi
tive Principle, the creator of the
world and a Negative Principle, the
pilnisher. But these three are by no
means a complete list of Brahmanistic
gods. The common people pay divine
honor to about
33,000,000
celebrating _pt Maa* to
gods, regard­
ing almost everything as a divine be
ing.
The lite and experiences of a mis
sionary were next portrayed by th*
speaker. The traveling from mission
to mission in a cart at the rate of two
miles an hour the eagerness display
ed by the people to see the priest,
when news of his coming was brought
to them the ingenious method of
counting confessions—by putting a
small stone in a hat for each confes
sion to indicate how many hosts to
consecrate for Holy Communion the
A
stable^efore
daybreak, to allow the people time to
go to work the duty of the catechist
to wake up the people in time for
Mass the examining of children to
see how far they had advanced in the
study of catechism under their
catechist these and other varied in
cidents were related by Father Kauf
man.
The Seminarians enjoyed the in
structive and entertaining lecture
and profited not a little from this prac- }nS{-ea(j
tical missionary talk.
Guild of Catholic Women: The Exe
cutive Board of- the Guild of Catho
lie Women will hold a Board meeting
Friday at 10:45 in the Wilder Build
ing. On Monday they will hold the
regular monthly meeting at 2.30 P. I
St. Vincent tie Paul Society Meet
ing: The annual meeting of the con
ferences of the Society of St. Vincent
de Paul under the auspices of the par
ticular council will be held on Sunday,
December 10, at 3 p. m., in the Cathe
dral basement hall. A report of the
year's work Will be ready there for
distribution. It will show gratifying
results of the year's work. Tt is hoped
the meeting will be well attended.
SBC
5iTf$b'
tfum J&SfSKf
includes choicest selections from the
jTfeat masters.
MINNEAPOLIS
Pro-Cathedral of St. Mary: Forty
Hours' Devotion will open in the Pro
Cathedral of St. Mary with Solemn
High Mass at 9 o'clock on Thursday
morning, December 7, followed by a
procession of the Blessed Sacrament,
and will close with a similar service at
9 a. m. Saturday, December 9. The
Blessed Sacrament will remain ex
posed for forty consecutive hours,
making two all-night expositions, dur
ing which relays of the men of the
parish will "watch one hour" each
from 11 p. m. to 6 a. m. All who de
sire- to pay a visit to the Blessed
auspices of the Rosary Society, Ush- Sacrament during the night will be
ers* Club, Holy Name Society and the made welcome, but it is not desirable
Young Ladies' Sodality of the Cathe
dral Parish. Cards at 8 p. m. Tables
for bridge, five hundred and euchre.
Dancing at 9 p. m.
that the women remain after 11
o'clock. During the day the school
children will watch by classes before
the Blessed Sacrament, and the altar
boys will maintain a continuous vigil
from the morning Masses until the
evening devotions, which will begin at
8 o'clock.
On Friday, December 8, the Feast
of the Immaculate Conception, Ponti
fical High Mass will be celebrated at
9
o'clock by the Right Reverend Fran
cis C. Kelley of Chicago, 111., Proton
otary Apostolic, and president of the
Catholic Church Extension Society.
Mgr. Kelley will also preach the morn
ing and evening sermons during the
Forty Hours' Devotion.
The following were elected officers
of the Ushers' Club at a meeting held
in the Pro-Cathedral school last week:
President, J. W. Hoffman first vice
president, P. J. Schroeder second
vice president, F. H. Cribby secre
tary-treasurer, J. F. Hurley. The Ush
ers' Club meets on the first Tuesday
of every month at 8 o'cldlk in the
Pro-Cathedral school.
K. of C. Notes: Admiral Benson's
presence in Minneapolis was easily
the most outstanding accomplishment
of the Knights of. Columbus in Minne
apolis and the greatest contribution
toward impressing upon those outside,
better than logic or argument could,
the patriotism of our people. Admiral
Benson's visit is but the first step. The
officers feel that on each similar cele
bration some outstanding Catholic
layman, a national figure, should be
brought to Minneapolis and if that
policy is continued the Knights of
Columbus will have accomplished
much for the advancement of a better
understanding among the people of
this community. The following letter
o e a n K n i o A i a
commjntIng on
The quaint custom of the people Of I bers of your council, for giving me
chanting their prayers during Mass
disturbs a priest at first, but he soon
becomes accustomed to it. They can
not pray or read unless they do so
aloud, and evince surprise when they
^eo a missionary reading quietly.
cju^
M. Rev. J. D. Moran of Farm ng on, I clodhopper" for the benefit of the
Minnesota, Legion Commander of the
Third District, will give an address.
A group of violin solos Will be played
by Fred Schulte. Mrs. W. J. Logue
will preside.
the proposal
will be of general interest:
November 15,1922.
M? Dear Mr. Kelly: I got back to
Washington in fairly good time, just
in time to attend a very important
meeting, as I had anticipated, but I
cannot resist the desire to write and
thank you, and through you the mem-
the opportunity of visiting your de
lightful city, and for all the attentions
and courtesies so generously extended
to me during my visit.
I congratulate you and your coun
cil on the splendid results of Saturday
Their language is a very difficult one and Sunday evening, and wish you
for a European to master, having fifty- every possible success in the future
r.ix letters in the alphabet, among If my visit was in any way beneficial
thorn eight kinds of d's and t's. It is, or pleasing it will certainly be
however, so musical that it is called I source of great ^satisfaction to me.
the Italian of the East. Fathei' Kauf- I want to take this opportunity of
man prayed the Hail Mary as it is saying I think your idea in regard to
recited by the people in India. having men of national importance
A menace, and at the same time, I come out there and talk to your peo
an ally of the missionary is sickness. I pie is most excellent, and if I can be
The different kinds of disease that are of any service in trying to persuade
most frequent are cholera, malaria, I any to go out there, do not hesitate
typhoid fever and small pox. These to call on me, or if I can be of service
diseases are a menace because so in any other way do not hesitate,to
many missionaries succumb to them I write me.
sooner or later, and an ally because Congratulating you and all the oth
through them many conversions are
made. Then there is the ever present
danger of snake bite. Father Kauf
man related his personal experience
with a cobra, the most poisonous of
reptiles. Other experiences were also
related in a most interesting manner.
ers, and with warm personal regards
I am, very sincerely yours,
W. S. BENSON.
Boys' Catholic Orphan Asylum: The
notice of the death of a devoted sis
ter of this institution, as published
last week, did not give the name of
the deceased quite correctly. It should
have read Sister Euphrasina Brown
Qf
sister Euphrasia. May her
soul rest in peace
OUTSIDE THE CITIES"
Green Isle: The Green Isle^opera
house was filled to its capacity the
eve of November 26 when the Dramatic
presented the play "The Little
parisll cijoir
fund.
Those taking part In the perform
ance and musical numbers were Grace
Nevin, Bella McMahon, Elanore Sul
livan, Margaret Egan, Marie Ryan,
Gladys Roth, Helen Crow, Bernice
Mulligan, F. Egan, Leslie Beaudette,
J. Lee and W. Welch. The Manalan
concert band furnished the music.
Shakopee: Paul Castner's host of
friends and admirers ih this vicinity
deplore the accident which ended his
college football career last Saturday,
when he sustained a partial fracture
of the pelvis in the game between
Butler college and Notre Dame at In-
Everyone interested will be welcome, dianapolis. Paul played the position
Recital Announced: St. Paul's mu- of fullback for Notre Dame and was
sical public will be interested in the hurt in the third period of the game
announcement that Lewis Shawe, bari- when he was tackled. He is now in
tone is to be heard in recital on Mon- St. Vincent's hospital at Indianapolis,
day evening, December 11. The con- where he will be compelled to remain
cert which is to take place in the in bed for more than two weeks be
Plymouth Congregational auditorium,1
Holly avenue and Mackubin street,
marks the initiation of the concert
service recently established by the
Twin City Publicity Bureau, conducted I ing his last year on the team. A
by Marv Dillon Foster and Frances message from Notre Dame to Twin
Boardman. Mr. Shawe and his sister, City dailies says that his injury has
Miss Elsie M. Shawe, were long asso- caused more genuine regret at the
ciated with the music at St. Mary's college than any occurrence since the
church as was also their mother, the death of George Gipp two years ago.
late Mrs. Antoinette' Shawe. Miss He is said to be possibly the greatest
fore returning to Notre Dame. He is
reported resting easily and will not
suffer any permanent effect from the
fracture. Paul is a senior and was play-
Marv Keegan, present organist at the all-around athlete* who has represented
Church, will play Mr. Shawe's accom-1 Notre Dame in recent years, is a fine
pMiTUfBta durtofi ft- program "which«type of man and a& excellent student
.-
V
in all of which his Shakopee friends
heartily concur and wish him speedy
recovery from the injury whltih has
interrupted his brilliant record.
John Berens, one of the pioneers
and a prominent Catholic citizen of
Shakopee, passed away November 19,
aged seventy-two years. His loss will
be keenly felt in the entire commu
nity. The deceased was born in Schil
lingen, Germany, October 15, 1850.
At the age of five years he came with
his parents to this country, remaining
short time in Chicago before coming
to Minnesota, where the family set
tled on a. farm near Marystown. He
attended school at Marystown and
came to Shakopee when about sixteen
years of age. From a position as
clerk in the general store of Kohls &
Berens, at present, M. J. Berens &
Sons, he rose by his Industry and good
practical judgment to be the builder
and owner of a leading general mer
chandise business.
Mr. Berens was married to Miss
Caecilia Yost November 21, 1876, at
St. Mark's church in this city, and
his funeral services were held at the
same church on the forty-sixth anni
versary of his marriage.
Six sons and six daughters mourn
his death. They are Fred, Harry, Ar
thur, Misses Kathryn, Esther, Colette
and Flora of this city, Paul of Choteau,
Mont., Dr. Vincent of Chicago, Roman
of Minneapolis, Mrs. Lee Schleck and
Miss Mildred of St. Paul. With Mrs.
Berens they were present at the bed
side when death claimed the first vic
tim of the large family circle.
Mr. Berens held the office of city
treasurer for the city of Shakopee for
twenty-four consecutive years, up to
the time of his death. In recognition
of his services the flag was raised to
half mast on the city hall from the
time of his death until after the fu
neral. The business houses in the
city were closed during the time of
the funeral services, which were held
Tuesday morning, November 21, at 9
o'clock from St. Mark's Catholic
church. Rev. Dean M. Savs officiated.
very large number of friends and
relatives were in attendance.
The city officials and St. John's
DIOCESE OF ST.CLOUD
Fergus Falls: A friend kindly sends
an item supplementing the sketch on
'the Catholic Church in Fergus Falls,
Minn.," published in last week's issue
of The Bulletin. The statement that
the Fergus Falls church was com
pletely destroyed by a cyclone in June,
1919, and that in 1921, Father Wess
ling, who succeeded Father Rauch,
built a new church, is lacking in ac
curacy. The facts are these: On
June 22, 1919, a cyclone destroyed the
church and wrecked the parsonage.
The new church was under roof and
the parsonage rebuilt before the snow
fell in the fall of
1919.
THE SCHOOL OF
SOCIAL
v i o i i o e o s e s s o u e w e u n e r
Benevolent Society, ot which the de-.
ceased had been a member for many
years, attended the funeral in a body.
The remains were laid to rest in the
Upper Catholic cemetery. R. I. P.
DIOCESE OF DULUTH
In 1920, the
church was completed and the essen
tial furniture installed. Funds were
then collected for a parochial school.
The amount was $14,000, in Septem
ber, 1921, when Father Rauch was
Wabasha: The mission conducted
here for a week by the Redemptorist i
Fathers at St. Felix Catholic church
came to a close Sunday evening with
a telling sermon preached by Father
Pregenzer. It was one of the most
successful missions conducted here
for many years, and the church was
crowded both during the Masses in
the morning and at the services and
sermons in the evening. Father Pre
genzer and Father Brand, who are
from Grand Rapids, Mich., are both ex
traordinary good speakers and they
left many a good message for the
many who came out to hear them
during their stay in Wabasha.
Do not stop to explain why a diffi
cult task was not performed. Save the
energy you have been spending in
thinking up a good reason for not do
ing it," and turn this energy toward
accomplishment and you will find the
task is already well under way.--
Tt otrtr a short way from traofcar
itableness to jealousy, which is one of
t|ie meanest vices.
V .- t- .- i
THE CATHOLIC BULLETIN, DECEMBER 2, 1922
COURSE QN APOLOGETIC8.
The course on Apologetics which
will be given by Rev. Dr. Moynihan,
rector of the St. Paul Seminary, will
begin next week. The opening lecture
will be given at the Pro-Cathedral
School Hall, Minneapolis, on Wednes
day evening, December 6, at 8 o'clock
P. M., and on Friday evening, at the
same hour, at Assumption Society
Hall, Exchange and Ninth streets, St.
Paul.
The course will present a general
exposition, and defence of religion in
view of the religious situation of the
times. The most vital truths of the
Christian Faith are attacked with a
freedom and a coarseness rare in days
gone by, when only divergent shades
of doctrine or interpretations of
Scripture were matters of dispute. In
days bristling with questions and ob
jections there is need everywhere to
reaffirm the very foundations of be
lief. The first lecture of the course
will consider the nature of religion,
the part which it plays in life, and
the current misconceptions of it. This
will be followed by a few lectures on
Materialism, the most dangerous
philosophic apd religious tendency of
the times. Here, on the one hand,
the evidence of science in favor of the
religious view of the universe will be
presented, and, on the other hand, the
difficulties drawn from Biology,
Physics and Chemistry will be con
sidered. The arguments for the ex
istence of a Supreme Being as they
are set forth in Catholic Theology
will be the theme of some succeeding
lectures. Evolution, which looms so
threateningly on the horizon of re
ligious thought, will be fully consid
ered.
The New Testament as a docu
mentary source will form the transi
tion to a few lectures on the Divinity
of Christ. The historical character
Cathollc3 who
Word has reached here from
Washington that the Right Rev. Bish
op was the preacher at the High Mass
with which the National Council of I with a consideration of the attitude
Catholic Women opened its session I *-he Church on various social and
at Washington. I economic problems.
On Sunday, November 26, Rev.l Throughout the bourse questions
James C. Timony, O. P., Holy Rosary I bearing upon the subject matter of the
church, Minneapolis, opened a week's I lectures may be presented by mem
mission at the Church of St. John the
Evangelist, Woodland.
Rev. John Begley is gone pro tem
to Buhl.
Rev. Father Lottie, Q. I., is con
ducting a mission at the Church, of I
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart, £lo
quet.
wish to have
an intelligent grasp of their faith.
The witness of the Gospels to Christ,
the witness of Christ to Himself, the
witness of St. Paul to Christ, the wit
ness of history to Christ will form the
core of the course on Christianity and
will open the way for the considera
tion of the Church as the Kingdom
of God on earth. The course of
Apologetics will be brought to a close
bers of the audience.
Schedule of School of Social Studies.
St. Pful.
All classes at the Society Hall of
the Church of the Assumption, corner
of Exchange and 9th streets, directly
across from St. Joseph's Hospital.
Public Speaking—Conducted by
Very Rev. Dr. Cullen, President of
St. Thomas College, assisted by a
number of the Public Speaking Staff
of the State University. General
class, open to all, convenes at 8:15 P.
M. in lodge room upstairs. Special
class for concentrated work meets at
7:00 P. M. in the committee room
downstairs.
First classes on Tuesday, Decem
ber 5, and regular classes on each
Tuesday thereafter at same hours.
Subject for the first week: "Why I
am a Catholic," by Very Rev. Dr.
Cullen.
Minneapolis.
All classes at the School Hall of
the Pro-Cathedral. Instructors and
methods of courses the satae as for St.
Paul.
Apologetics convenes at 8:00 P. M.
in main auditorium.
First class on Wednesday, Decem
ber 6, and regular classes-on each
transferred to Morris, Minn. Rev. B..
H. Wessling took charge of the parishl Wednesday thereafter at same hour
in October, 1921. In 1922, the Church I Public Speaking—General class con
of Our Lady of Victory was decorated venes at 8:15 P. M., in main audito
and new side altars, stations of the I rium, Pro-Cathedral School Hall,
cross and communion rail were ac-1 Special class meets at 7:00 P. M. in
quired. Possibly some future his-1 class room to be designated.
torian will appreciate these additional I First classes on Friday, December
details, the more so for their setting I 8, and regular classes on each Friday
the previous account more substantial-1 thereafter at same hour.
ly correct. The Archbishop's Course.
DIOCESE OF WINONA
Church History classes will be con
ducted once a week for men and wom
en. of both cities. This class will be
Winona: Dr. Mary A. Molloy, dean I directed by His Grace at the audi-
of the College of St. Teresa, accom
panied by two Sisters of St. Francis,
left Winona on the evening of Novem
ber 21 for a tour through Europe.
Among the countries they will visit
are England, Ireland, France, Belgium,
Austria and Spain. They will also
visit Assisi and other places in Italy
prominent in Franciscan history.
While in Europe they will make a
study of the educational systems of|
the countries visited, and will spend I
some time at the great universities
and institutions famous for the higher
education of women. I
torium of St. Thomas College on Mon-
MUSIC THE
uJL
Aim
day evenings, starting January 8.
Data as to costs are now being
gathered to determine the enrollment
fees. One such fee will be asked with
a small extra charge for each course
takgii.
CO pPERATIVEBANK PLANNED
(N. C. W. Ct Dept. .of Social Action.)
Co-operative banking, a success in
Cleveland and other cities in the Unit
ed States, is to invade New York City.
A co-operative bank with $1,000,000
capital and $1,000,000 surplus will be
started soon by organized labor.
Stock will be sold for $200 a share and
dividends will be limited to 10%, the
rest of the profits to go to the stock
holders. Branches will be established
in various parts of New York City to
accommodate depositors.
Peter J. Brady, a prominent labor
unionist in New York City and the
State, and chairman of the Banking
Committee of the State Federation of
Labor, in making public announce
ment of the plan, states that Walter
F. McCaleb, now general manager of
the highly successful bank of the Loco
motive Engineers, will be offered the
presidency of the New York bank.
Mr. McCaleb will assist in developing
sentiment among the New York labor
unionists. Mr. Brady announces also
that when the New York City co-opera
tive bank is established and is run
ning successfully, similar banks will
be established in the other cities of
the state and especially in Buffalo,
Rochester, Syracuse, Utica, Albany
and Binghamton.
While co-operative'banking is a re
cent development in the United States,
it has already made great headway
and has shown that it can be carried
on successfully and on a larger scale
than in European countries. Besides
encouraging thrift among the working
people, the new banks will furnish
funds for the protection of the working
people and the development of other
kinds of co-operatives. The funds of
the bank can be used as a weapon
against lockouts and wage reductions.
In addition, the consumers' co-opera
tives, factories started by labor
unions, building co-operatives and oth
er forms of co-operative production
can look to the .co-operative bank for
assistance in guiding their finances
and furnishing them credit.
While the banking laws of the Unit
ed States hamper somewhat the de
velopment of co-operative banking,
they throw the mantle of government
inspection and regulation a6out the
operation of the co-operative banks
and protect the money of the deposi
tors. Observers of the financial situ
ation are placing great hopes in co
operative banking as a means of
protecting the working people and
raisirig their status. It is expected that
in a few years there will be co-opera
tive banks in every industrial city in
the country, and that the banks will
be a great stimulus to co-operative
consumers' and producers' organiza
tions. The experience learned in
banking will be used in co-operative
stores, co-operative housing, building
trades guilds, co-operative factories,
etc.
Who among your friends would not appreciate a good book!
We suggest-—
Mary's Rainbow, $1.00 On the Run, $1.00
The Children Who iloljowed the Piper, $2.00
Mother Machree Maria Chapdelaine, $2.00
The Gates of Olivet, $2.Q& Average Cabins, $2.00
COESESSMU DIES
(N. C. W. G. News Servlee.)
.- v
Congressman John T. Nolan, one
of the most distinguished Catholic
members of the House of Representa
tives, died in St. Mary's Hospital, San
Francisco, last Saturday after a long
illness. Congressman Nolan, who was
formerly secretary of the San Fran
cisco Labor Council and a member of
the Board of Supervisors of this city,
was chairman of the House Commit
tee on Labor and the father of the
federal minimum wage law. Early in
1916 he sent to the Government Print
ing Office a remarkable document of
"heart throbs" in connection with his
bill providing that the government
should not pay any employe less than
$3 a day. Copies of this book, which
described injustices of working condi
tions under the federal government,
were sent broadcast and thousands of
men in official life commented upon it.
Congressman Nolan has served five
terms in the House of Representatives
and had been re-elected this month
BOOKS MAKE
IDEAL GIFTS
apljrppriafe gift articles with i rdigions
'. V* significance
-Polychrome Pictures, Book Ends. C*afi dtp
sticks
Scapular Lockets, St. Christopher Medals, Small Statuary,
Christmas Cribs, Gold Chain Rosaries,
Prayer and Books of special devotion, Greeting Cards,, etc.
THE E. M. LOHMANN CO.
385 St. Peter Street St. Paul, Minn.
BEST
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PAUL A. SCHMITT. Music Dealer
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I STRUM ENTS CWIMU, Fhit«t, Clarinet* and other Wlna instrument*
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Classified Advertising
Bates for each insertion: 50c for 20
words or less, lc for each additional word.
Terms: Payable in advance.
Copy for current week should reach pub
lishing office by Tuesday A. M.
SALESMEN WANTED
WE KEEP REPEATING THAT
SALES EXPERIENCE IS NOT
NECESSARY TO MAKE GOOD.
THOUSANDS OF MEN AND
WOMEN IN ALL WALKS OF
LIFE ARE EARNING
BIG
MONEY.
IT ONLY REQUIRES
MON
NERSHIPS IN
COM­
SENSE,
PLUS WORK, TO
BE
SUCCESSFUL.
THE "STAR CAR"
THE WONDER CAR OF THE
AGE MANUFACTURED
IN
THREE MAMMOTH PLANTS
WITH A DAILY CAPACITY OF
900 CARS A DAY. HAS SOLD
OUT ITS OUTPUT FOR NEXT
TWO YEARS.
WE ARE OFFERING
PART
STAR MOTORS, INCOR
PORATED UNDER THE
DUKANT S\M l-.Al OF
VESTMENT SAVINGS.
WE TEACH YOU THIS
SYS­
TEM. COME IN AND SEE
OUR SALES MANAGER ANY
DAY BETWEEN 9:30 A. M. AND
4:30 P. M.
The Durant Corporation
227 HAMM BLDG.,
St. Paul, Minn.
FOR SALE—100-acre farm for sale
or would trade for a quarter,section
not over 60. mileyfrom cities. Henry
Webelhutt, route 3, Hastings, Minn.
FOR SALE—Dental practice. Splen
did opportunity to secure a well estab
lished practice in southern Minnesota.
Catholic preferred. Address L. F. E.,
c-o The Catholic Bulletin.
WANTED—Steady middle-aged man
as janitor In country church, twenty
miles from the cities. Address K J,
Catholic Bulletin, 315 Newton Build
ing, St. Paul.
FOR RENT—Have two furnished
rooms for rent, newly decorated. Stu
dents preferred. Address Mrs. Chas.
F. Brown, 534 Laurel avenue, apt. 3.
or phone Elkhurst 4152.
WANTED—Salesmen with cars xo
extend the circulation of The Catho
lic Bulletin in the R. F. D. districts.
For particulars call or write Mr. Cox,
Circulation Manager, 212 Globe Bldg.,
St. Paul, Minn.
POSITION WANTED—Middle aged
unmarried lady desires position as
companion to elderly lady, or private
kindergarten work. Will leave city.
Has had much experience in kinder
garten work. Address "A E A," care
The Catholic Bulletin.
FOR SALE—Splendid improved t20
acre farm, 2y2 miles from Lakeville,
Minn., has all new buildings, timber
land, all bog-tile fencing. Send for
complete description and price. Can
also lease 120 acres adjoining this
farm, making it 240 acres. H. H.
Hiniker, R/ No. 2, Lakeville, Minn.
WANTED—Permanent position by
middle aged married man, 10 years'
experience in engineering, high and
low pressure boilers. Economical in
use of fuel, can take care of most all
repairs. Prefer small institutional
plant. Can furnish reference. Ad
dress Z» care The Catholic Bul
letin^
FOR SALE—160-acre prairie farm
with house and barn, 140 acres good
level tillable sandy loam soil. Must
ell for $2,000. Terms half cash. A
chance to get your own home. Only
four miles from good town. Good
down hill road all the way. Long
growing season. Good corn, wheat
and oat land. Box 34, Vananda, Mont.
On main line C. M. & St. P. Ry.
"The world is deceitful and incon
stant. When fortune forsakes us,
friendship takes flight."—B. Henry
Suso.
FATHER FINN'S STORIES
12mo, cloth
With Frontispiece
Each
$ 0 0
MANUFACTURERS
Net
P&stpald, $1.10
The Discoverer of the American Catholic Boy
ON THE RUN. It is an exciting story
of the adventures of an American boy
in Ireland, luring present times,
graphically picturing conditions and
stirring scenes, as Father Finn found
them on his recent visit to Ireland.
BOBBY IN MOVIELAIVD. The hero's
many and varied adventures, as he
wins his way upward on the ladder
of movie fame, make absorbing read
ing for everyone.
FACING DANGER. New and unusual
elements of adventure furnish the
thrills that lead up to a startling de
nouement.
HIS I.UCKIEST YKAR. A story of
struggle and adventure in a big city.
LUCKY BOB. The story of a boy, al
most penniless, virtually thrown Jnto
the world.
PERCY WYNN: or, Making a Boy of
Him. An account of the development
of a "Mamma's darling" into a real
boy.
TOM PLAYFAIR. A more realistic pic
ture of the new arrival at college has
rarely, if ever, been drawn.
CLAUDE LIGHTFOOT: or, How the
Problem Was Solved. A tale of a boy
full of mischief and fun, but always
honorable.
HARRY DEE: or, Working It Out.
Filled with stirring incidents, it is
never dull, and holds a thrilling plot.
ETHELRED PRESTON. A story of a
plucky schoolboy, replete with many
a boyish prank.
THE BEST FOOT FORWARD. Five
stories of college life.
CUPID OF CAMPION. A tale of kid
napping, unfolding adventures in a
gypsy camp.
THAT FOOTBALL GAME and What
Came of It. There is a vigorous tone
about the book decidedly refreshing.
THE FAIRY OF THE SNOWS. The
episodes of a 15ttle girl's life amid
citr tenetpertr,.
THAT OFFICE BOY. In which Mi
chael, an owl friend, is the hero' of
a tale all about himself.
MOSTLY BOYS. Tales about real boys,
in every walk of life.
HIS FIRST
AND LAST APPEAR-
ANTE. Philip, the hero, has the "gift
of eong."
Sent postage prepaid to any ad
dress upon receipt of price.
Send all orders to'
THE CATHOLIC BULLETIN,
SIS Newton Bids, St. Paal, Hina.
FTF
v y r
..= .,' '•"V
Duluth Diocesan Director!
G.
A. WHITMAN, President
R. U. CORNWELL, Caahler
THE
FIRST HATIONAL BASK OFEEETH
EVKLKTH, MI-NN.
Capital and Surplus, iJOO.OM.Of
Tour BuaJncM Invited
DeWitt-Seitz Co.,
Manufacturers .of
Mattresses and Springs
and Wholesale Furniture
SUPERIOR, DULUTH 1
WISCONSIN MINNPSOT/
St. Germain Bros., lisc.
AND
JOBBERS
Glass and Paints
Uet Our Prices Covering
Tom
Requirements. Glass and Paints
Art Glass Memorial*.
Established 1S91
DULUTH, MINN.
Attention!
Trapper, and
rarmeri
Higheit price* paid for bide* aLd fan
Returna mailed same day ai gcodi re­
ceived.
Write or phone ua for ptioea
and tagi.
Duluth Hide & Fur Co.
1924-1928 West Michigan St.
Duluth, Minn.
Call or
4rtoo
Melrose 78 Grui
u u I e &
Fuel Co.
12 EAST SUPERIOR STREET
Fine Interior Finish
Lumber, Sash, Doors and
Mouldings
Sso!!-Sra?[ lombsr Co.
an,! in, i.tf, v.
uss
OlAilOHD f§
4 ufactored by |g
a.-ifbnd
ridiseshoe Cd.i
Duluth, Minn.
Both Phone* 1949
TRANSFER S STORAGE CO.
Moving Packing Storage
OMeet 17 North Fifth AT* W.
DULUTH, MINN.
E Y O N
DOUBT OR QUESTION
The G!ass Block''
u
Tbe Shopping:
of Duluth
CONSOLIDATED STAMP AMD
PRINTING COMPANY
JOB PRINTING
Job Printing, Steel Die Embossed
Stationery, Card and Wedding En
graving, Rubber Stamps.
14 Fourth Ave. West, DULUTH
F. A. PATRICK & CO.
Wholesale Dry Good*
and Manufacturer*
DULUTH
Maker* of the Famoii
MWrJck-Dulnth Wool Prod
Write for Catalogue.
Z E N I
MEATS
pmt LAUD
ELLIOTT & COMPANY
DULUTH, MINN.
F. W. TO EL
"The Quality Florist"
Floral Remembrances For All Ocoatlons
191 East Seventh Street
Phones
ST.PAUL
CE 0997 V
M. W.CotwaO.
MINN.
GA 1670
QUALITY PRODUCTS
Direct to the Quantity Consumer
AT QUANTITY
Soap Powder
Scouring Powder
., laundry Pow$tir V
4
i feoap Chips
Scapstock'
Soft Soap
Linseed Oil Soap
Liquid Soap
Sweeping Compound, Etc.
CENTRAL SOAP COMPANY Manufacturer
f.k Murphy
W.fl.Atnl
CONTRACTORS
and BUILDERS
We Specialize in Catholic Churches
and School Buildings vs-j
Estimates gladly given on re-'
pair and alteration work.'
C0LWEI.L-L0NG CO,
251 6th Ave. So. MINNEAPOLIS, MINN.'

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