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The Holt County sentinel. (Oregon, Mo.) 1883-1980, November 20, 1908, Image 4

Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn90061417/1908-11-20/ed-1/seq-4/

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. it. at irim rr rr. ri ""- fc
Ota TVTiisf. Wait. revenue be raised by its otner taxing
- i . a hotwppn power?, .while the several localities-
Owing to the close contest between r ' .
, ,. . .. or,j; cities and counties could determine,
the Republican and Democratic candi-. . . .
, .i th each tor itself, whether to retain the
dates for the minor state ofhces and the cai-
.... . ,ua property tax for its own needs. New
provisions of the law respecting the i " v
u i r . fl,, ,.it York and Pennsylvania are the conspicu
tabulation of election returns, the result, -
. , 4, . . ous examples of the well working of this
of the election on those olhces may not uu CAt
be definitely known until after the Gen- i ne ?m-
i i The Miss .uri people should adopt the
eral Assembly c-nvenes in January, i , . - . . , fQ,,
T. . - a - ti,a mvis amendment, which nas been accurate!
It is claimed tnat under the prous- . .
4i i 1 de-vribed as "the hrst step to any tax
;nna f t m r,r-t nf ii rip ninsi the du-. UL" 1 ,WL" 1 1
ties of the Secretary of State, that of- reforms
iicial haa no power or authont to open Getting Ready for Winter,
I p:irlv all nlants ston srowit.'g in Sep
the returns on the otlices of governor
and the minor state ollices.
It is claimed that under section 701 S
of the ISiO statutes, the speaker nf the
house of representatives, shall in the
presence of the members of the senate
and house, meeting in joint session, open j
the returns and publish the same. Tho
jiersans havir g received the highest j
number of votes ate then declared elect j
ed. Contests are decided by a vote of j
the members of the legislature mpeting j
in i ,int f;Hsinn nisd errors in Iho returns i
are corrected by that body.
The custom has been for the secretary
of state to make the ollicial count on all
tha state otlicers and announce the re
sult of his tabulation.
Many prominent lawyers now through
out the state hold that if the hnv is fol
lowed it is clearly not in the province of
the secretary of state to make the count
on thoie oflifers, or to do more than to
turn over the returns to the speaker of
the hou.-e. wno is authorized to certify
the result of the election.
If no amei.dments to section 7018 ex
ist, it is plain that the people will have
to wait until the legislature meets to
learn officially who have been elected to
the minor state otlices, but we are satis
fied that the returns will show that the
Democracy has won all, losing only the
governor.
In Behalf of the Birds.
A phase of life in America that is dis
ticctly wanton and uncivilized is the
continual warfare that is made by man
against the feathered population of the
air. In the whole scheme of creation
there is nothing more lovely than birds,
with their light and graceful activity and
their spontaneous melody. They are a
perpetual source of cheer to the young
and to the old. Nothing in the economy
of nature offers such a persistent protest
to fatigue and monotony as birds. Had
these winged creatures no qualities to
indicate their utilit), their influence asa
moial and spiritual leaven would cry out
for,their protection.
In the first place, the destruction of
birds for commercial purposes or from
purely wanton motives becomes a grave
source of harm by brutalizing the per
sons engaged in the work of their ex
tinction. Humanity aud decency otler
no excuse for the killing of birds. It is
tne up'vardglaucealways that follows the
flight aud the movement of birds. It is
the upward impluse that takes note of
their concerns. It is not the groveling
that is moved and touched by bird life.
There is a tonic for mankind in the con
sideration of the birds and the study of
their g-iy and innoce? t evolutions.
P.nr. ihero is much be.-ide mere senti
tember and begin to prepare for winter
Most of the annuals are checked h the
cool niuhts: thrir leaves begin to ellow
an-1 show by their appearance that death
is close at hand.
The perenniais. however, make a regu
lar preparation for the cod weather.
Th-y seem to be .iv.vire that h:.nl times
are o .micg. a: d net ready fur the cold
season by ceaf-ing to extend th'ir
branches, by stopping all new enterprises
and making ready for lulwrsity. Ine
How of the tap is slower, I wigs that wen
green and succulent become hard and
dry. At the places where the leaf stem?
unite with the. branch a scar is formed,
and when it hardens the leaf separates
and falls away. The b .rk becomes a lit
tle thicker and rough-r, and rather har
der on the north side of the trunk, as
though the tree was aware that the
north wind is cold: the terminal buds for
thf ni-vr se-icciii's yrowth beirui to furm
and to cover themselves with ht'le vel
vety overcoats to keep out the cold.
A- the willow is among the lirt-t to be
gin work in the spring, so it is one of
the last to leave off operations in the
fall. For weeks after the other trees
have been getting ready for the wintor,
it keens on; in its lowly situation, down
on the banks of the streams, where it is
nmtfifited from the winds and does not
seem to realize that winter is coming
until the cold weather is actually at
hand. Then, all of a 6udden, it compre
hends the situation, learns it has been
growing too fast and too long; that it
has sent out its brauches too far and can
not harden them properly before the
freeing weather comes. But not to be
caught unprepared, it resorts to a device
that does credit to its intelligence. It
hardens its branches as far as it can;
then deliberately snins off 1 or 2 inches
at the end of each twig. Walk under a
willow tree after the first hard frost, and
vou will find the eround littered with
twig ends that the willow has cut off,
rather than let the frost bite them. If
the tree has an intelligence of its own,
it must feel a good deal of satisfaction
in its ability to take care of itself, for
even if it did work a little too late it is
not caught njppingafter all Exchange.
i go to
The Youth's Campanion for Christmas
There are three good reasons why The
Youth's Companion makes one of the
best of gifts for Christmas time, for a
birthday, for any occasion when a pres-
ent is in order.
It Never Fails to Give Pleasure
j There is something in every issue of
j The Companion for every member of the
! family. The children never pass it by,
- . .tr.A tha irarntltc nrft iPSlleSS Ulltll tile
ment to piead lor preservation oi ine -
birds. Xj form of an mal life pays more dren reluctantly put it down to ;
generously Tor its '-keep" than the birds. , befL
What is ielded in nr. fits by cattle and J
hmrs m savd by the birds. To know iho
n? -
full value of biids as coi servab-rs
vpfrptable and horticultural life we have ' ent of The Companion. Sit down in the
but to recall Longfellow's unique p em ; q.jiet of your own house and send the
on "The Mirds of Ki.lingwoith." 'subscription. The Companion will be
In the awakening of sentiment, there- ' delivered wherever you say, on Christmas
fore, for the protection of bird life in the
different states ard in the fforts of the
Watinnni , .I'h t illll llf A lid U OOn SOCie I
ties the American public may gladly
greet a t:m-l and needful declaration
of mercy, fiu.ity and geuuineciviliz .tion.
Tli3 largest stock of New
Cloaks in this part of the coun
try. FOR LADIES
Broad-Cloth Goats of high
quality in Black, Castors and j
Browns, semi-fitted, handsome- ?
ly trimmed, lined throughout j
with Satin at
bO
.00
:
IS
(s
f)
(3
m
(6
v5
I
P.ln.ek Kersev Cloaks, semi-
fitted and ripple bacK, 50 inch
at
i
u
.QKJ
to SI 5.0
(
it 2
Misses semi-fitted Coats and
ripple back; colors, Tans. Browns,
Red and Blue; age 14, 16, 18, at
$5.00 to $12,50
Infants and Children's Coats,
Bear Skins, Astrachans, Cheviots
and Kerseys, all colors, and all
prices.
'.f.-VMil'-
The Proserity Wave.
The prosperity wave that has struck
1 the country is almost unprecedented. In
1871), when special payments had been
resumed, confidence was re-established
and business qjickened into activity.
In IS'.'T. when the electorate declared for
the gold standard, and when tl.e coun
try was ble.sed wi h bumper crops,
there was inauguruted an era of pros
perity that continued until a year ago.
Hut in nei'her ca-e was there so quick a
response to s-ttle political conditions as
there whs .ho week immei'.iately follow
ing the hite election Within 13 hours
after the eh c ion of . Judge Taft had been
determine J. a wave of prosperity began
sweeping over ih country, the propor
tions of winch even now cannot be de
termined. As the Chicago Tribune well says, "it
was a though as ican.ic force had burst
its bonds and proceeded unobstructed
from the Atlantic to ti.e Pacific, from
the Likes to the (luif." Thousands of
industres In ftre on short time or with
Jl : ti-ors entirely closed, rci-umed full time:
5? millions f du.5a.-s of orders were ru-hed
to manufacturers: neatly a million men
($lwere re employeu: over diOO.O'jO.OOO
fgsj ! worth of imposed goods were taken
Tx i from bi.im: S"cunties rapidly rose: jo
i'tlnt tiid-., in mar'V sections of the
vjjj country, oormal conditions alrradv exist.
& ; The assurance that capital and labor
g?) j both would have a square deal, i-.nd that
! linanco would continue on well tried
0- i principles, was. th- m.unspring that set
I j wheels in motion. Confidence was re-
1 stored aud enterprise loosed. Prosper
ity was again a fact.
The prosperity wave will continue to
sweep over the country until it shall
reach the smallest industries in the
smallest hamlet. Before many months
the financial depression of 1907 '03 will
be a matter of history, and the people
again content and happy, providing they
do their part toward sustaining the new
conditions. It is to be hoped every man
will do what he can toward "pushing a
good thing along," and that no unavoid
able circumstances resulting from mis
understandings or disagreements, will
interpose between the humblest worker
and the prosperity that should be his.
E1E
mm
lib& bU.,8
It is Easy to Order by Mail
Vou need not go through the vexation
of nf Christmas shonpinir to make a pres
morning.
It Comes Every Week in the Year
Nino on of ten Christmas presents
have lostih-ir novelty by New Year's.
The Companion provides a continual
pleasure, for it is renewed 52 times until
" , - , , ' Christmas comes again. Is there an-
A Tax Lesson Irom Marshall Field., , . . . .
, little-31.7.".?
The new subscriber receives Free the
Double Holiday Numbers; and be
sides the gift of The Companion's Calen
dar for lilOfl, entitled "In Grandmother's
Garden," lithographed in Y.i colors.
Full illustrated Announcement of
the new volume for 1009 will be sent with
sample copies of the paper to any address
free.
TUB YOUTH'S COMHANION,
141 Berkeley Street, Boston, Mass.
Marshall Field was noted as a man of
great business integrity. Ho yave large
amounts of money for public uses. He
thn largest individual taxpayer in t
the United States, the asse-sment of
personal and real property returned by
him being larger than that of men who
were even much wealthier than he.
Yet his estate has recently paid to the
Cook county treasurer 1 million dollars
in compromise settlement of suits ag
gregating $1,7!0,(HiO for back taxes upon
securities owned b Mr. F.ehl w'lidi had
l K,,wl f.,r. Ii.volinn
Nothin, could better illustrate the in- j j,j flf Qqq
effectiveness of the general property tax
than this Field instance. That tax is in
the very great majority of cases an ir
resistible invitation to false affidavits for
tax dodging. A citizen' who was held up
as the model business man succumbed
to the temptation. Probably many, or
all, of the securities which were with
held from assessment bore a rate of in
terest which would not profitably permit
of taxes being paid. And that empha
sizes another vice in a hard and fast rule
to afempt to tax every form of prop
erty. The tax, if paid, would be added
to the rate of interest and the boriower
would eventually pay it.
The uuiversal admission that the gen
eral property tax dos not even accom
plish what, is intended by it and is the
6'jurce of most of the inequi'ies iuAmer
ican taxing syst-ms has led to a general
effort to abolish it. This has taken th
form in Missouri as in a number of
other state.- of a proposed separation of
the sources of state and local reveuue
under which the state general property
tax would be dicontinuedaud thostate's
MKS. SOIMIA BUNKER.
Mm. Bunker will be in Oregon, at
Mrs. J. U. Murray's, for a short time
Mrs. Bunker has won a reputation iu
her line, and is popular in every town
in which she takes orders, and her work
is in very great demand among the
ladies.
MRS. BUNKER'S SWITCHES ARE BEST.
i Phon, Martin's. No. ..G, Oregon, Mo.
j Her permanent address is Red Oak,
! Iowa.
Charles Koock h-s a "Mum" win
! dow at hi- store, and it is worth oominn
; up to;vn to se He I as selected shirts,
i fanc vests, new aud nobby hats, and
I other articles fr m his large and varied
i ctficlr And enmhmed them with chyrsan-
themums in a most pleasim: and artistic
manner. Even though "mum" it speaks
volumes for the enterprise of Mr. Koock.
Mrs. Tom Curry was in St. Joseph,
Thursday of this week.
HT g T
Farm
ers
f
Do you know that the Oregon Creamery Co.,
will buy your Produce, such as
, Eggs, Cream, Poultry, Sma!I Pigs,
and Small Calves, and anything
J
We will pay you CASH. Gome in and see us
YOUR
CREAM,
will pay as much as any Creamery Co. Come in,
use our Tester, and Test your own Cream.
We don't boost prices for a little while. We
will meet our competitors prices and stand by you.
Come in and we will show how we do business.
OREGON CREAMERY 00,,
"The Farmers Friend."
State Game Laws Upheld.
The United States supreme court up
holds, as a proper police regulation, all
the laws of the states tonding to throw
around game birds all possible protec-
tion and to prevent fraud and deceit in
! handling such as are yet considered
game. A Brooklyn dealer in imported
game was known to have many plover
and grouse in storage, out of season,
but he refused to give the required
bond, claiming that the New York state
yame law was unconstitutional and in-
terfered with his property rights, lie
was airested and the New ork court of
appeals, to which the cute was carried,
upheld the law. It was then taken to
the United States supreme court, which
has just decided that the law of the
state is valid and constitutional, and
that the bond rr qui red thereby may bo
exacted.
j which greatly reinforced the power of
thestteto protect its game. It en
' acted that all imported game, whether
J brought fur the purpose of consumption
I or stor ige, cam! in der the game laws
j of the state into which it was brought.
I exactly as if it had been produced" and
; taken in that state. In affirming the
j decision of the New York court, the fed
eral tribunal said that o.ving to the
! likelihood of fraud and deceit in hand
i ling such game, the possessor is prohib
j ited from having the same, whether
' killed within the state or without, and
I the state may legally require that it
i shali be held in the closed season and
j that bonds be g ven against its sale,
t Wherever, therefore, it becomes uec
f essary to enact more stringent laws, in
! order to protect our game from com
plete annihilation, there is little or no
room for doubt that the United States
supreme court will uphold every enact
ment. St .Joseph NewB Press.
THE
Presbyterian Church Notes.
The pastor spont several days at
Wondville last week.
-Corb m Marklai.d led the C. E. so
ciety lastSuuday, in an interesting meet
ing. The pastor will preach at the Union
Thanksgiving service at the Christian
church.
The subject fornext Sundaj's C. E.
mee'ing U "Gratitude, How to Express
It." Leader, Miss Montgomery.
The ladies aid soc ety return thanks
to Charles Cowan and Joe Lnneing for
grading done on the manse grounds.
Next Sunday the services promise
to be more interesting than ever Sub
jects: "Christian elements in Heathen
ism:" "The Church of Pergamas-A
Marriage in High Life."
" I There will lie nrearhitijr at Nodaway
I TTntpl Woodland Thankse-ivincDinnerl Edwin A. Welty is in Oklahoma on J i;. eln:reh nex; Sunday. November at
Marion.
V. .1. Smith lias been ili the preset week.
Mr. Kiehard Klderison the sick list this
week.
I.ora and Charley I'lanalp spent Saturday
evening with .Mattie .Morris.
- Klmer llreit a ml Clyde Smith are sather
inirenrii for Ceorire Pollock.
.lim Morris and Ceore Pollock hipi'd
two ear loads or ho last .Monday.
Mr. Cora MorrLs visited her parents. Na
than Smith and wife. .Monday and Tuoday
of thi week.
M
11
Menu.
California Olives New Celery
i Baked Ham, Champagne Sauce
Roast Turkey Dressing
Cianberry Saucrf
Mashed Potatoes
Glased Sweet Potatoes
Creamed Peas
business.
oVIoek ly Kev. IMteri.
i f... r ........... I (M....-1...- Il ...-.I.. -..i.l U'!M
Kbert Hatch, tne enst siae naroer, ,,urNt too; ,um.r with John oppeniand, r
has removed from the Norris property :il,d famHy la.st Sunday,
into the Zook property on the south ral o'Mare and -mi.
side.
Ljst Between Oregon and Forest
Citv. Mm. day. November 9th. a back
Hot Rolls
C.ibbnge Salad j COmb. gold decoration and two turquoisr
Mince Pie
Tea, Cotfe
Pumpkin V
Price o'jc
E. O.
and
Procram Chanter Z . P.
November 7.
llostfss. Mrs. Minnie Moore.
.Toll Call. In Italy today, new:
work.
Lesson Review, Chapter 7 S-9.
Mur-ic, Mrs. Moore
Review Magazine Study. Miss Mont
gomery. Paper, Magi.e and Garibaldi, Mrs. S.
F. O'Fallon.
sets. Keward
M eyer.
if returned t'j Mrs. C E
Will, are in Ne
braska. wliiT' they were (railed on aei-i nnt of
the ill ties-of .Mr. O'llare's on Kd. lie is im
proviti" slowly from an attaet of the appen
dicitis. i!-ssie ICneaie, Cora Kramer. Charley and
Orn I lornerUer attended the speakMn: at the
U'i-.lvil!erhi.r-ii last Sunday afternoon, af
u-liieh t lie V siient the evening With Miss,
-Charley Nar.tn? declares it pays to j I I'.nnt.
adverii-e. " Lxt week he advertised hM Harry IV i!o.-l; brought home his bride
. , , , . t--.t- front l-aHeMe, Mo. Mi js to - and eon-
had lost a pair o. d .ubie trees. W .thin , l. ,.,. ,,, a ,.,
21 h'nirs after The Skntinki. was nut, t . f , T s ,. . ,.Vt.im,.,. ;it the
J liot.ie and nr de alt tiie noise they possibly
could. After bem treated and i-onirratula-
;....- ...;.....-; T-i-n tln fli:iriv:triers ilen.'irteil
Miss Hessie Nichols, of Memptiis, Tenn.. j Von otttrht hnw heard Harry's voire trem
were the guests of Mrs France? Mel p. j !e.. Vu-ani.Zm.
Ujt;j aic .a.w.wfc, ...... j
the lost property was returned.
Mrs. McDowell, of St. .loseph. and
from a severe attack of tonsilitis.

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