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The Holt County sentinel. (Oregon, Mo.) 1883-1980, April 16, 1909, Image 4

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THE DRYS VICTORS AGAIN.
State-Wide Prohibition Constitu
tional Amendment Ordered
to Engrossment.
By a vote of 8( to -15. the state-wide
prohibition constitutional amendment
was ordered engrossed Friday last in
the lower House of our legislature
AH the tax-rider amendments were
defeated by substantial majorities
One amendment was adopted, which
will prevent prohibition, if it is made
-a law. from becoming effective until
.January 1. 1913.
The Oliver Jim Crow bill has been
referred to the railroad committee,
but not until an amendment was
anade to include the St. Louis and
Kansas City street cars. Tke bill
does not call for separate cars for the
negroes, but for reserved parts in the
regular cars for their accommodation.
The first good roads measure to
come before the House for considera
lion, was Saturdaj last'ordered en
grossed and printed. It is a joint
and concurrent resolution, which pro
poses to submit to the people the
question of levjing a state tax of five
cents on the $100, to be set apart and
apportioned to the several counties as
a permanent road fund.
The Senate last week passed bills
to submit two constitutional amend
ments. One provides for a bond issue
of 8(5,000,000 to build a new capital
The other provides that aliens shall
not be permitted to vote until they
-obtain their tinal naturalization
papers. Thev vote now after obtain
ing their first papers.
The House on Saturday last en
.grossed a bill empowering the state
board of railroad commissioners to
fx passenger rates in Missouri, but
such rates are not to exceed the max
imum rates fixedfbylaw.
Thursday last, the House passed
the Hawkins local option bill, by a
vote of 79 to 41. The enactment of
this law, if it passes the Senate, will
mean the closing of saloons in more
than 100 small towns and cities in
the state.
The two bills to tax whiskej, pre
pared -and introduced by Senators
Dowell and Buford, have been killed
by the committee on ways and means.
Senator "Wilson's anti-gun-toting
bill, to absolutely wipe out all de
fense for carrying deadly weapons,
having passed the Senate, has been
favorably reported by the House
committee to which it had been re
ferred. The house has engrossed a bill
which prohibits school boards from
employing teachers who are in the
immediate family of any member of
-the board. It is charged that mem
bers of school boards in rural districts
often employ their sons or daughters.
The bill is aimed to stop that prac
tice. In an extended message to the leg
islature Wednesday last Governor
H a d 1 e y reminded the la w-"
.makers that both political parties
have departed from their promises to
"the people on the question of liquor
laws. He calls on them to return to
what they promised the people city
district local option, strengthened
laws relating to the enforcement of
prohibition where it is ordered by lo
cal option elections and strict en--forcement
of the Sunday closing law.
He reminds them that they did not
tell the people.they would spend their
time playing politics over prohibition
amendments.
It has been discovered that only 12
names to a petition are necessary for
the submission of any proposed
amendment to the state constitution,
under the initiative theory adopted
at the last state election. This dis
covery is based on the wording of the
clause establishing the initiative in
3Iissouri. The wording of the amend
ment adoted is that a petition of '"not
more than 8 per cent of the legal vo
ters in each of at least two-thirds of
the congressional districts of the
state shall be required to propose any
measure by such petition." It is held
by capable lawyers that but one
signer from each of two-thirds of the
-KJ congressional districts of the state
can compel the submission of any
proposed amendment to the constitu
tion. By a vote of 55 to 20 the house on
.Monday of this week, killed the bill
which provided that no ballot for
United States should be counted un
less the voter also cast his ballot for
the nominee of his party lor the legislature.
Mrs. George Stephenson was in
St. Joseph last Tuesday and "Wednes
day.
John Foley, of Forest City, is
very sick witli pneumonia. We hope
to soon hear of his recover'.
Sherman Hibbard is home for
brief vacation from the Nebraska
State University, at Lincoln.
Mrs. Anna Lewis, of Sardorus
Ills., was here in attendance at the
funeral of her sister, Mrs. John
Pol ley.
Miss Kate Greene has closed
successful term of school at Hogrefe
near Corning, and has returned home
for the vacation.
Bring your cream to Moore &
Kreek, the Grocers. Highest price
paid Saturdav. The new cream sta
tion at Moore & Kreek's.
Miss Fanny Meyer, and her friend
Miss Gallowav. and Mrs. T. C. Taylor
attended the branch quarterly mis
sionarv meeting, held at Cameron
this week.
Place your orders early
for Roses and all kinds o
Plants for the Cemetery.
E. S. THATCHER, Ag't.
The Chrvsanthemum Society will
meet at the home of Mrs. Mina Curry
on Saturday, April li. at 3 p. m
The business of the meeting will be
to make arrangements for cleaning
the cemetery.
Little Helen, the daughter of D
B. Kunkel and wife, had her left leg
badly sprained, Sunday morning, as
the result of a fall, and Dr. Printy
savs it will be some time before she
can run around again.
From government surveys it has
been found that the present lengtl
of Missouri river from its mouth to
Fort Benton, Montana, is 2.283 miles
The distance in 1878 according to the
same source, was 3,112 miles, a de
crease m the distance ol tS2) miles m
the past thirty years.
A new lot of
Hair Goods
Just in now at
MBS. E. A. XETHERLAND.
New Point.
- Grandma Kunkel is now some
better.
-Art Callow's baby is now some
better.
Jesse Cain had a runaway, last
Sunday, and as a result he has a
badly wrecked buggy.
Mrs. J. W. King, of the Lincoln
-district, gave a most enjoyable recep
tion, Easter, to her Sunday school
class of voung ladies. Xeho.
County Engineer Morris has de
cided to make a test of the wisdom
of putting in use thecurrugated steel
culverts, and will put in the first one
on the road crossing the railroad just
south of the railroad about half
mile. It will be 04 feet long and have
a diameter of 24 inches.
Misses Edna Meadows and Ivan
Hunter, of Maitland, were guests of
Miss Hallie Gelvin. a few days the
past week; they are charming young
ladies and are making friends among
the popular young people during
their visits here. Miss Hallie enter
tained for them Saturdav evening at
42."
The countv court on Wednesdav
of this week, adjudged Wylie T
Pierce to be insane, and made their
order for committment in the St. Jo
seph institution, where he was taken
the following day by Seib Carson
superintendent of the poor farm. He
is 77 years of age and comes from
Craig.
NOTICE.
Having sold my meat market, it is
necessary that all indebted to me
will please call and settle, at once.
G. E. GELVIX.
Our road overseers should try to
arrange matters so thev can attend
the meeting of the State Highway
Association, which meets at the
court house in St. Joseph, on Wednes
day, April 2Sth. State Highway En
gineer Hill, County Engineer Morris
and others from various parts of the
state will be there.
Several farm dwellings unroofed,
barns blown down and live stock
killed, is the record of a severe wind
storm which visited the vicinity of
Burlington Junction, Xodaway coun
ty. Sunday night last, 11th instant.
It passed on to Hopkins where many
residences were damaged: fortunately
no lives were lost.
Private Sale.
1 will be at my house Monday,
luesdav and Wednesdav of next
week, and will offer the following, at
private saie: i ivase mirner, l air
tight, wood Stove, 25 or 30 yards of
Matting, kitchen Linoleum, 1 Xew
Process Gasoline Stove, and other
articles too numerous to mention.
Mks. Chas. A. Zachman.
William O'Neill, of Pittsburg,
IPenna., is working with Robert
Hatch, the east side barber. These
two will make a strong team.
When such citizens as George
Murray leaves a communitv. that
community is the loser in every rela
tion of life. His life from young
manhood has been spent among us,
and that manhood has been clean in
his every day life, and always has
been able to look his neighbors and
fellow citizens squarely in the face.
His departure Saturday last for Och
iltree, Texas, with his family, where
he expcts to cast his lot, will be a
gain to that community that they
will appreciate as time comes and
goes. We trust that in his going
from one of the best counties and
states on earth, his highest expecta
tations may be fully realized.
Burson Fashioned Stockings
No stocking can be made with truer lines
and shape, and yet there is not a seam in
them from toe to top.
As perfectly fashioned as the best foreign
goods.
But WITHOUT the Seams
You do not pay for the work of sewing up
those seams that hurt, as there are no seams
in the Burson.
Knit in perfect shape.
They keep the shape from machine to rag
bag.
Best in QUALITY
COMFORT
PRICE,
For Sale By
C. W. KING,
OREGON,
MISSOURI.
i
BUGGIES
KEYS BROS.,
S4YERS f SC0VILL,
tfOOH BROS.
3PRIZE WINNERS3
Style, Quality, Finish;
Direct From the Factory.
The up-to-date line-such as Twin Auto Seats, Re
movable Tops, Double and Single Reach Gears,
Roller Bearing Axle-Bike Gears, in fact by buying
direct from factory can sell you just the kind of
job you want at prices that will sure
GET YOUR BUSINESS.
WE MEET ANY COMPETITION.
. Second Hand Buggies Always On Hand.
FRANK FOSTER,
OREGON, MISSOURI
s
jdst i
s
s
8
S
MOMENT
8
S
8
8
8
8
If you would want a farm what
kind would it be? A good one of
course.
If you would buy a team what
kind would it be? The best you
could get.
If you would buy a wagon
what kind wculd it be? The best.
If you would buy a plow or a
cultivator what kind would it
be? The best.
Don't you think the same thing
to follow in the purchase of a
Shoe would be best?
Then buy that
BARKER BROWN WORK SHOE
AT
8
8 KOOCK'S,
8
8
8
IN
Mrs. Ed Fitzniaurice, who has
been very low from blood poisoning,
is now much better.
Will Ilanna and Ed Gibson left
Thursday of this week for Emmett,
Idaho, to look after their real estate
interests there.
Tames R. Brown and Alf
went over-land to St. Joseph, Thurs
day morning. They took with them
several horses for the market.
Elder Dawson returned. Wednes
i (lav irom KentucKv. where he was
called by the death of a sister.
We are under obligations to Har
ry Hasness for some tine ducks that
he sent us, this week.
The gentleman to whom I loaned
Quick i my "Sherwood's Commentaries Upon
the Laws of Missouri," will please re
turn the same at once and oblige me
very much. H. T. Alkike.
The School Election.
Out of a total of 75 school districts
in Holt county, up to Wednesday of
this week, 15 days after the election,
but 54 of the districts have certified
their election returns to the county
clerk, notwithstanding the law ex
pressly commands that the returns
shall be certified within five days.
Such carelessness on the part of those
who assume the duties as judges and
clerks is inexcussable and it is a pity
that the law does not make it pun
ishable with a tine commensurate
with the offense.
The interest shown by the people in
the greater number of the districts
can best be measured by stating that
about one out of every four voters in
the county went to the polls at this
school election, there being but 977
votes cast lor countv school commis
sioner, out of a total of 3,900 votes.
That the election for county school
commissioner, an officer who lias
charge of the educational interests of
the coontv, and whose office carries
with it a salary about equal to that
of the county clerk, should be t reated
with such indifference is a disgrace to
our people, and should not be allowed
to occur again.
Had the election been held to choose
a county veterinarian to look after
the condition of our horses, mulesand
cows, the woods would have been afire
with interest, and every school dis
trict canvassed but then, you know:
the annual school election is only to
select directors, who are to look after
the educational interests of our chil
dren, and our neighbor's children.
AVhy take an interest in such trifling
matters?
Let's Clean Up.
We notice what we consider to be a
serious nuisance, all along in the busi
ness section of town, that is the habit
the merchants have of throwing out
wrapping paper, which on these windy
days, makes it a very serious thing
for the owners of scary horses: in
fact there are very few horses that
will not scare at a flopping, jumping
piece of paper. It is by far worse than
an automobile. Now what does Ore
gon purpose to do in the great spring
clean up? Do the merchants purpose
to continue the practice of leaving
their back yards full of barrels, boxes,
and everything else in that line'? It
might improve trade to show that
you respect people by having your
premises cleaned of all these unneces
saries. The city council, if they were asked,
might be willing to furnish a team
and hands to haul off trash if the
business men will get together and
decide on a clean up day.
P. E. 0. Program.
April 10. 1909, Mrs. VanBuskirk.
hostess.
Lesson Review, chapters 7 and 8, Miss
Dungan leader.
Music, Mrs. Proud.
Paper, Great names of the Golden
Age and about them, Miss Weity.
Magazine Review, Mrs. VanBuskirk
Couldn't Help ' the Senator.
Every, once in a while a lot of
stories'are told around about things
that happened in past Missouri legis
latures, and here are a couple.
A bill was once up concerning
banks, and the author of the measure
a member of the senate, was desirous
of having trust companies included.
So he went to a certain lawmaker and
urged him to assist in having them
included.
"Senator," replied the man spoken
to, "I'd like mighty well to. help you
on that proposition. I'd like mighty
well to do it. But do you know, if I
voted for any trust under the sun
down here in this legislature, my peo
ple would mob me when I got back
home?"
Another time, a bucketshop meas
ure was pending before the legisla
ture. It was proposed to drive these
concerns from the state, and the pro
posed law was a drastic one.
One of the members got terribly
worked up about it. "Gentlemen,"
he declared; "gentlemen, down at our
town we've got a bucket factor and
if you pass that law, why it will ab
solutely stop the bucket making busi
ness in South Missouri "
Rural Graduating Exercises.
The Rural Graduating Exercises
for Holt county will be held in
Mound Oity. April 24, at 2 p. m. All
the rural graduates are expected to
be present to receive their High
school entrance certificates. A pro
gram has been prepared. The music
will be furnished by the Burnham
Family, of Mound City. Several of
the graduates will take part: an ad
dress will be given by Hon. Eobt.
Minton. The address to the gradu--ates
will be given b Dr. J. Moore.
The general admission will be free,
but reserved seats may be obtained
at 10c. This is the second exercise
for Holt county. Everybody come.
Geo. W. Reavis, Co. Com.
April 23, 1M)9, Mrs. O'Fallon. hostess
Lesson Review, chapters 9 and 10,
Mrs. Franky Hinde.
Music, Grace Montgomery.
Paper, "Great names in Ancient
Greece and about them," Mav
Zachman.
Magazine Review, Mrs. O'Fallon.
The Drys Win,
The House of Representatives of
the Missouri Legislature on Wednes
dav of this week, bv a vote of 8(5 to 51,
passeu the joint ana concurrent reso-
tion submitting to the qualified vo
ters of the state constitutional
amendment for state wide prohibit
ion. It now is up to the senate, and
it is our opinion it will also pass that
body. If adopted by the people, it
will not take effect until January 1st.
1913.
George Harmon, formerly of this
county, an old bachelor about (6 years
of age, was married at Wichita, Kas.,
on the 13th instant to Miss Grace
Dawson, a cornel young miss of 22
summers, a dispatch to the it. Jo
seph News-Press announcing this mar
riage states that Mr. Harmon had
known his bride since babyhood, and
being quite wealthy declared he mar
ried her to legalize the disposal of his
wealth, as he wants her to get it
without possible tangle or technical
ity intervening.
-Captain Matt Saville. of the 27th
Infantry, and wife are back again in
their old home county, visiting rel
atives in and around Mound City. He
has for some time been stationed at
Havana, Cuba, and his regiment is
the last to leave that island. lie will
report for duty in a short time at
ort Sheridan, Illinois. and his moth
er, wno is now quite leeoie, win go
with him to his new post of duty.
There are quite a few of your former
school chums down this way that
would be glad to see you, Captain.
Miss Kate Greene was here, this
week, looking after business. She
left on Thursday for Kansas City,
where she will visit acouple of weeks.
then go to visit her mother and other
relatives in Green Bay, Wise., and re
turn here in time to take up her fall
term of school.
Contractor Morris and family
have removed to Oklahoma, where he
has engaged in railroad work.
Mrs. Henrietta Luckhardt, of St.
Joseph, is here visiting her daughter,
Mrs. Flora Bucher, and other rel
atives. George Stephenson went to Fair
fax last Friday to attend the funeral
of his uncle, John Sley, which took
place Saturdaj morning.
Mrs. E. A Cooper, far advanced in
years, died at her home in lorest
City, Saturday last, April 10th, 1909,
and was buried Monday, in the For
est City cemetery.
Postmaster Phil Thompson, C.
W. Annibal, of Craig, Dr. Wj'maiK
Dr. Williams, of Maitland, and Will
McRoberts, of Mound City, are here
attending the Masonic lodge of in
struction. It wasn't any Easterhat; it was a
sweet girl baby that shared the
honors of Easter Sunday at the Riley
Huiatt home, and they say they are
grateful to Dr. Proud for his visit to
them on that day.
"The stuff is off," said Agent
Birmingham of the Burlington, at
Forest City, Saturday. "So new
rates will go into effect today, having
received notice to continue to sell
tickets at the old rates until further
notice." As matters now; stand, no
change in rates will be made until
further developements in the injunc
tion case, no desire on the part of the
roads to defy the court's temporary
orders being evinced.
Easter Sunday was a very bad
day for the display of Easter milli
nery. April seems to have taken the
bulge on March's prerogative and all
day Saturday, Sunday and Monday
was doing the "lion" act in great
shape, the lamb being relegated to
the rear by a steady incessant 40 mile
gale all of these days, and 1.09 inchesof
rainfall on the record for Monday.
The dusty condition of the roads and
streets made travel exceedingly disagreeable.
Mrs. W. M. Hinde left last Satur
day for Oregon where she has been
visiting her parents and other rela
tives and friends. Mr. Hinde was here
to wind up some business affairs and
left Friday to join his wife and they
will at once go to Kansas City. He
will enter a large hardwarse house
there and fully master the stock,
prices, etc.. and then probably travel
for such establishment. The friends
or this young couple here wish them
prosperity wherever their lot may be
cast. Fairfax Forum.
A brother newspaper man claims
that human beings will work hardest
to secure a luxury. To prove it, he
tells of a farmer hauling hay and
corn to town over roads almost im
passable, at the same time declaring
that the roads were good enough to
suit him. Ihat was when he was
paying for his farm. Now the same
farmer owns an automobile and he is
kicking like a bay steer because the
roads are rotten. When all of us own
automobiles perhaps we will spend
the long summer evenings and moon
light nights working on the roads,
that we may get out on Sundays and
break the speed limit.

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